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The Weird Science of Tossing Stones Into a Lake

kdawson posted more than 4 years ago | from the no-skipping-allowed dept.

Science 89

Interoperable writes "Researchers in Spain and the Netherlands add another piece to a centuries-old puzzle in physics: the dynamics of an object falling into water. This common occurrence has a complex anatomy that includes a thin 'crown splash' around the perimeter of the impact, a deep cavity of air following the impactor, and a high, narrow jet of water that results from the collapse of the cavity. The new research, recently published in Physical Review Letters, demonstrates that airflow through the neck of the collapsing cavity reaches supersonic speeds despite low relative pressures between the air in the cavity and ambient pressure. Such an effect has no analogue in aerospace engineering or other sciences because of the highly dynamic nature of the collapsing nozzle structure." It's funny that the APS wants to charge non-subscribers $25 to download what is available for free on the arXiv.

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duhhhh (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30814560)

It's funny that the APS wants to charge non-subscribers $25 to download what is available for free on the arXiv.

You're right. That is funny!

Y'know what's funnier? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30814602)

Rob "CmdrTaco" Malda is a 29-year old white male with a stocky build and a goatee. He responded to my ad to be interviewed for this article wearing only leather pants, leather boots and a leather vest. I could see that both of his nipples were pierced with large-gauge silver rings.

Questioner: I hope you won't be offended if I ask you to prove to me that you're a nullo. Just so that my readers will know that this isn't a fake.

CmdrTaco: Sure, no problem. (stands and unbuckles pants and drops them to his ankles, revealing a smooth, shaven crotch with only a thin scar to show where his genitals once were).

Q: Thank you. That's a remarkable sight.

(laughs and pulls pants back up). Most people think so.

Q: What made you decide to become a nullo?

(pauses). Well, it really wasn't entirely my decision.

Q: Excuse me?

The idea wasn't mine. It was my lover's idea.

Q: Please explain what you mean.

Okay, it's a long story. You have to understand my relationship with Hemos before you'll know what happened.

Q: We have plenty of time. Please go on.

Both of us were into the leather lifestyle when we met through a personal ad. Hemos's ad was very specific: he was looking for someone to completely dominate and modify to his pleasure. In other word, a slave.

The ad intrigued me. I had been in a number of B&D scenes and also some S&M, but I found them unsatisfying because they were all temporary. After the fun was over, everybody went on with life as usual.

I was looking for a complete life change. I wanted to meet someone who would be part of my life forever. Someone who would control me and change me at his whim.

Q: In other words, you're a true masochist.

Oh yes, no doubt about that. I've always been totally passive in my sexual relationships.

Anyway, we met and there was instant chemistry. Hemos is about my age and is a complete loser. Our personalities meshed totally. He's very dominant.

I went back to his place after drinks and had the best sex of my life. That's when I knew I was going to be with Hemos for a long, long time.

Q: What sort of things did you two do?

It was very heavy right away. He restrained me and whipped me for quite awhile. He put clamps on my nipples and a ball gag in my mouth. And he hung a ball bag on my sack with some very heavy weights. That bag really bounced around when Hemos fucked me from behind.

Q: Ouch.

(laughs) Yeah, no kidding. At first I didn't think I could take the pain, but Hemos worked me through it and after awhile I was flying. I was sorry when it was over.

Hemos enjoyed it as much as I did. Afterwards he talked about what kind of a commitment I'd have to make if I wanted to stay with him.

Q: What did he say exactly?

Well, besides agreeing to be his slave in every way, I'd have to be ready to be modified. To have my body modified.

Q: Did he explain what he meant by that?

Not specifically, but I got the general idea. I guessed that something like castration might be part of it.

Q: How did that make you feel?

(laughs) I think it would make any guy a little hesitant.

Q: But it didn't stop you from agreeing to Hemos's terms?

No it didn't. I was totally hooked on this man. I knew that I was willing to pay any price to be with him.

Anyway, a few days later I moved in with Hemos. He gave me the rules right away: I'd have to be naked at all times while we were indoors, except for a leather dog collar that I could never take off. I had to keep my balls shaved. And I had to wear a butt plug except when I needed to take a shit or when we were having sex.

I had to sleep on the floor next to his bed. I ate all my food on the floor, too.

The next day he took me to a piercing parlor where he had my nipples done, and a Prince Albert put into the head of my cock.

Q: Heavy stuff.

Yeah, and it got heavier. He used me as a toilet, pissing in my mouth. I had to lick his asshole clean after he took a shit, too. It was all part of a process to break down any sense of individuality I had. After awhile, I wouldn't hesitate to do anything he asked.

Q: Did the sex get rougher?

Oh God, yeah. He started fisting me every time we had sex. But he really started concentrating on my cock and balls, working them over for hours at a time.

He put pins into the head of my cock and into my sack. He attached clothespins up and down my cock and around my sack. The pain was pretty bad. He had to gag me to keep me from screaming.

Q: When did the idea of nullification come up?

Well, it wasn't nullification at first. He started talking about how I needed to make a greater commitment to him, to do something to show that I was dedicated to him for life.

When I asked him what he meant, he said that he wanted to take my balls.

Q: How did you respond?

Not very well at first. I told him that I liked being a man and didn't want to become a eunuch. But he kept at me, and wore me down. He reminded me that I agreed to be modified according to his wishes, and this is what he wanted for me. Anything less would show that I wasn't really committed to the relationship. And besides, I was a total bottom and didn't really need my balls.

It took about a week before I agreed to be castrated. But I wasn't happy about it, believe me.

Q: How did he castrate you?

Hemos had a friend, Zonk, who was into the eunuch scene. One night he came over with his bag of toys, and Hemos told me that this was it. I was gonna lose my nuts then and there.

Q: Did you think of resisting?

I did for a minute, but deep down I knew there was no way. I just didn't want to lose Hemos. I'd rather lose my balls.

Zonk restrained me on the living room floor while Hemos videotaped us. He used an elastrator to put a band around my sack.

Q: That must have really hurt.

Hell yeah. It's liked getting kicked in the balls over and over again. I screamed for him to cut the band off, but he just kept on going, putting more bands on me. I had four bands around my sack when he finished.

I was rolling around on the floor screaming, while Hemos just videotaped me. Eventually, my sack got numb and the pain subsided. I looked between my legs and could see my sack was a dark purple. I knew my balls were dying inside.

Hemos and his friend left the room and turned out the light. I lay there for hours, crying because I was turning into a eunuch and there wasn't anything I could do about it.

Q: What happened then?

Eventually I fell asleep from exhaustion. Then the light switched on and I could see Hemos's friend kneeling between my legs, touching my sack. I heard him tell Hemos that my balls were dead.

Q: How did Hemos react?

Very pleased. He bent down and felt around my sack. He said that it felt cold.

Zonk told me that I needed to keep the bands on. He said that eventually my balls and sack would dry up and fall off. I just nodded. What else could I do at that point?

Q: Did it happen just like Zonk said?

Yeah, a week or so later my package just fell off. Hemos put it in a jar of alcohol to preserve it. It's on the table next to his bed.

Q: How did things go after that?

Hemos was really loving to me. He kept saying how proud he was of me, how grateful that I had made the commitment to him. He even let me sleep in his bed.

Q: What about the sex?

We waited awhile after my castration, and then took it easy until I was completely healed. At first I was able to get hard, but as the weeks went by my erections began to disappear.

That pleased Hemos. He liked fucking me and feeling my limp cock. It made his dominance over me even greater.

Q: When did he start talking about making you a nullo?

A couple of months after he took my nuts. Our sex had gotten to be just as rough as before the castration. He really got off on torturing my cock. Then he started saying stuff like, "Why do you even need this anymore?"

That freaked me out. I always thought that he might someday take my balls, but I never imagined that he'd go all the way. I told him that I wanted to keep my dick.

Q: How did he react to that?

At first he didn't say much. But he kept pushing. Hemos said I would look so nice being smooth between my legs. He said my dick was small and never got hard anymore, so what was the point of having it.

But I still resisted. I wanted to keep my cock. I felt like I wouldn't be a man anymore without it.

Q: So how did he get you to agree?

He didn't. He took it against my will.

Q: How did that happen?

We were having sex in the basement, and I was tied up and bent over this wooden bench as he fucked me. Then I heard the doorbell ring. Hemos answered it, and he brought this guy into the room.

At first I couldn't see anything because of the way I was tied. But then I felt these hands lift me up and put me on my back. And I could see it was Zonk, the guy who took my nuts.

Q: How did you react?

I started screaming and crying, but the guy just gagged me. The two of them dragged me to the other side of the room where they tied me spread eagled on the floor.

Zonk snaked a catheter up my dick, and gave me a shot to numb my crotch. I was grateful for that, at least. I remember how bad it hurt to lose my balls.

Q: What was Hemos doing at this time?

He was kneeling next to me talking quietly. He said I'd be happy that they were doing this. That it would make our relationship better. That kind of calmed me down. I thought, "Well, maybe it won't be so bad."

Q: How long did the penectomy take?

It took awhile. Some of the penis is inside the body, so he had to dig inside to get all of it. There was a lot of stitching up and stuff. He put my cock in the same jar with my balls. You can even see the Prince Albert sticking out of the head.

Then they made me a new pisshole. It's between my asshole and where my sack used to be. So now I have to squat to piss.

Q: What has life been like since you were nullified?

After I got over the surgery and my anger, things got better. When I healed up, I began to like my smooth look. Hemos brought friends over and they all admired it, saying how pretty I looked. It made me feel good that Hemos was proud of me.

Q: Do you have any sexual feeling anymore?

Yes, my prostate still responds when Hemos fucks me or uses the buttplug. And my nipples are quite sensitive. If Hemos plays with them while fucking me, I have a kind of orgasm. It's hard to describe, but it's definitely an orgasm.

Sometimes Hemos says he's gonna have my prostate and nipples removed, but he's just kidding around. He's happy with what he's done to me.

Q: So are you glad Hemos had you nullified?

Well, I wouldn't say I'm glad. If I could, I'd like to have my cock and balls back. But I know that I'm a nullo forever. So I'm making the best of it.

Hemos and I are very happy. I know that he'll take care of me and we'll be together always. I guess losing my manhood was worth it to make that happen for us.

Re:Y'know what's funnier? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30816024)

What the fucking fuck

First Post ?!? (-1, Offtopic)

PoorImpulseControl (805340) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814570)

Feels weird hitting the Read More link and seeing nothing.... Creeps me out. I am outta here.

On The West Coast... (4, Funny)

creimer (824291) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814590)

The only way to appreciate the science of tossing stones into a lake is to be stoned yourself.

Re:On The West Coast... (1)

calmofthestorm (1344385) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814730)

Personally I'd suggest getting high on marihuana; I've never been a fan of playing the Lottery.

Re:On The West Coast... (1)

trb (8509) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815008)

I guess most slashdot readers never read that story.

Re:On The West Coast... (0, Troll)

scorpivs (1408651) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815424)

I guess most slashdot readers never read that story.

Until presently, I'd always assumed it was a requirement for membership.

Sadly, it has occurred to me just now, that story was indeed in book form
and therefore is likely no longer considered pertinent by trolls and the like.

Re:On The West Coast... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30819676)

I used to be in a band named Omelas. Nice...

Re:On The West Coast... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30820582)

What an insightful way to show that YOU get the reference without actually giving ANY information to others on what the reference is. Jackass.

Re:On The West Coast... (1)

trb (8509) | more than 4 years ago | (#30821480)

I thought it would be easy enough to find, I guess I was mistaken.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lottery [wikipedia.org]

Re:On The West Coast... (1)

eleuthero (812560) | more than 4 years ago | (#30822134)

I am a bit surprised that there is no reference in the article to the general theme of human sacrifice. This pulls in a significant amount of human history (sacrifices given to the gods to ensure good harvest were part of the practices of a number of ancient peoples - many of these were human in nature). Perhaps this was simply a connection made in my own high school class' approach to the story.

Re:On The West Coast... (1)

scorpivs (1408651) | more than 4 years ago | (#30912998)

What an insightful way to show that YOU get the reference without actually giving ANY information to others on what the reference is. Jackass.

I did not mean to impute; however, and after having been modded 'Troll,' in retrospect: Point taken.

Now, shall we dispense with this business of stoning and getting stoned...?

Re:On The West Coast... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30821606)

I lol'd

Re:On The West Coast... (1)

bw-sf (937673) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814760)

I know of people whose idea of fun / Is throwing stones in the river in the afternoon sun

Re:On The West Coast... (1)

u38cg (607297) | more than 4 years ago | (#30817884)

An old bridge engineer's trick is to chuck a large stone into water. If it goes 'splash', it's shallow. If it swallows it with a 'gloop', it's too deep for a person.

Who would have thought... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30814622)

...that a story about tossing stones in a body of water would be picked up by an IT and technology news site.

Re:Who would have thought... (2, Funny)

Garble Snarky (715674) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815112)

Full understanding of the phenomenon would allow simulation and rendering of it in computer graphics. That's definitely tech related, and its reason enough for me to take a look at the paper.

Re:Who would have thought... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30815242)

I haven't seen a stretch that big since the last time there was a goatse post here.. By that logic, /. ought to be running an article on every single thing that happens in the world, so that we can model it better in computers.

Re:Who would have thought... (1)

TapeCutter (624760) | more than 4 years ago | (#30817474)

It's more than likely you could derive the same result from existing models [youtube.com] and verify it with a clever experiment such as the one in TFA.

Re:Who would have thought... (1)

tenco (773732) | more than 4 years ago | (#30818862)

an IT and technology news site.

Science is not nerdy anymore? I don't think so.

Re:Who would have thought... (1)

SQLGuru (980662) | more than 4 years ago | (#30819216)

"that a story about tossing stones in a body of water would be picked up by an IT and technology news site."

This bit:
"The new research, recently published in Physical Review Letters, demonstrates that airflow through the neck of the collapsing cavity reaches supersonic speeds despite low relative pressures between the air in the cavity and ambient pressure"

implies that there is relevant information that may (eventually) lead to improvements in technology related to - air travel, space travel, etc. And maybe even into energy generation. It's a *LONG* way away from any of that, but if this article causes the right spark, all of those tech areas could benefit.

Re:Who would have thought... (1)

TropicalCoder (898500) | more than 4 years ago | (#30819742)

Collapsing bubbles [wikipedia.org] are very powerful...

Bubble fusion, also known as sonofusion, is the non-technical name for a nuclear fusion reaction hypothesized to occur during a high-pressure version of sonoluminescence, an extreme form of acoustic cavitation. Officially, this reaction is termed acoustic inertial confinement fusion since the inertia of the collapsing bubble wall confines the energy, causing an extreme rise in temperature. The high temperatures that sonoluminescence can produce raise the possibility that it might be a means to achieve thermonuclear fusion.

No wonder the air is expelled at supersonic speeds.

Jumped the shark (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30814658)

Slashdot has officially jumped the shark with this splashing story. Really, who gives a toss?

Re:Jumped the shark (1)

JWSmythe (446288) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814734)

Ummmm, it jumped the shark a few years ago. We just hang out here out of morbid curiosity. Kinda like watching the last few years of the Cosby show. Oh wait, that one bit it on the pilot. We only watched for one reason [youtube.com] (warning, video acid trip).

Re:Jumped the shark (1)

MRe_nl (306212) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815344)

Well, one could allways skip the article...

ps Lisa Bonet.

Re:Jumped the shark (1)

MadnessASAP (1052274) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814936)

I do, really I'm quite fascinated by stuff like this.

Re:Jumped the shark (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30815000)

Wow, it's unfathomable how many replies are misunderstanding the parent.

Re:Jumped the shark (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30818084)

says a lot about PRL too.

tossing stones in the lake and detecting cloaking devices are what get you an impact factor of 7?

The two papers aren't identical (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30814684)

It's funny that the APS wants to charge non-subscribers $25 to download what is available for free on the arXiv.

Funny or not, there are actually a few differences between the papers.

Re:The two papers aren't identical (2, Funny)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 4 years ago | (#30816040)

Yep, one costs you 25, the other diddly squat.

Re:The two papers aren't identical (2, Insightful)

tenco (773732) | more than 4 years ago | (#30818878)

One costs you 25$ and was reviewed by peers, the other not.

Make you a deal... (4, Funny)

djupedal (584558) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814690)

If you promise not to mess with the nature of my nozzle's highly dynamic collapsing nozzle-structure, I won't mess with yours - unless you want me to, of course, in which case I would expect to be able to count on reciprocity.

I think that's only fair, I mean, especially given that we just met and all. Let's just hope your nozzle hasn't been anywhere unseemly lately. I hate unseemly nozzles and I have no use for any with a rather static collapsing nozzle-structure, as I'm sure most people do. yuck....

Looks like we elected the wrong guy (5, Funny)

Trepidity (597) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814722)

Imagine what the U.S.'s technology leadership could've been like if we had put a President in the White House who truly understood [youtube.com] this kind of cutting-edge science.

Re:Looks like we elected the wrong guy (1)

kandela (835710) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814788)

Yeah, he made quite a splash!

Re:Looks like we elected the wrong guy (2, Insightful)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815832)

Wow, you posted the link to a youtube video and now slashdotters are starting to post over there. Check out this comment for example, made about an hour ago:

Wait, what? Some "people" will spend $15 to $20 for the tickets to sit through 'Butterfly Effect,' 'The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy' and 'Shrek' but still make themselves known to Big Brother as unclear on such a plain and simple concept as we have in this video? OK, put the cell phone down and step away from the 'candy.'

Notice these signs:

* The implication that all other people are stupider than the poster.
* Talking about geeky movies
* Vastly over-estimating the value of a movie ticket, showing this person never actually goes to the theater, because he has no friends and just downloads all the movies he or she watches.
* Totally out of place comment
* Exaggerated, unexplainable paranoia about big brother.
* Referring to 'drugs' in terms that no one who actually is on drugs uses.

Strangely, somehow even the slashdotters on youtube get more stupid.

Re:Looks like we elected the wrong guy (1)

Cassius Corodes (1084513) | more than 4 years ago | (#30816096)

Not the poster but in Australia movie tickets cost $15 for a standard ticket - more ritzier set-ups go as high as $30. What is the cost in the US and elsewhere? Are we getting ripped off?

Re:Looks like we elected the wrong guy (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 4 years ago | (#30816108)

I expect to spend about $10 USD when I go to the theater. Don't know how that relates to the Australian dollar, but I know the exchange rates have been fluctuating a lot lately.

Re:Looks like we elected the wrong guy (1)

NitroWolf (72977) | more than 4 years ago | (#30817010)

Not the poster but in Australia movie tickets cost $15 for a standard ticket - more ritzier set-ups go as high as $30. What is the cost in the US and elsewhere? Are we getting ripped off?

It depends on what theater you go to...

Standard tickets are $5 - $7 for matinee, then you have prime time which usually runs $7 - $10. We are starting to see a lot more premium theaters that have suites and recliners, restaurants, etc... and those tickets are $15 - $20 each. I pay for the suites which are $20 a piece because, well, it's worth it and they give you "free" $7.50 in food, so the ticket is really only $12.50 if you plan on ordering something anyway... and no one under 18 is allowed. It's much more pleasant in the theater. Oh and there's only like 30 seats in the suite theaters. Worth the premium IMHO and the seats are comfortable. And they bring you food/snacks. Free refills on drinks, too.

Re:Looks like we elected the wrong guy (1)

pjt33 (739471) | more than 4 years ago | (#30819498)

I saw Avatar in 3D in Spain for a bit less than the equivalent of 15 AUD. Normal tickets are about 75% of that.

Re:Looks like we elected the wrong guy (1)

aug24 (38229) | more than 4 years ago | (#30817676)

I like the way he quoted the word people. What are they really? I suggest that he or she must be on some kind of drugs. Possibly Ritalin.

Verrry Interesting (2, Funny)

denmarkw00t (892627) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814724)

Neat! I want to see what that cone looks like as it develops, in super-slow motion.

Offtopic: I can't reply to the Racist Facial thread - all the Reply buttons are missing in both Camino and Firefox, and obviously I can post this thread. What gives?

Re:Verrry Interesting (2, Interesting)

shams42 (562402) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815858)

Offtopic: I can't reply to the Racist Facial thread - all the Reply buttons are missing in both Camino and Firefox, and obviously I can post this thread. What gives?

You must not be of Slashdot's preferred race...

Re:Verrry Interesting (1)

WhatAmIDoingHere (742870) | more than 4 years ago | (#30816000)

It's probably because the story is old.

How ARXIV and PRL work together (5, Informative)

imsabbel (611519) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814748)

Just some pieces of info for people who might not know:

Nowadays, all the major publishers dont have an issue if you post a prepring on arxiv, prl included.
If you want to get a preprint out, the procedure is as follows:

1) You put something on arxiv and submit it to PRL.
2) After a few weeks/months, you get your referee reports.
3) Then you revise it, and update your arxiv version.
4) Paper gets accepted. Paper is entering the editorial process, and you get proofs.
  -> at this point, APS has contributed to the paper. The specific version proofed by PRL can no longer be uploaded to ARXIV /etc.
5) Final corrections, ready to print.

Nowadays, the proof and setting part is relatively minor. Most likely you will have written it in RevTex, and have PDF figures, so its an no issue.
But they still allow you to send them the text in word and the figures in phyical form (ink drawing, whatever), if you are really interested in it not getting published quickly.

So for most issues, a paper on Arxiv might be 99.9% identical to the final published paper, and only diiffer by the editorial issues. But you cannot know it. It might also represent a state from before the peer review.

Re:How ARXIV and PRL work together (2, Insightful)

skine (1524819) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815366)

My impression of the system is:

1) Hey, respectable journal! Here's my paper. You own it now. Please publish it?

2) Journal either publishes it, or doesn't. Either way, they own your paper and pay you nothing.

3) You want to spread the information, so you post it for free on the internet. This is a breach of copyright, but the Journal doesn't really care because the same number of people will buy the magazines regardless.

Re:How ARXIV and PRL work together (2, Insightful)

Krahar (1655029) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815586)

In my experience you only hand over copyright AFTER the paper has been accepted for publication, and you ARE allowed to post preprints on the internet. What you are not allowed to do is to take the final PDF that the paper prints and distribute it, even if it is word-for-word identical other than editorial changes.

Re:How ARXIV and PRL work together (2, Insightful)

Interoperable (1651953) | more than 4 years ago | (#30816116)

I think that's correct. You can generate a pdf of the exact article that the journal has and distribute it freely because you retain the rights to the content. The exact formatting, however, is copyrighted exclusively by the journal so you can't distribute the pdf you get from their website.

Re:How ARXIV and PRL work together (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815796)

I agree with the other replier. When I published [scientificcommons.org] some physics papers with my PhD adviser, we wrote the papers first, put them on the Arxiv, then looked for a place to publish the papers. We didn't actually hand over copyright till the papers were accepted.

Re:How ARXIV and PRL work together (2, Interesting)

Interoperable (1651953) | more than 4 years ago | (#30816094)

No, copyright transfer is very odd for journals. The author retains the right to print the article for personal distribution (you can always find a pdf on the author's website) and distribution of pre-prints is fine. I believe that the journal does hold the copyright, but certain exceptions are included in the transfer paperwork so there's no breach of copyright. Furthermore, images can be usually copied with consent of the author, not the journal (except art supplied by the journal, such as covers).

You can't make a copy of the journal article, but the author can make one for you and send it to you. It's an odd system, but journals are very concerned about their "impact factor," the average number of times that an article in that journal gets cited by other articles. Free distribution of articles helps get citations, which increases the impact factor. Journals just don't want people to freely copy the entire contents of the journal. In any case, they make most of their money by selling site subscriptions to universities.

Re:How ARXIV and PRL work together (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30816362)

While I get the impression that some journals in other disciplines are more flexible about the timeline of handing over the copyright of the article, Biology journals, especially the top ones, are sticklers for having the copyright up front. In many of them I have submitted/published in (e.g. PNAS), each had a copyright transfer agreement that prevented outside publication. Some, like the PLoS journals, are nicer since they are always open-access. But I still believe they have some explicit guarantee from you that you won't publish the article anywhere else as to guarantee themselves traffic.

Moreover, some top journals (i.e. Nature and the like), have "embargoes" on when you can even talk about your work to a news organization. Not only do they control the article, they control the complete release of the story as well.

Re:How ARXIV and PRL work together (1)

tsa (15680) | more than 4 years ago | (#30817576)

Don't forget the journal usually charges you 100 US$ per page for publishing it.

Re:How ARXIV and PRL work together (1)

kandela (835710) | more than 4 years ago | (#30818876)

Only if you want colour.

Re:How ARXIV and PRL work together (3, Informative)

jschen (1249578) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815778)

Nowadays, all the major publishers dont have an issue if you post a prepring on arxiv, prl included.

True in some fields, but not all. The two biggest chemistry journals, Angewandte Chemie and Journal of the American Chemical Society, both do not allow submission of communications for which preprints have been released. One also can't submit it elsewhere at the same time. (One can, though, submit a paper to either journal after another journal has already declined to publish it.) As for the major multidisplinary journals, Nature allows publication of preprints. Science does not.

Re:How ARXIV and PRL work together (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30816518)

Access to the PRL article is actually free, if the article is accessed via the APS Physics web page that contains a nice commentary by Daniel Lathrop:

http://physics.aps.org/viewpoint-for/10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.024501

Re:How ARXIV and PRL work together (1)

prograde (1425683) | more than 4 years ago | (#30819740)

There's a quicktime movie showing the reversal of the air stream [aps.org] in the Supplemental Material of the PRL site.

It's pretty cool, and I couldn't find it on arxiv. Boy, I love being a student again and having free access to journal subscriptions!

Where are the visualizations? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30814798)

After I RTFA I was all excited to see some cool video simulation or animations of this effect....

Re:Where are the visualizations? (1)

PhilHibbs (4537) | more than 4 years ago | (#30817340)

There are these footnotes but I can't find the video

[18] See EPAPS Document No. 1 for a description of the experimental method. For more information on EPAPS, see http://www.aip.org/pubservs/epaps.html [aip.org] .
[19] See EPAPS Document No. 2 for a movie of the smoke visualization.

PT Barnum (2, Insightful)

v1 (525388) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814810)

It's funny that the APS wants to charge non-subscribers $25 to download what is available for free on the arXiv.

If there's somebody stupid enough to pay for it, there's always somebody smart enough to charge for it.

Economic Darwinism hard at work, parting fools from their money since before 5,000 BC.

Re:PT Barnum (1)

LihTox (754597) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815236)

They charge $25/paper so that university libraries will continue to pay for full access for their users. If the papers were free, libraries could stop subscribing to the journals and the funding would dry up. As it is, I doubt that very many people pay the $25; at least I hope not. If any are, I suggest becoming acquainted with the nearest university library (and if you're a scholar, even an unemployed/underemployed one, try to become affiliated with the appropriate department of a local college or university. While I was teaching at a community college a couple years ago, I was also a Research Assistant Professor at the local university-- no salary, but I got a grand title and, more importantly, checkout and online-periodical privileges at the campus library.)

Re:PT Barnum (1)

Interoperable (1651953) | more than 4 years ago | (#30816124)

Usually a trip to the author's website will serve to get you pdf generated from the same source sent to the journal. If not, e-mail the author; they love it when people read their work.

$25 (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30814824)

It's funny that the APS wants to charge non-subscribers $25 to download what is available for free on the arXiv.

It's not that funny - the version subscribers can download from the APS has, amongst other things, a guarantee that it has had at least one cursory review. While it is true that the arxiv also filters out almost all spam and quite a few of the crackpot submissions, it is still chock-full of total bullshit. Say what you like about APS being the "accepts anyone" whore of the scientific community, the arxiv does not review submissions and probably never well.

Add to this the fact that the vast majority of people reading grabbing papers directly from the APS site will have either individual or institutional membership, thereby paying somewhere between $1 and $0.001 per paper, and you can hopefully see that the APS is not trying to rip people off or make everyone miserable. I imagine they're registered non-profit...

Re:$25 (1)

petermgreen (876956) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815214)

you can hopefully see that the APS is not trying to rip people off or make everyone miserable.
What I guess they are doing is trying to drive people to subscribe rather than buying single articles by making the single article price stupidly high.

Subscriptions have a number of advantages for a publisher

1: it provides a more steady stream of income. In general stability is good especially for a smaller buisness or a nonprofit.
2: people may keep paying even if they no longer really need the subscription. People will only pay on a per article basis if it's something that really matters to them.
3: gathering the payments into fewer larger transactions mean less of the money the customer pays goes to the the financial institutions.
4: by encouraging insitution wide subscriptions they can get money from central university budgets rather than individual research budgets.

Testing Process (5, Funny)

KneelBeforeZod (1527235) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814848)

I'd love to see the testing process for this.

Tries 1 - 100

1. Plop
2. Plunk
3. Plunk
4. Bloop
5. Plunk ....

Give me a grant!

Viscosity Changes the Sound Too (5, Funny)

Tisha_AH (600987) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814914)

My younger brother discovered a key principle of the viscosity of fluids when he was 12 years old. He and his friend decided to drop a gigantic boulder down the center hole of an outhouse, they were standing over the "opening" to see the effect.

I imagine the sound was much "deeper" but their screams were really high.

It was a 2 mile walk to the nearest running water for them, our camping trips were never the same after that.

Re:Viscosity Changes the Sound Too (4, Interesting)

mikael (484) | more than 4 years ago | (#30816268)

A similar event happened during the construction of the London flood barrier. For some reason, a large amount of material had to be dumped into the river Thames. This might have been cement or just rubble for part of the underground foundations. It was anticipated that this process might generate some sort of pressure wave that would travel at high speed through the water. Thus a warning was given not to be in the river or close any storm drains at this time. Unfortunately, this warning was not received by a particular tenant of an old apartment block which had one end of their combined storm drain/sewer overflow submerged in the river. Minutes after the construction process had begun there was a complaint through the telephone lines that the tenant in question had just stood up in their bathroom, when the toilet had erupted in a geyser that went everywhere.

This was from the same construction company that attempted to fill in a deep hole in the River Thames with liquid cement, only to find that they had filled in someone's basement / underground car park.

Re:Viscosity Changes the Sound Too (1)

squidfood (149212) | more than 4 years ago | (#30816330)

Teachable moments are so rare.

oh god, I need more coffee... (0, Offtopic)

AresTheImpaler (570208) | more than 4 years ago | (#30814928)

I read the title as "The weird Science of Tossing Salad"

Re:oh god, I need more coffee... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30815150)

I just stopped reading after "The Weird Science of Tossing"

My browser cut of the title. (1)

mjwx (966435) | more than 4 years ago | (#30816486)

All I got was, "The Weird Science of Tossing" and thought you could get a grant for any kind of wankery these days.

Sink (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30815020)

UPON SINKING: The sinked shall yell "I sank it!" or something equally as thoughtful.

Fluid Dynamics (-1, Offtopic)

pipingguy (566974) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815080)

The more important question is: is it better to flush the toilet with the lid closed or with it open? I'm thinking about the quantity of residual feces and urine deposited on my toothbrush.

In theory, keeping the lid closed may cause an increased air suction effect into the bowl and, as a result, increased atomization of liquid-agitated turds into the bathroom environment as it shoots out from the smaller openings created between the lid and the porcelain.

Anything that results in less shit in my mouth is OK with me.

Re:Fluid Dynamics (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30815136)

It's the quality that counts!

Re:Fluid Dynamics (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30815454)

If you can smell it, you are picking up some of its particles... but there have been studies with dyes that show during flushing, some water will hit the ceiling directly above the toilet.

Re:Fluid Dynamics (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30815610)

While you were seriously offtopic, man has invented a solution for your ridiculous problem that only costs about 4 cents to produce, including manufacturing and shipping (at least in bulk).

Its called a toothbrush cover. Damn, how do scientist come up with these completely useless things designed to sucker money out of the kind of people who worry about spiders laying eggs in bananas, but only the top, so they cut the top off?

No wait, that's marketing.

Smoke on the water (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815298)

Cool technique. I wonder if they played "Smoke on the water" in the background ;P~~~

profound (1)

codepunk (167897) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815490)

How Profound:The high air speeds are shown to result from the "nozzle" being a liquid cavity shrinking rapidly in time.

Re:profound (1)

AniVisual (1373773) | more than 4 years ago | (#30817020)

Remember, the cavity is closing up in 3 dimensions while the air has only one direction in which to escape. Rather than profound, it is an interesting phenomenon, and can possibly have some practical usage.

lol (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30815516)

I read that as "The Weird Science of Shoving Greased Up Yoda Dolls Up My Ass"

You forgot the name of the scientist! (2, Funny)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#30815638)

For anyone who cares: Her name was: Amélie Poulain.

___
*Waiting for the about 3 french female geeks who get it* ;)

Re:You forgot the name of the scientist! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30816282)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amelie [wikipedia.org]

IANEFOF (I am neither Female nor French)

What I observe (1)

OneSmartFellow (716217) | more than 4 years ago | (#30817376)

1.) When the ball reaches the fluid it momentarily stops
2.) Just as the balls is completely below the fluid line it appears to stop again
3.) As the ball travels through the fluid, the INNER wall of separated fluid remains surprisingly straight for a surprisingly long period of time, yet the OUTER wall appears to be in constant motion
4.) Just before the ejected column of fluid collapses, a bright flash (a bubble perhaps) appears within the 'dome' of the ejection. This appears to change in intensity, becoming brightest just before the column collapses.


I'd like these particular events explained: e.g. The balls apparent momentary stop as it reaches the surface.

Re:What I observe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30821842)

When the ball reaches the fluid it momentarily stops

I can't tell if you are being serious or making a joke about some animation or video you saw. A ball dropped into water doesn't stop. I've never even seen it appear to stop.

The big question (1)

smorar (520638) | more than 4 years ago | (#30817944)

So, the big question is: when will the first computer game that features realistic water splashes be released?

For example (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30818740)

I took this over the holiday break while bored:

http://links.cse.msu.edu:8000/members/matt_gerber/images/a/ac/Thumbtack.jpg

There's *always* been a lottery (1)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | more than 4 years ago | (#30837790)

Lottery in June. Corn come soon....

Air go, Kerplunk! (1)

EricTheO (973140) | more than 4 years ago | (#30840312)

This explains the "Kerplunk" sound of a softball or slightly larger sized rock dropped into water. It's the initial splash "Ker" and the collapsing cone "Plunk".

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