Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Developing Games On and For Linux/SteamOS

Soulskill posted about 7 months ago | from the year-of-linux-on-the-console dept.

Games 145

An anonymous reader writes "With the release of SteamOS, developing video game engines for Linux is a subject with increasing interest. This article is an initiation guide on the tools used to develop games, and it discusses the pros and cons of Linux as a platform for developing game engines. It goes over OpenGL and drivers, CPU and GPU profiling, compilers, build systems, IDEs, debuggers, platform abstraction layers and other tools."

cancel ×

145 comments

Richard Stallman endorses Gamemaker (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45784147)

Richard Stallman endorsed Gamemaker.

"There's nothing that Gamemaker cannot do. Gamemaker can simply do anything. Anything made in Gamemaker is fantastic. I love Gamemaker. I can't get enough of Gamemaker. Return to Gamemakerdom, you insolent insects! You're nothing without Gamemaker! Why not use Gamemaker? Linux is garbage; it wasn't made in Gamemaker. Why do you cower? Because you're not using Gamemaker. Use Gamemaker already! Return, return, return, return, return to Gamemakerdooooooooooooooom!" -Richard M. Stallman, on Gamemaker.

Re:Richard Stallman endorses Gamemaker (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45784225)

Have you HURD about gamemaker?

Re:Richard Stallman endorses Gamemaker (5, Funny)

smitty_one_each (243267) | about 7 months ago | (#45784621)

It Emacs me sick.

Re:Richard Stallman endorses Gamemaker (5, Funny)

davester666 (731373) | about 7 months ago | (#45784307)

This message paid for by the Society To Keep Richard Stallman Away From Society.

Re:Richard Stallman endorses Gamemaker (0)

will.perdikakis (1074743) | about 7 months ago | (#45784659)

He also pretends to be a doctor because he received an honorary degree.

Re:Richard Stallman endorses Gamemaker (0)

larry bagina (561269) | about 7 months ago | (#45784507)

I'm pretty sure he was talking about "Gay Maker", the codename for HURD beta.

TFA needs editor (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45784169)

The article referenced is sure to cause seizures for anyone that can't get past things like the incorrect use of "it's" and various other spelling and grammar errors. The author should do a quick read through before getting Slashdotted.

Re:TFA needs editor (2)

boundary (1226600) | about 7 months ago | (#45784261)

With typing like that I'd be surprised if their code ran.

Re:TFA needs editor (1)

houstonbofh (602064) | about 7 months ago | (#45785359)

With typing like that I'd be surprised if their code ran.

Did you see all the references to debugger plug-ins and the debugger section?

Re:TFA needs editor (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45786867)

I've never understood how some apparently very creative people - especially hardware geeks - have such atrocious spelling and grammar. I would think that if your brain can't master getting a few letters in the right place, you'd not be able to handle the far greater complexity of identifying - let alone correctly integrating - components.

Is it because these people look stuff up a lot? Or are they genuinely lazy about communicating? I understand that some people have difficulty with writing, but that's solved by taking the time to get a grip on your difficulties and spending a little more time on the activity. That only works if you actually want to do it, of course.

Re:TFA needs editor (1)

Eunuchswear (210685) | about 6 months ago | (#45787111)

I've never understood how some apparently very creative people - especially hardware geeks - have such atrocious spelling and grammar.

Maybe they have creative spelling and grammar?

Article is generic (4, Informative)

the_scoots (1595597) | about 7 months ago | (#45784215)

There's really not any information specific to SteamOS or even games in particular, just general info. Not a bad article, but a misleading title.

Re:Article is generic (4, Insightful)

jafac (1449) | about 7 months ago | (#45785409)

. . . and ppl wonder why I don't RTFA.

Re:Article is generic (1)

hobarrera (2008506) | about 6 months ago | (#45786509)

You're not suposed to RTFA on slashdot, you must be new here.

Its (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45784285)

The grammar in that article is atrocious. Please Panagiotis, learn how to use 'its' and 'it's' correctly.

Re:Its (1)

aliquis (678370) | about 7 months ago | (#45784339)

I don't get the background story though.

I know it's = it is.

And I have used its for everything else.

But then I checked that apostrophe s stuff and when to use it and it seemed liked the s after words was for multiple of them and 's was for belongings? (fucking annoying thing to do since it make weird characters most of the time.)

Like AC's comment. Right?

But if so why the fuck isn't it also used when it is it which something belong to?

The ball's valve? It's valve? Are both wrong? Is it just some special cases of belongings where one use 's?

Re:Its (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45784635)

You don't use "it's" when talking possessive pronouns for the same reason you don't write "her's" or "your's" or "hi's" - the word is a standalone pronoun in modern English. Various online etymology sources claim that it was once "it's" (e.g., http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=its [etymonline.com] ) but over time it lost the apostrophe.

Re:Its (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45785041)

When I am talking about my chickens, "it's food" and "its food" mean very different things for the chicken.

AC because of moderation.

Re:Its (1)

aliquis (678370) | about 7 months ago | (#45785107)

Ok, so convenience factor or something. I'm fine with that :)

I just wondered why since I saw how 's was supposed to be used (guess I've been taught that some 20+ years ago too) and see the comments (and usage) every now and then :)

If yours is just a more comfortable way of typing your's I kinda feel like your's should be accepted and not complained on thought I guess some people may read it wrong in especially it's case.

Thank you for the reply :)
Came to think about it over here in Sweden we mostly use "dess" rather than "dens" or "dets" (it) as well, though there seem to be cases where that doesn't work.
Funny enough our possessive "de" (they) doesn't become des but rather "deras", then again the English word isn't those's either so ..
Maybe there's some other secret hidden in the world of grammar (a world very scarcely explored by this individual :D) for why it is this way :)

Re:Its (1)

Smauler (915644) | about 7 months ago | (#45785419)

It's not convenience factor. "Hers" does not have an apostrophe because it is is a pronoun, for example. "Its" does not have an apostrophe because it's also a pronoun. You might as well go putting apostrophes in our's, your's, hi's and her's, too, if you do it in "it's".

It's confusing, admittedly, but it's not there because of the convenience factor.

Re:Its (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45785539)

Actually, our's, you's hi(m)'s and her's would make much more sense –just like Jane's, John's and the Chicken's.

Re:Its (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45785557)

It's there because humans are mentally retarded, and so their languages make no sense, either. English is like a whore; it sleeps with every other language on the planet and picks up all sorts of nasty things, and it even comes up with some abominations of its own.

Re:Its (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45785991)

Yes an in the mother tongue they are termed Americanism. Bloody colonials you would think they would have learned how to spell colour correctly after five hundred years.

Re:Its (1)

gbjbaanb (229885) | about 6 months ago | (#45786927)

not to mention how to pronounce aluminium - the last i is not silent!

Re:Its (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45787025)

The original spelling was without the i.

Re:Its (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45785515)

The problem with your argument that it's incredibly consistent to use its, hers, yours, his, etc is that it's not, the fact that as soon as a personal pronoun is involved this instantly changes, makes your argument basically bullshit.

Re:Its (1)

HJED (1304957) | about 7 months ago | (#45784885)

because there isn't a plural of it, and it's is a contraction. Wherever there is a contraction and a possessive form, the contraction gets the apostrophe and the possessive form doesn't

Re:Its (1)

Psychotria (953670) | about 7 months ago | (#45784369)

I agree that the grammar could use a lot of work, however their name is Panagiotis. This name suggests to me that English is not their native language, so I'll cut them some slack. Delving deeper, the name Panagiotis suggests that the person is from ancient Greece. I'd have to do some more research but it's even possible that they're from a period even earlier than the so-called Archaic Period. This dates them at somewhere between 2000 and 4000 years of age. Given the transformations that all languages have experienced throughout the last 2000 to 4000 years it seems reasonable to expect some differences in grammar and punctuation.

Re: Its (1)

loufoque (1400831) | about 6 months ago | (#45786971)

Foreigners are normally much better at grammar than natives.

So long as we have non-Steam games too (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45784431)

I do appreciate this recent influx of interest in game development for Linux, brought on by Steam for Linux. I just hope that at least some developers show an interest in developing games that doesn't REQUIRE Steam as well, or have Steam as an option as well as maybe a DRM-free version as well. I play a lot of older commercial games on Linux like Doom 3/Quake 4/UT2004/Neverwinter Nights, and they all work fine but don't use Steam. Now, we might see more commercial games on Linux but they'll probably all use Steam, and that seems quite disappointing if you don't want to tie yourself to the platform (which I don't, for various reasons).

Re:So long as we have non-Steam games too (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45785153)

At the same time, we're also seeing a huge push for indie games. Big gaming companies have grown stale while indie developers and bringing in fresh ideas (even if over-using not-so-fresh pixel graphics). Thankfully, these indie developers have seen the mistakes others made when playing with DRM and are steering clear while still seeing Steam as a viable release platform. That means they release a stand-alone client and a Steam-based client. Take a look at Starbound [playstarbound.com] , which is currently in beta. The same can be said for many (most?) games that appear in the Humble Bundle.

We can't say with any certainty yet, but I'm under the impression that indie games will continue to rise*, multi-platform gaming will spread, and DRM will disappear.

*Maybe rise and replace the current gaming giants? Maybe not-so-independent?

Re:So long as we have non-Steam games too (1)

Blaskowicz (634489) | about 7 months ago | (#45786195)

I failed to run the linux version of doom 3, so I fell back on running it with Wine instead where it was flawless. Of course as often on linux, to accesss the console and weapons you need to set the keyboard to QWERTY so it's more like typing 'setxkbmap us&&wine doom3.exe' at the prompt, but it's almost there lol. (not 100% sure if that part applies to doom 3 but it does much often, including in random linux native games)

Re:So long as we have non-Steam games too (4, Informative)

Winamp (3439895) | about 6 months ago | (#45786725)

Yeah, I guess I didn't mention in my post that one of the unfortunate things about trying to get these older commercial Linux games to run is that they're all more difficult at getting to install or behave properly in modern Linux distros than they do in modern versions of Windows.

In your case, the Doom 3 installer normally uses a GTK 1.2-based installer but relies on system libraries. Most distros don't supply them anymore and even if you can find a way to put them on, the installer looks for 32 bit libraries in particular locations so in the end it'll default to its fallback console-based installer, which at least still works. Then you've got to deal with forcing DOOM 3 to bypass PulseAudio as it glitches badly with either no sound at all, or something like a 5 second sound lag (PulseAudio didn't exactly exist when the game was made).

Ah, good fun I guess. It's certainly more satisfying once you finally get it working as you'll learn a heck of a lot about Linux (including a broader understanding of why people get frustrated with it and go back to Windows). Having said that though, newer games are better designed for the Linux ecosystem and have FAR less issues.

Re:So long as we have non-Steam games too (1)

hobarrera (2008506) | about 6 months ago | (#45786517)

Oh, there are plenty. Humble Bundle games. Don't Starve. Planetary Annihilation. A lot of the steam games also have non-steam versions you get if you buy it from their website too.

Re:So long as we have non-Steam games too (1)

Winamp (3439895) | about 6 months ago | (#45786751)

Yep, that's true and it's good to see. I guess I just wish more AAA (commercial) titles like Metro: Last Light had a DRM-free version, but then again it's not like such a version exists in Windows anyway, so it's good Linux gets more games and even if the DRM has to stay it's not WORSE on Linux compared to Windows.

misses to mention popular IDE (2, Informative)

postmortem (906676) | about 7 months ago | (#45784443)

Netbeans - although their focus is Java, C/C++ support is great.

Re:misses to mention popular IDE (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45786341)

Netbeans - although their focus is Java, C/C++ support is great.

Do you really think developers need to be told what IDEs are popular?

Re:misses to mention popular IDE (2)

Great Big Bird (1751616) | about 6 months ago | (#45786463)

On another platform: yes.

Re:misses to mention popular IDE (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45786929)

Oh look, Oracle's marketing arm is awake already.

give it up (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45784463)

you guys peaked with tuxracer. linux games are going nowhere.

Re:give it up (4, Funny)

fisted (2295862) | about 7 months ago | (#45784599)

Actually we peaked with NetHack [nethack.org] . It's been a while, admittedly, but then again, you guys never had a peak anywhere near that high

Re:give it up (1)

higuita (129722) | about 6 months ago | (#45787033)

+10^32 :)

Re:give it up (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45784725)

Really, tuxracer? While it's not a bad game, it's not the best open source game... There are at least a few dozen really decent open source games. Plus all the games you can buy for linux, a ton of which use some FOSS tools and libraries such as OpenGL, SDL, or Blender 3D. I would argue that claiming that open sources contributions to gaming are no better than one game is a troll comment for sure! Here are a few open source games that I think are worth mention in support of my argument that you are a large hairy TROLL:

  Supertuxcart .8 was pretty decent, it's on 8.1 now, and it's got at least two more releases to 1.0.

Sauerbraten and the other first person shooters are good, Warsow with it's cartoon look is neat. That being said a story mode even half as good as Half Life 1 would be nice.

Hedgewars an tank game with armed hedgehog battle for 1 or two people.

Megaglest a RTS warfare game has been one of my fav's. 0 AD honorable mention although still in early Alpha and likely not to be done for years.

Chromium a pretty fun arcade style space shooter that looks good.

I could go on....

Linux (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45784467)

Windows has, as of late, become Linux and Open Source's best ally. M$ is breaking things so quickly that business is concerned that it will become unmaintainable. For example IE 11 has issues with Exchange 2010's OWA web page. If the M$ stuff doesn't work with the M$ stuff, what chance does it have on legacy systems?

I have been waiting for mainstream gaming to come to linux for some time now. The only reason I am running windows at home is netflix and games. At work I have to maintain it on servers and workstations, but am running Kubuntu at my own desk.

Bring on the Linux version of GTA, Battlefield, and other major titles, PLEASE!

Re:Linux (2)

jones_supa (887896) | about 7 months ago | (#45784693)

Bring on the Linux version of GTA, Battlefield, and other major titles, PLEASE!

Try Serious Sam 3: BFE [steampowered.com] for this holiday.

Re:Linux (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45787035)

Or don't. That game sucked. Play the vastly better "Serious Sam: The Second Encounter" instead. The HD version uses the same engine as Serious Sam 3, so go ask Croteam to port it.

What about Ninnle Linux? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45784495)

The Ninnle Linux kernel is optimized for games. DMA GPU, zero-copy audio buffers, low latency input peripherals and graphic. It's a game programmer's (and player's) wet dream reified.

Awful article (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45784563)

The article doesn't even touch how to make build-once-run-on-all Linux installations... Because it doesn't happen. Your average person can not be expected to compile everything.

Re:Awful article (2)

jedidiah (1196) | about 7 months ago | (#45784757)

Yet somehow companies like Oracle manage it.

It's just like all of Adobe's whining about audio libraries.

Some people just take care of business while others do nothing but make excuses.

Re:Awful article (0)

Blakey Rat (99501) | about 7 months ago | (#45785143)

You have two platforms, one with 80+% marketshare and one with 10% marketshare (and I think those numbers are generous.) The one with 80+% marketshare is easy to develop with. The other is difficult.

Which do you choose?

Linux will never have more software than Windows until it's easier to develop, test, and deploy Linux applications than it is Windows applications. (Games included.) Until the incentive to develop for Linux isn't "well we want to support Linux" but is closer to, "well since porting was so easy and cheap, it's a no-brainer!"

Right now, it's nowhere even close.

Re:Awful article (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45786731)

Let's just replace all of the occurrences of Linux in that post, with Playstation 3, shall we? It's not easy to develop for. Just for a start, it's fucking expensive.

Or, shall we go with my development experience, when I was studying programming about 15 years ago. My compiles failed with "Error 0: no error." Perhaps there's the one on the Mac back in 2000, where nobody could get the program to compile, until someone had the bright idea to move the comment below the next line of code. Worked great after that - I guess the problem is that, until someone makes programming easy on Macs, nobody will take them seriously.

In fact, why don't we go with "Programming is hard, and I'm not very comfortable with anything but Windows, so therefore it is the best."

Seems to fit your position on things.

Re:Awful article (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45786407)

The article doesn't even touch how to make build-once-run-on-all Linux installations... Because it doesn't happen. Your average person can not be expected to compile everything.

g++ ... -static?

Developing Linux applications in OSX? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45784589)

I apologize if this is a dumb question as I've never done Linux development, but given that OSX is a Unix-based OS and even has its own X11 support, is it possible to develop Linux apps in OSX? (Final testing would be done in real Linux, of course — maybe through a VM.) I ask because the workflow presented in this article seems rather frustrating compared to the Xcode workflow I normally use, and I imagine a lot of developers would feel the same way.

Re:Developing Linux applications in OSX? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45784613)

Oops, sorry for the "apps" terminology. I don't like it either, but I'm currently mired in the iOS development mindset.

Re:Developing Linux applications in OSX? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45786235)

No biggie, "apps" was a common word a decade or more before iOS and Apple attempting to somehow trademark it. "App" means "application" means "piece of software other than an OS, driver or library".

You can. . . (3, Funny)

smitty_one_each (243267) | about 7 months ago | (#45784629)

. . .but only if you're going to run them within a BeOS VM on Linux.
Sorry, I don't make these rules; I just enforce them.

Re:You can. . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45787039)

That should be a Linux VM on BeOS, since BeOS is much more resource efficient.

Re:You can. . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45787123)

...in the same manner as DOS is.

Re:Developing Linux applications in OSX? (2)

AHuxley (892839) | about 7 months ago | (#45785081)

You could create a great cross platform game by coding with the big OS in mind from the start.
As the OS developers updates, dropped support for hardware or changed code *should* be able to be fixed with good game code planning.
You could find a good 'free' 2D/3D engine that has wide OS support and the fine print for you to make a profit.
Or find a good 'free' 2D/3D engine that can allow you to make a profit and work long and hard to recode it for more OS options.
The main issues are great artists, good level design, developers insight into updated cross platform support.
Other issues are the 'wait' for sound, graphics or control code to be 'fixed' after huge OS changes from open or closed developers.

Some Additions (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45784591)

  • For Linux IDEs the article misses Netbeans which has a stable and reliable C/C++ Plugin that directly supports CMake projects .
  • A list of c++ cross platform libraries is never complete without mentioning boost - severall C++11 features where inspired or even copied from it.
  • OpenGL dropped a lot of its old API and you should develop against the Core profile to get most out of performance enhancements.
  • Since GLSL shaders are a must with the core API you should make soure to specify a shader version in every shader (at least with the NVIDIA driver this forces it to be stricter) one of the portability problems is that NVIDIA compiles both CG shaders and GLSL shaders with the same compiler and it currently allows you to use CG constructs in GLSL code.
  • Test running code on AMD/Intel/NVIDIA cards shows that each of them varies on how strict they parse GLSL, to make sure that your code runs on all of them you have to test against all of them (thought testing against intel might be enough, from limited tests it seemed to be the strictest).
  • CPU profiling: Until you get into very small ranges you can sample by randomly stopping the program in a debbuger - the line appearing most often in the stacktrace is likely the culprit.
  • GPU profiling/debbuging: since AMD bought and then killed the vendor agnostic gDebbuger (after releasing an AMD only version) before releasing CodeXL the only alternative is a windows setup with visual studio (not free - express does not support plugins) and Nvidia visual Insight(free). Older versions of gDebbuger might still be available but are rather limited.

Re:Some Additions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45785065)

Mod this guy up. There's some great info in that post.

Re:Some Additions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45786381)

CPU profiling: Until you get into very small ranges you can sample by randomly stopping the program in a debbuger - the line appearing most often in the stacktrace is likely the culprit.

...

Where are we expecting all these new Linux game developers from anyway, they're graduating from highschool tomorrow and starting this weekend?

Seriously, remind people what IDEs are available again, maybe they've never heard of them. Sorry folks, this is hard to watch.

Re:Some Additions (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45786875)

I pulled that line from a stackoverflow question about the best available profilers for linux (http://stackoverflow.com/a/378024/216111). Some people thought that it would not be precise enough and you really should use a full profiler, while in reality this way is simple, easy to use and quite often enough. People sometimes get so lost in their need for tools that they miss the easy solutions.

Seriously, remind people what IDEs are available again, maybe they've never heard of them. Sorry folks, this is hard to watch.

During my time at the university it was either Eclipse or Visual studio for any project done at both the University and the part time jobs I worked at. QtCreator was something I never heard about until I had a project using Qt libraries and Netbeans tends to be seen as a mostly Java IDE and even there behind Eclipse. Really there are a lot of people who never heard that the Netbeans IDE is both good at C++ projects and supports CMake.

Re:Some Additions (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45786507)

Oh God, where to begin...

(1). You have an extra space between projects and the . on the first line.

(2) It's C++, not c++. Case matters.

(3) "Where inspired"? It should be "were inspired".

(4) "make soure"? It should be "make sure".

(5) Intel, not intel. Same goes for Visual Studio and a few other named entities.

There are several other errors but you get the point. I don't care if you wrote it in a rush or aren't a native English speaker, this is a web site with a predominately English audience. Write the fucking language properly!

Re:Some Additions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45786883)

Sorry, my only exuse is that I was tired. The uppercase first letter in names is something I forget way too often.

Re:Some Additions (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45786931)

Oh God, where to begin...

(1). You have an extra space between projects and the . on the first line.

(2) It's C++, not c++. Case matters.

(3) "Where inspired"? It should be "were inspired".

(4) "make soure"? It should be "make sure".

(5) Intel, not intel. Same goes for Visual Studio and a few other named entities.

There are several other errors but you get the point. I don't care if you wrote it in a rush or aren't a native English speaker, this is a web site with a predominately English audience. Write the fucking language properly!

Get a fucking like you sad bastard! No wonder your a virgin.

Re:Some Additions (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45786965)

Hey look everybody, another Oracle shill!

Qt Creator (4, Informative)

jones_supa (887896) | about 7 months ago | (#45784705)

Qt Creator is hands down the best C/C++ IDE for Linux.

Re:Qt Creator (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45785155)

I recently decided to try KDevelop for the first time, as 4.6.0 had just hit fedora, and it is also quite good.

Re:Qt Creator (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45785193)

Please explain why. What are the pros/cons?

Re:Qt Creator (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45786969)

Qt creator is nice, however it is NOT yet ready for mobile platforms unless you want to live in Qt++, Qml and Javascript is just not feature complete for mobile, in fact Qt++ level is not even feature complete, I was looking at Qt for Android, however, it was a waste of time and turned into a feature missing/bug hunt.

Qt mobile, Not ready until probably 5.4 and then it will be tight.

You want linux gaming to go big? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45784731)

Come up with some sort of directX emulator/port.

Being able to put 90% of the windows games on linux with some minor emulation layer would be HUGE.

THAT would make a huge difference.

|::Now insert everyone saying this would be HARD and POINTLESS and blah blah blah...
But bottom line is you want linux to be mainstream as a consumer OS? Make it play games.
And make it EASY for the end user who does not want to screw with config files. Recompiling anything. Or major system changes just to get a game to work.

Once you support anything from simcity to far cry and everything inbetween. Then linux will take off. HUGE.

There's even a ton of money to be made here. "Drop this blob on your linux pc for $50 and it will play most windows games!"

Re:You want linux gaming to go big? (2, Informative)

jedidiah (1196) | about 7 months ago | (#45784767)

The gaming market is already moving away from Windows and thus DirectX. There was a time when trying to emulate Windows was the most relevant approach but that time has passed already.

Re:You want linux gaming to go big? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45785407)

The gaming market is already moving away from Windows and thus DirectX. There was a time when trying to emulate Windows was the most relevant approach but that time has passed already.

Said no one ever. Ever heard of the Frostbite engine and all the huge titles that run on it? The game market is not moving away from Windows. The Windows game market is the largest it's ever been, ever.

Re:You want linux gaming to go big? (1)

marsu_k (701360) | about 6 months ago | (#45786807)

...and Frostbite on for example PS3/4 runs on DirectX, right?

Re:You want linux gaming to go big? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45786987)

Said no one ever. Ever heard of the Frostbite engine and all the huge titles that run on it

Afaik the current frostbyte engine is used by AMD as a showcase for their Mantel API (a low level Graphics API even closer to the hardware than Direct3D and OpenGL), DirectX may be one backend for it but it supports many others.

Re:You want linux gaming to go big? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45786809)

Moving away from thousands and thousands of damm fine games...
Yeah that's not going to happen any decade soon.

I still find win95/98 era games i want to play. When directX was just starting out.

Wine is working on that (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45784801)

http://wiki.winehq.org/DirectX

The Wine team is working on that....

Re:Wine is working on that (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 7 months ago | (#45785823)

Last time I checked, it was still the case that wine was explicitly not officially supported on 64 bit only platforms.

Also, most applications which require .NET, which is quite a few, actually, won't work under wine.

Re:Wine is working on that (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45786245)

Last time I checked, it was still the case that wine was explicitly not officially supported on 64 bit only platforms.

Also, most applications which require .NET, which is quite a few, actually, won't work under wine.

You might want to "check" again. Wine has supported 64bit since 1.2 which was released in 2010.

The .NET bit is also incorrect.

Re:Wine is working on that (0)

mark-t (151149) | about 6 months ago | (#45786359)

It's not supported in Slackware [slackbuilds.org]

Re:Wine is working on that (1)

JonJ (907502) | about 6 months ago | (#45786973)

You're not seriously using Slackware as a benchmark for what's supported on Linux? I love the distro, but that's just absurd.

Re:Wine is working on that (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45786977)

You're that guy that knows nothing beyond what a quick Google search can tell you, aren't you?

Seriously, if your only knowledge of a subject is the first result of a Google search, just stay out of the conversation. There's a lot you don't know, and you have nothing to add to the conversation that all other participants don't already know.

Re:You want linux gaming to go big? (2)

EzInKy (115248) | about 7 months ago | (#45785057)

Better would be better! Why emulate when you can improve?

Re:You want linux gaming to go big? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45785337)

Porting to Linux is trivial. I ported one of our games to Linux over a weekend (with two bugs... one related to fullscreen switching, and the other related to gamepad support... both could be fixed with another day's work). It never got released though, Why? Because convincing the business people that there might be a market for a linux game was simply too hard.

DirectX support is a completely non-issue.

Re:You want linux gaming to go big? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45786101)

Sorta...

Most library stacks that people use to make games are on all the relevant platforms (except maybe xna which is mostly .net anyway). What kills most of these projects is test time.

You have enough money to test 1-3 platforms. Do you pick one where 1% of 10% of the users out there will play your game? Or do you pick one where if 5% of 80% will play your game?

Games are a business. Time is usually their biggest constraint.

Re:You want linux gaming to go big? (1)

ledow (319597) | about 6 months ago | (#45786993)

If you are in any way a vaguely competent games developer (even an individual) then the difference between DirectX and OpenGL is miniscule.

And if you CHOSE to lock yourself into a Microsoft-only platform (thereby destroying your compatibility with Mac, Linux and many console platforms - apart from XBox, obviously - in one fell stroke) then that's a choice you made that you have to do the work to recover when it comes time to admit your mistake.

And yet targeting OpenGL from day one, it would have all worked, all just as fast, all with the same fancy effects, all for the same effort, on all platforms.

DirectX lock-in is the result of developer stupidity but, fortunately, it's not that hard to drag yourself out of.

Come on Dice owned Slashdot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45785003)

Come on guys, this linked article is complete garbage. It reads like a syllabus.
Captcha: Disgust

What are good programming-oriented text-editors? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45785215)

In Windows, I use Notepad++ because it, simply put, is the best. It is light, simple, and supports everything I need. Most of the (scripted) work I do is going to be PHP, CSS, JS, and Lua, so support for those languages is a must (I'll use C::B for C/C++). Regex file search/replace also a must. A good, seamless (auto-upload on save) FTP plugin would be greatly appreciated.

I've used Geany a bit, and it is close, but some things just feel really awkward (mostly the FTP support). What other good alternatives are there?

Sure... when Unity3d makes a Linux editor... (2)

mark-t (151149) | about 7 months ago | (#45785793)

Right now Unity3d can target Linux, which is leaps and bounds in the right direction, but it really needs a native Linux development environment to be really useful.

The forum feedback page for a native Linux Unity3d editor [unity3d.com] has been around for over 3 years, received almost double the number of votes of the next highest issue in the feedback pages, and we're still waiting on it.

The impression I'm left with is that even those who produce a sophisticated enough gaming engine or system that can be genuinely competitive in that industry, and who might actually have some support for Linux aren't generally taking Linux seriously as a game development platform. Until that happens, I don't see Linux gaming going anywhere...even with what Valve is doing with it these days.

Re:Sure... when Unity3d makes a Linux editor... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45786455)

Right now Unity3d can target Linux, which is leaps and bounds in the right direction, but it really needs a native Linux development environment to be really useful.

The forum feedback page for a native Linux Unity3d editor [unity3d.com] has been around for over 3 years, received almost double the number of votes of the next highest issue in the feedback pages, and we're still waiting on it.

The impression I'm left with is that even those who produce a sophisticated enough gaming engine or system that can be genuinely competitive in that industry, and who might actually have some support for Linux aren't generally taking Linux seriously as a game development platform. Until that happens, I don't see Linux gaming going anywhere...even with what Valve is doing with it these days.

Why the hell does Linux or SteamOS need to be a development environment? Are people developing on iPads, PS3s or Wiis??

Get a grip guys, SteamOS needs to be a great environment for gamers and users. That's a tall order... forget what IDE's are available, how will it manage audio devices like headsets, and will surround sound work or be downmixed correctly, how will more than one person use it, will HMDI-CEC work, will power saving modes work well, what will keep background processes from affecting a running game, how will you back up user data that isn't cloud synced, how will multitasking work, will cheaters/hackers have their steam ID's banned?

Re:Sure... when Unity3d makes a Linux editor... (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 6 months ago | (#45786519)

None of those platforms can lay claim to actually being a general purpose computing platform that could actually be suitable for software development..

So unless you are saying that Linux is only good for end-user blackbox-like consumer devices, and not viable as a general computing platform or in particular as a platform for software development, I'm not sure that comparing the lack of native editors for devices that are never intended to be development platforms in the first place to the lack of a native editor for Linux is particularly apt.

Re:Sure... when Unity3d makes a Linux editor... (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 6 months ago | (#45787099)

Why the hell does Linux or SteamOS need to be a development environment?

Linux needs to be a development environment for SteamOS because otherwise you have to spend money ($600 for a shitty mac, or $100 for a copy of windows) to develop for SteamOS, even though you don't have to pay for the OS which hosts the games. It makes more sense to not depend on any proprietary components. Also, windows and MacOS both fucking suck.

Is this article a joke? (1)

TrollstonButterbeans (2914995) | about 7 months ago | (#45786133)

Debugging: " Even if I don’t quite understand why people chosen GDB as their top thing that needs improvement (I think there are more pressing matters)"

I'm not sure what is worse, that this gentleman doesn't know why gdb debugging is inconvenient compared to other options --- or that he hasn't taken the time to learn why gdb is no fun to debug with by asking around.

" I’ve been using SDL for years but because of lack of shared OpenGL context support I wrote my own X11 implementation. A few months ago I went back to SDL because the shared context support appears to be implemented and secondly because maintaining cross-platform code for input (keyboard, mouse and controllers) is a huge pain. "

I'm sure this gentleman is a nice guy, but this sounds like a "learning about multiplatform coding 101" class paper. Nothing wrong with that, but it is very unclear why this is "news".

"Game development was always tight to Windows for various reasons"

Ok, typos too. Not saying anything else or I'll seem like I'm being too negative, but why is this front page news?

Rulers on the knuckles (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45786645)

Debugging is supposed to be painful. If your code isn't easier to trace in your head than it is in a debugger, you need a better debugger. GDB is one of the best debuggers out there. Those graphical doohickeys help you debug, but you're not supposed to spend your time debugging. You're not supposed to write bugs in the first place. How are you gonna learn if debugging is easier than coding? Kids these days.

Re:Is this article a joke? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45786691)

GDB does not need any improvement at least not any as regards to usability. It is a debugging engine made to be integrated in other tools. It would not fit with the "simple is beautiful" approach if it had a high level GUI to begin with. Most of the other options you are talking about (on Linux) are just fancy frontend on GDB (Eclipse, NetBeans, ...) so if you use one you don't even need to know how to use GDB directly.
Hell, even Emacs has a fancy interface for GDB with multiple windows (dynamic libraries, threads, stacktrace, ...) and shiny buttons (but if you know how to use emacs you are probably faster using GDB with your keyboard than with your mouse anyway).
What really needs some improvements is DDD.

Re:Is this article a joke? (3, Informative)

ledow (319597) | about 6 months ago | (#45786861)

I have to say that GDB under Eclipse is actually my preferred tool for debugging. Hell, half the time you can't even see that it's actually using GDB yet it does everything I would want in a debugger.

It's all horses-for-courses but in terms of GDB *itself* (i.e. not a frontend to it), I don't think there's much to improve except keeping up with new binary formats, instructions, etc.

No content (1)

loufoque (1400831) | about 6 months ago | (#45786979)

This is a blog article that essentially says "on linux you have this gcc compiler, and you use opengl instead of directx for games".
How useful! I'm sure most people didn't already know that. Not slashdot worthy at all.

Re:No content (1)

_Shad0w_ (127912) | about 6 months ago | (#45787007)

To be fair it also said "there's also clang; but it uses the same switches as gcc so you can just use it as a drop in replacement." But other than that...yeah, it doesn't really containing anything startling.

Some games are only a hair's breadth away from being Linux ready anyway - I've certain played quite a few Windows games that use SDL, Ogre, OpenAL, etc..

Re: No content (1)

loufoque (1400831) | about 6 months ago | (#45787267)

For good software, all you should need to do is recompile and test.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...