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Monitor Your Health 24x7 With the WIN Human Recorder

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the paranoia-count-high dept.

Biotech 66

kkleiner writes "Japanese venture firm WIN Human Recorder Ltd is set to bring a health monitor patch to market that is capable of keeping tabs on all your vitals. The HRS-I is a small (30mm x 30mm x 5mm) lightweight (7g) device that adheres to your chest and relays the data it collects to a computer or mobile phone via wireless connection. While the HRS-I only directly monitors electrocardiograph information, body surface temperature, and movement (via accelerometers), it can connect to sensors for heart rate, brain waves, respiration and many other important health indicators. WIN is selling the HRS-I for around ¥30,000 (~$330) and providing monitoring software for around ¥10,000 (~$110)."

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hmmm targeted advertising (1)

kallen3 (171792) | more than 4 years ago | (#30944614)

can anyone say advertiser's dream? So now they can tell what you like by heart rate, skin temp and brain waves.

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (3, Insightful)

base3 (539820) | more than 4 years ago | (#30944644)

I was thinking "health insurance company's dream."

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (3, Insightful)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 4 years ago | (#30944680)

So long as the patient has insurance. The devices would be a hypochondriac's wet dream and worst nightmare all in one.

A shrink once told me that internal organs being shown in childhood Draw-A-Person and House-tree-person test are popularly interpreted as precursors to schizophrenia.

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (2, Funny)

BrokenHalo (565198) | more than 4 years ago | (#30945136)

a hypochondriac's wet dream and worst nightmare all in one.

...or a valetudinarian's vademecum. ;-)

[A virtual beer to whoever spots the literary reference - Google probably won't find it.]

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (1)

tsa (15680) | more than 4 years ago | (#30946274)

Showoff ;)

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30964768)

This? [amazon.co.uk]

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (1)

BrokenHalo (565198) | more than 4 years ago | (#30968026)

This?

No, sorry. It's a snippet from Myles Na gCopaleen, also known as Flann O'Brien or Brian O'Nolan.

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (1)

RockDoctor (15477) | more than 4 years ago | (#30960616)

Choices, choices ... to mod you up, or to comment?

SlashDot doesn't have a "most disturbing image I've had all day" moderation option, so I'll comment instead.
Um, comment above ^^^^

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (1)

jmv (93421) | more than 4 years ago | (#30944690)

I was thinking "health insurance company's dream."

In the short term possibly, but not necessarily in the long term. Insurance is about risk and probabilities. If you know the outcome in advance, you don't need insurance.

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (3, Insightful)

uberdilligaff (988232) | more than 4 years ago | (#30945622)

If you know the outcome in advance, you don't need insurance.

...and you won't be able to get any.

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (1)

jmv (93421) | more than 4 years ago | (#30979496)

Exactly, there will be people who don't want to be insured and people the companies won't want to ensure. So zero revenue.

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (4, Insightful)

dnwq (910646) | more than 4 years ago | (#30944864)

Soon: "wear this and we'll give you a discount off your premiums"

Soon after that: "We're jacking up premiums. But don't worry, since many of our customers are wearing 24/7 monitors, they'll cancel out anyway. Don't regulate us!"

Soon after that: "Since almost everyone is willing wear the monitor to avoid paying $texas per month, we're dropping that tiny minority of holdout paranoid privacy-freaks."

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (1, Informative)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 4 years ago | (#30945312)

Soon after that: "We're jacking up premiums. But don't worry, since many of our customers are wearing 24/7 monitors, they'll cancel out anyway. Don't regulate us!"

You realize the insurance companies are making about a hundred bucks a year [the-americ...tholic.com] per subscriber, right?

That "jacking up premiums" is a function of the cost of healthcare (which is a broken market thanks to government meddling).

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (4, Insightful)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#30945514)

You realize the insurance companies are making about a hundred bucks a year per subscriber, right?

If you are trying to prove a point, the first step is choosing a neutral source not "politics and culture from a Catholic perspective". Without a valid source you prove nothing. Otherwise I can "prove" that Jews were to blame for 9/11 ( http://encyclopediadramatica.com/JEWS_DID_WTC [encycloped...matica.com] ) (link is NSFW really), the holocaust didn't happen ( http://www.666ismoney.com/HolocaustAds.html [666ismoney.com] ), oh and the "contrails" you see in the sky are really chemicals ( http://educate-yourself.org/ct/ [educate-yourself.org] ).

Whenever some site has an agenda, it usually isn't a valid source.

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30945630)

Whenever some site has an agenda, it usually isn't a valid source.

Every site has an agenda, otherwise it wouldn't exist, you moron.

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (1)

Ambiguous Coward (205751) | more than 4 years ago | (#30949496)

Apparently you never took the time to visit any geocities pages back in the day...

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30945714)

the "contrails" you see in the sky are really chemicals

Well, water is a chemical. :)

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (2, Funny)

cstdenis (1118589) | more than 4 years ago | (#30954074)

They are made of Dihydrogen monoxide

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30945518)

its a 1-way ticket to medical slavery

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (1)

ortholattice (175065) | more than 4 years ago | (#30945542)

Soon after that: "Since it monitors so much already, it won't cost much more to monitor the substances ingested by the user, so that appropriate interception can take place if necessary to help lower health costs."

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (2, Informative)

Inda (580031) | more than 4 years ago | (#30947842)

Yep, for all the good they'll do, you may as well stick 'um up your arse.

Auto insurance industry is already on it (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 4 years ago | (#30949652)

They're already doing that with cars - as if your ECU now acting like a mini flight data recorder wasn't enough, they want to put GPS tracking units in your car.

http://articles.moneycentral.msn.com/Insurance/InsureYourCar/WillYourCarRatYouOut.aspx [msn.com]

Oh and if you have bad credit the dealer may install one too:

http://blogs.computerworld.com/gps_tracking_privacy_violation [computerworld.com]

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (1)

pushing-robot (1037830) | more than 4 years ago | (#30944972)

On the other hand, I was thinking "Dead man's switch". Not that I have any use for one, but it would still be damn cool to keep around.

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (1)

ZeroExistenZ (721849) | more than 4 years ago | (#30949398)

I was thinking "health insurance company's dream."

I was thinking signal hack to see if your pickuplines have positive effect by certain bodyques, with an Android app to process it and show a realtime "fail/success" meter, upload statistics to a central server (ofcourse with target foto and the type of person failing) so you can augment reality, do a facial detection match and pull a list of moves that might work and this target is sensitive to.

Just record data, let the suckers be shot down and swoon in with a "You know, I LOVE puppies, the brand tampons you buy and that joke about bananas, like you do (based on the data we have collected)" and have it be an instant success.

Ofcourse, this is acceptable, as that information in public domain once you walk in public and are observable.

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30944746)

The amount of computing power required to implement such a plan on a vast scale is presently beyond us--hopefully. You'd have to correlate GPS info for all of the advertisements with a GPS tag in the person, and then you'd either have to monitor head position or hack the optic nerve to tell what's being looked at.

Realistically, you're being a crazy pessimist and should chill the hell out. Look at this more from a computing perspective, not a tin-foil hat one: it could seriously help save your life!

Re:hmmm targeted advertising (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30946136)

Huh? The computing power to do this is trivial. I don't know the extent of the NSA monitoring, nor am I tinfoil enough to get too paranoid about it, but live monitoring and capturing of all international (and probably most domestic) calls takes far, far more computing power than what you're describing.

Niggers niggers niggers niggers (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30944650)

Niggers niggers niggers niggers. Niggers fucking stink.

die of aids faggots! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30944702)

die and rot in the ground you rump roasters. die!

Wireless connection... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30944718)

perfect, so it gives you a tumor to monitor...

Re:Wireless connection... (0, Redundant)

s4ltyd0g (452701) | more than 4 years ago | (#30945120)

crap wanted to mod funny

Re:Wireless connection... (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#30947896)

Wait for a year. Then everybody will call it the FAIL Human Recorder.

Re:Wireless connection... (1)

lineman60 (806614) | more than 4 years ago | (#30951442)

It's not a tumor!

Cheap Polysomnograph? (1)

Guppy (12314) | more than 4 years ago | (#30944740)

I wonder if this could be used as a sort of cheap way to evaluate problems like sleep apnea. It seems to support most of the read-outs that you'd need to examine. Of course, it doesn't replace a medical evaluation, as interpretation of the results can be tricky. But, it might be a good way for someone who's uninsured to get some data.

Re:Cheap Polysomnograph? (1)

Martin Blank (154261) | more than 4 years ago | (#30944822)

Depending on the kind of EKG results this can produce, it may become a useful replacement for some of the chest-band EKGs used for 24-hour monitoring. I have a very occasional palpitation that usually only comes about in stressful times, and then only two or three times a day. It's very unpredictable, and even wearing one of the chest bands wouldn't necessarily catch it. This would be unobtrusive enough to wear for long periods to hopefully catch it.

Hell, it could even be used for games/challenges, like scoring more points the higher and more persistent the exercising heart rate. Tie it into an online system, and one might be able to get some couch potatoes moving.

Re:Cheap Polysomnograph? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30946228)

Dear Mr. Blank


Thank you for the additional information about your medical condition and history.

This additional information prompted our underwriting team to review your policy, application, and medical history again. As a result of this review, your coverage will be terminated immediately.

Thank you for the opportunity to serve you and for you helping us maintain profit^H^H^H^H^H^H premium levels.

We hope that in the future you will refer all your healthy friends and family members to us.


Sincerely,

Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield Customer Service

Re:Cheap Polysomnograph? (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 4 years ago | (#30949712)

They could even automate it so they could catch the early signs of a heart attack, terminate your policy and send out and email to inform you (with a snail mail letter behind it) before you hit the ground.

Cheap Fear (4, Insightful)

fm6 (162816) | more than 4 years ago | (#30944920)

What you would do is take the results to an MD. Lots of tests involve measurements you make yourself at home. I usually bring my doctor a record of blood pressure readings.

But there's a big problem here. This device will be sold to people who are worried about potential problems and think that if they get enough data they can know exactly what their health state is. (There's already a thriving business in "preventive" full body MRIs that cater to such folks.) They might seem like a good idea, if you can afford it, but it's not. Everybody has anomalies in their body, and too much proactive diagnosis can lead to unnecessary procedures. In some cases these procedures are more dangerous than benign neglect.

There are certainly preventive procedures that make sense. (He says hypocritically, as he puts off the colonoscopy he should have had done a year ago.) But medicine is still very much a black art, and the Star Trek model of pointing a magic gadget at somebody and knowing exactly what's going on in their body is still a fantasy — and probably always will be. So gathering tons of data about potential problems you have no reason to suspect is worse than useless.

Re:Cheap Fear (1)

psithurism (1642461) | more than 4 years ago | (#30945608)

This device will be sold to people who are worried about potential problems

I was thinking the device would mainly be sold to geeks who can never have enough data. Though this will also be a detriment to health as we see how much we can screw with them.

"Those RedBulls kicked in precisely 20minutes after chugged them: look at my heart rate right here at 1:25!"

"Hey, look at my breathing change as I accelerated at 2:37.32 PM! Tomorrow I'll jump from higher and see what that does!"

Re:Cheap Fear (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30945926)

my mom had a hemorrhagic stroke on wednesday. the cause is likely high blood pressure. she tries to keep it under control with diet, medication, and exercise. but it seems that for some reason it spiked that day. something like this would be useful in the future so that if there is a blood pressure spike again we know that she needs to take aggressive measures to bring it down.

Re:Cheap Polysomnograph? (2, Interesting)

castoridae (453809) | more than 4 years ago | (#30945014)

There might be all sorts of interesting bio-feedback applications. I was involved with a similar project about ten years ago, and one of our more interesting sessions involved connecting a number of sensors (primarily muscle tension sensors tracking electrical differentials across the skin) to the face of a trombone player who had some nerve damage on one side of his face. He couldn't really feel the "bad" side of his face, but kept adjusting until the readings looked the same as the "good" side, enabling him to play his instrument with somewhat closer to the technique he'd had before his injury/illness.

other medical monitors Now out and coming soon (4, Informative)

loose electron (699583) | more than 4 years ago | (#30944800)

This is old news, and just a variation on a theme -

As somebody who does this sort of stuff for a living - now they need to get around the IEC-60601 compliance and the FDA before they could introduce it in the USA.

http://www.devicelink.com/mddi/archive/03/09/015.html [devicelink.com] [devicelink.com]

Something similar is in the works for hospital use:

http://www.soterawireless.com/main/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=55&Itemid=18 [soterawireless.com] [soterawireless.com]

That goes out over WiFi inside a hospital.

Also - Bluetooth LE (Low Energy) is designed for this application and there are a bunch of "health monitors either int the works, or already out there for this:

    http://mobihealthnews.com/2577/continua-picks-zigbee-bluetooth-le-for-health-devices-sensors/ [mobihealthnews.com] [mobihealthnews.com]

Blood Glucose monitors using this technology have been around for a while:

http://www.dexcom.com/default.aspx [dexcom.com] [dexcom.com]

Now if you want exciting - research into electronic eyes, electronic ears and neural pacemaker for people with epilepsy are kind of interesting. Google them and you will find them.

Got your Borg Implants? :-)

Re:other medical monitors Now out and coming soon (1)

blincoln (592401) | more than 4 years ago | (#30945038)

This is old news, and just a variation on a theme

Yeah, I immediately thought of the BodyBugg (which has been around for a couple of years at least) when I saw the description. I believe that even has more sensors built in and costs less. I was considering getting one myself for awhile, until I found out that all the processing of the raw sensor data happens on the manufacturer's servers, so you are forced into subscribing to their service.

IEEE 802.15.6, too (1)

dtmos (447842) | more than 4 years ago | (#30947838)

There's also IEEE 802.15.6 [ieee802.org] , "a [developing] communication standard optimized for low power devices and operation on, in or around the human body (but not limited to humans) to serve a variety of applications including medical, consumer electronics / personal entertainment ..."

Companies interested in making on-body patches and plasters for medical applications are quite active in this group.

Like car insurance asking for mileage (1)

jhoegl (638955) | more than 4 years ago | (#30944824)

Now, to get a discount on your car insurance, they ask for mileage. Its a nice idea, if you drive less you are less at risk of getting into an accident. Or at least that is the thought.
It is a small jump to use these devices to "report your mileage" to the health insurance companies for a reduced fee. Mark this comment people, in a few years....

This is why we need a health paln and not republic (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 4 years ago | (#30945096)

This is why we need a health paln and not republican any system with out a ban on pre existing conditions is no Plan.

Re:This is why we need a health paln and not repub (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 4 years ago | (#30945300)

This is why we need a health paln and not republican any system with out a ban on pre existing conditions is no Plan.

And of course, better keyboards.

A big improvement over the first gen product .... (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30944860)

A tennis ball sized probe that was inserted rectally. The worst part was the external antenna.

The product testing... (1)

nozendo (1656053) | more than 4 years ago | (#30944868)

...hopefully wasn't done using the slashdot crowd. Imagine the embarrassment after sending it back for re-engineering 30x over only to discover the test subjects were genuinely immobile with a constant level of activity in front of a workstation for 14 hours a day.

*despair*

hmm... (1)

theblackarrow0 (1695326) | more than 4 years ago | (#30944880)

built-in lie detector anyone?? ;)

WIN? (1, Funny)

russlar (1122455) | more than 4 years ago | (#30944886)

Do the obese get their health monitored with the FAIL Human Recorder?

Re:WIN? (1)

Belial6 (794905) | more than 4 years ago | (#30945406)

Yeah, maybe this device could help prevent us from having obese people like this. [schwarzenegger.it]

Of course it's Japanese (4, Interesting)

Enleth (947766) | more than 4 years ago | (#30944916)

The Japanese are probably the single most proactive nation in the world when it comes to the aging of population and proper care of the elderly, and this invention has some very obvious uses in this field. Coupled with a caretaker robot which would remind about medicines, schedule appointments with a doctor and call emergency services as appropriate, this device might actually improve the quality of life of some people considerably. Interestingly, such robots are already being tested in Japan, and they are also designed to relay local news, play logic- and memory-based games and engage in everyday chitchat with the people under their care to delay the onset of dementia and effects of boredom.

Re:Of course it's Japanese (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30946316)

I don't think we'll see the rise of the machines, it will be a gradual process.

I imagine an old stock trader with robots that take him to the bathroom, make his food, dials his calls, etc.

The trading software basically runs itself after 80 years of him training his AI.

One day he dies, but the robots don't know that he's dead so they keep shoveling food in his mouth and dumping him in the bathroom, while his software trades stocks and his robots take care of all of his calls.

Eventually they need more help cause his software does so well, and they create a corporation to make robots just like themselves.

iPhone app compatible? (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 4 years ago | (#30944944)

Actually, I kinda like the idea of this. So long as the channel is secured with strong encryption.... But having a device log data and an application parse it for potential heart disease is a must-have application.

Been there done that (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30945160)

This was done 11 years ago but, due to the technology of the time, we used a device a little larger than a modern smart phone that recorded information. It plugged into a base station to transfer data over POTS. Once the base station connected to a medical facility over the telephone, information could be sent in real time from the device. It could do ECG, blood oximetry, heart rate, core body temperature and respiration. The base station could take blood pressure, oral temperature and weight. It all worked well.

Lawyers got involved and the system, along with the company, disappeared. Glad to see it back in a smaller wireless package -- even if it did take 11 years!

This is not the only project I've been involved with that was a decade or more ahead of it's time. I can't help but wonder how many wonderful things have been buried by litigation over the years.

IP address? (1)

belmolis (702863) | more than 4 years ago | (#30945448)

So, does each of these things want its own IP address? If so, these could accelerate adoption of IPv6.

Check out BodyMedia for this kind of monitoring (1)

foxxlf25 (672758) | more than 4 years ago | (#30945498)

BodyMedia has been the leader in making consumer usable technology to monitor 24x7. Check out www.bodymedia.com for more information. They manufacture GoWear fit, BodyMedia FIT, and the Bodybugg, They are also FDA regulated and have an accuracy of 90% for daily caloric burn and minutes of activity data.

Yeah right (1)

Snaller (147050) | more than 4 years ago | (#30945640)

Mine would be a continuous alarm tone - who could stand listening to that!

WIN Recorder? (1)

pckl300 (1525891) | more than 4 years ago | (#30945814)

I much prefer my FAIL recorder.

Huh? (1)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | more than 4 years ago | (#30946024)

Big deal. I could already buy a wristwatch that does most of this, for less money.

fp S41t (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30946978)

are aate8ding a

Defective (1)

GerryHattrick (1037764) | more than 4 years ago | (#30947058)

Friend bought a new running-treadmill with this sort of stuff built in. It had to go back twice for unreliable readings. That's what he said. You've guessed it - he's now doing well after heart bypass surgery.

DocWagon? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30947516)

Ok, the technology is here. Now, where can I sign up for my DocWagon [dumpshock.com] contract?

the future is coming... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30952678)

One of my favorite Sci-fi techs was in 'Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom' by Cory Doctorow and I'm certain in many other novels that i can't remember or haven't read yet. Monitor your heartrate, adreneline levels, etc... and both display any warning messages via your optical nerve as well as dispensing drugs to counter any problems pro-actively. 'You have a fever and an ear infection, dispensing anti-biotics in appropriate dosage'. Or, 'irregular heart rate detected, contact medical help immediately, ready to upload data'. This is the first time i've seen something even close to that for the consumer. Tie the software into your mobile device to page you when it detects irregularities and all that is left is dispensing the drugs. We'll need tort reform in the US of A before that part is ready but we will someday get there. Cool!

Create a version for Triathletes (1)

glaqua (572332) | more than 4 years ago | (#30956928)

They need to double the price, and market it to triathletes. We seem to love having all kinds of data, and a powertap hub is like crack. Once you start getting wattage, you are lost to the world. Imagine what this would do....

To hack a well known saying (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#30961624)

Remember, it's not hypercondria if you really are dying.

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