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Iceland's Data Center Push Finally Gets Traction

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 4 years ago | from the time-to-move-your-data-center-again dept.

Power 117

miller60 writes "Iceland is poised for the completion of its first major international data center project, after years of marketing itself as a potential data center mecca. Iceland offers an ample supply of geothermal energy and an ideal environment for fresh air cooling, but its ambitions were slowed by the global financial collapse. But now the huge UK charity Wellcome Trust has provided funding to complete a new data center in a former NATO facility in Keflavik."

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117 comments

Niggers and kikes (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30814066)

You're all niggers and kikes.

What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (3, Insightful)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814088)

What is the bandwith to iceland anyways?

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30814228)

I would rather build my data centre in Lazytown.

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30814370)

I'd rather just plow stephanie's asshole.

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (5, Informative)

Dragoniz3r (992309) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814242)

If wiki is to be believed, 3 x 2.5gbit/sec (List of Transatlantic cables [wikipedia.org] and The one that makes a stop in Iceland [wikipedia.org])

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (1)

stephanruby (542433) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814312)

Also, what's the legal system like down there?

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (1)

molecular (311632) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814792)

it's in the process of being changed. Iceland has really been fucked over by the crisis. People are mad. Country small, politicians agile and everybody desperate... expect some REAL CHANGE you insensitive americans.

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 4 years ago | (#30818412)

So, like Germany around 1930 then? Sounds like a good place for a data center...

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814676)

Zero, they got cut off because they can't pay their bill.

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30816072)

No *their* bill, bills run up by three *private* banks.

The UK and the Netherlands are now saying that the Icelandic people should fork out, which would essentially bankrupt the country for at least a generation.

An Island full of Bernie Madoffs. (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 4 years ago | (#30817304)

No *their* bill, bills run up by three *private* banks.

Banks that were guaranteed by the Icelandic government, which then tried to weasel out of its obligations.

The UK and the Netherlands are now saying that the Icelandic people should fork out, which would essentially bankrupt the country for at least a generation.

I didn't hear any of you complaining when the money was all rolling in.

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (1)

molecular (311632) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814782)

What is the bandwith to iceland anyways?

from where you insensitive clod?

Never underestimate the bandwidth... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30814834)

...of a floating ice floe. The latency might be large, but it will definitely outperform a Volkswagen.

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (3, Interesting)

S-100 (1295224) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814858)

More important is the latency. You're now talking about a significant trip partway around the globe for many users. Even the speed of light takes some time to travel 10,000 miles.

Eastern Canada then? (5, Interesting)

atomic777 (860023) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815206)

It seems like the regions of the world where electricity-hungry aluminum production has centered would do well with data centers. Quebec is also endowed with plentiful hydroelectric electricity, ample cooling capacity, local expertise, and most importantly, proximity to large markets. I almost wonder why i don't hear more about data center hosting in Quebec, given the natural advantages

Re:Eastern Canada then? (1)

Tycho (11893) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815412)

By the way, does anyone know if there was a plan to build an aluminum smelter in Iceland, if it ever ended up being built, and if the smelter is currently in production if it was built? Oddly enough, even a single reasonably sized aluminum smelter using the geothermal power available in Iceland would be much more profitable, directly employ far more people, and would produce far more economic activity locally in Iceland than a rinky-dink data center on an old NATO base.

Re:Eastern Canada then? (2, Informative)

WalksOnDirt (704461) | more than 4 years ago | (#30816246)

Aluminum is being smelted in Iceland. The primary power source is hydroelectric, though.

Re:Eastern Canada then? (3, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815498)

I almost wonder why i don't hear more about data center hosting in Quebec,

Because nobody wants to translate all the packets to French and back again.

Re:Eastern Canada then? (4, Funny)

nazsco (695026) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815756)

actually, you would be required to have your packets with headers in both languages.

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (1)

fermion (181285) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815218)

10000 miles / 186000 miles/sec *1000=54 ms

ping to iceland is a little over 150 ms. ping to slashdot is over 100 ms less than that. Travel time accounts for less than 1/2 of the difference.

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 4 years ago | (#30818446)

Of course, that depends a lot on where you start from. From the UK, ping to Slashdot.org is 120ms, ping to www.icetourist.is is 70ms. From anywhere in the EU, ping times from Iceland will be lower than ping times to the USA.

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 4 years ago | (#30818482)

And, for another data point, ping from my server in Texas is 66ms to Slashdot, 188ms to www.icetourist.is. Ping from here to there is 175ms. So, somewhat strangely, it's further from your US customers than a data center in the UK would be, but it's about as close to people in the EU as Slashdot is to people in the US.

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (5, Insightful)

sopssa (1498795) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815944)

Actually no. Since it sits between Europe and North America, its a good place for a site or service that has users from both continents. You most likely already use sites that reside in Europe and we use sites that reside in US (like slashdot) anyway - its the middle ground.

Just don't use it for gaming servers.

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30816280)

i spend about 5% of my time on european sites. face it, europe sucks.

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (2, Interesting)

indi0144 (1264518) | more than 4 years ago | (#30816602)

nah, just for you. Is this data reliable?

http://www.internettrafficreport.com/

How come we (South A.) are tied with N America in relative performance? Less user base ergo better service?

Funny for those who think that we use "TCP over poisoned darts" : )

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (1)

LucidBeast (601749) | more than 4 years ago | (#30816738)

It also sits on a massive fault line. "Sir, where would you like to have your data center?" "Well, why don't you put in on top of a F:n VOLCANO!"

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30818364)

Right! That would be just stupid. Let's find somewhere geologically stable, like the SF bay area for example, and headquarter as many tech companies there as possible, so they'll be safe.

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30816980)

Iceland is midway between America and Europe with 4 cables each way, most transatlantic data goes through Iceland anyway, so moving an USA server to Iceland would shorten the path to germany and the other way around

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (1)

icebike (68054) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814946)

Bandwidth?

Why worry about that when your island is basically a volcano?

All that geothermal should be a clue, and if not the Atlantic rift running right up the middle of the island should give you some kind of clue.

http://www.decadevolcano.net/volcanoes/iceland/graphics/island_hekla.gif [decadevolcano.net]

What could Possibly go wrong?
http://photography.nationalgeographic.com/staticfiles/NGS/Shared/StaticFiles/Photography/Images/POD/e/eldfell-volcano-41861-sw.jpg [nationalgeographic.com]

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (3, Interesting)

JWSmythe (446288) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815154)

    From what I understand, it's really pretty good. A lot of the transatlantic bandwidth goes up and over, rather than straight across underwater. It helps to have repeaters occasionally, and it's nice if you can service them with a quick drive, rather than a submarine dive. :) It's suppose to make for a very nice place to have service, with fast pipes pointing towards the Northeast US and Western Europe.

    In an ideal world, if you had to locate for customers in both the US and Europe, it would be a great place. I know routing doesn't always cooperate as well as you'd like though.

    Way back when, I had servers in New York, and in Germany (among other places). Many European customers complained about the speeds to the German datacenter. Some of those were even in the same city in Germany as our equipment. The ones that sent me traceroutes showed that they were being routed from Germany to New York, and then back to Germany. Needless to say, the latency on that was a nightmare. In the end, we moved all of our European traffic to New York, and we started getting thank you notes from all over Europe. We didn't announce what we did, but they could tell the difference in speed. Most of the customers assumed that we simply changed the operation in Europe. They were completely unaware that they were being served out of New York. Well, except the few who knew enough to run a traceroute. :)

    So, the Iceland datacenters may be a wonderful thing, or they may be a project that dies in it's infancy.

    I know a lot of folks like having their servers within reach. That is, somewhere they can drive to from their home or office in a reasonable amount of time. I've seen with customers all over. Just because they live in god forsaken (and bandwidth limited) nowhere, they'll still host locally.

Re:What is the bandwith to iceland anyways? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30817826)

Some of those were even in the same city in Germany as our equipment. The ones that sent me traceroutes showed that they were being routed from Germany to New York, and then back to Germany.

Well, how would the NSA be able to snoop on that traffic if it weren't routed through the USA? :)

Risky business (0, Offtopic)

Meshach (578918) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814128)

A call center that I worked at before I became a developer (Convergys) just closed in my old hometown. My warning to Iceland is to be cautious: there is no loyalty in the call center industry. Sure this is good now and will help the economy but a lot of good it will do in the long run if they close down in four years.

Re:Risky business (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814160)

This is nothing to do with call centers, Its about big factories with servers in racks. No people are involves (well, maybe three or four for operations).

Re:Risky business (1)

Meshach (578918) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814316)

Your right. I should have RTFA a little more thoroughly I guess.

Re:Risky business (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30814366)

or the summary... at all

Re:Risky business (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30814650)

or the title, one word in

Re:Risky business (1)

nazsco (695026) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815772)

or the site name. call center for us nerds is a server answering your call and demanding you to press 2. or else it will read the options again.

WikiLeaks & Iceland's Legislation (5, Interesting)

Rand310 (264407) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814134)

Wikileaks has a proposal to get a bunch of different free-speech, safe-harbor, journalist-protection style legislation through Iceland so as to both spur this kind of development, as well as provide a political safe-haven for data. Apparently it has caught on pretty well locally, and with a small population it's not particularly difficult to get such legislation passed on short notice.

http://www.wikileaks.org/ [wikileaks.org]

Re:WikiLeaks & Iceland's Legislation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30814550)

...and if they restructure their tax system (i.e. make themselves into a tax haven), capital would flow in at an astronomical rate - as long as they pay back the EU members they borrowed money from to bail themselves out of their current financial crisis. If they don't, it'll be a bit harder for folks to trust them again.

Re:WikiLeaks & Iceland's Legislation (4, Informative)

TapeCutter (624760) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815234)

Their banking problems have nothing to do with their local economy. Capital has already been flooding into Iceland. These datacenters are chicken feed compared to Alcoa moving their aluminum smelters to the island.

They are selling themselves as the clean energy capital of the world and doing a pretty good job of it. I'm pretty sure the locals want a slice of Alcoa pie in the form of tax.

Re:WikiLeaks & Iceland's Legislation (1)

Tycho (11893) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815572)

Umm, I'm a bit confused on the local benefits to being a tax haven for both tax cheats and "legitimate" uses, perhaps you could help me. Even though cash might flow into a location that might act as a tax haven assuming it has a currency with a history of stability, which Iceland's currency does not currently, please explain why it follows that being a tax haven is a good thing. Tax cheats and tax avoiders really only want to put there money where their home country will not tax it, they really don't care if the bank is in the South Pacific, North Atlantic, or Central Asia, they also don't care about the local economy. Also, wouldn't it seem likely that the tax haven that attempts to tax any of that money will find the money in those accounts moved to another country, its always a race to the bottom when it comes to being a tax haven. I'm also going to guess that the terms "Chicago School" and "Milton Friedman" could be used a curse words these days in Iceland. Iceland got in its current mess by diligently following practices described by the both the Chicago School and Milton Friedman, these practices ended up putting Iceland in its current predicament, trying the same techniques again because they weren't done "properly" strikes me as a bad idea, an economic policy should have some amount of robustness built into its system. The type of "economics" espoused by the Chicago School seems to result in an unstable, fragile system in practice, even though the doctrine may state otherwise. Then again, it would be hard to get tax cheats and tax avoiders to put money into banks in a country that dealt recently with a collapse of its banking sector due to mismanagement.

Re:WikiLeaks & Iceland's Legislation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30817086)

They did not borrow money, 2 banks borrowed money, those 2 are now bankrupt

Loads of American banks have none bankrupt in the last 2 years a couple of them quite big

No-one is asking the American government to pay back the people that had securities in failed US banks, why is the UK and NL govs demanding that the Icelandic gov. pays securities for Icelandic banks?

The sums that the Icelandic government was responsible for legally (approx 20k euros per account holder) was paid back in 2008.

Re:WikiLeaks & Iceland's Legislation (3, Informative)

YeeHaW_Jelte (451855) | more than 4 years ago | (#30817156)

"The sums that the Icelandic government was responsible for legally (approx 20k euros per account holder) was paid back in 2008."

The money needed to pay up this guarantee was forked over by the UK and NL governments, not by Iceland. This was done in the form of a loan to the Icelandic government and it's this money both governments are claiming back.

Please inform yourself before blurting out nonsense, even if as AC.

Re:WikiLeaks & Iceland's Legislation (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30814698)

The youtube video [youtube.com] should be linked in the summary.

Re:WikiLeaks & Iceland's Legislation (2, Informative)

Fluffeh (1273756) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815440)

The youtube video [youtube.com] should be linked in the summary.

Mod this Anon Post up. It's at 0 now and it's amazingly informative.

Re:WikiLeaks & Iceland's Legislation (2, Insightful)

laddiebuck (868690) | more than 4 years ago | (#30816624)

Apparently it has caught on pretty well locally, and with a small population it's not particularly difficult to get such legislation passed on short notice.

Nor hard to reverse it when things go south.

Re:WikiLeaks & Iceland's Legislation (1)

Xinvoker (1660417) | more than 4 years ago | (#30817836)

I wonder if they will be able to keep that law if they decide to join the EU.

Hilarious editors (-1, Flamebait)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814136)

I honestly couldn't care more or less what they do in Iceland, unless it affects me directly.

However, the title of the article alone has made me smile. It kind of reminds me of myself, throwing out a play on words to get a chuckle. A pun trying to be funny.

Or should I say... punny.

Re:Hilarious editors (5, Insightful)

ducomputergeek (595742) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814328)

Do you have a need for datacenters? We do and I frankly could care less if our datacenters are located in the US and Iceland is an attractive location for the reason mentioned in the article. Geothermal power is plentiful and the climate keeps the cooling costs down, but there are some other factors to consider. Bandwidth is one, another is how much extra does it cost to design a facility to be more resistant to earthquakes as the vulcanization that offers those benefits of abundant geothermal power also means there is seismic instability.

There are other factors as well. Iceland has a small population. Do they have the local expertise? If not, how hard is it to get residency permits for foreign workers. What are the other associated tax laws and other legal differences in the area. Do they have different data laws than here in the US? Do these costs off set the energy cost savings?

I've been to Iceland a couple times to visit friends and like it there. They are used to constructing buildings to withstand earthquakes and they have an educated work force and middle of the rung when it comes to tax and other expenses. Our only huge concern I know was looking at the size of the population and wondering how many people in the entire country are familiar with Teradata. If not, we'd need to relocate a couple people at least for 3 - 5 years.

Re:Hilarious editors (1)

Snarkalicious (1589343) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814500)

Right now? If you're looking to business as anything other than a bank/investment firm, white slavery operation or kiddie porn ring in Iceland, the answer to just about any request is going to be 'yes'. It's a great time for businesses to extract concessions from Iceland's govt.

Re:Hilarious editors (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 4 years ago | (#30818506)

If you're looking to business as anything other than a bank/investment firm, white slavery operation or kiddie porn ring in Iceland, the answer to just about any request is going to be 'yes'.

So, we can get government concessions if we only trade black slaves?

Re:Hilarious editors (5, Informative)

helgihg (843017) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814648)

"Bandwidth is one, another is how much extra does it cost to design a facility to be more resistant to earthquakes as the vulcanization that offers those benefits of abundant geothermal power also means there is seismic instability." While a perfectly legitimate concern, bandwidth is not a problem. Neither is the seismic activity. Any serious seismic activity is well mapped out and building for it hasn't been a problem since we crawled out of the caves (which admittedly was only around 1900). In my opinion, the earthquakes are outright fun, and we know well where the earthquake danger zones are. Start worrying if you hear that they want to build it around Selfoss. ;) I'm born raised in Iceland but currently live in Canada and I've spent a year in Finland, and I can absolutely, positively guarantee you that the tech guru population per capita in Iceland is drastically higher than in either one of those. Even though the Finns are generally geeks... and I mean that in a good way obviously. Frankly, I think lack of geek skills in Iceland are not a problem for this particular project, and besides, the worst case scenario is that it won't be as monstrously huge as otherwise. Of course I'm biased, I can only promise you that I'd tell you if I thought it were a problem. I suppose the biggest problem would be the controversy over the energy it would require. Even though we are extremely lucky for how cheap electricity is in Iceland, there is also the counter-view that nature is to be preserved and therefore not exploited... even though it's the most nature-friendly way of producing electricity imaginable... okay, let's not get into politics. ;) Honestly, I think that would be the biggest problem. Dealing with the politics.

Re:Hilarious editors (1)

helgihg (843017) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814664)

Also I have to add... foreign money is worth a lot in Iceland now, and will for quite a while (decades). It's one of the most serious economic problems facing Iceland, the low value of the currency. It's terrible for the Icelandic population of course, but it means that labour is dirt cheap if you have foreign currency. Odds are you'd get much better bang for the buck.

Re:Hilarious editors (1)

blind biker (1066130) | more than 4 years ago | (#30817834)

I'm born raised in Iceland but currently live in Canada and I've spent a year in Finland, and I can absolutely, positively guarantee you that the tech guru population per capita in Iceland is drastically higher than in either one of those. Even though the Finns are generally geeks... and I mean that in a good way obviously.

As a Finnish geek... I don't know whether to feel insulted or flattered.

kinakuta (1)

molecular (311632) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814846)

Do you have a need for datacenters? We do and I frankly could care less if our datacenters are located in the US and Iceland is an attractive location for the reason mentioned in the article.

You might not care where your data is hosted, but some people do care about the legislation around it and the dangers associated with that.
Kinakuta!

Re:Hilarious editors (1)

JWSmythe (446288) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815198)

    As far as earthquakes go, consider how many folks host at or near One Wilshire (Los Angeles) or the Silicon Valley.

    Volcano's are another concern though. You can build a good building that can be shaken pretty hard, but I don't think there's a building yet that can really handle direct contact with a lava flow.

Re:Hilarious editors (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 4 years ago | (#30818518)

You can build a good building that can be shaken pretty hard, but I don't think there's a building yet that can really handle direct contact with a lava flow.

On the other hand, if there's a glacier on the other side then the Peltier effect would power your data center for a long time...

Impact of geology (4, Informative)

Beryllium Sphere(tm) (193358) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815250)

A friend of mine worked on an earlier attempt to locate a data center in Iceland. They mapped out a place somewhere on the west side that they believed to be seismically stable.

Volcanoes are scary though. You can build miles away from them and still get your HVAC clogged if the wind blows ash your way.

Re:Impact of geology (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30815904)

And a friend of mine said he knew a data center had dirt problems just by using the wrong kind of dust mop.

It's oh so quiet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30814176)

It's oh so still
You're all alone
And so peaceful until...

Your site gets Slashdotted

Improvements to network connectivity (4, Informative)

kilf (135983) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814208)

It wasn't that long ago that Iceland's only internet access line went via a Scottish high-street that was getting dug up repeatedly, with the inevitable consequences:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/11/28/iceland_without_broadband/ [theregister.co.uk]

Re:Improvements to network connectivity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30817138)

Not true

When I lived there:

Internet access routed via phone cable to the USA in 1986

Internet access routed via copper cables to USA, satellite to Europe ca 1990

Fibre optic links to Scandinavia, Canada, New York, the UK and mainland Europe in 1999

Broadband was cheaper than in the UK until 2006/7 and is still more readily available. Synchronus access is still cheaper than in the UK and available pretty much everywhere, unlike the UK

Re:Improvements to network connectivity (1)

Sindri (207695) | more than 4 years ago | (#30818000)

No, that was 4 years ago. That's a long time when it comes to internet things.

Nice power source but.. (0, Redundant)

assemblyronin (1719578) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814398)

How soon until Laki [wikipedia.org] blows again?

I see geothermal power as a bit of a trade off, especially for IT needs; you get a nice sustainable power source, but you're probably in an area where the activity could just as soon destroy your data as well as power it. Then again, if you hosted your Data Center in Iceland, you could probably afford to have backups in another country far, far away from any 'event'.

Re:Nice power source but.. (1)

derGoldstein (1494129) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814616)

Global warming to the rescue: the melting glaciers will cool down the lava before it reaches the datacenter.

Re:Nice power source but.. (1)

heidaro (1392977) | more than 4 years ago | (#30817078)

It erupts every 800-900 years or so I believe, so it's nothing to worry about right now at least.

Not news here (4, Interesting)

akarnid (591191) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814414)

This has been on the cards for about two years now. Construction at the site stopped last month because politicians wouldn't dare go on with the project because of public opposition. One of the top stakeholders in Verne Global is one Bjorgolfur Thor Bjorgolfsson, former owner of failed bank Landsbanki, whose high-interest Icesave savings accounts failed spectacularly and have kicked off the biggest firestorm in the republics' short history. Also, the bandwidth is not a problem. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenland_Connect [wikipedia.org] (goes to US/CANADA) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DANICE [wikipedia.org] (goes to EU) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FARICE-1 [wikipedia.org] (goes to EU) These are the fiber cables we have. As you can read, we have lots of unlit fiber there.

Wasn't that the plot to Cryptonomicon? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30814444)

It was called a data haven and it was in a different country, but Iceland seems to be as good a place as any to build one.

Location (2, Funny)

Lazlo Woodbine (54822) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814538)

I prefer my data-center to be further away from active volcanoes.

Re:Location (1)

molecular (311632) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814882)

I prefer my data-center to be further away from active volcanoes.

I, for one, prefer my datacenters be as far as possible away from a scared-to-death, self-centered, 1984-style, patriotic, homeland-secured government that just got a big one in the nuts on september 11th.

Re:Location (1)

mjwx (966435) | more than 4 years ago | (#30816510)

I prefer my data-center to be further away from active volcanoes.

Well that explains it.

latency. It must have been latency that caused the volcano death machine to move so slowly and permit Mr Bond to escape. I shall have to build my next evil lair in iceland.

This is very good news (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814744)

Especially since Iceland is essentially bankrupt. Projects like this will help get its economy on the way to recovery, and hopefully accomplish great things for the infrastructure of the internet as well. Particularly if the safe-harbor legislation gets... through...

Woah. I just realized:

Does this mean we can refer to Iceland as Kinakuta now?

chaos computer club wikileaks talk (1)

molecular (311632) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814774)

the wikileaks guys really want this, too.

the following video is a recording of a very interesting talk by Julian Assange and Daniel Schmitt (wikileaks) at the chaos communication congress (here be dragons) in berlin between the years.

http://mirror.fem-net.de/CCC/26C3/mp4/26c3-3567-en-wikileaks_release_10.mp4 [fem-net.de]
http://mirror.fem-net.de/CCC/26C3/mp4/26c3-3567-en-wikileaks_release_10.mp4.torrent [fem-net.de]

Iceland may offer more than power and cooling (2, Interesting)

janwedekind (778872) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814866)

According to the Wikileaks 1.0 presentation [youtube.com] Iceland could pass a bill which will provide a last resort for information which is suppressed in other European countries (currently on the Wikileaks [wikileaks.org] website with a call for donations).

Re:Iceland may offer more than power and cooling (1)

physburn (1095481) | more than 4 years ago | (#30816160)

Could pass, isn't good enough. If they do pass such a bill, Iceland might offer a useful data center for boardline data (which types?), but I doubt that alone would make it worthwhile offer a transnational data center. For most companies, all they need, is good response to service the equipment they Co-locate they, and easy-access. Iceland is so remote that access would almost be only by the internet, and not physical. I think Iceland will have to grow they're own local internet companies to get they data center used. But perphaps I'm wrong.

---

Data Centers [feeddistiller.com] Feed @ Feed Distiller [feeddistiller.com]

If Europe really cared about the environment... (1)

gatkinso (15975) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814958)

...they would put the data center in GREENland.

Harharharharhar. Sigh.

Bandwidth is not the issue (1)

BovineSpirit (247170) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815078)

The Wellcome Trust are a huge biomedical research charity. I would imagine that they are looking for processing power(think folding@home type projects) rather than the ability to serve up millions of webpages. If so bandwidth will be less of a concern than cheap reliable power and cooling. Iceland is looking to join the European Union so their Data Protection legislation is probably similar to rest of the EU's.

Re:Bandwidth is not the issue (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30817136)

The Sanger center has around 5PB of usable data and say 7K cores of compute. Today space and power are the main issues faced.

excuse for being inside, (1)

sc0p3 (972992) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815224)

now we have a real excuse to spend 6-months indoors. By 2020 all good hackers will live in Iceland :)

$86,000 ea. family owed? Data center (1)

myspace-cn (1094627) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815326)

Dear Iceland, "your government" has allowed institutions in your nation (and elsewhere) to claim that "debt is output" and that speculation constitutes GDP. That's a willful, knowing lie.
Nobody should trust the stability of Iceland at all let alone the ability to keep data safe and keep it available through emergencies, "your government" is already milking you for this.

The server isn't responding (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30815766)

"Yeah, I think it's frozen"

Re:The server isn't responding (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30817504)

Right now Iceland is among the warmest places in Europe.

They Will Do a Great Job (1)

b4upoo (166390) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815802)

I suspect that Iceland will provide a first rate service. Their climate makes indoor activities and studies much more of a good idea than Miami Beach. It is somewhat like Harvard being in Boston. So much of the year is too cold to do much anything other than study.

I hope that... (0, Redundant)

jonfr (888673) | more than 4 years ago | (#30816482)

I hope that this datacenters can take earthquakes, as they are building them on top of active seismic zone on the Reykjanes. But then there is also the volcano problem and the ash that can happen when a volcano eruption is taking place.

EVE online, CCP (2, Interesting)

egnop (531002) | more than 4 years ago | (#30817280)

Now I am wondering if CCP is getting their servers back to Iceland instead of the UK

Wasn't Iceland a Seismic land? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30817450)

Correct me if I'm wrong but wasn't Iceland a geologically unstable land with an high rate of volcanoes [wikipedia.org] because traversed by a fault line [wikipedia.org] and thus subject to seismicity [usgs.gov]?

Right, someone could object that also some [usgs.gov] other [usgs.gov] place [wikipedia.org] as well filled with important [facebook.com] datacenters [google.com] and nodes [ams-ix.net] has far more seismicity or happens to be under water level in times of sea level rise [wikipedia.org], but still.

Although geografic spreading like in Akamai [akamai.com] make a non-problem of this, at least for big data providers who can afford them: how do we confront the problem of nodes like AMS-IX and other [nyiix.net] Internet Exchange Points of NAPs [wikipedia.org] potentially vulnerable, and not only to the force of nature?

Would the Net Transit survive a Big One, and then be useful as emergency service too and for communications, the reason it was initially made for, or would it miserably fail by the falling of one of its major nodes? So then does it really make sense to concentrate too many resources in the same place other than from an economic point of view?

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