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Physicists Discover How To Teleport Energy

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 4 years ago | from the scott-me-up-beamy dept.

Power 365

MikeChino writes "A physicist at Tohoku University in Japan has figured out how to teleport energy from one point in the universe to another. The technique is based upon prior research that shows it's possible to teleport information from one location to another, and involves making a measurement on each [of] an entangled pair of particles. The measurement on the first particle injects quantum energy into the system, and then by carefully choosing the measurement to do so on the second particle, it is possible to extract the original energy. Heady stuff, but essentially it means that you can inject energy at one point in the universe and extract it from somewhere else without changing the energy of the system as a whole."

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365 comments

Consistent Histories? (5, Interesting)

slifox (605302) | more than 4 years ago | (#31040968)

How would an experiment like this be interpreted using the consistent histories theory?

For a classic entanglement "teleportation" scenario where a measurement on one particle could cause information to be "teleported" to the state of the other particle, I think the consistent histories interpretation of quantum mechanics says that the second particle was always in the same state until it was measured, and that no information was exchanged.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Consistent_histories [wikipedia.org]

On another note, is there a way to test if this is correct?
Are there direct practical applications for this, if it is correct?

Re:Consistent Histories? (2, Interesting)

PIBM (588930) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041034)

Just wait until there is ..

no more powerline!

That would clean up a lot of space :)

Re:Consistent Histories? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041082)

Linux just isn't ready for the desktop yet. It may be ready for the servers that you nerds use to distribute your TRON fanzines and personal dungeons and dragons web-sights, but the average computer user isn't going to spend weeks learning how to use a CLI and then hours compiling packages just to get a workable desktop environment to check their mail with. Especially not when they already have a Windows box that does this perfectly well, and is supported by real companies and not just a few unemployed nerds living in their mother's basement somewhere. The last thing I want is a level 5 dwarf(haha) providing me my OS.

Re:Consistent Histories? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041262)

Ladies and gentlemen, I hereby present you with the first ever time travelling message! Posted in 1993, it appeared on slashdot just now.

Re:Consistent Histories? (4, Funny)

daeley (126313) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041552)

Ladies and gentlemen, I hereby present you with the first ever time travelling message! Posted in 1993, it appeared on slashdot just now.

You must be old here.

Re:Consistent Histories? (1)

tyrione (134248) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041114)

Just wait until there is ..

no more powerline!

That would clean up a lot of space :)

Bury the power lines. Problem solved.

Re:Consistent Histories? (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041356)

You can't do that for megavolt-level power lines. It's fine for residential areas though.

Re:Consistent Histories? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041406)

You can if it's a superconducting line... ask New York City. They've recently ( 2-3 years ago ) did a limited trial of this.

Re:Consistent Histories? (4, Funny)

CorporateSuit (1319461) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041132)

Exactly. In a few decades, instead of a power cable leading to your house, you could fit your house with a 30-ton, $7,000,000 quantum disentangler! I imagine it could also be used in place of a battery on your ipad! Never worry about low battery ever again!

Powerlines? (1)

denzacar (181829) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041368)

Energy teleportation could mean no more need for any kind of fuel.
Heck... even if the send/receive station is to huge to be portable it would still eliminate any other form of powerplant.

Just chuck some solar sails on huge platforms up into space and point them towards the sun.
For the extra credit, get them there by pumping energy collected on Earth into their receiving station and use ion engines to set them up at the most desired position.
Then, do what they do on Star Trek all the time - reverse the polarity.
Pump the energy they collect back to Earth using the very same station that got them there.

Re:Consistent Histories? (4, Informative)

fusiongyro (55524) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041096)

I am not the guy to answer this, but I'm going to take a stab at it.

The article says that the prior research worked by transmitting the information separately, at the speed of light. So the idea here is apparently that the energy itself can be transmitted instantly, but you can't actually transmit information this way. Just energy.

Still, that rocks pretty hard.

Re:Consistent Histories? (5, Funny)

IICV (652597) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041166)

I am not the guy to answer this, but I'm going to take a stab at it.

You've just described Slashdot in a nutshell.

Re:Consistent Histories? (5, Funny)

mugurel (1424497) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041338)

you can't actually transmit information this way. Just energy.

You've just described Slashdot in a nutshell.

Re:Consistent Histories? (1)

nine-times (778537) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041188)

I don't understand what the hell is going on, but it seems to me that if you can send energy someplace faster than the speed of light, that could be used to transmit "information".

Assuming the energy increase is detectable and measurable, I could pre-arrange a system where a particular increase in energy constituted a discrete signal. All you need to do is to be able to detect the difference between "increase in energy" and "no increase in energy", and you basically have a bit. Find a way to have a lot of bits, and suddenly you can have conventional data transmission.

Re:Consistent Histories? (2, Interesting)

Normal Dan (1053064) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041340)

A lot of this has to do with what we call cause and effect and other terminology being used. Reading one side of the quantum pair 'causes' the other side to be of a certain outcome. It doesn't really mean anything spooky or mystical or faster than light is 'really' happening (for some values of reality).

Here's a different way to think about what's going on. Suppose you have some device that fires bowling balls in opposing directions, you're just not sure what direction they will go. So, on one side, you have something large that will be hit by the bowling ball... when this is hit you now know where the other ball will be, so now you know exactly where to set up an apparatus to catch the other bowling ball and convert its energy into something usable.

Remember, this is just an analogy to help you think of it in a different way. There's a lot more to what's going on than this.

Re:Consistent Histories? (1)

BiggerIsBetter (682164) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041198)

The article says that the prior research worked by transmitting the information separately, at the speed of light. So the idea here is apparently that the energy itself can be transmitted instantly, but you can't actually transmit information this way. Just energy.

I'm having trouble with the difference (energy level + time factor = digital information) and that's without getting into the idea that matter basically = energy + information, but I guess that it's the measurement that differentiates them. However, unless I'm horribly mistaken, and I probably am, you could have two sync'd clocks and make repeated measurements of the energy being teleported, and use that for instant information transfer.

There, I fixed those pesky space travel comms and control delays for you.

Re:Consistent Histories? (2, Interesting)

MJMullinII (1232636) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041414)

The article says that the prior research worked by transmitting the information separately, at the speed of light. So the idea here is apparently that the energy itself can be transmitted instantly, but you can't actually transmit information this way. Just energy.

I'm having trouble with the difference (energy level + time factor = digital information) and that's without getting into the idea that matter basically = energy + information, but I guess that it's the measurement that differentiates them. However, unless I'm horribly mistaken, and I probably am, you could have two sync'd clocks and make repeated measurements of the energy being teleported, and use that for instant information transfer.

There, I fixed those pesky space travel comms and control delays for you.

That's almost infinitely valuable in itself. Imagine being able to instantaneously keep contact with spacecraft, regardless of how far they travel from earth. They're have been theoretical designs for over thirty years for Nuclear Powered unmanned missions to Alpha Centauri, Bearnard's Star (unsure about spelling there), and others. The main drag on spending the enormous amounts of money on such missions is that while everyone pretty much understands it will take a long time getting their (I seem to remember the project going to Bearnard's Star taking something like 40 or so years), but that the information gained from traveling to such places would take an equal time getting back.

I mean, we've done long-term space missions, even if "long-term" wasn't the original intention (I'm speaking of the Voyager Probes, etc.) So that's not completely foreign too us, but no one is going to put the effort into doing real science that far out without the instant gratification of collecting data all along the way.

Lets (for the moment) leave out the Star Trek, "transporting humans and people all around the galaxy", etc. I can see plenty of real world applications for this type of technology right now.

Imagine developing "androids" that, while human in appearance and capability, weren't artificially controlled...

By the way, I have NOT seen Avatar (and have no real interest in doing so) so if my following scenario is in any way close to what they were doing in that movie -- I'm basing this on the trailers I've scene -- please no smartass comments to that point, thank you

but were instead "inhabited" by real humans in shifts (normal, 8 hour work shifts, etc.) Imagine building spacecraft that were capable of traveling much faster than humans themselves were capable of surviving (in craft that while economical, weren't specifically built to be "human-rated") and that could be sent on long term missions through deep-space. RIGHT NOW we can build spacecraft that could leave our solar system and arrive at distant stars in our lifetime, the problem is that there is no way to keep people alive on those spacecraft (at least not in any way that doesn't lead to them being drooling idiots by the time they arrive -- no offense intended to any drooling idiots reading :)).

If you can maintain instantaneous communication with the craft regardless of how faraway it travels, you could keep a crew of "people-droids" permanently manned with people in simulators right here on Earth. As long as the ships power-supply holds out (something easily done with current technology), the droids can be continuously used to represent people doing science on the ship (not to mention repairing the ship when need-be, etc.) Basically I'm talking about being able to begin exploring the galaxy without needing fictional artificial intelligence or superhuman survival skills (which, considering how far away we still are from the world of Aurthur C. Clarke's "2001" & "2010", imagine how much farther we are from computers that have human-levels of adaptation and human-levels of endurance -- which make all the jokes you want about human frailty, we're hearty as viruses when we need to be :)).

And this is the most extreme, I'm completely skipping over the economical benefits of being able to communicate in far-away places without any latency to speak of (compared with GEO Satellite Communications, etc.) For that matter, being able to transmit data instantly to as close by as Mars or Venus (speaking of potential colonies, etc.)

I have no idea how close this is to actually being able to engineer (as opposed to neat mathematics), but I'd definitely keep a close eye on how this develops, myself.

Re:Consistent Histories? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041544)

Now all we need to do is build a craft of some sort that would relay information on samples back, completely out of energy. We would be able to sample anything in the universe

Re:Consistent Histories? (1)

Pharmboy (216950) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041590)

Wouldn't it make it possible to send the craft without humans, because it can be controlled "in real time" here from earth, and perhaps by the time it gets there, we might be able to transport the humans to the ship? All we needed was a destination that we know we could safely send them. That and the technology to do such a thing.

Re:Consistent Histories? (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041252)

Yes, it also looks like the amount of energy doesn't have to be the exact same.
So if different amounts of energy could be sent then they can be, interpreted as "ones" and "zeros"

Re:Consistent Histories? (1)

net28573 (1516385) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041604)

This is possible but a less complicated method (assuming that the interval between each burst of energy is small) would be using a system like morse code or using the same protocol that fiberoptic cable receivers use to read light as data. Either that or create a new data transfer protocol entirely. I sincerely hope that its the latter because id appreciate something better than usb 2.0 (other than 3.0)

Re:Consistent Histories? (1)

DeadDecoy (877617) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041350)

But if you transmit energy this way, doesn't that imply that you have sent information? i.e. energy is being sent or received which might be encoded as a bit.

Re:Consistent Histories? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041402)

f you can transmit energy, then why can't you transmit energy in pulses that inherently transmit information?

The telegraph transmitted electricity (i.e., energy) across a wire that created information, after all.

Re:Consistent Histories? (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041548)

Because you can't control the timing or amount of energy transferred precisely, or where exactly it gets transferred to?

Re:Consistent Histories? (4, Informative)

FrangoAssado (561740) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041484)

So the idea here is apparently that the energy itself can be transmitted instantly, but you can't actually transmit information this way. Just energy.

No, energy can't be transmitted instantly. From the abstract:

Protocols of quantum energy teleportation (QET) (...) enable the transportation of energy from a subsystem of a many-body quantum system to a distant subsystem by local operations and classical communication through ground-state entanglement. We prove two energy-entanglement inequalities for a minimal QET model. [my emphasis]

So, you apparently still need the classical channel in order to know what measurement to perform in the receiving end, just like in good old quantum teleportation [wikipedia.org].

Communications perk? (1, Redundant)

DJRumpy (1345787) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041014)

How long before something like this makes it's way into communications? Granted it's no 'beam me up Scotty', but it's getting pretty damn close, at least from an energy perspective. Is this instantaneous across a distance?

Re:Communications perk? (1)

txoof (553270) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041050)

All we need now are some Heisenberg Compensators and we're half way to a teleporter.

Re:Communications perk? (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041270)

I suspect that if you can transport mass and energy, you could manipulate the energy so your momentum is correct for where you are arriving at. In fact, if you did it right, you could create an energy generators.

Re:Communications perk? (1)

v1 (525388) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041378)

well if E still equals MC^2, if you can teleport energy, then you can teleport mass. And that causes all sorts of problems with issues such as angular momentum and conservation of energy, so I remain skeptical.

Generally speaking, the 'to every action there is an equal but opposite reaction" means that if you teleport something, something else of an opposite nature also was teleported the other way. So either they're wrong, or they've overlooked something important.

Re:Communications perk? (1)

DJRumpy (1345787) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041052)

I've re-read this 3 times, and I'm still not sure. It seems the information can be passed instantaneously across a distance, but some other piece of this requires plain old speed of light. Is there an engineer in the house?

"The technique relies on the strange quantum phenomenon called entanglement, in which two particles share the same existence. This deep connection means that a measurement on one particle immediately influences the other, even though they are light-years apart. Bennett and company worked out how to exploit this to send information. (The influence between the particles may be immediate, but the process does not violate relativity because some informatiom has to be sent classically at the speed of light.) They called the technique teleportation. "

Re:Communications perk? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041110)

Quantum entanglement is what Einstein called "spooky action at a distance".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_entanglement

"Observations pertaining to entangled states appear to conflict with the property of relativity that information cannot be transferred faster than the speed of light." Very awesome stuff.

Re:Communications perk? (1)

dissy (172727) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041156)

It seems the information can be passed instantaneously across a distance, but some other piece of this requires plain old speed of light. Is there an engineer in the house?

It seems what they are saying is not that the information can be teleported faster than light (even though in limited prearranged cases it can), but instead that the 'information' can be ignored as such, but its useful energy can be raised by lowering the useful energy at the other teleporter site by the same amount.

Think of each end of the teleporter as each end of a power extension cord.

I for one am OK with the fact, after plugging one end into the wall, that I have to and carry the other end at speeds much slower than that of light, to the device across the room I need power for :)

Assuming it actually works at all, it would still be useful.

Re:Communications perk? (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041426)

I'm an engineer, and I can't help you too much. What you're looking for is a scientist, more specifically a physicist.

We engineers don't usually get too involved in stuff like this until there's practical applications for the scientific findings, and real pieces of equipment being designed to exploit them. When someone's figured out how to make teleportation machines or FTL communicators with this data, then you can call an engineer to tell you how it works.

Wow. (5, Funny)

tool462 (677306) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041022)

Best. Physics quote. Ever.

"He gives the example of a string of entangled ions oscillating back and forth in an electric field trap, a bit like Newton's balls."

Re:Wow. (4, Funny)

frosty_tsm (933163) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041210)

Best. Physics quote. Ever.

"He gives the example of a string of entangled ions oscillating back and forth in an electric field trap, a bit like Newton's balls."

Which we know from his laws, will continue to swing until they encounter another object or friction.

Re:Wow. (5, Funny)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041292)

And at which point he will stiffen. Which brings us to the less known Newton's law:

"The angle of the dangle is proportional to the heat of the meat." - Newton

"Think like a dinosaur" Outer Limits episode (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041216)

"Best. Physics quote. Ever." - by tool462 (677306) on Friday February 05, @06:25PM (#31041022)

Per my subject-line above, & that espisode has a great line in it that actually fits this article to a decent extent (as to a 'great quote'):

"THE EQUATION MUST BE BALANCED!" - Dino-Alien teleporter operator, from "Think like a Dinosaur" OUTER LIMITS episode

APK

P.S.=> Yes, it's "Sci-Fi", but I thought it fit well here, especially per this quote from the article here ->

"Heady stuff, but essentially it means that you can inject energy at one point in the universe and extract it from somewhere else without changing the energy of the system as a whole."

All-in-all on this?... Pretty neat, & matter is next! apk

Re:Wow. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041318)

If you think Newton's balls were a sight to see, you should have seen Einstein's! I mean, talk about relative size.

fags, stop eating shit out of other faggot's asses (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041032)

you dirty birds.

holy crap (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041038)

I for one welcome our new quantum overlords.

Re:holy crap (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041238)

I for one may or may not welcome our new quantum overlords

Wow.... (3, Interesting)

Cheerio Boy (82178) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041042)

If you can inject enough energy into the process this could in theory be the replacement for batteries. This is provided you could make a giant transmitter that sends to the receiving devices. (Or possibly battery replacement modules?)

This is provided the technology isn't only "ten years away" or so. ;-)

Re:Wow.... (1)

dissy (172727) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041120)

If you can inject enough energy into the process this could in theory be the replacement for batteries. This is provided you could make a giant transmitter that sends to the receiving devices. (Or possibly battery replacement modules?)

To teleport energy between two points in space, I would imagine a little bit of hardware would be needed to accomplish this.
Instead of just 'device a' and 'device b' as our two devices that teleport energy, lets call them 'battery' device'\ which comes in a tiny pellet sized unit, that comes with adapters of the sizes of our current batteries, and the other one called the 'power brick with no wire' device that plugs in the wall.

It's a start!

Re:Wow.... (1)

jfengel (409917) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041312)

> This is provided the technology isn't only "ten years away" or so. ;-)

This is the kind of technology they call "40 years away". As in "Yeah, I suppose, maybe, but I'm not even sure it's theoretically possible."

(As opposed to "10 years", meaning "It's theoretically possible, but I have no idea how.")

Physics! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041056)

Where is Gordon Freeman when you need him?! He knows this stuff better than ANYONE!

Bingbing, holography! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041068)

If the two entangled particles only appear in our holographic 3D space to be diverging, while on the actual 2D horizon they are still coherent, any form of 'spooky action at a distance' makes perfect sense. If you inject energy into one of the particles, it makes sense that this should be transferable to the other.

Re:Bingbing, holography! (1)

BiggerIsBetter (682164) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041244)

If the two entangled particles only appear in our holographic 3D space to be diverging, while on the actual 2D horizon they are still coherent, any form of 'spooky action at a distance' makes perfect sense. If you inject energy into one of the particles, it makes sense that this should be transferable to the other.

That's cool if the holographic universe theory works, but my gut says it's the other way around, and that it's coherent in a 4D or higher space while only appearing separate in our 3D space.

Life Imitates Video Games (2, Interesting)

TyIzaeL (1203354) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041076)

If I recall, in Mass Effect 2 they used entangled particles for instantaneous long-distance transmission across the galaxy!

Re:Life Imitates Video Games (3, Funny)

ArundelCastle (1581543) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041168)

If you recall? It came out last week. My copy arrived today.
Too bad the post office couldn't entangle it into my mailbox sooner.

video game imitates book (1)

city (1189205) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041226)

If I recall, in Hyperion [wikipedia.org], they used entangled particles for instantaneous long-distance transmission across the galaxy!

who's next?

Re:video game imitates book (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041512)

Microcosmic God by Theodore Sturgeon.

Re:Life Imitates Video Games (5, Funny)

neokushan (932374) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041230)

Yes, according to the lore they use entangled particles as a form of long range communication. EDI (Tricia Heifer of BSG fame) goes into some detail about how it works, which isn't that different from how the article here describes it.

Bioware deserve points for doing that kind of research into the game.

Re:Life Imitates Video Games (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041452)

EDI (Tricia Heifer of BSG fame) goes into some detail about how it works,

You may not like her like most other BSG fans, but that's no reason to call her a cow.

Re:Life Imitates Video Games (1)

neokushan (932374) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041500)

I always get her name wrong, my bad entirely.

Should be Tricia Helfer.

Re:Life Imitates Video Games (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041622)

Actually, that was supposed to be funny... it's a pretty obvious and understandable misspelling, but quite funny.

Re:Life Imitates Video Games (2, Informative)

Tmack (593755) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041582)

Yes, according to the lore they use entangled particles as a form of long range communication. EDI (Tricia Heifer of BSG fame) goes into some detail about how it works, which isn't that different from how the article here describes it.

Bioware deserve points for doing that kind of research into the game.

Its actually been around in Sci-Fi for quite some time. See Ansible [wikipedia.org], Orson Scott Card used it as the basis for Ender's Game and that whole series of books (though it got a bit extreme after the first one).

tm

Re:Life Imitates Video Games (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041306)

Except it can't and that's not this. Other then that, you are spot on...this.

Positioning? (2, Insightful)

Mikkeles (698461) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041080)

Exactly how do I get the 'second' particle to where I want the information to be retrieved?

Re:Positioning? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041192)

With a power line .. duh ;)

Re:Positioning? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041336)

Let it take the bus

Re:Positioning? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041364)

Exactly how do I get the 'second' particle to where I want the information to be retrieved?

Bring refreshments.

Re:Positioning? (1)

MJMullinII (1232636) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041466)

Exactly how do I get the 'second' particle to where I want the information to be retrieved?

I'm guessing that's the rub. You'd most probably need to get said second particle to wherever you were wanting to transmit too the old fashion way (meaning anything you can manage below the speed of light), so it's not as cool as "Warp Drive", though assuming you are able to constantly communicate with the ship (were assuming space for the purposes of my example), you at least could be kept abreast of the trip the entire way to said destination.

That's kinds how it works today when laying fiber optic cable. While you have to physically drag the cable to wherever your wanting a hookup, the cable is active the entire time of the trip. The ship or transport can talk back to home-base while laying the cable (and in fact, they do keep in constant contact so as to know immediately is the cable gets severed in some way -- you know, before they get a few hundred miles away from the break ;) )

Who's calling please? oops sorry wrong number. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041540)

Generation Ship!

Re:Positioning? (1)

youn (1516637) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041600)

positioning you ask? welll it depends... I'd first start with position to turn on the particle, get it in excited state... then move towards €missionary then work my way from here :)

Interesting possibilities (0, Redundant)

vanyel (28049) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041084)

mobile devices of the future come with entangled "battery" pairs: plug one in at home an voila! no more recharging...

Re:Interesting possibilities (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041136)

yup, but think bigger .. seems like it's only a step away from extracting energy directly from our sun, destroying random parallel universes in the process

Re:Interesting possibilities (1)

androst (1738796) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041308)

don't worry. I'm working on a device that would extract natural gas from your anus which in theory wouldn't harm parallel universes (or the peaceful creatures they harbor).

Re:Interesting possibilities (1)

MJMullinII (1232636) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041472)

yup, but think bigger .. seems like it's only a step away from extracting energy directly from our sun, destroying random parallel universes in the process

Screw em'...what they ever do for us anyway!

There ain't no such thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041394)

as a free lunch.

I thought quantum entanglement didn't transport (1)

NotSoHeavyD3 (1400425) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041094)

Information. Well I mean besides the states of the 2 entangled particles. (You look at one, it's state is set and therefore the entangled particle gets it state set.)

Re:I thought quantum entanglement didn't transport (1)

PotatoFiend (1330299) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041376)

Correct. David Deutsch proved [arxiv.org] that "spooky action at a distance" is information being transferred via classical channels after all. The same principle should apply to energy transfer.

Trying to entangle my brain to become inmortal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041112)

But I need another brain without any use. The problem is that I don't want to reincarnate into Paris Hilton body.

Practical application? (1)

geekprime (969454) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041162)

So we can put the solar panels in a "close" solar orbit (or even earth orbit) and entangle/detangle the power into our grid?

Will it FINALLY be power to cheap to meter?

Headline (1)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041170)

Man, I love the headline, whatever the details. Even better, the scientist(s) is Japanese!

Re:Headline (2, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041320)

Which means the technology will be used to give people faster access to tentacle porn.

Re:Headline (0, Flamebait)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041476)

Why would that be a surprise? What'd be a big surprise is if the scientist were American, since Americans aren't studying advanced science any more.

The Japanese are much more long-term thinking than the Americans, and their society still values science.

Just a theoretical preprint, premature to plug it (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041178)

Speaking as a Physicist, it seems the title should be " A physicist has posted a preprint in which he claims that "energy can be teleported"
(as opposed to beiing transmitted)." and someone has praised it in a blog post.

The astract says
"Protocols of quantum energy teleportation (QET), while retaining causality and local energy conservation, enable the transportation of energy from a subsystem of a many-body quantum system to a distant subsystem by local operations and classical communication through ground-state entanglement. We prove two energy-entanglement inequalities for a minimal QET model. These relations help us to gain a profound understanding of entanglement itself as a physical resource by relating entanglement to energy as an evident physical resource. "

note "classical communication" (i.e. a telephone call from one place to another) to tell the recipient what to do to extract the energy is needed.

Note that an arxiv post is an assertion by an author, prior to any refereeing. The are only minimal "fences" at arxiv.org to keep out the "Einstein was wrong, I am right" nuts.

Space based sular arrays to ground transfer (1)

ZP-Blight (827688) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041184)

This tech, if ever made viable on a larger scale would be the perfect way to transfer solar energy to the ground, much more efficient than the currently proposed lasers.

Saudi Naughty (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041220)

Does this mean we can finally get away from funding M.E. terrorists and get our energy directly from planet Zoofnin?
   

Re:Saudi Naughty (1)

kehren77 (814078) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041556)

Or directly from Zoofnin's sun. More energy there than on their planet.

Actually this does beg the question of how long until we have a working ZPM.

yes, we know, it's called a Stargate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041272)

MacGyver can help further ...

In all honesty... (1)

Facegarden (967477) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041342)

All I can sat is: Jesus, what the fuck? This is insane. This can't possibly be even close to as real as I think it is. Does this mean that we could actually have space-based solar cells that are just *magically* linked to the ground?
This is blowing my fucking mind.
-Taylor

travel to the stars just got easier (1)

chezifresh (1726048) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041358)

if this really works and can be very precise then you can teleport energy to a moving spacecraft making serious space travel a reality. no longer would you need to carry ANY fuel.

Good news. (1)

Tibia1 (1615959) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041384)

Although I've already read about this concept, I'm glad to see that there is progress being made. It's been said that we can make the most efficient computer in the universe by utilizing every process inside a black hole, and it's been theorized that we can send in quantum entangled atoms, and leave the other half out of the black hole to keep the result of the computation available. This means we can utilize the power a black hole can deliver without having to enter it at all. The atoms will keep the same spin as their entangled partners and therefore we can computations and energy back out.

Energy mass equivalence and the lightspeed limit ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31041474)

Haven't read the papers yet.
But actually the argument that quantum teleportation doesn't break relativity theory was that no information/mass/energy is moved at speeds beyond lightspeed. Like if you use it to transmit information, you need a 2nd channel that goes at lightspeed max. like to tell the target station how to do the measurement, or not ?

So mmmh, teleporting energy ... how can it work then ? Need to read more about it...

Not faster than light, but still teleportation (5, Informative)

Pfhorrest (545131) | more than 4 years ago | (#31041610)

People both here and on the linked blog article seem to be thinking that this "teleportation" talk is all about sending things from one place to another faster than light. That's not the big deal; it's already well-established that that cannot be done, at least not via quantum entanglement.

The breakthrough the article is talking about is moving energy from one place to another "instantly" by means of performing the right pair of measurements on both end; but the communication between ends about what measurements to make still happens at light speed or less.

For example, say I have a bunch of particles here on Earth and my colleagues on Mars have another bunch of particles entangled with mine. Mars is at the moment ten light-minutes away from each. On my end, I perform a measurement on (i.e. I interact with) my particles in a way which raises their energy from X joules to Y joules; I then send a radio transmission (with said transmission using less than Y-X joules) to my colleagues on Mars giving them instructions for what measurements to make on their end, i.e. I transmit information, in normal ways, at the speed of light or less.

Ten minutes later, my colleagues on Mars get my message, perform the measurement, and BAM, the energy of their particles jumps up to Y joules. The most efficient classical alternative for transmitting that (Y-X) joules of energy would be to beam a signal of said energy between the two points, but that requires a clear line of sight between them, or some set of relays capable of carrying that signal, each of which adds inefficiency to the transmission. An even less efficient, even more classical method would be to take whatever the energy is stored in here on Earth and physically move it to its destination, which is both much slower and much less energy-efficient.

With this method, my colleagues could be buried deep underground in a sealed lab with no way of getting anything in or out except for a limited range of radio signals carried by equipment incapable of carrying high-power signals... and still I can "beam" them arbitrary amounts of energy straight into their lab just beaming energy into some particles in my lab and then telling them over the radio what to do in their lab to receive it.
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