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Internet Nominated For 2010 Nobel Peace Prize

Soulskill posted more than 4 years ago | from the i-don't-know-where-to-send-the-fruit-basket dept.

The Internet 259

An anonymous reader writes "It's official. The Internet, which has virtually revolutionized world communication, has been nominated for the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize. 'Organizers said signatories to its petition backing the nomination include 2003 peace laureate and exiled Iranian activist Shirin Ebadi — which would make it a legitimate entry.' The nomination was proposed by the Italian edition of Wired magazine for promoting 'dialogue, debate and consensus through communication' as well as democracy."

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Soo.... (5, Funny)

nine-times (778537) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046470)

who would get the cash prize? Please don't tell me it's "anonymous". I hate that guy.

Re:Soo.... (5, Funny)

A. B3ttik (1344591) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046578)

I dunno, is Al Gore even allowed to receive two Nobel Peace prizes?

Re:Soo.... (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046658)

More importantly - which of the individuals wearing Guy Fawkes mask gives the acceptance speech and gets the price?

Hm, a plot to shatter them?...

Re:Soo.... (5, Insightful)

penguinoid (724646) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046668)

My guess, if the internet wins the Nobel Peace Prize, the money will go toward internet infrastructure in poor countries with a violence problem.

Re:Soo.... (5, Funny)

LockeOnLogic (723968) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046710)

So, the United States then?

Re:Soo.... (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046778)

He said "poor countries" not "countries with intellectually poor people"

Re:Soo.... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31047030)

America is both those things, actually.
Debt out the eyeballs and most people sub-standard IQs. Quite sad what has happened really.

Oh god, why did I get Quahog as the captcha?
Seriously beginning to think Slashdot is conscious, it linked both Family Guy, America, Poorness and Idiocy via the place they live.

Re:Soo.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046706)

But I deserve it more than anyone.

    To all those who have flamed me in the past, PBTHHHHHH! I got da award!

    Damn the Slashdot timers have gone wild.

Slashdot requires you to wait between each successful posting of a comment to allow everyone a fair chance at posting a comment.

It's been 51 minutes since you last successfully posted a comment

Re:Soo.... (5, Funny)

davester666 (731373) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046858)

but why did it get nominated?

It's been the scene for the biggest flame-wars in history! Is it just because so few people actually died because of these wars?

And Hitler seems to get mentioned a surprising number of times...

Re:Soo.... (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046938)

Of course it will. Right to the 4chan community account for madness and mayhem. :D

No, just kidding. Reality will be far worse. Al Gore will try to claim it. But in reality, some previously unknown US (!) government agency will take it, and trough some funding program “for protection of rights on the Internet”, will give the money to a RIAA/MPAA joint-venture project to create a “copyright cybersoldier” unit with NSA-like powers. Then trough an ACTA addition, that unit will get the power to “catch” anyone, anywhere, in any country of the world, without any basic human rights being applicable.

I think Anonymous is the better option here...

Re:Soo.... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046982)

If the history of the internet is any indication, the entire cash prize will be spent to pay for more porn!

The speech (4, Funny)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046474)

The Internet has decided to present its acceptance speech in form of a Twitter live feed.

Blasphemy! (5, Funny)

sakdoctor (1087155) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046694)

The internet's acceptance speech was actually:

HTTP/1.1 202 Accepted

Re:Blasphemy! (1)

DakotaSmith (937647) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046992)

Nah, this is the Internet, just not the stuff hanging off of it like Web servers ...

I'm not sure how they'd even notify the Internet of its having won, assuming that it does. The most reliably way I can think of is to ping the entire supply of public IPv4 addresses. Once they have, say, 50% replies back, they can consider the Internet to have accepted.

But perhaps you'd need to make it a super-majority. After all, given the historic importance of the Nobel Prize, there should be as great a number of devices and computers as possible to make it representative.

Then there are all those pesky firewalls rejecting UNDP ... how will we know if those devices can accept on behalf of the Internet?

I've got it. They get the most recent winner of the award to get a bill introduced in his nation's Congress requiring UNDP to be turned on for any device carrying a public IP addresses, including LinkSys home routers. Make it a Federal crime to fail to turn on UNDP, with a minimum sentence of ten years in prison and a $50,000 fine. Create and hire a whole new batch of flunkies whose job it is to hunt down those who've not turned on UNDP.

I mean, come on, it's for the children.

Re:Blasphemy! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31047032)

I'd guess you are confusing the internet and the world wide web. The internet would likely have its acceptance speech in the form of a TCP/IP ACK flag if anything...

Re:Blasphemy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31047102)

You are apparently confusing a sense of humor with whatever you possess that incompletely substitutes for it.

Obligatory (5, Insightful)

NYMeatball (1635689) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046478)

"At least the Internet's been in office longer than Obama"

Re:Obligatory (1, Insightful)

darjen (879890) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046918)

more importantly: at least the internet is not accelerating or conducting multiple wars while accepting the prize.

Re:Obligatory (1)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 4 years ago | (#31047004)

As much as I like Obama (I did vote for him), I think the Internet is more deserving of a peace prize than Obama was! Guys who spend all day wanking off to free pictures of Cindy Margolis simply don't have the time or energy to wage war!

in before the irony (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046492)

when the singularity and skynet arrive we'll all look back at this and laugh(before our demise)

Re:in before the irony (1)

twidarkling (1537077) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046520)

Hey, this might actually save our asses. After all, Skynet won't want to look like an ungrateful hypocrite after getting a Peace Prize. So, instead of killing us all, we'll simply be confined to our homes!

Re:in before the irony (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046902)

It'll send drones to do the job...

Re:in before the irony (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046878)

when the singularity and skynet arrive we'll all look back at this...

Which Terminator should accept the award, the California Governor-resembling model, or the oozing silver one?
     

irony (5, Funny)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046504)

The US department of defense will be accepting the award, as they funded the first tubes.

Re:irony (1)

sauge (930823) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046530)

It would be very entertaining to see a full uniform set of generals accept the prize, though I suppose Al Gore will step up to receive it.

Re:irony (1)

brian1078 (230523) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046574)

maybe... or maybe to UCLA and Stanford as they were the ones doing the actual research and had the first INTER-conneted NETworks.

Re:irony (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31047138)

Maybe the military paid for it, encouraged it, and IDK Owned it? Im sorry point goes to military here, considering without the military who knows when the first link would have been made, shoot we could be on dialup right now.

People seem to fail to realise that the military technology we have now, makes it way to us. I hope one day to see my kids flying drones..(Not model airplanes, im thinking long range, with a video feed)

So you can take your pedant self and leave.

Re:irony (2, Funny)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046602)

They would probably twist it in a way that Tim Berners-Lee or similar persona could accept it (easy, "pushed the Internet into mass acceptance" or something like that)

All I know is that if it wins, I'm flying, driving or taking a train / ferry just to be in Oslo on the occasion.

Wearing V mask.

woo hooo! (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046510)

Finally, pr0n might win a Nobel prize!

Sounds a lot like.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046512)

the time person of the year in 2006. Why not just nominate "you" for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Decline of the Prize (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046514)

Is it just me, or is the Peace Price rapidly declining into nothing more than an alternate venue for Time magazine's "man/woman/person/object of the year"?

Re:Decline of the Prize (5, Insightful)

retchdog (1319261) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046722)

If Kissinger (1973) didn't kill its credibility, then Arafat; Peres; Rabin (1994) did.

Re:Decline of the Prize (5, Insightful)

Kral_Blbec (1201285) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046762)

And if that didn't so it, then last year sure did.

If an idiot got the award for doing nothing (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046528)

If Obama got the award for DOING NOTHING, why not give it to an communication system?

Seriously, if the :"Internet" wins the award, it will be the same as when Obama won it.

Re:If an idiot got the award for doing nothing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046546)

Seriously, if the :"Internet" wins the award, it will be the same as when Obama won it.

Except the Internet deserves it more than Obama.

Re:If an idiot got the award for doing nothing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31047054)

This just makes me think: But how can the internet win one internet?

Spoon? (0, Offtopic)

sugarmotor (621907) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046532)

Spoon!

inspirational theme song (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046542)

"Reach out and hack someone... Reach out and flame someone..."

Fail (4, Insightful)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046554)

The Internet, which has virtually revolutionized world communication, has been nominated for the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize.

Yeah, okay... How come the telegraph isn't being nominated? It was the first time people on different continents started talking to each other in real-time. Or radio for that matter. The internet is not the greatest thing in the past hundred years of mass communications; The gutenburg press did more to free the masses from tyranny. If anything, the internet may make the problem worse: one of the side-effects of digitalization is that everything can be tracked, monitored, and recorded in perpetuity. The government doesn't concern itself with how to spy on its citizens... it's busy trying to figure out what to do with all this data. And we want to nominate this for a Nobel Prize?

Forget that... I want "None of the Above" to win the award.

Re:Fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046642)

Nobel Prizes aren't awarded posthumously, and the telegraph... well, telephony isn't dead, but I've never received an actual telegraph in my lifetime.

Re:Fail (1)

vadim_t (324782) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046704)

The telegraph enabled communication on a very limited level compared to the Internet. The press, and for the most part radio are broadcasting methods.

What I think the Internet brought is the ability for people from different continents (as we probably are) to easily talk to each other, and realize that there are people on the other side of the globe too, and that civilization doesn't end at their country's border.

Yeah, you could do that with the phone and telegraph as well, but you couldn't just happen to converse with somebody without having a prior reason for it.

Re:Fail (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046944)

The telegraph enabled communication on a very limited level compared to the Internet.

I'm looking at the amount of social change that resulted from a single invention, not its reach. The Nobel Prize likewise looks at how significant the discovery is for its time period.

Re:Fail (1)

kandela (835710) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046728)

The Chinese are trying to expel the internet, the telegraph never did enough to provoke that reaction, and I believe it's a requirement now.

Well, it's become a political game.... (1)

electrosoccertux (874415) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046764)

The Nobel Peace Prize has become a political game more than anything. I don't even bother clicking anymore when I hear about whatever the next peace price is going to be...
Overinflated too.

Re:Well, it's become a political game.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046948)

One might argue that the Nobel peace prize would have sunk into obscurity long ago if it didn't share a name with the Nobel science prizes.

Re:Fail (3, Insightful)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046788)

Telegraph, mail, phone, are basically 1vs1 communications, usually between people that know each other. Newspaper, Television, movies, are 1 or few to many, and sometimes the source of that communication is controlled by very few or follow the policy of government or some groups. But internet is communication everyone with everyone, usually unfiltered.

Pre-internet you could anonimize all the people of a region, country or culture, put them under an unified view, and see them as the enemy, rival, or whatever your government say. Now you deal directly against with individuals, against people with what you could communicate. Maybe won't stop future wars (i.e. didnt stopped US intervention in iraq) but could make that kind of things harder. If you take governments out of the equation, could be seen as a positive push to world peace.

Ok, until the trigger for WWIII is the discussion on who should get that cash.

Re:Fail (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 4 years ago | (#31047016)

Telegraph, mail, phone, are basically 1vs1 communications[...]But internet is communication everyone with everyone, usually unfiltered.

TCP/IP is, fundamentally, the same thing: A point to point transmission medium. The telegraph was used to transmit international and regional news to local newspapers, which dutifully printed the news for general distribution. This model continues today; the difference being that the internet decreased the cost per message which meant that people with less means can still take advantage of the network. But the patterns of communication over the internet looks pretty much the same as the telegraph, it just happens orders of magnitude faster and is more versatile in the quantity and kind of information.

Re:Fail (1)

SpeedyDX (1014595) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046798)

If I'm reading you right, you're saying that something that is very useful and has a lot of legitimate uses but at the same time has a few illegitimate uses should be considered a bad thing. Huh. Who knew? I guess the RIAA has more influence on us than we thought.

Re:Fail (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 4 years ago | (#31047050)

If I'm reading you right, you're saying that something that is very useful and has a lot of legitimate uses but at the same time has a few illegitimate uses should be considered a bad thing. Huh. Who knew? I guess the RIAA has more influence on us than we thought.

You are not reading me correctly. As to illegitimate uses, the telegraph was used for that as well -- the lines frequently transmitted information about cargo on trains, which criminals used to plot which trains to rob. But that's not my point:

I am looking at the social change that was brought about as a result of the technology. The telegraph allowed realtime worldwide communication, which previously didn't exist. The result was the world got a lot smaller, fast. The internet performs the same function as the telegraph -- it didn't fundamentally change how we looked at the world, it advanced pre-existing social trends. There is nothing the internet has done for social interaction that can't be done by mail or telegraph -- it just does it a lot faster, cheaper, and is available to people of less means.

Re:Fail (2, Informative)

LockeOnLogic (723968) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046846)

All the examples you list are either broadcast or point to point communication. The internet is an evolution of these technologies that allows for both kinds of communication at a low cost of entry for billions. Not the greatest thing in mass communication in the last 100 years? A large and rapidly growing number of the population of this planet has the capacity to instantly communicate regardless of geographical location. It seems magical by comparison to communication technology of the past.

As for government control, having a million ants running around with megaphones is alot harder to stop (or control) than a few centralized points of broadcast. Look at the recent political turmoil is Iran as an example of a repressive state having alot harder time silencing it's populace than it would have twenty/thirty years ago.

Re:Fail (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 4 years ago | (#31047078)

The internet is an evolution of these technologies...

I rest my case. The Nobel Prize is awarded for revolutionary changes or significant advancements in the state of the art and our understanding of science, as well as acts which significantly advance peaceful behavior between people. The internet qualifies as neither a revolutionary technology, nor one that advances "peaceful behavior". I also somehow doubt it would win any awards for literature -- 4Chan comes to mind as a reason against.

Re:Fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046870)

To compare just the sheer amount and types of information available on the internet to the telegraph is to really minimize the scope of change the internet has brought. It's a frickin' living Library of Alexandria.

And I'd be quick to point out we are only really in year 25 (for popular usage) of this internet thingy. Give it as much time as the gutenburg press and see what the real effect is.

One of the side effects of police states is that everything is monitored. The tool is neutral. And we can impliment it any way we see fit.

Re:Fail (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 4 years ago | (#31047104)

To compare just the sheer amount and types of information available on the internet to the telegraph is to really minimize the scope of change the internet has brought. It's a frickin' living Library of Alexandria.

...Yeah, about a thousand Library of Alexandrias, at least. But all people care about is watching the next movie, or episode of House. Again, the idea that increased access to information will spur people towards self-education and enlightenment is one of humanity's oldest illusions. Which makes sense historically... Most of the Library of Alexandria was dedicated to poetry, plays, and other forms of entertainment.

Re:Fail (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046970)

Because the Internet has a property that none of those other options have: It’s the first time in history, that the general public has a intelligence agency more powerful than anything else on the world.

But hey, the Internet getting a prize, and other things getting it, are no mutually exclusive concepts. So your “argument” is moot anyway.

Re:Fail (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 4 years ago | (#31047094)

Because the Internet has a property that none of those other options have: It's the first time in history, that the general public has a intelligence agency more powerful than anything else on the world.

...And the public has shown a remarkable disinclination towards self-education despite this. The idea that increased access to information will necessarily stir people towards enlightenment is one of humanity's oldest illusions.

Well... (1, Redundant)

mobby_6kl (668092) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046570)

*fetches a flamesuit*

well, at least that's not as ridiculous as when Obama got the prize!

People not things. (1)

Faux_Pseudo (141152) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046580)

How about we nominate the guy from all those stories about the 40th aniversery of the internet that we had to listen to in October? Can't remember his name but he worked at DARPA and got tired of having to change seats every time he wanted to use a different computer and was also tired of not being able have two computers in two different parts of the country talk to eachother instead of having to type things over and over again.

Let Al Gore Accept (4, Funny)

CodeBuster (516420) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046592)

Al Gore should accept on behalf of the Internet; this way the irrelevance of the Nobel Peace Prize will be complete.

Re:Let Al Gore Accept (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046718)

He's already got one! (It's very nice.)

Web 4.0 should win (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046608)

Web 4.0 should clearly win the prize.

Now, I'm not sure exactly what Web 4.0 will be. But I'm *sure* it will be so great we may as well award it the prize now.

And hey, at the very least at least it won't be Web 1.0.

Tim Berners-Lee (5, Insightful)

wigaloo (897600) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046612)

I have always thought that Tim Berners-Lee [wikipedia.org] , inventor of the World-Wide-Web, is deserving of a Peace Prize. Communication is the foundation of peace, and it is hard do identify another individual who has done so much for world-wide communications in recent history.

Awarding the Peace Prize to a thing? Ugh. Don't get me started. Awarding the Prize to organizations is silly enough already.

Re:Tim Berners-Lee (1)

nine-times (778537) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046768)

Awarding the Peace Prize to a thing? Ugh.

They already gave it to Al Gore already. As far as animatronics go, he isn't even very life-like.

At least the Internet has some personality.

Re:Tim Berners-Lee (2, Funny)

raddan (519638) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046776)

You can't award a Peace Prize to Berners-Lee: he's a knight [wikipedia.org] ! Didn't you know? He didn't just beat Gopher-- he slew it!

Re:Tim Berners-Lee (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046828)

I would second this nomination. Berners-Lee is a _real_ person that did something _real_. There is no nobel prize for engineering/technology(the closest is the Draper prize [draperprize.org] ). It is utterly appropriate that engineering efforts that contribute to world peace should be recognized via the Peace Prize. I think that what Berners-Lee did is a much greater contribution to world peace than some of the politician winners of the Peace Prize.

Obligatory (1)

Bragador (1036480) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046836)

I have always thought that Tim Berners-Lee, inventor of the World-Wide-Web, is deserving of a Peace Prize.[...] Awarding the Peace Prize to a thing? Ugh. Don't get me started. Awarding the Prize to organizations is silly enough already.

Tom: Uh, how'd you solve the door dilemma?

Buzz: Homer Simpson was the real hero here. He jury-rigged the door closed using this.

Man 1: Hey, what is that?

Man 2: It's an inanimate carbon rod!

Everyone: Yay!

[Time magazine cover: "In Rod We Trust"]

Re:Tim Berners-Lee (1)

AmazinglySmooth (1668735) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046980)

How about Claude Shannon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claude_E._Shannon)?

Re:Tim Berners-Lee (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#31047022)

You know that the WWW is only a PART of the Internet?
As in: The USA is just a PART of the world.

Re:Tim Berners-Lee (1)

wigaloo (897600) | more than 4 years ago | (#31047060)

You know that the WWW is only a PART of the Internet?

As in: The USA is just a PART of the world.

You know that the Inernet was little-known outside of universities before the Web? You also know that Tim is British, right? And that he invented the WWW while at CERN? You know, the European Organization for Nuclear Research?

Reducing this to some problem you have with the USA only exposes your own ignorance and predjudice.

darpa (4, Funny)

portscan (140282) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046616)

So, the award would really have to be given to DARPA -- the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, which is where the Internet was invented. After all the attention last year given to Obama receiving the prize while waging two wars, I think giving it to the US Military directly would really drive some people over the edge.

Re:darpa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046808)

CONTINUING (and trying to end) two wars. Not 'waging' them. That was what the warmongers before him started.

Re:darpa (4, Informative)

dreamchaser (49529) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046868)

He also just called for increased funding for the development and testing of nuclear weapons. That was all on him.

Re:darpa (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046908)

(and trying to end)

proof? i've seen nothing of the sort.

Re:darpa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31047014)

i've seen nothing of the sort.

No one is so blind as he who refuses to see.

Re:darpa (1)

santax (1541065) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046946)

You know, there is way to much truth in what you are saying. See that van outside? With that guy in black? Thats me. Please step out of your house sir and approach me with your hands where I can see them.

The Internet will start a war (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046618)

It looks like the internet is the perfect breeding ground for paranoia and fear of China.
The capacity of the american public for whipping themselves into a warmongering state of fear is helped by quick and easy communication with like minded paranoiacs.

While the internet has done a good bit for peace.. (0, Redundant)

Entropius (188861) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046648)

... can't we find somebody else who deserves the thing? Obama's done no more for world peace than any other sane person in the US: he's not a radical warmonger, but that in itself shouldn't get you an award. Rather than giving it to him, give it to someone who worked to make sure McCain didn't get elected, if you want to tie it to the US.

Morgan Tsangvirai, maybe. Or the pro-democracy campaigners in Iran.

Are there really that few good people in the world these days?

Re:While the internet has done a good bit for peac (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046684)

I was thinking of that women wearing the red dress up in the Google ad.

Re:While the internet has done a good bit for peac (1)

russotto (537200) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046712)

Rather than giving it to him, give it to someone who worked to make sure McCain didn't get elected

And who worked harder to make sure McCain didn't get elected than Obama?

Re:While the internet has done a good bit for peac (1, Informative)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046770)

And who worked harder to make sure McCain didn't get elected than Obama?

Sarah Palin.

Not sure if she's eligible though - she probably was "thinking" that she's helping McCain, so her motivations weren't exactly at the right place.

Re:While the internet has done a good bit for peac (1)

wigaloo (897600) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046840)

Are there really that few good people in the world these days?

Maybe. Or at least they are getting harder to identify.

One problem is that the word hero is over-used and abused. For example, anyone from "our side" who gets killed in war is a hero. Sorry -- and this is not a popular position these days -- but that is wrong, despite the families need to justify their horrendous sacrifice. Furthermore, it only perpetuates the never-ending cycle of war we seem to have gotten ourselves into. We don't want to "dishour" their sacrifice by refusing to sacrifice more of our youth.

Nelson Mandella is one of my personal heroes. But would he survive as a hero in this day and age? A lot of effort is spent trying to tear people of accomplishment down. Nobody is perfect.

Re:While the internet has done a good bit for peac (2, Informative)

nsayer (86181) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046860)

Rather than giving it to him, give it to someone who worked to make sure McCain didn't get elected

You know, folks like you told me over and over again during 2008 that if I voted for McCain that we'd wind up having more troops sent to Iraq and Afghanistan, and they were absolutely right. I did vote for McCain and sure enough.

Gee, I don't know... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046680)

Shouldn't we throw another one at Obama for good measure?

Officially nominated? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046682)

Okay, from RTFS, it seems like it's only been "nominated" by Wired magazine itself, which is not the same thing as receiving an official nomination. Is this the same shit that happened with that doctor in the Schiavo case, who went around on talk shows introducing himself as a Nobel Prize nominee because some Congressman wrote a letter to the Nobel committee once? It's like posting in a blog that Aaron Seltzer and Jason Friedberg deserve an Academy Award for Epic Movie and then going around calling it an Oscar-nominated film.

Re:Officially nominated? (5, Informative)

twidarkling (1537077) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046742)

Excellent point. The Prize Committee doesn't tell who the nominated parties are until 50 years, according to the first link in the summary. I could nominate my toothbrush, and post about it, and it'd be as a legitimate a story as this one.

I nominate ... (4, Funny)

wisnoskij (1206448) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046724)

I nominate Inanimate Carbon Rod [wikia.com] for employee of the month.

Nominate Al Gore (1)

bkeahl (1688280) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046732)

Shoot, just nominate Al Gore for creating it! Do I have to think of everything? :).

Re:Nominate Al Gore (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046756)

You missed the joke. The Committee was going to announce the Internet as the winner, and then Al would walk up on stage uninvited to accept the award.

Babelfish example (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046734)

Isn't the internet kind of like the Babelfish in that it makes communication easier between difference groups? So in effect isn't it possible that the internet is helping to cause or prolong all the wars we have now?

Ludicrous (1)

DakotaSmith (937647) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046774)

Well, after exposing themselves for the utter frauds they are after the last winner, I'd hardly put it past the Committee.

There's no reason to give a Nobel Prize of any kind to an inanimate collection of circuits. You give the prize to people who built the circuits.

I mean, you know ... duh.

I wondering if my knowing this particular tidbit of sanity would qualify me for a Nobel Prize of my own ... ?

Precedent (1)

nsayer (86181) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046780)

There is a precedent for Nobel prizes to other than natural persons, and for the prize to not be awarded in a particular year. There's no reason they couldn't allocate the prize money back into the prize fund (like they did in 1972) while issuing a proclamation praising the Internet for whatever they like.

The alternative would be to award the prize to DARPA, which is probably not really in keeping with the spirit of the award.

Resist great firewalls (1)

presidenteloco (659168) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046820)

There is something to this, in that when individual citizens of different countries
communicate directly with each other, and can read a broad range of perspective,
their political views will inevitably slide toward global norms.

The non-hierarchical, international nature of the Internet is a threat to
the sovereignty of state governments. The state government now just becomes
one of many voices communicating with its people.

The challenge to peace-loving people will be resisting the tendency of threatened state governments
to erect more and more opaque and monitored firewalls (or latency walls)
between the nets in different countries.

The invention of GeoIP services (restricting my ability to view and purchase things, depending
on my country) has already made the Internet tragically more bordered
than it was even 10 years ago. We have to resist this trend. We have to allow simple global
e-commerce, and open global sharing of cultural "products".

I nominate ... (1)

paimin (656338) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046824)

My. Balls. They're peaceful. They never hurt no one.

Is it just me, (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046848)

or is the Nobel committee just seeing if they can get exponentially more ludicrous year after year?

vote obama (1)

Sam36 (1065410) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046856)

obama is way better than any internet

This trend started when the Supreme Court (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046864)

...gave corporations the same rights to bribe politicians as individuals.

Legitimate entry? Not according to Nobel's will... (4, Informative)

LockeOnLogic (723968) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046924)

Excerpt from the will of Alfred Nobel (emphasis added): "...divided into five equal parts, which shall be apportioned as follows: one part to the PERSON who shall have made the most important discovery or invention within the field of physics; one part to the PERSON who shall have made the most important chemical discovery or improvement; one part to the PERSON who shall have made the most important discovery within the domain of physiology or medicine; one part to the PERSON who shall have produced in the field of literature the most outstanding work in an ideal direction; and one part to the PERSON who shall have done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, for the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding and promotion of peace congresses."

This nomination of an object clearly goes against the founders intent. Are we going to aware the physics prize to the LHC someday?

Clearly (2, Insightful)

ShiningSomething (1097589) | more than 4 years ago | (#31046986)

These people have not heard of 4chan.

Nobel peace prize (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31046994)

has become a joke.

The same people that awarded prizes to (1)

Low Ranked Craig (1327799) | more than 4 years ago | (#31047090)

Yasser Arafat for bring "peace" and then Obama for things he had yet to do?

This is about as meaningful as who wins an Academy Award.

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