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356 comments

Suspicious... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31076752)

Somehow Dominic Michael Salemno was involved in this.

pstools best by far (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31076758)

psexec has saved my ass SO many times it's not even funny. psexec \\almostcrashedserver cmd.exe

Re:pstools best by far (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31076904)

yay, windows! where you have to download third-party "sysinternals" tools to get the most basic functionality that any stock Unix provides out of the box. woohoo for progress! let's celebrate this with much praise and ado.

Re:pstools best by far (0, Flamebait)

PRMan (959735) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077664)

As a convicted monopolist, it behooves Microsoft to have as many tools remain third-party as possible.

Duh (5, Insightful)

afidel (530433) | more than 4 years ago | (#31076766)

There's a reason MS bought the company and hired Mark, he consistently puts out the most useful tools for in the trenches Windows diagnostics. Heck MS's PSS would routinely have you use his tools even before the purchase because nothing they put out internally was nearly as useful.

Re:Duh (2, Interesting)

Jeng (926980) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077356)

And here I thought that Mark got hired to turn Windows Vista into Windows 7. ( I have no idea, but it was my thought at the time that they bought the best kernal hacker out there to redo Vista. )

Glad to see that not only are Marks old free tools still free, but that Microsoft is allowing new tools of his to be free also. Very un-microsoft of microsoft.

Re:Duh (1, Interesting)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077432)

"The Hidden Treasures of Sysinternals"

Why are they hidden? This is the sort of thing that should be documented. Of course, MS documantation is completely lame. Half the time when I hit F1 trying to find out how to do something in MS Access, it points me to a nonexistant menu item. It makes me think of the late Lilly Tomlin's "Ernestine the telephone operator" -- "We're the phone company. We don't HAVE To."

People badmouth Linux docs, but I have a far easier time finding how to do something in Linux than Windows. How good is Apple documentation?

We've had them on UNIX for ages now! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31077690)

While his tools are by far extremely useful when using Windows, I've always found it hilarious that we've had similar commands bundled with UNIX and UNIX-like systems for decades now.

I mean, the dd command takes care of "creating virtual hard disks from physical drives" and "putting ISO images onto flash drives". Commands like iostat and iotop take care of "hard disk read-write monitoring". And they're present even in the most basic of installations.

Re:Duh (3, Interesting)

EvanED (569694) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077776)

Heck MS's PSS would routinely have you use his tools even before the purchase because nothing they put out internally was nearly as useful.

Around the time MS hired Russinovich a lot of people on Slashdot were worried that it would mean the death of Sysinternals's tools, but what you say is why that argument was almost ridiculous: there'd have been open revolt within MS if that went down.

(I suppose they could have kept the tools internal to MS, but that didn't seem likely.)

Best Buy (5, Funny)

liquidpele (663430) | more than 4 years ago | (#31076788)

I bet Best Buy could sure use these

Re:Best Buy (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31077182)

ironically... mark sued geeksquad for using these and his other tools!

Re:Best Buy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31077414)

He knows that. His post isn't funny without that fact.

Re:Best Buy (2, Insightful)

zero0ne (1309517) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077706)

I understand the joke... but lets be serious here, I would be surprised if even 5% of their staff understands how to use these tools correctly.

When they first started GeekSquad in my area, I was there for a total of 3 months (~15/hr was a good chunk of cash for a college student).

I saw:

- people returning towers that ended up having the actual folder we used to document our steps INSIDE the case (surprised the thing didnt overheat)

- employees trying to remove a power supply without properly unscrewing and detaching the cables from the mobo.

- managers press their staff to push the ~$70 backup "deal" onto customers (4.7GB of backup no less)

- a virus on a PC that looked like it filled up the entire hard drive with empty avi files that had a random porn like name given to em.

- much more I cant recall right now (I've tried to delete it from my memory)

I stopped showing up shortly after.

It's all stuff that ships with Linux (3, Insightful)

tjstork (137384) | more than 4 years ago | (#31076792)

You know, sysinternals was amazing piece of reverse engineering work and some of the utilities that came out of it were pretty interesting as examples of that reverse engineering work.

But...

All that stuff is junk compared to what Linux does for utilities!

I mean, my ubuntu has had burning ISOs and copying them any which way now for at leas 5 years. I can type sensors and get the motherboard temperature, fan speeds, everything. I mean, if you are into doing hardware and low level OS hardware interfacing stuff, there's enough gobblygook in /proc to keep anyone happy from Linux, and then there's all the log files and then the source.

I mean, yeah, Windows has its advantages, but sysinternals isn't one of them. sysinternals is just proof that for a lot of applications you have to be a hero to get it to do anything simply because the source is closed.

Re:It's all stuff that ships with Linux (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31076824)

No one gives a shit about your tinker toy Loonix box you fucking obese neckbeard.

Re:It's all stuff that ships with Linux (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31076974)

Have fun reinstalling your OS next time you bork your Windows box with malware, douchebag. How's that autorun working for 'ya? Oh, right, you don't know about it, because I'm gonna be the one wiping your ass and fixing your shitware anyway.

Reinstall OS, check. Disable autorun, check. That'll be 120 dollars, please.

Re:It's all stuff that ships with Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31077070)

Except, you know, autorun hardly matters.

Re:It's all stuff that ships with Linux (1)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077372)

No one gives a shit about your tinker toy Loonix box you fucking obese neckbeard.

Thank you for speaking for the entire population. Why do we even need those expensive polls? They could just ask you...

Re:It's all stuff that ships with Linux (-1, Flamebait)

Zironic (1112127) | more than 4 years ago | (#31076910)

Which would be awesome and all if anyone cared :p

Linux desktop penetration is what, 2%? (random guess)

Re:It's all stuff that ships with Linux (1)

Sinning (1433953) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077034)

But the mobile market is booming.

Re:It's all stuff that ships with Linux (2, Insightful)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077126)

At 8-10% penetration? And that's only if you aggregate all Linux based OSes together.

Re:It's all stuff that ships with Linux (4, Insightful)

heffrey (229704) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077036)

Let me see if I've got this straight. A great set of tools that run on Windows demonstrates how rubbish Windows is. A great set of tools that run on Linux demonstrates how fantastic Linux is.

This sounds a bit like Raymond Chen's post today: http://blogs.msdn.com/oldnewthing/archive/2010/02/09/9960102.aspx [msdn.com] .

Re:It's all stuff that ships with Linux (3, Insightful)

Whatsisname (891214) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077128)

The tools on sysinternals are tools that should come with windows from day one.

Re:It's all stuff that ships with Linux (2, Funny)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077252)

Why? Most people won't use them. Then what will happen is you same people would be the whining about how Microsoft is "bloating" Windows with all sorts of applications.

Re:It's all stuff that ships with Linux (2, Insightful)

Pr0xY (526811) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077570)

Why compromise and have the installer have a checkbox for "advanced tools?" 99% of people will blindly click next without checking it, they won't get it, the other 1% will actually read what is being asked of them and possibly install it.

Seems like it would be simple to include it without bloating things at all.

Re:It's all stuff that ships with Linux (2, Insightful)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077642)

"Bloat" isn't putting apps on a CD you can choose to install or not, it's forcing unnecessary features that few will use in an app or OS.

IE is bloat, since it's welded to the OS and there are superior alternatives; on most people I know who use windows, it's superflous since they use Firefox.

IINM these utilities, both in Windows in Linux, aren't mandatory like IE is.

Re:It's all stuff that ships with Linux (1, Troll)

BarryJacobsen (526926) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077270)

The tools on sysinternals are tools that should come with windows from day one.

Yeah. And an image editor - wait, no, 3 image editors a few which work only on the command line. And five word processors. Ten calculators. A utility to write random data to the disk.

The average user doesn't need these tools. The people who can make use of them without messing other things up already know about them.

Re:It's all stuff that ships with Linux (2, Funny)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077394)

Yeah. And an image editor - wait, no, 3 image editors a few which work only on the command line. And five word processors. Ten calculators. A utility to write random data to the disk.

You want MS Word to come for free? That is asking a lot...

Re:It's all stuff that ships with Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31077320)

Why? Only 0.1% of the user's would ever be interested in this...

Re:It's all stuff that ships with Linux (2, Informative)

heffrey (229704) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077338)

Anyone who is capable of using these tools is capable of finding them. Personally, on all machines that I use I copy a folder containing around 200 useful utilities (e.g. grep, ls, cat, cp, bzip2, cpuz, console, depends, ps*, diff, gawk, gzip, less, strings, rapidee, sleep, tar, touch, whoami, whois, zip) and then add it to the path. But, I don't think my mum's going to be using psexec anytime soon.

Re:It's all stuff that ships with Linux (1)

Machtyn (759119) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077460)

I agreed with you right up until you stated sysinternals isn't one of Windows advantages. Just because it is bringing similar *nix functionality to Windows doesn't make it disadvantageous. I would argue that without sysinternals, Windows would be bunk compared to *nix systems (from a administrative and/or development standpoint.)

Flamebait? (0, Troll)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077576)

Whatever MS shill modded the above "flamebait" should have his moderation priveleges revoked. How is a politely worded, informative and truthful comment "flamebait"?

WTF???

First? (5, Informative)

I_have_a_life (1582721) | more than 4 years ago | (#31076796)

Process Explorer is what Windows should ship with instead of task manager.

Process Monitor is so kick ass... I can't even put it in words.

Re:First? (1)

Jeng (926980) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077442)

Stuck on a win2k machine at work, but I was fairly certain that Vista and 7 both came with a very kick ass upgraded process explorer?

It's Sysinternals, slashdotters (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31076812)

Not to be confused with the Sisinternals porn website.

Re:It's Sysinternals, slashdotters (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31077112)

Thanks for clarifying. I was a little confused when I read the name Jon Honeyball.

THIS is why I love Windows! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31076816)

There is nothing like these tools for any other platform on the market. Mark Russinovich is THE MAN!

Re:THIS is why I love Windows! (4, Informative)

hduff (570443) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077292)

There is nothing like these tools for any other platform on the market. Mark Russinovich is THE MAN!

You mean other than UNIX and Linux systems? I don't see any comparable functionality that is not already available on those systems. It's great that the MS environment gets some useful diagnostic funtionality too; sad they haven't always had it.

free BUT effective (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31076852)

> They're free, but they're effective.

What an unusual combination of attributes!

Re:free BUT effective (1)

Machtyn (759119) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077490)

I know! It's like that free "demo" language program I keep hearing about! I can't believe they're giving away a FREE "demo".

Re:free BUT effective (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077716)

They're free, but they're effective.
What an unusual combination of attributes!

Air and sunshine are free, and they're pretty effective, too. What is it with people that they equate "free" with "worthless?"

Putting ISO's onto a usb stick and making bootable (3, Informative)

gblackwo (1087063) | more than 4 years ago | (#31076862)

This is very useful- I was one of the people who stuck the Windows 7 MSDNAA downloaded iso onto a flash drive in order to install it to my desktop and laptop.

The more difficult part for normal users is not extracting the iso to the drive but making the drive bootable- which unless you have a utility (Like the one in the article)- requires some command line work. This would make the process way quicker.

Re:Putting ISO's onto a usb stick and making boota (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077436)

I think I would be able to use all 3 of the tools they mentioned in the summary - I also enjoy the idea of an ISO boot from a flash drive - as that means I only ever have to store all my ISO's on a hard drive, and then put them on the flash drive when I need to use them, no more need for blank CD's.

I also think creating virtual hard drives from physical ones is a good idea. I have been trying to go more virtual lately, just to keep up with the trends and add some security, but its difficult to get into full swing when all your apps are already installed on the root Machine.

As for the read-write monitoring, I have seen more and more failed hard drives lately, maybe its just my experience, but I have this looming feeling that it'll happen to me soon, and I'll want a record of whats going on.

What you meant to say... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31076864)

> "They're free, but they're effective."

What you mean to say is, "They're free, and they're effective."

What kind of free software advocate ARE you???

Newsid (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31076866)

I am just pissed Newsid doesn't work on Vista and 64-bit OSes anymore. I know it(SID) shouldn't matter but it can an sometimes does in some instances.

Latest, Really? (1)

Asadullah Ahmad (1608869) | more than 4 years ago | (#31076882)

I have been using SysInternals stuff starting from TCPView, which was pretty useful for me back then. But how exactly is DiskMon a latest treasure? It's been around for ages, unless now it monitors on kernel level.

Re:Latest, Really? (2, Insightful)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077160)

But how exactly is DiskMon a latest treasure?

Because the PC Pro editor just discovered it and doesn't know any better.

Among them are a tool for creating virtual hard di (1)

GerardAtJob (1245980) | more than 4 years ago | (#31076906)

Among them are a tool for creating virtual hard disks from physical drives...
subst? That's old stuff... but nice for the other tools!!

Re:Among them are a tool for creating virtual hard (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31077480)

SUBST is not the same thing. It just lets you assign a drive letter to a path. SUBST was great years ago when you had only one floppy drive and needed to copy a disk. Using SUBST to create an virtual drive, you could copy a floppy to the virtual driver and DOS would pause in between, letting you swap disks.

Be careful using the P2V tool. (4, Informative)

mbourgon (186257) | more than 4 years ago | (#31076916)

Tried using it on my box as a backup tool for a clean install of Win7. AVOID IF YOU ARE GOING TO USE THE SAME PHYSICAL DRIVE. Windows 7 couldn't mount or boot it. Known issue, and extremely aggravating.

Re:Be careful using the P2V tool. (5, Informative)

klocwerk (48514) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077532)

It says so in the readme file, and it's a feature not a bug to keep you from hosing your system because you didn't read the readme...

When you first fire up the new VHD it replaces the disk ID with a new one so that it's unique. This causes much trouble if the computer has two of the same disk ID at the same time when it goes to change one, as you might imagine.

the iso to usb tool only accepts win7 isos (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31077048)

So it's usefulness is kind of limited. If you want to create bootable usb-sticks for other operating systems, check http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/ [sourceforge.net]

Re:the iso to usb tool only accepts win7 isos (1)

gblackwo (1087063) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077156)

Even though the application is written specifically for your windows 7 iso- it isn't clear that it won't work for other iso's. Maybe if someone downloads it we will know for sure.

Re:the iso to usb tool only accepts win7 isos (4, Interesting)

interiot (50685) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077384)

There are no silver-bullet solutions for booting ISOs via USB. A silver-bullet solution requires doing "floppy emulation", which is something that can't be easily done in a general-purpose way. For CD booting, each BIOS has this functionality implemented differently. For USB booting, the bootloader has to figure out how to do this. MEMDISK [zytor.com] and GRUB4DOS [boot-land.net] are the only ones I know that do floppy emulation.

But then you have to do CD drive emulation too.

The way almost all ISO=>USB booters work is to pull the pieces apart and make them work without floppy+CD drive emulation. But this requires intimate knowledge of how that ISO normally boots, and thus it can't be a silver-bullet solution.

Re:the iso to usb tool only accepts win7 isos (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31077596)

If by "floppy emulation" you mean booting from a usb stick as if it were a floppy, I do this all the time. I can do it with a stick or external hard drive either emulating a floppy or a bootable hard drive depending on what MBR I use.

Re:the iso to usb tool only accepts win7 isos (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31077598)

i did download and try it before i posted. It didn't accept Fedora-12-i686-Live.iso and osol-0906-x86.iso

The error message is "Invalid ISO File: The selected file is not a valid ISO file. Please select a valid ISO file and try again."

Disk2vhd vs SelfImage (3, Interesting)

lymond01 (314120) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077078)

I used SelfImage [excelcia.org] recently to dd [die.net] a windows 2003 box to an LVM-based virtual machine on Proxmox [proxmox.com] , a Debian-based Virtual Machine Server. Worked a treat. While I see the benefit of created a Microsoft VHD if you're an MS shop, we're a mix so being able to pump a live physical disk into a remote logical volume was great.

wow (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31077092)

They're free, but they're effective.

Trolling really is a art.

Jon Honeyball (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31077096)

"PC Pro contributing editor Jon Honeyball

Was that his porn star name?

Is time for multidesktop for windows? (1, Interesting)

Tei (520358) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077106)

One of the reasons I can't use Windows for real work is because of the lack of multidesktop. For me is very important the ability to switch from one desktop to other, never having the screen of the taskbar cluttered, having my "graphic things" open in a desktop, and my "programming things" in other. I can't understand how people can work withouth it. Is like browsing withouth tabs, only worse :-)

I know that there are a few free and now free tools that try to provide MD to windows, but all falls flat. The guy behind sysinternals tried to, and was almost a success, but nope. It seems theres some architecture limit that stop this thing to work smoothly on windows, but that is just natural on the X system.

This and the horrible console that Windows have, makes working with windows infuriating.

Re:Is time for multidesktop for windows? (1)

Jaysyn (203771) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077194)

WinXP had multiple desktops if you just installed one of the free PowerToys.

Re:Is time for multidesktop for windows? (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077472)

The trouble with virtual desktops isn't so much the virtual desktops themselves, which more or less work fine(the one from Sysinternals even uses the actual Windows desktop objects, not some nasty window hiding hack) though are subject to some limitations since MS never really intended for them; but the fact that most application developers never considered them as a possibility.

Running any of the Windows virtual desktop setups for any length of time is a good way to run into some really, really, weird bugs with applications that made various assumptions about there being only one desktop.

Re:Is time for multidesktop for windows? (1)

Spad (470073) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077212)

Powershell is a massive improvement over the traditional Windows console (which really hasn't changed significantly since the early DOS days); yes, it is in part just a re-implementation of but it is a joy to work with as a Windows admin.

Re:Is time for multidesktop for windows? (1)

Spad (470073) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077228)

That obviously should have said:

...just a re-implementation of <insert favourite *nix shell here>...

Re:Is time for multidesktop for windows? (2, Informative)

strength_of_10_men (967050) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077284)

The guy behind sysinternals tried to, and was almost a success, but nope.

Is the failure you're talking about this [microsoft.com] ?

What are the shortcomings of Sysinternals' Desktops?

I haven't tried other solutions but I occasionally use this and it works fairly well.

Whatabout Virtualbox? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31077138)

Now if someone could point out how I boot up my Vista partition from Virtualbox then that would be truly useful. I don't see how any of this proprietary Microsoft stuff helps matters.

disk2vhd (2, Informative)

micromuncher (171881) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077144)

This was a god send to me, after VMWare Converter could not/would not convert a machine of mine, even after registry and driver cleaning, it just failed near the end without a meaningful error message in the log.

I used disk2vhd, booted up the image in VirtualBox, and bingo - working image.

Free doesn't imply ineffective (and vice-versa) (4, Insightful)

noidentity (188756) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077152)

They're free and they're effective

There, fixed that for you. Saying "free but effective" suggests that free implies ineffective.

I read it as: free, not open source, but effective (1)

anton_kg (1079811) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077478)

"free" is indeed means not necessary effective to me. I always suspect it might become "not free" tomorrow or I won't be able to add functionality for my specific task if I need to.

Nothing hidden about them... (5, Informative)

syousef (465911) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077154)

They're excellent for a wide range of things. Filemon (now superceded but still available) is an excellent tool for working out what files a piece of software is opening (eg. if you're trying to find config files). Regmon does something similar for the registry. Process explorer is stellar for getting more detail on a process than task manager will ever give (like where the image is running from and what DLLs it's using). Sysinternals filled a gap in diagnostic software. In a Windows environment they're as basic to me as netstat or ping. (speaking of which check out sysinternals tcpview). Especially good for tracing a user mode process right through. There are a lot of other utils to unlock the power of your Windows environment too.

Two sysinternals that weren't mentioned worth knowing about:

streams - view or remove hidden file streams attached to a file not normally seen in explorer. Especially good for removing that pesky "downloaded files are bad" warning when something is marked as being from the Internet zone.

junction - One of a handful of tools that allows you to create junctions (simliar to but not the same as hard directory links) in Windows XP.

The other non-sys-internals thing that every power user should know about is windbg and the debugging symbols. Indespesible for tracking down the culprit if you get blue screens due to device drivers (though obviously non-developers are not going to be able to do much about fixing the fault apart from downloading a different version or removing the device driver)

Author means filemon not diskmon (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077300)

Now that I read more carefully author of referenced article must mean Filemon not Diskmon. Diskmon doesn't tell you what files are open (at least not the version I have). Filemon does.

Performance Monitor (1)

rwa2 (4391) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077184)

Barely related to the topic (except that the Sysinternals monitors did a lot of this first), but I've had limited success googling...

The Windows 7 Performance Monitor is very very nice... what utilities under Linux would give it similar abilities to show per-process cpu/mem/disk/network/file/I/O usage?

So far I've managed to scrape together a variety of disparate tools to report on most of those things, but it would be nice if it could all be builtin to e.g. gkrellm or gnome-system-monitor or something.

* (the venerable) top: for sorting by CPU / mem virtual/reserved/shared, but not much else.
* iftop, ntop : to show realtime network activity per host:port (not just an aggregate for the interface). It would be nice to also be able to see net activity per process, though.
* dstat, sar : can print out some disk I/O related numbers at intervals, suitable for plotting. But "dstat --top-bio" only lists the process using the most disk I/O. And other than running "lsof" and trying to manually correlate PIDs, is there a way to actually figure out what file is being written / read?
* ltrace, strace, and dtrace : can tap into a running program and show library and sys.os function calls, (such as files being opened, etc.) but they put in some execution overhead.
* pmap : for digging into memory mapped to processes; would be neat to be able to visualize this... e.g. to see what apps have how much memory swapped to disk, or if something is still mapped to an older version of a shared library after an upgrade, etc.

Re:Performance Monitor (2, Informative)

eeeuh (165197) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077376)

Maybe you could give atop http://www.atoptool.nl/ [atoptool.nl] a try?
It shows (per process) disk-IO and nicely integrates cpu/disk/network/io statistics, it can also store statistics for later playback.

When trying to trace which file is getting a lot of IO you might want to take al look at the filedescriptors in /proc//fd in conjunction with lsof/strace. I Don't know of a nicely integrated tool for that unfortunately.

windowssucks tag? (2, Insightful)

Angst Badger (8636) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077220)

Well, yes, of course Windows sucks, but the SysInternals package really does mitigate the suckage to a surprising degree. Arguably, it's stuff that should have been part of Windows all along. I've been using it for a couple of years and it has made it much, much easier to beat Windows into submission. It's also extremely useful for finding and removing the crap that virus and malware scanners are apparently incapable of dealing with, as well as finding the mounds of not-actually-temporary temporary files that both Windows and a lot of applications like to consume unreasonable amounts of drive space with.

Re:windowssucks tag? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31077718)

Still running Vista are we? ;-)

XP here btw..

Re:windowssucks tag? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31077758)

"it's stuff that should have been part of Windows all along."

Yea... then we can bitch about Windows being bloated. Their only winning move, is not to play. How about a nice game of chess?

Wonderful tools (5, Interesting)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077230)

These have been available for a long time, used to just be from a site called Sysinternals run by Russonivich before Microsoft hired him. This guy is, literally, the person who wrote the book on Windows. Windows Internals is the current name, used to be called Inside Windows 2000. A wonderful technical document of the internal workings of Windows.

At any rate, Russonivich produces extremely useful tools. Not the sort of thing you want in the hands of inexperienced users, as many of them can break your system, but extremely powerful. I use them all the time in the course of my job, especially when there's manual malware removal that needs to be done. So far, malware is unaware of the ability to suspend a process, which Process Explorer will do. So you suspend the malware, its watcher process doesn't know to restart it. You then use autoruns to remove the startup entries. At that point you can reboot, it won't start, and you can clean up the residuals.

Those that do not understand UNIX (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31077336)

are condemned to reinvent it. Poorly.

The Revised "Hidden Treasures of Sysinternals" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31077422)

for botnets.

Slashdot, should, for liability purposes, post a disclaimer with every story about WinBLOWs software.

Thanks for NOTHING.

Yours In Minsk,
K. T.

A non-sysintenrals thing... but.... (2, Interesting)

mindstrm (20013) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077590)

It's not from sysinternals, but for tiny little utils, Spacemonger - the older version - not the new "installable" one - is absolutely fantastic for finding out where disk-space went..... can't live without it in any windows shop.

this is their second attempt (1)

anton_kg (1079811) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077682)

last time they had to shutdown the website and re-licence the tool (http://store.microsoft.com/Help/ISO-Tool) because of GPL violations. I wounder if they use http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/ [sourceforge.net] source code this time ;-)

Multiple ISOs on one flash drive (1)

richardellisjr (584919) | more than 4 years ago | (#31077740)

Speaking of booting from an ISO on a flash drive... does anyone know a way to store multiple ISOs files on a flash drive so that you can choose which to boot from? Would make installing the various OSs I use a lot easier than searching for the correct CD/DVD each time I install.
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