Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

International Space Station Cupola Video Released

kdawson posted more than 4 years ago | from the next-to-the-gazebo dept.

Space 70

quaith writes "With the Space Shuttle Endeavour scheduled to launch at 4:39 AM EST on Sunday for a trip to the International Space Station, the European Space Agency has released a video that shows how the modules it's carrying — Node-3 ('Tranquility') and Cupola — are going to get attached. Node-3 is a connecting module. Cupola has six trapezoidal windows and circular roof designed to provide a unique vantage-point for observing Earth. The video animations show how the station's robotic arm will be used initially to put the modules in place as a single unit, and then to detach Cupola from the end of Node-3 and reattach it on the Earth-facing side. With this addition, the ISS will start to look like something that Jules Verne would have wanted to visit."

cancel ×

70 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

I want my freedom back (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31049404)

"I hereby sentence you to a term of no less than 6 years and not exceeding 12 years" bellowed the Judge at my court case. You could tell in the sterness of his voice and his general demeanor that he took delight in sending scum like me up the river. A fucking DUI that ended up killing some black kid in Detroit was all it took to sealed my fate for the next decade. I had thoughts of appeal but I figured it wouldn't be worth the little savings I had left and my sentence would probably stand. To this day I still believe had the kid been white, my life would have been much easier, inside and outside of prison.

Now, don't believe what you see on Televison about prison, it is a far worse place than any 32" screen could every conjure up. Imagine watching an MSNBC special on jail or an episode of OZ and take that experience and double it. That's about the wretched hell I have come to know for the past 3 1/2 years. Sometimes I don't know who is worse and my already fazed and battered mind, the prison guards or the inmates. It really takes a certain type of psychopath to want to work around this place, 8 hours a day or longer and that's exactly the type of labor pool this place picks from.

I can't say my first week was the worst week of my life, but I can certainly say it was the scariest, most horrifying change change in lifestyle I can remember. The dynamic between my old life as a software developer with a modest 1 bedroom downtime, to sharing a tiny cell with a sexual deviant is enough to make anyone go insane. But anyway let me talk about my first day of 12 long years here.

As I was escorted on to the prison bound bus with the day's newly convicted felons, it was already starting. I was chained next to this black man named Napps. I am sure this wasn't his real name but you can't tell these days with the way these people are named. Now Napps was a pretty built man, and I could tell by the excess amount of tattos and his attitude, that this wasn't the first time he was getting bussed off to a stint in the State Penetentary. Napps upon being forced to sit next to me had given me a look that you would imagine a wolf would give towards their defenseless prey. That was what I officially was now, defensless prey for Napps and God knows who else now. Napps, with a smug and deviously look in his eye asked me "What's a white boy like yourself doing going to the shit?". "Pardon?", I said uneasily almost choking on my words. "This white boy dinks we at da country club.", he said to the rest of the bus, while the bus started roaring in laughter. Now all eyes and ears on the bus were tuned in to me. "I says, wat a tender cracka like you doing here wit the rest of us?", he said in a more pointed fashion. "I'm here...for drunk driving. I killed someone in Brightmore", I shamefully admitted. "So you the motherfucka who killed dat black kid!", now furious with me. The rest of the bus, still focused on me began roaring again loudly as if my crime is more terrible than raping and killing a white woman in the suburbs (I eventually find this out later on). "You lucky da guards are here bitch, you hear me? When we get down to the shit, your ass belongs to the blacks, you got it cracker?". My heart jumped, not even in prison yet, and I am already targeted for what I am sure is to be a stabbing. Shit.

The bus finally turned into the outer gate, which seemed to stretch on for ever, Napps was still from time to time threatening me. I didn't think I would even make it into prison alive. "So you kill one of ours, huh?", he uttered with extreme hatred. "Well, I took one of yours too bitch ass. 4 of my boys went to your white part of town and and took a bitch. We ran a train on dat fo 8 hours, den we pours acid on that cunt", he must have enjoyed the thought as he laughed sadisticly while telling me his crime. As we got manhandled off of the bus one by one, Napps turned around and said "watch yo ass, lit'ry!", before being forced face first by the guard.

By now I was too much in shock from being scared to even be scared. I went through the motions of "processing" before I was escorted to my cell. The bunk was already occupied with an inmate, reading some sort of hip-hop magazine. I was pushed into my cell, and my new roommate eyed me and said "So you the nigga killer?". "It's gonna be you and me tonight", he threatened as I already had my fill of being threatened by prison niggers. It was already about 8:30 and since our bus got delayed coming in, and I knew that in a half an hour it was going to be 'me and him'.

"Lights out! Lights fucking out!" Yelled from the distance as the boom of the dimming lights started my first night. "You and me time, cracker" the hulking voice from the top of the bunk whispered. He came down from his bunk getting about 6 inches away from me and must have been 6 foot five. I started panicking, believing he had a shank or was going to choke me to death but it was too dark to tell. He moved his hands down around his crotch and made several 'manuveurs'. Before I knew it, still being dark, he had his cock out in front of me, which must have been at least 8 inches but probably 10 if I could see. "Yo want to ack like a bitch, you gonna suck like one too". His giant hands pushed me into my knees while he began putting his already erect cock up towards my face. By now his throbbing cock was hitting me on the side of my ear as he kept commanding me to open my mouth. "Put this shit down yo throat bitch", he commanded again while I still resisted. "Boy, I will cut yo throat if I gots to say it another time", he responded to my reluctance.

I finally gave in, thinking that this was probably still better than death. I opened my mouth and began feeding his nigger cock into my mouth. This was not enough for him and he grabbed my hair while he forced the rest of what was probably 5 inches more down my throat. I almost gagged but maintained composure, while he started skull fucking me more and more. I figured this would soon be over and I would be able to go cry myself to sleep very soon. He then pulled out and I thought the worst was over. "Bitches need a good fuck now too", he said while he threw me in my bunk and made me get on my hands and knees. He forced my pants down and kept me in place even while I tried my best to squirm out of there and go...nowhere. His cock still hard and wet with my mouth, he pushed his cock into my virgin asshole. I swear, between his cock size and my clenching reaction, this was the most painful experience I have can remember. The car accident that brought me here didn't even hurt half as bad. He kept going at it while he pulled my hair and pinned me down with his giant body. I tried to scream for help but nothing would even coming out. The only sounds now coming out of my cell was the cyclic screeching of springs and the "Hmm! Hmm! Hmm!" of my new found rapist. When it was finally over, he had deposited a gigantic load of semen on my ass, and with his cock still in my ass whispered in my ear "Wait till the rest of the niggers break you in tomorrow". He kissed me on the cheek and left my limp body in my own bed as he climbed back up to his bunk.

3 spinchter surgeries and an HIV positive diagnosis later, I am 3 year into my prison sentence, and worth about a pack of Pall Malls. I constantly think of killing myself but I know I don't have the guts to do so. Napps, Tbone, and Shades are back and I have little time now before I get traded on the nigger exchange. I thought I would share my experiences on Slashdot and let people know how prison reall
asfd
sf
dfasd

Re:I want my freedom back (-1, Offtopic)

haderytn (1232484) | more than 4 years ago | (#31049414)

Yum, copy pasta. Grats on the Nobel nomination.

Two astronauts... (4, Funny)

nacturation (646836) | more than 4 years ago | (#31049444)

... one cupola?

Re:Two astronauts... (1)

wwwillem (253720) | more than 4 years ago | (#31049834)

Yes, but with seven windows. And I didn't see curtains .....

Re:Two astronauts... (1)

gcnaddict (841664) | more than 4 years ago | (#31172924)

There were mechanical covers on the outside that opened almost like flower petals.

Re:Two astronauts... (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 4 years ago | (#31050974)

Two astronauts in, three astronauts out???

Launch Cancelled. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31051236)

"No-go" for Endeavour's Launch
Sun, 07 Feb 2010 04:30:56 AM EST

Space shuttle Endeavour's launch attempt has been scrubbed due to a low cloud ceiling over Kennedy Space Center.

Managers initially plan for a 24-hour turnaround, but will evaluate tomorrow's weather before making a final decision. Next possible launch attempt is Monday, Feb. 8 at 4:14 a.m. EST.

I want a room with a view (3, Interesting)

v1 (525388) | more than 4 years ago | (#31049446)

and that looks like it delivers. Interesting idea to forge the frame from a single piece of aluminum... definitely saved some weight on a bunch more seals...

Re:I want a room with a view (4, Funny)

argent (18001) | more than 4 years ago | (#31049608)

Seals are so heavy, They would have saved a bunch of weight by using sea otters holding hands.

Re:I want a room with a view (1)

QuantumPion (805098) | more than 4 years ago | (#31176490)

You call that an observation deck? Looks more like the cockpit of a TIE fighter to me...

Market (3, Funny)

NonSequor (230139) | more than 4 years ago | (#31049496)

This is going to do wonders for their resale value when the market turns around.

Well, they may call it "Tranquility" (4, Funny)

portforward (313061) | more than 4 years ago | (#31049536)

but I know it my heart it should be "Colbert."

Re:Well, they may call it "Tranquility" (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#31049746)

but I know it my heart it should be "Colbert."

I would vote for "Buzz" but I guess people would feel strange saying "Lets meet in Buzz", etc.

Re:Well, they may call it "Tranquility" (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#31050222)

Bah. You are too modest.
I say: Only they call it Tranquility. ^^
The rest of the world won’t even/ever know what that’s supposed to be.;)

If I ever meet a NASA/ESA/whatever employee/astronaut, I will annoy the hell out of him, by answering to a “blablabla... Tranquility ...blablabla” statement with “What?... Aaahh, you mean the Colbert module!”! :D

Re:Well, they may call it "Tranquility" (1)

Erbo (384) | more than 4 years ago | (#31050572)

I voted for "Serenity." 'Cos you can't take the sky from me.

But "Tranquility" is also good. Not only is it a reference to the first moon landing, but "Tranquility" is also the name of EVE Online's primary server cluster. And the view from that cupola would leave a Gallente sighing with contentment, an Amarr reverently praying, and a Minmatar rejoicing in the freedom. (The Caldari would probably be too busy fretting about how much it all cost...)

Re:Well, they may call it "Tranquility" (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31051300)

what the hell are you talking about? get out of your basement much?

Re:Well, they may call it "Tranquility" (1)

mwvdlee (775178) | more than 4 years ago | (#31051398)

Okay, so "Tranquility" is out of the running.

Do we have some other names lined up that DON'T have dozens of sci-fi references linked to them?

Re:Well, they may call it "Tranquility" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31052072)

Apple pie.

You know what you have to do first.

Is this the Frances Ford Cupola? (4, Funny)

trout007 (975317) | more than 4 years ago | (#31049566)

I think it was a partnership between France and Ford. I could be wrong.

Re:Is this the Frances Ford Cupola? (1)

gad_zuki! (70830) | more than 4 years ago | (#31049768)

A partnership between France and Ford, what could possibly go wrong?

The robotic arm's seal broke after just five hours of use and, wait, is that wine spilling out?

Re:Is this the Frances Ford Cupola? (3, Funny)

mwvdlee (775178) | more than 4 years ago | (#31051408)

The robotic arm's seal broke after just five hours of use and, wait, is that wine spilling out?

Hydraulics, alcoholics... it's all pretty much the same thing.

Re:Is this the Frances Ford Cupola? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31052388)

France? I suppose they will surrender the control of this module to the German astronauts...

Designed for what? (4, Informative)

Shag (3737) | more than 4 years ago | (#31049570)

Cupola has six trapezoidal windows and circular roof designed to provide a unique vantage-point for observing Earth.

I think you meant to say "designed for monitoring dockings, robotic-arm operations and spacewalks."

But I'm sure the residents of the station will be begging command to let them open the aluminum shutters that protect those windows from space junk and meteorites, since the windows coincidentally would provide a unique vantage-point for observing Earth and space, too. :)

As well as anything else that might be outside... glass elevators, vermicious knids, etc.

Re:Designed for what? (1)

tsotha (720379) | more than 4 years ago | (#31050620)

Thanks for pointing that out. Based on the summary, my first reaction to the story was "I paid what to give seven guys a nice view?"

Re:Designed for what? (2, Informative)

Rexdude (747457) | more than 4 years ago | (#31051478)

As well as anything else that might be outside... glass elevators, vermicious knids, etc.

For those who didn't know, that's a Roald Dahl reference, from 'Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator'

Re:Designed for what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31057158)

Please mod parent (-1: must not get invited to a lot of parties.)

grammatically challenged scientists announce (5, Funny)

byrdfl3w (1193387) | more than 4 years ago | (#31049620)

they're gonna put a cupola new bits on the ISS..

Shed engineering (1)

LoudMusic (199347) | more than 4 years ago | (#31049758)

I'm building a coffee table in my garage. NASA probably wouldn't pass my engineering for space use :(

"We want a window!" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31049894)

I'm reminded of that quote from "The Right Stuff" when I see this story.
Yes, let's haul exercise equipment and a window to the space station, and cancel the Aries rocket and manned space exploration.
Hooray for NASA priorities! Money well spent!

Re:"We want a window!" (4, Interesting)

khallow (566160) | more than 4 years ago | (#31049992)

and cancel the Aries rocket and manned space exploration.

We can always do manned space exploration with the Delta IV Heavy and Atlas V Heavy. And since NASA will be using commercial vehicles, they'll help the US develop space instead of being the usual obstacle.

Re:"We want a window!" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31050286)

Chill. The super heavy IS coming. Bolden is trying hard to get the ducks in a row first. It will likely be direct stage one, but it might not be. From what I hear, it WILL be private space.

Re:"We want a window!" (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 4 years ago | (#31050384)

Chill. The super heavy IS coming. Bolden is trying hard to get the ducks in a row first. It will likely be direct stage one, but it might not be. From what I hear, it WILL be private space.

Would be very nice. I'd have to say though that I'm a bit reluctant to believe it. The problem is that commercial space, while it does have a lot of launch experience is starting to push into ground where nobody outside of Shuttle program really has much experience. For example, for bigger than the current breed of 20-25 ton launchers (there are three currently, Ariane 5, Proton, and Delta IV Heavy), there is no experience outside of the Shuttle, Apollo, and Energia. That means that this is new ground for the commercial sector. I hope you are right, but it'll be a big challenge.

Re:"We want a window!" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31052472)

I did not say that it would be new space. If they do Direct, it will almost certainly be the same Shuttle players. And ALL of them have the RD, as well as manufacturing experience. The problem right now, is that Bolden is kind of back sliding on some of this. He is now saying that he still considers Ares V a possibility. Personally, I hope not. THAT would require an all new system.

There is one other option that I am sure bolden is not thinking about. SpaceX recently acquired rights to a large hylox engine (I forget which one, but it was Rocketdynes). I could see them scaling up the Falcon 9 and then replacing their engine with these. That would be a MONSTER craft. And the nice thing is that they are constantly doing one-offs. It limits the risk on each new iteration. Personally, I would love to see them announce a tug with a fuel depot. Even if they do RP1/lox, that would work for say 4-6 years. In the mean time, that would stimulate NASA to get their act together and come up with a docking standard for doing automated depot loading.

Re:"We want a window!" (1)

ae1294 (1547521) | more than 4 years ago | (#31052994)

At least until one of the commercial vehicles explode.

Re:"We want a window!" (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 4 years ago | (#31053168)

How is a commercial vehicle explosion different from a government vehicle explosion? There's a simple answer here. There is no obligation to use a commercial vehicle. If it cannot demonstrate that it can meet or maintain the safety standards that NASA needs (I'm not talking of the bogus safety standards and estimates designed to exclude commercial vehicles like are present in the Exploration Space Architecture Study which rationalized use of the Ares I), then they can be dropped. If a NASA program like the Shuttle or Ares I cannot meet the safety standards, then NASA does a bit of safety theater and keeps using the vehicle. There is an obligation to use a NASA vehicle.

Re:"We want a window!" (1)

ae1294 (1547521) | more than 4 years ago | (#31054730)

Ugh... My point was that space travel is dangerous. What do you think will happen when a private companies space craft explodes? If it is anything like what happened when the space shuttle exploded then said company will be out of business...

Re:"We want a window!" (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 4 years ago | (#31057176)

Ugh... My point was that space travel is dangerous. What do you think will happen when a private companies space craft explodes? If it is anything like what happened when the space shuttle exploded then said company will be out of business...

There are a couple of things to remember here. First, it won't be like the Space Shuttle. Even if a manned launch fails and kills astronauts, the business can still continue to launch unmanned missions. That doesn't work for every vehicle, but most vehicles can lift unmanned payloads (some already do). This provides a way to test fixes on the vehicle without risking astronaut lives, both lowering the cost of testing and speeding up necessary fixes. The Shuttle was unusual in that it required people on each flight so there was a lot of soul searching prior to a launch after an accident. Second, while a commercial launcher won't have the deep pockets of NASA, they probably will be immune to a number of legal liabilities.

Re:"We want a window!" (1)

ae1294 (1547521) | more than 4 years ago | (#31060944)

That's an interesting point and you are right to a certain degree. I just wonder about the venture capital and stock prices dropping for these private companies. I guess we will see how the market reacts when there is a major accident. I personally hope people don't freak out but I'm not so sure that they won't. I'd love to take a trip to LEO sometime regardless of the risk but that will never happen until the price is driven down by the free market.

Re:"We want a window!" (1)

LingNoi (1066278) | more than 4 years ago | (#31050050)

This is seems to be part of an agreement with the European space agency so it probably was money well spent.

Node-3 is part of the Columbus launch barter agreement with NASA under which ESA supplied two of the connecting nodes (Node-2 and -3) for the International Space Station (ISS) and additional high-technology laboratory equipment and services to NASA in return for launching Europe’s Columbus laboratory to the ISS in February 2008. Cupola is covered by a separate barter agreement in exchange of the launch and return of five ESA payloads by NASA.

Re:"We want a window!" (4, Informative)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#31051352)

Exercise equipment is essential for keeping the crew healthy; Cupola is a useful observation deck for EVA and Canadarm activities as well as basic Earth observation - that it also provides a very nice view is a good thing, if only because of possible benefits in keeping the crew functioning nicely, all around.

Speaking of hauling equipment - the view of Shuttle on the launchpad with cargo visible was really depressing; so much barely needed structure, so much waste in launched mass...

Re:"We want a window!" (1)

carn1fex (613593) | more than 4 years ago | (#31175120)

Lolz, yea they really should have pulled out a cutting torch and cut out the middle third of the shuttle. :)

Imagine the view (2, Insightful)

kerskine (46804) | more than 4 years ago | (#31049944)

What I would give to spend 8 hours in that cupola

Re:Imagine the view (2)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#31050254)

What I would give, to spend 8 hours with (first) a really great meal and (then) a naked and willing $favoriteHotGirl in that Cupola.

And how I wish that I would have the skill to make HER want to give (whatever she would give) to do this with me. :D

Re:Imagine the view (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31057208)

Easy... her price for the experience would be spending it with you.

Cool (4, Informative)

FleaPlus (6935) | more than 4 years ago | (#31049994)

Sure, the international cooperation on the ISS was done pretty suboptimally (e.g. over-reliance on the delay-prone and costly Space Shuttle), but there's still something really inspirational about a European-built observatory module being launched on an American rocket, so that astronauts can (among other things) effectively control a Canada-built robotic construction arm, powered by US and Russian solar panels. Also, the robotic Canadarm and Cupola will be used to install the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer [wikipedia.org] in a few months, one of the space station's most promising scientific instruments.

Some more info on the Cupola over at wiki (of course): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cupola_(ISS) [wikipedia.org]

Re:Cool (1)

nicknamenotavailable (1730990) | more than 4 years ago | (#31050918)

American components, Russian components... all made in Taiwan!

Lev Andropov.

Re:Cool (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 4 years ago | (#31052490)

Personally, I am in hopes that we will restore the CAM. AMS could have occurred on the planet, but ISS is also nice. BUT, CAM can ONLY happen in micro grav. That is the one thing that ISS can really deliver; tell us how we will do in space, on the moon, or on mars. But, W killed it. Hopefully, Bolden has enough brains to make that a top priority once he has sorted through the coming nightmare over the budget.

Re:Cool (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 4 years ago | (#31053344)

CAM requires lower gravity than the minimum range it is to test, it doesn't require the microgravity environment present on the ISS. For example, you could test Mars level gravity on the Moon or Mars and lunar level gravity on Ceres even though both places have significant gravity acceleration four or more orders of magnitude greater than a microgravity environment.

Re:Cool (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 4 years ago | (#31057190)

The real question is not just how we will do on these planets, but what is the minimum to keep us from having longterm damage. As I wrote to fleaplus, it is possible that 1/10 G (less than mars or moon, but more than ceres) would be enough to keep our bones and muscles in OK shape. If so, then a craft is easy to design. In the end, it does not matter. Far far cheaper to put a CAM on the ISS, than the other locations.

Re:Cool (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 4 years ago | (#31057338)

Far far cheaper to put a CAM on the ISS, than the other locations.

I agree. I was just saying the microgravity environment isn't needed unless you are doing experiments with very low gravity, say one or two orders of magnitude above the microgravity environment.\

Re:Cool (1)

FleaPlus (6935) | more than 4 years ago | (#31053972)

I suspect you probably already know about this, but it looks like CAM is one of the things the newly-announced initiative for NASA is looking to bring back:

http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/factsheet_department_nasa/ [whitehouse.gov]

$183 million to extend operations of the ISS past its previously planned retirement date of 2016. NASA will deploy new research facilities to conduct scientific research and test technologies in space. New capabilities could include a centrifuge to support research into human physiology, inflatable space habitats, and a program to continuously upgrade Space Station capabilities.

Re:Cool (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 4 years ago | (#31057162)

I missed that. THANK YOU!!!!!! That is damn good news. We really need to know how the body will react on these various gravities. Likewise, it would be nice to know if there is a minimal amount of gravity that will keep the body from the degradation. Maybe something as simple as 1/10G would cut it, which would make it pretty damn simple to design that in a Mars bound craft.

www.esa.int (3, Interesting)

hey (83763) | more than 4 years ago | (#31050018)

I like the use of the .int top-level-domain.

Re:www.esa.int (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31050948)

Quick! Somebody snatch short.int, long.int, and long.long.int.

Re:www.esa.int (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31051270)

It's a shame they're only avaiable for intergovernmental organizations [iana.org] . Really :-( .

Re:www.esa.int (1)

mwvdlee (775178) | more than 4 years ago | (#31051442)

So? Get the governments of some of those miniscule island states to create intergovernmental organizations for you; the domain name is free!

Re:www.esa.int (2, Insightful)

Trapezium Artist (919330) | more than 4 years ago | (#31053300)

I completely agree with you, it's very cool in a Joe-90, Thunderbirds kind of way. Then again, what else could we use for an international organisation with 18 member states? .org possibly, but it's a bit bland.

(Yes, I work for ESA and very much like my @esa.int mail address :-)

Re:www.esa.int (1)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | more than 4 years ago | (#31173906)

Want to trade an esa.int mail account for a .gov one? =) I kid, I kid

/works on the LHC out of the US

Tank turret (1)

rossdee (243626) | more than 4 years ago | (#31050348)

I thought that the cupola was the commanders turret on top of a tank, usually mounting a heavy machine gun.

Re:Tank turret (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | more than 4 years ago | (#31051080)

I thought that the cupola was the commanders turret on top of a tank, usually mounting a heavy machine gun.

It is.

Dig foxholes. Duck and cover.

Is this your leader?

Re:Tank turret (1)

MakinBacon (1476701) | more than 4 years ago | (#31052618)

What else do you expect us to use to fend off the inevitable alien invasion?

Re:Tank turret (1)

ArsonSmith (13997) | more than 4 years ago | (#31175778)

We'll confuse them by cutting the corners off all our paper and books.

Love it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31050682)

Great place to take a date on Valentine's Day. Way better than the usual accommodations those of us in the Mile High Club are used to....

Launch scrubbed! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31051334)

The launch has been scrubbed [nasa.gov] due to less-than-optimal weather.
Damn, I was really looking forward to watching the launch. I hope they'll launch tomorrow, otherwise i probably won't be able to watch it...
Goddamnit Obama! Nuke the friggin' clouds from high orbit!

Re:Launch scrubbed! (1)

abuelos84 (1340505) | more than 4 years ago | (#31057084)

Hahaha, that's got to be the best anti-obama statement i've read in a long time, classy as hell! roflmaololalo

"Video animation" ? (2, Informative)

rpetre (818018) | more than 4 years ago | (#31051436)

Maybe it's because I'm not a native English speaker, but this sounds very much like redundancy (I think the correct grammatical term is "tautology"), probably induced by some so-called SEO expert: "screw common sense, just toss in the keyword 'video' as much as possible".

Re:"Video animation" ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31173760)

Yes, I agree. They should have printed the animation in a flip book and handed that out to everyone interested in this space module.

too bad only four US astronauts a year will use it (3, Informative)

peter303 (12292) | more than 4 years ago | (#31053106)

At its maximum capacity the Soyuz could supply 18 astronauts a year to the space station via six annual launches. But Soyuz has never operated at that high capacity. Four launches would be considered more likely. The US quota is 2 of the 6 ISS astronauts, Russia another two, and the remaining two more for Japan, ESA, and Canada. More likely there will be 4-5 at a time and four launched, hence the four US astronaut estimate. Contrast this to the 25-30 in recent years to build the ISS.

Re:too bad only four US astronauts a year will use (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 4 years ago | (#31057300)

I was under impression that we already paid them to bring up the number of launches. In particular, I thought that we paid them several years ago to keep the levels up for several years.

Tie-Fighter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31184246)

Is it me or the view from the cupola with the shutters opened looks A LOT like the view from a Tie-Fighters cockpit??
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cupola_ISS_open_shutters_middle_crop.jpg (wikipedia picture)

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?