×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

IETF Turns Introspective With New Wiki

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 4 years ago | from the history-trying-not-to-repeat-itself dept.

The Internet 13

alphadogg writes to tell us that the Internet Engineering Task Force has decided to document the successes and failures of past standards and the reasons why. The hope is that lessons learned can influence future decisions. "Grading the success of the IETF standards can also serve several other functions, Crocker pointed out. It could help working groups focus their thinking on how their standards may get implemented, acting in effect a bit like a report card. A secondary benefit of the wiki is that it could serve as an aid in public relations, a place for the standards body to tout its successes. This is not the IETF's first foray into deriving lessons learned from its own work, Housley said. In 2007, Microsoft software architect Dave Thaler gave a talk at the IETF 70 meeting, held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, in which he outlined some of the factors that make a protocol a success."

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

13 comments

What makes standards work (4, Informative)

idontgno (624372) | more than 4 years ago | (#31040706)

Re:What makes standards work (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31040810)

...and flying a small clique of 'consensus makers' around the world on junkets!

I'm not surprised they omitted that one.

... patents! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31040916)

VRRP, philosophically,
must ipso facto standard be
But standard it
needs to be free
vis a vis
the IETF
you see?

But can VRRP
be said to be
or not to be
a standard, see,
when VRRP can not be free,
due to some Cisco patentry..

Singing...

La Dee Dee, 1, 2, 3.
VRRP ain't free.
O P E N B S D
CARP is free

http://www.openbsd.org/lyrics.html#35 [openbsd.org]

This will probably be a good idea... (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31040726)

*if* they can marshal the manpower to maintain it properly, and understand that public engagement requires that you *engage*, and that you remember that all the smart people don't work for you; neither of these is easy.

(Ok, Slashdot? No, I am *not* not logged in, and *nine times* is my limit for trying to fix your stupidity. -- jra)

What is the point of this? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041228)

This may be the least interesting, least controversial article I've read in my life.

IETF Security Standards (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041360)

Looking at the summary of security standards, it seems (roughly) that all the IETF ones have failed and all the external-to-IETF ones have succeeded. So if you want a security standard to work it seems the rule is don't get the IETF to design it.

The company that came up with Microsoft Bob (1, Interesting)

shoppa (464619) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041428)

In the mid-90's, when the Web was becoming Wide, even World-Wide (Wow!), Microsoft decided that the web was entirely inadequate for the real needs of computer users. Instead, MS came up with its paradigm for how it would dominate the future of computing in hope of displacing the www. What did they come up with?

Microsoft Bob [wikipedia.org]

And this company is lecturing the world on how to come up with good protocols?

To be fair, Comic Sans MS was a font developed for Microsoft Bob, and seems somehow to have become one of the more commonly used font on the web.

Tim.

Re:The company that came up with Microsoft Bob (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31042240)

I suppose the reason IETF standards are becoming irrelevant is the inability of geeks to move on from their fixation on things like MS Bob. Because it's so much less work to pitch snide remarks about 15 year old flops than it is to write new systems and protocols.

Re:The company that came up with Microsoft Bob (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 4 years ago | (#31043436)

Comic Sans MS is the font equivalent to the auto-tuned musical "star" of your choice. It's a horrible font in nearly every way possible, but it looks cute so people adore it. Also it is the only font from Microsoft with personality, where personality is assumed to include originality. All the usual Microsoft fonts are knockoffs of other fonts except Tahoma, which is as bland as possible in the name of readability. The people have declared that they do not give a shit about readability. And let's not forget the abomination that is Arial...

BOB has nothing to do with protocols. If you want to pick on those you need to pick on NetBEUI and SMB, both of which have enough design flaws to drive a train through. And many have...

Not the first forray into deriving lessons learned (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31043232)

Yes, I believe Microsoft learned the lesson well... "In 2007, Microsoft software architect Dave Thaler gave a talk at the IETF 70 meeting, held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, in which he outlined some of the factors that make a protocol a success." With the help of the IETF MS learned that you can influence an standards body by ensuring the people voting are on your side (well actually cram it with your own set of last minute voters) resulting in standards that even 'they' (MS) can not implement. Such a standard.

So should we be happy that the IETF is teaching companies how to sway the standards committees?

anon

Re:Not the first forray into deriving lessons lear (1)

Philip_the_physicist (1536015) | more than 4 years ago | (#31044780)

You're thinking of ISO, not IETF. Whilst MS were part of the push to allow patents in IETF standards without a royalty-free licence, they have been a lot less harmful there than in other bodies, perhaps because of the requirement for running code, and since they can ignore the IETF entirely when they want to much more easily than they can other bodies.

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...