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Google's Experimental Fiber Network

CmdrTaco posted more than 4 years ago | from the contact-me-please dept.

Google 363

gmuslera writes "Not enough speed from your ISP? Google seems to go into that market too. 'We're planning to build and test ultra high-speed broadband networks in a small number of trial locations across the United States. We'll deliver Internet speeds more than 100 times faster than what most Americans have access to today with 1 gigabit per second, fiber-to-the-home connections. We plan to offer service at a competitive price to at least 50,000 and potentially up to 500,000 people.' The goal isnt just to give ultra fast speed for some lucky ones, but to test under that conditions things like new generations of apps, and deployment techniques that take advantage of it." If they need a test neighborhood, I'm sure mine would be willing.

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more competition (5, Interesting)

saturnblackhole (1737076) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087672)

this is great i hope its a huge success, comcast and time warner needs some competition to lower prices and get rid of stupid data caps. just wish i was available to more people.

Re:more competition (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31087750)

I'm sure more people wish you were available to them too ;-)

Re:more competition (1)

Woldscum (1267136) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087832)

Build it and they will come.

Re:more competition (4, Interesting)

WinterSolstice (223271) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088386)

I see this as a response to the filtering and tiering complaints. Google seems to be attempting to say "Fine, take your toys and go home. We'll just give everyone new toys"

I wish them luck, and hope we're not seeing the founding of the new IBM/Ma Bell empire.

Re:more competition (-1, Troll)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088552)

We plan to offer service at a competitive price

That's fairly meaningless marketspeak. Why are they afraid of telling us exactly what that "competetive" price is, and competetive to what? We don't have fiber, competetive to DSL? Cable? Dialup?

Damn it Google, stop trying to join the corporatti and be like you used to be -- not evil. Marketspeak is lies, and Satan is the father of lies. Don't be evil. What's it cost to tell us what your service costs??

Re:more competition (5, Insightful)

Eric52902 (1080393) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088622)

Or, for those of us who've run out of tinfoil, maybe it just happens that they haven't hammered out the details. That seems far less likely than the marketspeak angle though, huh?

Google (4, Interesting)

russlar (1122455) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087694)

Seriously, is there any market Google is not going into?

Re:Google (5, Insightful)

_PimpDaddy7_ (415866) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087828)

I don't care.

If this means more competition to the likes of Comcast and Verizon with internet in the home, so be it.

I am so sick of the cable companies stranglehold. It's obvious the FCC won't do anything about competition.

I'd gladly welcome Google.

Competition is GOOD.

Re:Google (4, Insightful)

mc1138 (718275) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088482)

I hope they'll take this a step further and offer up this sort of connection to corporate customers. I work from a company with a 20 Mbit connection and probably pay a lot more than what this connection is going to be offered for. Granted I'd still be fine paying more than a home user to guarantee uptime etc, but really, hopefully this will be a shot in the arm to other providers to wake up and not nickel and dime people for services that can't meet demand. It seems like Google is doing what they can to keep the US from falling behind the rest of the world.

Yes. (4, Funny)

ChinggisK (1133009) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087856)

Ostrich farming.

Re:Yes. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31087944)

gOstrich - new in the labs

Re:Yes. (5, Funny)

abigor (540274) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088020)

It's a "head in the sandbox" virtual machine.

Re:Yes. (1)

nacturation (646836) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088142)

For the love of mod points, someone mod this one up. Brilliant!

Re:Yes. (1)

mujadaddy (1238164) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088028)

Get with the times, gramps: Alpaca are where it's at!

Re:Yes. (4, Funny)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088186)

Ostrich farming.

Never underestimate the bandwidth of an ostrich carrying a pack of SSDs.

Re:Yes. (1)

eleuthero (812560) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088384)

yes, but the latency is awful!

Re:Yes. (1)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088498)


>> Never underestimate the bandwidth of an ostrich carrying a pack of SSDs.
> yes, but the latency is awful!

Yeah, and it's more of a UDP than a TCP connection, too. When they stick their head in the sand, you could be waiting a _long_ time for your data. *shrug* Still, it's funny to think of what the NSA has to go through to catch them to tap your communications. :)

Re:Yes. (3, Informative)

newell98 (539530) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088480)

They use sheep to mow their grass on campus. Close enough?

Re:Google (4, Funny)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088104)

Privacy protection; and ad-blocking.

Re:Google (1)

killmenow (184444) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088580)

I know you're moderated funny, but I could see them eventually getting into that business. How better to learn methods of bypassing ad-blocks than by being a leading producer of ad-blocking technology yourself?

Look at it like this:

1. sell advertising to companies
2. sell ad-blocking tools to people
3. sell enhanced advertising that bypasses new ad-blocks to companies at a higher price
4. sell enhanced ad-blocking tools to people that block the new ads at a higher price
5. GOTO 3

Re:Google (1)

neophytepwner (992971) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088262)

Airline industry? Highspeed rail?

Re:Google (1)

nschubach (922175) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088332)

They don't do video game consoles, keyboards, mice, or portable media players... *cough*

Old news (4, Funny)

Tmack (593755) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087722)

They launched this a few years back iirc: http://www.google.com/tisp/ [google.com]

tm

Re:Old news (1)

revlayle (964221) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087766)

TiSP is WIRELESS - this article talks about fiber to the home

Re:Old news (4, Informative)

Tmack (593755) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087782)

TiSP is WIRELESS - this article talks about fiber to the home

"Google TiSP (BETA) is a fully functional, end-to-end system that provides in-home wireless access by connecting your commode-based TiSP wireless router to one of thousands of TiSP Access Nodes via fiber-optic cable strung through your local municipal sewage lines."

RTFA!

tm

Re:Old news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31087914)

They, uh, launched it on April 1st a few years back... I looked into it because the services currently provided by my toilet are, frankly, shit. Not wanting to be pissy, but TiSP was a little leaky at the wireless router end. And I was a little uncomfortable with yet more fat pipes passing through my U-bend.

Re:Old news (1)

rugatero (1292060) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087858)

I would say "Whoosh!", but were it not for the preview button my missing-the-point comment would be where yours is now.

Re:Old news (5, Funny)

rsborg (111459) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088184)

TiSP is WIRELESS - this article talks about fiber to the home

Be careful, fiber will increase the "data" flow.

Re:Old news (1)

revlayle (964221) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088460)

I is teh dumb - this was joke - wind over hair!!

Re:Old news (4, Funny)

Firemouth (1360899) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087834)

I had this. I don't recommend it as it was pretty shitty.

Way to go (5, Insightful)

LeotheQuick (657964) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087724)

ISPs are yet another market where companies have been allowed to sit high on the hog because of the cost the advantage they have in their existing infrastructure. Any sort of competition that can give these companies a good kick in the arse is a good thing in my book. Now Google just needs to get into the banking business :-)

What is Google's interest? Data Tracking? (3, Insightful)

Jackie_Chan_Fan (730745) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087726)

Why would Google want to get into Fiber? Will they just track every packet you send over the net and sell that data?

Re:What is Google's interest? Data Tracking? (2, Informative)

Patch86 (1465427) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087876)

RTFS?

They want to use it as a test-bed for programmes and services under ultra-high-speed conditions. That's why they're only planning a relatively small roll our (what, less than 1/500 of the US population?).

Re:What is Google's interest? Data Tracking? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31088316)

A test market is going to be a much smaller subset of the market, practically by definition.

Realistically, what does Google need to offer in the 1 Gbps range that can't be offered at 15 Mbps range? I don't know, and I honestly don't care about their needs, but I do want to see this leap forward (and maintained by some other company).

What I want to see is them get in, and have the rest of the industry suddenly trying to surpass them.

What will probably, really happen though: Google will be looked into by the Justice Department for attempting to monopolize the market (which, to be honest, isn't too far off when you consider phone, Chrome OS, email, search, and now the ISP itself would be owned by Google), and the other ISPs will claim that the market is being entered unfairly and litigate instead of innovate. After all, this is the market that wants to tell everyone 25 GB is enough for a month. How could they claim that, while giving users enough bandwidth to exceed that amount in less than 4 minutes? I hope it happens, but with litigation proving to be more powerful that freedom (what if people used this for copyright infringement!?!!! Clearly, there is no other benefit!!...), I cannot really see it happening.

Re:What is Google's interest? Data Tracking? (3, Insightful)

MozeeToby (1163751) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087916)

A) There is undoubtably money to be made installing ultra-high speed internet, the market is large and the suppliers are few. It's entirely possible that they simple intend to move into the ISP business
B) It's in Google's best interests for everyone to have a high quality internet connection. Specifically, this is probably more about creating a market to test the next generation of web based apps than it is about anything else. Presumably, ultra-high speed connections will be more common in a few years, and Google would like the opportunity to see what exactly people will use them for. We already have the bandwidth for video, VOIP, and webapps, so what's next?

Re:What is Google's interest? Data Tracking? (1)

swimin (828756) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088494)

Apps where more has moved to the cloud.

Re:What is Google's interest? Data Tracking? (4, Informative)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087934)

Google is already into fiber having bought out a lot of dark fiber years ago [voip-news.com] . At the time, Google said it was help reduce costs by using their own pipes rather pay a network like AT&T to connect their own data centers. Now the real question is why are they going into providing consumers fiber access.

Re:What is Google's interest? Data Tracking? (1)

nschubach (922175) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088364)

Now the real question is why

Why not?

Re:What is Google's interest? Data Tracking? (2, Informative)

Amorymeltzer (1213818) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087964)

Why should you be more fearful of Google doing that as opposed to our current swath of ISPs and Telecoms? Especially given that some of them have been proven to be amenable to wiretapping during the Bush era? Maybe I'm blurring the lines between internet and phone, but a lot of these companies provide both and as the amount of valued information continues to shift away from the telephone jack and to the ethernet cable, it is indeed a valid concern. Sure, some may prefer the Devil they know, but when weighing Pros and Cons, I'm going to side with the guys who didn't need a pardon from Congress, and instead give me excellent email and help me find things online.

Re:What is Google's interest? Data Tracking? (3, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088060)

They could well have a tracking agenda, they are an advertising company, and a fair few ISPs have been seen sniffing around NebuAd and Phorm and their ilk. It certainly wouldn't surprise me.

However, if they just wanted the tracking data, there are almost certainly cheaper, easier, and very much quieter ways to get 90% of the effect. They already have ads on some huge percentage of webpages, and set cookies all over the place, not to mention the people who stay logged in to iGoogle and the like all the time. I'm sure the additional data they could get by being the ISP would be a bonus; but I'm a lot less sure that it is a bonus worth going into the infrastructure business, and bringing down the combined marketing/lobbying wrath of every cable and telco incumbent in the US over.

More likely, they have two basic concerns: Network quality and network neutrality.

If available net connections suck, webapps will suck and online experiences generally will suck. More people will continue to use desktop apps, or iPhone style purpose-specific applications, which will mean fewer people looking at adsense ads and using webapps. That would make Google a sad panda.

If the incumbent carriers, telco and cable, are in the position to do so, it will be immensely tempting for them to sell access to "their consumers". At worst, this will mean Google gets blocked entirely. At best, this will shift money out of Google's margins and into Comcast and Verizon's margins. Google really has to shiv them before they shiv google on this one.

Re:What is Google's interest? Data Tracking? (1)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088282)

Uhm.... people pay them money to use the internets... Man... not everything is data mining. Shouldn't be that confusing how a ISP can make money, they aren't giving it away (that I know of....).

Re:What is Google's interest? Data Tracking? (1)

markov_chain (202465) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088298)

With a broadband connection 100x faster they can deliver 100x more ads :)

Re:What is Google's interest? Data Tracking? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31088488)

With a broadband connection 100x faster they can deliver 100x more ads :)

If you also make my day last 100x longer, I, by all means, would not use that time to watch ads ;)

Re:What is Google's interest? Data Tracking? (5, Insightful)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088550)

They don't. They want to embarrass the real ISP's into building decent networks so the network-neutrality issue goes away and they don't wind up having to pay the ISP's for traffic they're sending to its customers.

Google is always playing the chess board three moves ahead.

Here is what is going to happen. (5, Insightful)

eparker05 (1738842) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087728)

The big names in networking (AT&T, Charter, etc.) are going to sue Google on antitrust grounds because it is easier to hire lawyers than to upgrade failing and obsolete networks.

Re:Here is what is going to happen. (3, Insightful)

FlyingBishop (1293238) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088008)

Which will pan out about as well as Palm's attempt to get Apple in trouble for breaching the USB standard.

Re:Here is what is going to happen. (2, Informative)

eparker05 (1738842) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088100)

I'm inclined to agree with you, but it sucks that innovative companies like Google will have to deal with this.

Notice that prior to laying down the fiber network, they took the town to court to prevent competition:
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2009/10/want-50mbps-internet-in-your-town-threaten-to-roll-out-your-own.ars [arstechnica.com]

Re:Here is what is going to happen. (1)

alen (225700) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088140)

if you think Google is going to have 1gbps of bandwidth for everyone one of their users then you are deluding yourself

Re:Here is what is going to happen. (2, Interesting)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088544)

100mbps with any RELIABILITY would be pretty industry shifting for North America. I'd prefer they focus on that rather than burst speeds... I suppose if they get it high enough the slow speeds will be enough assuming it doesn't drop much... But that is quite a big statement, even for Google. 1gbps for 500k ppl and cost competitive? No company in the world has lines to homes like this... World's fastest have been hovering around 60Mbps for quite a while now. Entering a new market and completely dominating everything in comparison on a global scale.... that'd be impressive. Even for Google.

meanwhile, (1)

martas (1439879) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087736)

in Big Internet Bloodsucking Company headquarters:
CEO: [loading gun] "Jimmy, tell my wife... Tell her I never gave a fuck about anyone but myself. Ha! Hahahahahaaa!"
[pan to wall. shot heard, brains splatter]

Re:meanwhile, (1)

characterZer0 (138196) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087778)

They need not worry. They already bought and paid for the local politicians to make sure nobody else comes in.

Re:meanwhile, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31088146)

You make claims that aren't true just because you don't like Google. They can't have "already bought and paid for the local politicians" because they haven't chosen where they'll do it.

Really? Do you just barely read enough to make a negative comment and move on?

Re:meanwhile, (1)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088210)

He wasn't talking about Google, fuckhead. He was talking about the already entrenched ISPs. You know, the companies that were being mocked in the GGP's post.

Re:meanwhile, (1)

JazzLad (935151) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088594)

I can't believe I am bothering to reply to an AC, but he was referring to the "Big Internet Bloodsucking Company CEO"

Oh no... (1)

sadness203 (1539377) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087742)

Now they take it to the next level, they will harvest all the information directly to the source of it, one hundred time faster than before. *Insert all the possible paranoia*

Re:Oh no... (5, Interesting)

lorenlal (164133) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087864)

Well, they could. So what? Instead of Comcast, Cox, Charter, AT&T, Verizon, etc, Google can get their stats direct. Yes, there's a much bigger pipe, but you and I are still generating the traceable data as fast as we can.

Of course, I see another possibility for this. You know how many of these ISPs are trying to make providers pay for "preferred" access? Maybe Google is seeing this as a way to ensure net neutrality in the market, or possibly turn the tables. We shall see if it makes it far into the market, and if it ends up making a real difference.

I, for one, would welcome such a bandwidth overlord.

Community Organization? (4, Funny)

Itninja (937614) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087770)

I just tried to 'recommend my community' and apparently one needs to be part of some community organization to make the recommendation. I wonder if 'my house' can be considered a community organization?

Me too, me too (1)

ls671 (1122017) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087822)

Me too please ;-)))

Re:Community Organization? (3, Informative)

srealm (157581) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087848)

Filling in the community organization is optional (not a required field).

Re:Community Organization? (1)

lazyforker (957705) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088464)

mod parent "Informative" please. Same thing here. I just nominated the whole of New York City. I frigging hate Time Warner but it's the best/only option I have. Verizon's nowhere near getting FiOS in my 'hood and there are no other providers.

Re:Community Organization? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31087938)

I entered "Obama", and I immediately received an email welcoming my house in the trial.

Re:Community Organization? (1)

matzahboy (1656011) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088042)

It's too expensive for Google to roll out cables for a single home. Communities mean that the cables transferring the data are shared, and it is therefore cheaper for Google

Re:Community Organization? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31088272)

Where's a community organizer when you need one???

It doesn't matter right now (1)

Johnberg (1642323) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087808)

I have a 20Mb fiber line and seldom get speeds above 1Mb. Once I get off the ISP's network, the speeds are throttled down either by other carriers or the destination website.

Re:It doesn't matter right now (2, Funny)

Snarkalicious (1589343) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088054)

True. But someday the exact wrong combo of people will have control, and on that day net neutrality, as a concept that applies to the wider populace, will die (perhaps to later be resurrected, but by then, the damage is done). Then, everybody is selling bullshit. Google is positioning itself for that day. If they can emerge as the top dog when it ceases to be a question of personal freedom/privacy and begins a new life as an issue of corporate volition (due, in no small part to the political boondoggle that is corporate personhood), they'll be the top dog for a looooooong time to come. Christ, I'm negative today.

Re:It doesn't matter right now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31088270)

1Mb? As in 128 KB/s? I get better download speeds on my *phone*. I have 10Mbit DSL and absolutely no problem maxing it out on a single site (1.25MB/s).

If you're really getting 1Mbit on a 20Mbit line, your ISP sucks horribly and/or is a bunch of lying liars.

Wow! (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31087824)

Awesome, then maybe you Americans can start catching up with the rest of the world :) Funny, 10, or even maybe only 5 years ago, I would had been very impressed by just hearing 1 Gbit. Nowadays, eh. Sure, I only have 100/100 Mbit, but I have no restrictions whatsoever (and I use my fair share) and I pay $10. I could go for the 1 Gbit package, but why pay 5 times as much ($50) per month for something I don't see myself needing. Maybe in a year or so :)

Madison, WI! (1)

mim (535591) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087866)

Best choice to test market is a political seat and major university town which is in need of this sort of upgrade!

Re:Madison, WI! (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088144)

But it is cold and it snows and I am don't live there.
I sent the link to my local government and hope they will do something with it.
Part of me hopes they pick some small towns in the midwest right now only get's dial up. But I don't live so the truth is I hope they will pick here.

Time to upgrade the home network? (1)

shawnmchorse (442605) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087924)

Almost everything inside my house is still running at 100Mbps (or less, over 802.11g/n wireless bridges). And even then, my router still melts if I actually let BitTorrent run full out. I sense a lot of upgrades needed before I could even come close to taking full advantage of a 1Gbps line.

Re:Time to upgrade the home network? (1)

scubamage (727538) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088182)

Most of the time the ISP supplies a supported router. I'm sure google would be no different. If not, cheap routers aren't that hard to come by.

Re:Time to upgrade the home network? (1)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088228)

I sense a lot of upgrades needed before I could even come close to taking full advantage of a 1Gbps line.

That's called 'incentivizing'. :)

Re:Time to upgrade the home network? (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088306)

Usually that's not related to the actual throughput. The problem is that those routers don't have enough RAM to keep up with all the connections bittorrent opens, and many lock up or slow down.

Re:Time to upgrade the home network? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31088554)

Assuming you don't have tens or hundreds of nodes in your house, all you would need is to make sure your computers have gigabit ethernet cards and a router that can handle it- and if yours can't, then you might have to spend some dough upgrading to a soho router, not a big deal since gigabit nics have been standard for around 5 years now, if you have a machine older than that, gig-e cards sell for about $20 these days, and even if you don't want to do that, 100MB/s is still pretty farking fast. All in all, not a big deal really.

Soho routers are a pretty good idea IMHO anyway- my parents would constantly call me and ask me why the internet was down, and 9 times out of 10, it was because the router took a crap and needed to be rebooted. They renovated their house a few years back, running cat 5 to each room, and I set them up with a 3com small business router/switch, and they never call me about internet problems anymore.

To be honest, I am not even sure what I would do with 1G/s connection to my house. I would be constrained by the fact that no one else has 1G/s available for me to even use, and while pulling a dvd down in ~30 seconds would be nice, it just seems... unnecessary. I have 50Mbps now and rarely yearn for more speed.

I'm shocked (5, Funny)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 4 years ago | (#31087926)

23 comments about a 1 gigabit home connection, and not one of them has even mentioned the word "porn"?!? Man, you guys are slipping...

Re:I'm shocked (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31087998)

23 comments about a 1 gigabit home connection, and not one of them has even mentioned the word "porn"?!? Man, you guys are slipping...

I was going to post something about that earlier, but my typing hand was...otherwise occupied.

Better late than never.

Re:I'm shocked (1)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088078)

On the downside .... goatse at fiber speeds eewwwwww.

Re:I'm shocked (1)

nacturation (646836) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088220)

23 comments about a 1 gigabit home connection, and not one of them has even mentioned the word "porn"?!? Man, you guys are slipping...

It's the Astroglide.

How Else... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31087946)

will they get their next generation of cpu-sucking ads onto your desktop?

No article, just a blog post (2, Interesting)

Areyoukiddingme (1289470) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088118)

Google really understands Slashdot. Everything pertinent in the blog post fits just fine in the summary. No need to read the "article." It isn't an article. It's just a blog post soliciting proposals.

Seems an odd way to go about it. It's missing the one thing that is relevant to market demand: price. I don't know whether my community would care to be part of it because I don't know how much it would cost the users. I know for a fact that people are only willing to pay so much for high bandwidth, and past that, they decide it's not worth the cost.

Worse, most internet hosts throttle or load balance their outbound throughput to any one destination. I had 20 megabit downstream service for a while, and the only way to come remotely close to saturating it was bittorrent. And I never did saturate it. I managed to sustain over 10 megabit only twice, ever, and that was hard to do and didn't last. Even most streaming video sites transmit at no more than 300 KB/s (2.4 megabit), and many, if not most, transmit slower than that.

Sounds to me like the whole thing is going to be a disappointment to them. Truly high bandwidth demands will only emerge when truly high bandwidth (1 gigabit) is widely deployed and widely subscribed to, and when major servers move from truly high bandwidth to absurdly high bandwidth (10 gigabit through to the backbone). All of their scenarios can be satisfied by deploying fiber to just a few premises, like hospitals and clinics, which is a big dumb duh idea anyway. It's not already done? The nebulous "let's see what happens" goal they have depends on lots of people having access to lots of bandwidth. Network effects have to kick in before a network is valuable. Build it and they will come, but there's no way to predict what they'll actually use it for. It will take large numbers of bored programmers fiddling around with their high bandwidth to generate something to use all that bandwidth, and they won't bother if 90% of their potential audience has 1/1000th of the bandwidth.

In short, it's the network, stupid.

Re:No article, just a blog post (1)

kalidasa (577403) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088222)

I would imagine that Google will also deploy gigabit worthy applications.

Re:No article, just a blog post (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088380)

I had 20 megabit downstream service for a while, and the only way to come remotely close to saturating it was bittorrent. And I never did saturate it. I managed to sustain over 10 megabit only twice, ever, and that was hard to do and didn't last. Even most streaming video sites transmit at no more than 300 KB/s (2.4 megabit), and many, if not most, transmit slower than that.

So what? You don't use more than one app at the same time? I like being able to use bittorrent, plus download files (over HTTP), plus listening to Internet radio, at the same time. And now I've setup a Tor node.

Really, there's plenty of ways to exhaust your connection. But yeah, most people won't take advantage of it.

IPv6? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31088134)

I'm guessing this is going to be IPv6 to the home? Any confirmation?

When you build a network that fast the use-to-idle time drops very low. What is the cost of operating the links when idle? Maybe at a certain speed it makes more sense to go with a low-bandwidth carrier and invoke (turn on) high-bandwidth when needed?

Google isn't stupidly altruistic (1)

MSTCrow5429 (642744) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088152)

Would be much easier to data-mine if you control actual pieces of the network...

Ooh...ooh, pick me! (3, Informative)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088160)

Seriously. Blacksburg, Virginia (home of Virginia Tech) was supposed to have 10bT to every home back in the 90s - the Blacksburg Electronic Village they called it. You would think we'd be sitting pretty for even higher speed by now. It never materialized. We've got Verizon (copper only, 3Mb max speed) or Comcast (formerly Adelphia, ~7Mb max speed, when the moon is full). There are a few other minor players, but they are either geared towards the large apartment complexes or businesses (and make Verizon look inexpensive). Heck, I'm close enough in that my power is from Virginia Tech electric.

I don't need huge total volume, I just want blisteringly fast for shortish periods.

Re:Ooh...ooh, pick me! (1)

O('_')O_Bush (1162487) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088338)

*highfive* for a Blacksburg Brother!

Re:Ooh...ooh, pick me! (1)

Nimey (114278) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088370)

My small (8500 people) hometown in southwestern Missouri was going to have something like that as well - I believe it was called an Acorn televillage.

The developer only built one house before it went bust, and the house was never occupied.

Piss your pants Comcast (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31088168)

Your days of monopolistic whoring just might be coming to an end.

pulling a gmail (5, Insightful)

speed of lightx2 (1375759) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088198)

When gmail first appeared, the two big free email services were yahoo and hotmail. Hotmail have you 2MB to play with, and Yahoo was a bit more generous with 5 (if I remember correctly). That seemed to be the status-quo until google offered with gmail 200 times more free storage (plus features).

Columbia, MO (0, Offtopic)

JazzyJ (1995) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088202)

Hey Google! Make Columbia, MO one of your test areas and sign me the HELL up!

When will Google stop? (1)

Jetrel (514839) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088252)

I for one welcome my new Google overload. Long live the Google!

For the love of all that is good... (2, Informative)

Taibhsear (1286214) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088254)

in the world, please compete with Comcast and the other monopoly ISPs. The speeds in Chicago finally got upgraded a bit but the throttling, bandwidth caps, and retarded pricing shenanigans still have to go. Comcast is still one of the leaders in customer service douchebaggery so any competition is greatly appreciated. (RCN and Verizon FIOS are the only thing even close, speed wise, but they have never been available in any of the areas I have ever lived in in Chicago.)

It would be nice (1)

hesaigo999ca (786966) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088372)

It would be nice to see if they have some for Canada as well, I am looking forward also to them offering their successful venture once it is up and running to the public as a replacement to most disgruntled ISP clients that are tired of not having any choices.

Why not just look at non-USA countries? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31088402)

I Google has money to burn ... but surely they could save some of it on this study by just looking at what consumers do with very fast internet connections in countries that already provide them?

Just don't make us sign in with a Gmail account (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31088538)

fuck them if they're only willing to do this to track more of our activity online.

thanks to them if not...

Omaha needs some love (1)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088574)

Omaha is right next door to your new data center in Council Bluffs, IA, and a telecommunications hub for the country. You know you want to roll out here.

I, for one, ... (0, Redundant)

castironpigeon (1056188) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088586)

...welcome our new all content, all service providing do-no-evil overlords.

No Northern Locales? (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088618)

I take this:

To that end, we'll use our RFI to identify interested communities and to assess local factors that will impact the efficiency and speed of our deployment, such as the level of community support, local resources, weather conditions, approved construction methods and local regulatory issues.

to mean that they're not going to deal with winter in this round.

Is today fiber day or something? (1)

rickb928 (945187) | more than 4 years ago | (#31088620)

I get this post [gwi.net] from a friend of mine in Maine. Looks like our government is sporting over some recovery funds and one of Maine's more aggresive ISPs is gonna spend it making fiber around the rural areas of Maine.

And he better hurry, or Google will beat him to it! Oh, wait... Google will be looking for density and volume users. Where volume is spelled with dollar signs.

Now, are other states also going to start pulling fiber to add to the existing dark fiber, so we can continue to be ready to serve rural America?

Not that anyone will actually get service out in the woods with any of this fiber, though GWI in Maine deploys long-range DSL and does at least as well as the cable companies. Maybe better.

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