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Facebook Master Password Was "Chuck Norris"

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the ad-nauseum-roundhouse dept.

Privacy 319

I Don't Believe in Imaginary Property writes "A Facebook employee has given a tell-all interview with some very interesting things about Facebook's internals. Especially interesting are all the things relating to Facebook privacy. Basically, you don't have any. Nearly everything you've ever done on the site is recorded into a database. While they fire employees for snooping, more than a few have done it. There's an internal system to let them log into anyone's profile, though they have to be able to defend their reason for doing so. And they used to have a master password that could log into any Facebook profile: 'Chuck Norris.' Bruce Schneier might be jealous of that one."

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319 comments

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Chuck Norris... (4, Insightful)

thewils (463314) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850096)

doesn't need a password.

Re:Chuck Norris... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850114)

doesn't need a password.

But us mere mortals must invoke his name to access his powers.

Re:Chuck Norris... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850118)

Will he brute force his way in?

Re:Chuck Norris... (1, Insightful)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850194)

Haha, now THAT one is actually clever.

Re:Chuck Norris... (4, Insightful)

electricbern (1222632) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850490)

That joke is so clever you get modded insightful for calling it clever. It had to be about Chuck Norris.

Re:Chuck Norris... (1)

InlawBiker (1124825) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850342)

Good one. Replying to remove my mistaken Overrated.

Re:Chuck Norris... (5, Funny)

Eric52902 (1080393) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850792)

^ Chuck Norris must have gotten to him

Re:Chuck Norris... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30851042)

No, Chuck Norris is the password.

Re:Chuck Norris... (5, Funny)

Em Emalb (452530) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850126)

In Soviet Russia, passwords ask for Chuck Norris.

Re:Chuck Norris... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850140)

Chuck Norris types in his name as the Username and a program never has the chance to ask for a Password.

Re:Chuck Norris... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850144)

123456 [slashdot.org]

Re:Chuck Norris... (4, Funny)

Zarf (5735) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850166)

Chuck Norris doesn't need a password, he just round-house kicks the keyboard into submission.

Re:Chuck Norris... (1)

coyotetwilightstudio (1499291) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850632)

The real password here is the Chuck Norris Roundhouse kick to the Face..book to gain access.

Re:Chuck Norris... (0)

mukund (163654) | more than 3 years ago | (#30851044)

Bender doesn't *need* to drink.

Lulz (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850108)

A privatized social networking site does not actually give you any privacy. Surprise!!!

Unhackable (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850130)

Chuck Norris is unhackable thats the perfect password.

Not the master password (5, Funny)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850132)

It's not Facebook's fault: it's not like they actually set the master password to "Chuck Norris".

The real WTF is that "Chuck Norris" works as a password into anything: Facebook, your online bank account, your sister's pants...

Re:Not the master password (3, Insightful)

hansamurai (907719) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850204)

My pants...

this is idle, right?

Re:Not the master password (1)

Zarf (5735) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850240)

Try this when attempting to enter a club. When the bouncer denies you entry point and say, "Chuck Norris" while he is cowering for his life enter the club.

Re:Not the master password (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850392)

relatedly, -your- sister's pants don't need a password at all to access

Re:Not the master password (1)

sunking2 (521698) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850406)

This is revealed in the extended edition of Sneakers.

Re:Not the master password (1)

goontz (1441623) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850872)

More importantly, why do you want the password to your own sister's pants?

Re:Not the master password (1)

krou (1027572) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850920)

your sister's pants...

Please tell me you didn't use this line to get into your sister's pants ...

But it only works ... (3, Insightful)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 3 years ago | (#30851004)

The real WTF is that "Chuck Norris" works as a password into anything: Facebook, your online bank account, your sister's pants...

But it only works for Chuck Norris.

Reason #2378238 not to be on Facebook (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850138)

Like you need another reason?

True story.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850696)

A friend of mine was at a party. She wasn't drinking but others were. Anyway, it was a long table and she was in the middle. When the waitress came by, she was passing shots down to the others. At one point she had two shots in her hand. Of course, that's when someone took a photo of the group and TADA! My friend is now on another friend's Facebook page with two shots in her hand.

She's worried that a potential employer will see that and think she's some sort of party animal and is trying to get her friend to take it off of their Facebook page. She's already getting some ribbing from folks who've seen the picture.

Re:True story.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850960)

Disable tagging of yourself in photos. It's not too difficult to do (fairly obvious in privacy settings, though you do have to use a custom setting), and then you're much, much harder to find images of. Strictly speaking people can still tag you, and you can find tagged photos of yourself, but no one else can.

Re:True story.... (1)

Itninja (937614) | more than 3 years ago | (#30851138)

Really? Because I just Googled you [google.com] on Facebook and found all kinds of images. Check. Mate.

Re:True story.... (2, Insightful)

VJ42 (860241) | more than 3 years ago | (#30851172)

What company would decide not to employ you for having a drink at a party in your own time? Seriously, here in the UK when we talk about what we did on the weekend at the office more than one of my bosses has to going out and getting absolutely hammered. If they saw that picture, it would only prove that your friend is a sociable person that likes to have fun; i.e. someone that will also have a sense of humour around the office. What's wrong with that?

Re:Reason #2378238 not to be on Facebook (1)

FlyingBishop (1293238) | more than 3 years ago | (#30851126)

Summary is a troll. The password was not plaintext (ok, l33t isn't that much more secure.) Just the same, the summary is a troll because this password only works if you're logged in at Facebook HQ - so basically it's like a database password. There's no real reason to secure this any more zealously than you would a database password, because it's just as secure. If someone's in a position to use the Chuck Norris password, they've already broken Facebook's security, or they are responsible for Facebook in some manner.

SHOCKER (4, Insightful)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850152)

Nearly everything you've ever done on the site is recorded into a database

Considering nearly everything you ever do on Facebook is made public to either your friends or everybody - thats not shocking at all. The entire system is basically built around informing everybody of everything you do. You can't even perform an action without some app or another prompting you "Do you want to post this on your profile? YES/NO".

And for those of you wondering, it's obvious what the new password is;

The only man to have ever beaten Chuck Norris? Bruce Lee.

Re:SHOCKER (1)

flappinbooger (574405) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850622)

Come on, it's not Bruce Lee. Bruce Lee is dead. The new password MUST be Jack Bauer.

Close but no cigar. (1)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 3 years ago | (#30851130)

Come on, it's not Bruce Lee. Bruce Lee is dead. The new password MUST be Jack Bauer.

Close but no cigar.

"Jack Bauer" might work for physical access. But for password access to databases and encrypted files it's "Chloe O'Brian".

Re:SHOCKER (1)

osu-neko (2604) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850798)

The only man to have ever beaten Chuck Norris? Bruce Lee.

Wow, they must both have been spectacular actors to pull off that flight of fantasy... ;)

There's funny... (3, Insightful)

DeadPixels (1391907) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850176)

There's funny, and then there's irresponsible. Having "Chuck Norris" as a master password that grants access to any account is most definitely the latter. I would expect that from a couple of teenagers running their first web server, not one of the most popular websites on the Internet.

There is a time and a place for silly HTML comments or in-joke variable names, but a master password for a site with hundreds of millions of users is not one of them.

Re:There's funny... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850252)

Got something to hide?

Re:There's funny... (1)

godrik (1287354) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850300)

What a great idea. Since I have notthing to hide, let just not use password online. I'll just say "Hey that's me" to the website and it will let me in. Sounds perfect!

Re:There's funny... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850318)

Your making one large assumption there, that face book is more important than a teenagers first website.

Just because it has millions of users doesn't make it important, that site is essentially a recording of all the teenage girl conversations on the planet...aka, the most worthless data ever.

Re:There's funny... (1)

praxis (19962) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850760)

Not to people that want to sell useless things teenage girls don't really need to teenage girls.

Re:There's funny... (5, Insightful)

coastal984 (847795) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850330)

There's funny, and then there's irresponsible. Having "Chuck Norris" as a master password that grants access to any account is most definitely the latter. I would expect that from a couple of teenagers running their first web server, not one of the most popular websites on the Internet. But Facebook WAS a couple of teenagers running a web server (He was 19 when FB launched)... and it grew. Not that I don't disagree with it being irresponsible, I'm just saying...

Re:There's funny... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850348)

The thing is Facebook, in essence, started out as a couple of college dropouts running their first social network... pretty much the same thing.

Re:There's funny... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850362)

I'm pretty sure it was only accessible within their own network and not publicly accessible to the outside world and it was used for debugging and such. Now they can just hit a button to login as if they were anyone on the system.

Re:There's funny... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850396)

If you read the article, the "master password" wasn't really a master password. It only worked if you were in the Facebook offices on one of their computers. And if you had access to that, you almost certainly had access to the database too.

Re:There's funny... (1)

praxis (19962) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850888)

I would certainly hope that physical access to one of their office desktops would not get you access to production live databases.

Also, there's a reason to set a password to begin with. Sometimes you want multiple layers of security. For example, sure you can only log into arbitrary profiles from inside their network, that makes sense, but do you really want everyone on that network to have that ability. Every single employee? What about visitors using their WiFi? What about contracted employees, say cleaners, that see an unlocked desktop session, should they have the ability to log into anyone's profile?

On the other hand, it's Facebook. The site exists so that you can share with the world anything you want about yourself. I don't think there was ever any expectation of privacy. I mean, you are giving up personal information to a corporation whose motive is profit, for whom there is no verification that they do with your data what their policy says they will do. Perhaps you can get some "justice" after the fact if it comes to light that they violated the privacy policy they publish, but you certainly get no rights to audit them. Anyhow, that's not my point, I'm rambling.

My point is: it was still a master password, and having a secure one is still wise. They were (are?) unwise.

Re:There's funny... (5, Informative)

carvell (764574) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850400)

The default password only worked from the Facebook office on the Facebook ISP.

Re:There's funny... (1)

Gordo_1 (256312) | more than 3 years ago | (#30851100)

And as we know, no hacker has ever owned a system inside a company before.

Re:There's funny... (5, Informative)

Rary (566291) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850402)

There's funny, and then there's irresponsible. Having "Chuck Norris" as a master password that grants access to any account is most definitely the latter. I would expect that from a couple of teenagers running their first web server, not one of the most popular websites on the Internet.

Despite what the summary and title say, the password was not "Chuck Norris". The password was a combination of uppercase letters, lowercase letters, numbers, and symbols that essentially spelled "Chuck Norris". In other words, probably something like "(hu(|<N0rr15". Also, it only worked from within the Facebook office, and was only known to certain individuals. It's not like you or I could have used the password from home to enter anyone's account.

There is a time and a place for silly HTML comments or in-joke variable names, but a master password for a site with hundreds of millions of users is not one of them.

It's pretty normal for support personnel to have access to production systems in order to provide support.

Re:There's funny... (2, Interesting)

ThinkingInBinary (899485) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850522)

It's pretty normal for support personnel to have access to production systems in order to provide support.

Yes, but this is a childishly simple and unaccountable way to provide said access. Their current system (described in the article) where you hit "Switch login", you have to justify your action, and it is logged, is much better, although I hope it is restricted only to employees who have an active need to switch to other users' profiles, and approved beforehand for anyone else who needs to use it.

Re:There's funny... (2, Insightful)

Rary (566291) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850608)

Yes, but this is a childishly simple and unaccountable way to provide said access.

Considering Facebook logs everything, I wouldn't describe this as "unaccountable". I'm sure it's not that difficult to track who did what and when. In fact, the interview discusses cases where people who abused it were tracked down and fired.

It's not the best system, but that's exactly why they replaced it. It did the job for a while, then they introduced a better system. That's how things usually work.

Re:There's funny... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30851108)

Inquiry, how do you know this? You from facebook?

Re:There's funny... (4, Informative)

Ma8thew (861741) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850412)

RTFA. Firstly, it wasn't just "Chuck Norris", the interviewee didn't reveal the actual password, but suggested it included numbers and symbols. And secondly, it only worked within Facebook's internal network.

Re:There's funny... (3, Interesting)

kevinNCSU (1531307) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850452)

It's probably worth noting that it could only be used from Facebook's internal network. Not that it wasn't still a risk to privacy, but not quite as bad as it sounds at first pass.

Re:There's funny... (2, Insightful)

Gudeldar (705128) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850464)

That is a false dichotomy. It is both very irresponsible and funny.

Re:There's funny... (2, Interesting)

mea37 (1201159) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850500)

Yeah, that's why you should probably not rely on the summary to be accurate.

  1. The password was not 'Chuck Norris'. It was a combination of letters, numbers, and symbols that, were you to see them typed out, would "look like" it said Chuck Norris. Like maybe they replaced the o with a zero, or a *, or something else. Maybe the N was an N, an n, a series of symbols like /\/... no idea.

    In other words, they used a lengthy password (presumably at least 11 characters) with a mix of alphanumerics and symbols and a simple mnemonic that would allow anyone who had seen the password to remember it. That sounds pretty damned good to me.

  2. This is a deprecated access mechanism. As the service grew up to be a "site with hundreds of millions of users", they got rid of it. I don't mean they chagned the password; they threw out the ability to use such a password entirely, having replaced it with an audited feature of the app when viewed on their internal network.
  3. Even when this password worked, you had to be on their network to use it. It filled an administrative and technical need. The only problem I see with this approach, especially when the site was small and didn't know how big it would be, was that they apparently didn't have much control to prevent an employee from stumbing on the password.

I have a dim view of the "privacy" of information on FaceBook, but this story isn't even a blip on that radar. If you don't already know that information you post to a social networking site is available to the company that runs that site, you need to wake up.

Re:There's funny... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850510)

It was a complicated l33tspeak representation of Chuck Norris, which was only usable from the Facebook offices and which caused additional logging.

To my mind, perfectly reasonable as such access is necessary for testing and troubleshooting.

The only WTF (and not a huge one) is that deleted messages are kept around indefinitely.

Re:There's funny... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850526)

Still uses more letters than fred which was the most common password among IT types in the 70s 80s and 90s.

Re:There's funny... (1)

Moridineas (213502) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850626)

RTFM...it's a good bit more complicated. Along with being deprecated sometime before now, the password was not just "Chuck Norris" but bore some resemblance to Chuck Norris including non-alphanumeric, numbers, different cases, etc. Maybe Chuck Norris wasn't a great source word, but I highly doubt from the description in the article there was any danger.

I feel that overall, it's a pretty good way to come up with passwords. For instance, take your pets name and childhood phone number, replace some letters with symbols, mix them up in a memorable way and chances are you've got a pretty decent password.

Fido + 424-5566 could be

424@f1D0#5566

Maybe not a perfect password by randomness standards etc, but orders of magnitude better than MOST passwords. And, perhaps most importantly, memorable to the person who made it, and can easily be extended in length.

Re:There's funny... (1)

praxis (19962) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850968)

and can easily be extended in length.

Are there passwords that are difficult to extend in legth?

Re:There's funny... (0, Redundant)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850650)

To be fair it wasn't "Chuck Norris" but used a combination of symbols, numbers and letters to spell that out in some way and then required you to be within the network. Not ideal but not that irresponsible either. Certainly not as irresponsible as putting your whole life onto Facebook.

Chuck Norris Jokes (0)

Psychotic_Wrath (693928) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850178)

Alright lets hear the chuck Norris Jokes! I wanna see some good ones

Re:Chuck Norris Jokes (4, Funny)

maxume (22995) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850254)

So this guy shot Chuck Norris in the face with a shotgun, and then he ended up in prison, because murder is illegal.

Re:Chuck Norris Jokes (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850314)

I think you meant because suicide is illegal.

Re:Chuck Norris Jokes (1)

Lemmy Caution (8378) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850556)

Actually, as it is, it's the best joke ever.

Re:Chuck Norris Jokes (2, Funny)

berashith (222128) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850454)

that prison's name was Chuck Norris

Re:Chuck Norris Jokes (1)

MasterPatricko (1414887) | more than 3 years ago | (#30851050)

So this guy shot Chuck Norris in the face with a shotgun, and then he ended up in prison, because murder is illegal.

I'm cracking up over this one. Please, please, noone fix it.

Re:Chuck Norris Jokes (1)

Em Emalb (452530) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850334)

Chuck Norris doesn't leave a room.

He lingers like a curry fart.

Re:Chuck Norris Jokes (-1, Troll)

Gizzmonic (412910) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850736)

2004 called, it wants its meme back.

Re:Chuck Norris Jokes (1)

Em Emalb (452530) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850898)

Nineteen frigging 80 called, it wants to apologize for foisting David Spade on us.

The facebooks master password was NOT Chuck Norris (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850190)

It just so happens that every computer system everywhere on the planet at all times can be rooted with the Chuck Norris password, given its infinite power.

TFA accuracy? (4, Insightful)

carvell (764574) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850308)

Rumpus: When you say “click on somebody’s profile,” you mean you save our viewing history?

Employee: That’s right. How do you think we know who your best friends are? But that’s public knowledge; we’ve explicitly stated that we record that. If you look in your type-ahead search, and you press “A,” or just one letter, a list of your best friends shows up. It’s no longer organized alphabetically, but by the person you interact with most, your “best friends,” or at least those whom we have concluded you are best friends with.


This is rubbish, isn't it?

I've just typed "a" into the search box and it comes up with an alphabetical list of contacts. The first one happens to be someone whos profile I don't think I've ever clicked on.

Re:TFA accuracy? (2, Interesting)

kevinNCSU (1531307) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850416)

Go to the live news feed, scroll to the bottom, and click "edit options" There you will see a "view recommended friends" button in the bottom left. This shows the list of your friends with "best friends" highlighted for you. I assume this list is built off how often you interact with these people, including how often you view their profiles.

Re:TFA accuracy? (1)

carvell (764574) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850646)

Fair enough - no hint that the highlighted friends are based on profile views though.

Plus TFA is still fundamentally inaccurate, it doesn't seem to have anything to do with the search box. Wonder where that info came from?

Re:TFA accuracy? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850428)

You don't have any friends.

Re:TFA accuracy? (1)

b4k3d b34nz (900066) | more than 3 years ago | (#30851180)

Think of someone in your friends list and search for them, and click through to their profile. Do it a few times, and at some point today or tomorrow you'll see them come up as the first result in a search.

Domain Admin (1)

igadget78 (1698420) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850346)

Well ... I found my new password.

Chuck Norris... (4, Funny)

SoundGuyNoise (864550) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850364)

...can actually type ******** into any system and login successfully.

Re:Chuck Norris... (2, Funny)

PReDiToR (687141) | more than 3 years ago | (#30851188)

Don't be silly, hunter2 hasn't worked for ages!

The very idea of a "master password" seems scary.. (5, Funny)

mi (197448) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850380)

I wonder, what it is now... "Angelina Jolie"? "Bruce Willis"?

Re:The very idea of a "master password" seems scar (1)

mea37 (1201159) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850606)

It's a shame the summary doesn't somehow provide you with access to more detailed information on the topic, like an article or something. If it did, you could read that and find out that there is no longer a master password (or at least, so they claim), as they've replaced that concept with a newer admin tool.

However, I disagree; in the context of FB, the idea of a master password is not scary.

Re:The very idea of a "master password" seems scar (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850614)

Read the article. They replaced it with a system where developers click a widget and fill in the justification for the access.

At least the don't call the Master account (1)

wiredog (43288) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850660)

something lame like "root".

Re:The very idea of a "master password" seems scar (1)

igadget78 (1698420) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850672)

I wonder, what it is now... "Angelina Jolie"? "Bruce Willis"?

Obama

Re:The very idea of a "master password" seems scar (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30851156)

I wonder, what it is now... "Angelina Jolie"? "Bruce Willis"?

Obama

|3@rry $0ter0

Re:The very idea of a "master password" seems scar (1)

krou (1027572) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850846)

They tried to change it, but once a password's been set to Chuck Norris, password changes just get fucked up.

Re:The very idea of a "master password" seems scar (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30851028)

No, they chose a really obscure washed-up has-been actor whos career has been in the gutter for quite some time: WInona Ryder, I just tried it, still works!

Re:The very idea of a "master password" seems scar (1)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | more than 3 years ago | (#30851148)

J03 pisC0p0

Like anyone's ever going to admit to using *that* as a password.

Chuck Norris is good security (5, Funny)

nilbog (732352) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850382)

At least the master password wasn't something weak like "Rick Moranis." By using Chuck Norris, you can tell Facebook was taking security seriously.

i am the Keymaster (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850520)

are you the Gatekeeper?

Chuck Norris - last post (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850666)

No, this is what happened. Chuck Norris logged into Facebook once to check it out (without having to register, of course) and when he logged out, the master password automatically set itself to his name, so that every time someone would log in using the master password, Chuck would find out about it right away, he immediately knows when someone types, writes, pronounces or even thinks his name. I should warn you to watch what you type, write, say or think, because he is omnipresent [slashdot.org] ! I have mentioned His name too many times in vain here, so this is probably my last pNO CARRIER

google has a similar set up (5, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850430)

in fact, a little known subplot in the whole drama last week over china hacking into google email servers is that chinese intel knew the master password for gmail was "chuck norris"

problem was, when the chinese spies typed chuck norris into the human rights activists' email logins, the password itself would jump off the computer screen, hit the spy with five roundhouse kicks to the face, then smash their keyboard into dust just by giving it a hard stare

so the chinese government had no other choice but to hire hackers to break into the accounts. because even when they hired seven of the greatest kung fu masters and the most proficient in the eighteen arms of wushu in all of china to stand by while the spy logged in, plus jet li, plus jackie chan, and plus the reanimated cyborg admantium zombie of bruce lee, the chuck norris password still roundhouse kicked all of them into submission

Re:google has a similar set up (1, Funny)

hymy (735785) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850724)

The password was "Chuck Nollis", you plick!

This post is full of Win.... (0)

Orleron (835910) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850432)

... Not
Privacy Invader FAIL

Re:This post is full of Win.... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30851048)

Win and Fail are not nouns, you fucking idiot. Go back to 4chan with the rest of the retards.

(In)security (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850486)

And based on earlier developments of today (Analysis of 32 Million Breached Passwords [slashdot.org] ), it has just been changed to 123456 or zuc123456 because we know that no one would try it now...

We Have A "Magic" Password Too (3, Insightful)

TheNinjaroach (878876) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850674)

We have a "magic" password for our internal website as well as our customer website. It's highly obscure and serves as a great tool for walking our customers through issues they have with the website, since it changes quite a bit depending on who they are. So I'm not really surprised Facebook has (had) a "magic" password, but I was pretty disappointed to read in the summary it was something as simple as "Chuck Norris." Then I read this:

I’m not going to give you the exact password, but with upper and lower case, symbols, numbers, all of the above, it spelled out ‘Chuck Norris,’ more or less.

Sounds like it was obscure enough to me. If a user just happened to be using that password they would have never known it was magic unless they thought to try it on another user id.

Re:We Have A "Magic" Password Too (1)

osu-neko (2604) | more than 3 years ago | (#30851160)

Sounds like it was obscure enough to me. If a user just happened to be using that password they would have never known it was magic unless they thought to try it on another user id.

...while sitting at a computer in Facebook's offices.

I must admit I used to work for a company that used a similar magic password, too. Ours was based on "Emperor Joshua Norton". The problem with it isn't that it's a security issue, the problem is the lack of accountability. (Well, okay, that's a security issue, too, but a different one.) Like Facebook, we eventually replaced it with a system where employees logged into their own account, then hit a button to become logged in as the customer, so they could still do exactly what they could before, but we knew who was really doing it. As an added bonus, they didn't need to remember the magic password. It turns out, a lot of people have never heard of Emperor Norton! In retrospect I guess I shouldn't have been surprised, but I was...

Chuck Norris (2, Funny)

palmerj3 (900866) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850844)

doesn't sleep.... he stalks your facebook photos

NEWSFLASH! (1)

Quai (188898) | more than 3 years ago | (#30850878)

Nearly everything you've ever done on [insert any social network] is recorded into a database!

symmetry (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30850938)

Good symmetry here... use the name of a douchebag as your password to do douchebag things.

Bruce Lee (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#30851122)

I thought it was Bruce Lee no spacings.

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