Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Latvian "Robin Hood" Hacker Leaks Bank Details

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 4 years ago | from the too-many-hoods-in-the-forest dept.

Security 170

eldavojohn writes "Move over Russell Crowe, an anonymous hacker in Latvia is being hailed as a real life modern Robin Hood. The hacker refers to himself as 'Neo,' claims allegiance with the Fourth Awakening People's Army, and is outing banks that are capitalizing off of the horrible economic status Latvia is currently suffering from. No word on how he is acquiring the information but it is slowly being leaked to TV sources via Twitter and the common people love him. The hacker is thought to be based in Britain but a TV reporter pointed out the fine line Neo is walking, 'On the one hand of course he has stolen confidential data ... and he actually has committed a crime. But at the same time there is value for the public in the sense that now a lot of information gets disclosed and the whole system maybe becomes a little more transparent.' An example of a juicy tidbit he revealed is that managers of a Latvian bank did not take the salary cuts they promised they would after the government bailed them out of economic trouble. You can imagine that taxpayers were upset and thankful they knew this information."

cancel ×

170 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Latvia explained in pictures and comments (5, Funny)

sopssa (1498795) | more than 4 years ago | (#31263772)

Million Reasons Why Latvia Is The Best Country In The World [miljons.com]

Be warned, you'll lose productivity for rest of the day.

Re:Latvia explained in pictures and comments (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31263924)

Every time someone posts anything about Latvia in international portal and somebody advertises this site instantly. Never enough ?

Latvia, isn't than near Detroit? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31264192)

That place really is third-world. Detroit Crap City is what KISS calls it now.

Re:Latvia explained in pictures and comments (2, Informative)

jayme0227 (1558821) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264138)

I suppose it would be better if I could actually read what was written in the pictures, but really, I only lost about 38 seconds of productivity. Without a sense of context, the humor in most of those was lost on me.

Re:Latvia explained in pictures and comments (-1, Troll)

kramulous (977841) | more than 4 years ago | (#31265110)

I can see what you mean [miljons.com] .

Try harder next time before you turn on the ignorance tap.

Or, hey boss? Is that you?

Re:Latvia explained in pictures and comments (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31264426)

Reminds me of http://www.peopleofwalmart.com/

Re:Latvia explained in pictures and comments (5, Insightful)

copponex (13876) | more than 4 years ago | (#31265188)

Be warned, you'll lose productivity for rest of the day.

Sir, we are already reading slashdot.

Re:Latvia explained in pictures and comments (1)

rhathar (1247530) | more than 4 years ago | (#31265298)

+1 Insightful Sad Truth

Neo? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31263820)

Ok, everything else aside, that's just lame.

ahh (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31263830)

i saw a guy walking down the street just today - in a long black coat wearing sunglasses talking on his nokia. i thought "i bet that guys a leet hacker" probably him. he was scowling.

Re:ahh (5, Funny)

grcumb (781340) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264272)

i saw a guy walking down the street just today - in a long black coat wearing sunglasses talking on his nokia. i thought "i bet that guys a leet hacker" probably him. he was scowling.

You're wrong. The person you saw:

  • Was stylish;
  • Outdoors;
  • Had at least one friend.

If this was a real hacker, he was disguised as a n00b.

Re:ahh (1)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 4 years ago | (#31265272)

It was 4am so there was no sun and he's not stylish. And he's was sshing into his voice controlled server.

Some sympathy some not so (5, Interesting)

JoshuaZ (1134087) | more than 4 years ago | (#31263866)

Ok. Clearly the fact that the pay cuts for the executives didn't occur is something that this individual should have leaked and was the right thing to do. ( Why didn't the government insist on minimal transparency about the salaries in the first place? Because apparently corruption and lobbying is the same everywhere). Frankly, in TFA I don't see any information listed that shouldn't have become public. It doesn't look like they leaked anything that allowed people to take money from accounts or to steal identities or to create damage to the banks' computer networks. If there's any indication that Neo has done anything bad (other than choosing a really pretentious and unoriginal alias) I don't see it in TFA.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (5, Insightful)

Danse (1026) | more than 4 years ago | (#31263948)

I think it's a good thing that he's doing this. Of course if he gets caught he'll face at least some sort of punishment. He's not being malicious or destructive, so I'd consider it a form of civil disobedience. What I'd like to hear is what kind of punishment the bankers are going to get for essentially lying and stealing from the taxpayers. I bet they get a slap on the wrist at best.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (4, Funny)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264024)

Slap on the Wrist?

How dare you openly endorse such uncivil class warfare! It is everyone's obligation to understand that bankers are simply special. It would be an insult to apply rules made for common men to them.

Don't fuck with the big banks (5, Interesting)

Bloopie (991306) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264220)

I don't know anything about Latvia. Here in the U.S., though, you don't fuck with the big banks. They have money and power--which they will throw at your political opponents [nytimes.com] if you become too much of a "problem."

From the article I just linked to:

Republicans are rushing to capitalize on what they call Wall Street's "buyer's remorse" with the Democrats. And industry executives and lobbyists are warning Democrats that if Mr. Obama keeps attacking Wall Street "fat cats," they may fight back by withholding their cash.

"If the president doesn't become a little more balanced and centrist in his approach, then he will likely lose that support," said Kelly S. King, the chairman and chief executive of BB&T.

Balanced and centrist? I guess that just about sums it up.

Re:Don't fuck with the big banks (1)

sricetx (806767) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264812)

The solution is for everyone to pull money out of Chase bank and cancel their accounts. Granted, like any boycott is may not be very effective, but that's about all the individual can do. See the website move your money for more information http://moveyourmoney.info/ [moveyourmoney.info]

Re:Don't fuck with the big banks (1)

Grizzley9 (1407005) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264914)

What a great way to show the public you're not easily swayed by [withheld] campaign contributions and will do what you say...

Re:Don't fuck with the big banks (4, Insightful)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 4 years ago | (#31265606)

I can see those conversations:

Bank chairmen: "Mr. Obama and Congress, give us billions of dollars of the Public's money, no strings attached."

Politicians: "If we don't do this, your banks will close, the FDIC will go bankrupt, and we will have a terrible deflationary depression, is that right?"

Bank chairmen: "You are correct. Billions of dollars, please. Hand 'em over."

Politicians: "Well we must prevent a depression, but you don't exactly deserve billions of the Public's money. So here's the cash, but there will be strings attached..."

Bank chairmen: "Whatever; thanks for the cash! PS: buy these defaulting mortgages from us too, please. At twice their real value. Good! Bye!" ... one year later ...

Politicians: "Here are the strings we told you about..."

Bank chairmen: "What? Regulation? Penalties? You radicals! We thought you were balanced centrists, not commies! After all our payouts, we still have a few billion of the Public's money left. If you try to force any penalties on us, that money will be used to make sure you never get elected again. Checkmate."

Politicians: "Oh fuck--pwned."

Re:Don't fuck with the big banks (1)

sjames (1099) | more than 4 years ago | (#31265852)

What really makes me wonder is that they cannot have put things more plainly. They are not only offering their cash to have the leaders of our nation act in their personal interest (and so against the best interests of the country) but they fully expect their offer to be accepted. All that and nobody even blinks.

Truly, they should be lined up and shot as traitors, and so should anybody who accepts their offer.

Perhaps it should be televised as an example to others.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31264246)

what kind of punishment the bankers are going to get for essentially lying and stealing from the taxpayers

A bonus?

They won't stop until bankers get lynched in the streets.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (1)

umghhh (965931) | more than 4 years ago | (#31266198)

you had an excellent idea - I mean the lynching one. I guess at some point the only thing good men can do.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (1, Insightful)

cdrguru (88047) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264874)

Let's see... the information that this guy is posting came from government tax documents. Meaning, pretty clearly that the government knew all about this and it is no surprise to anyone there.

Some bankers made promises that didn't come true. Boo-hoo. As far as I am aware, unless there is some sort of "contract" involved promises mean, well, nothing. No criminal act, no wrongdoing whatsoever. For example, Obama promised to close Guantanamo Bay within one year. Where is his comeuppance? See, promises don't mean much.

There was no lying and no stealing from anyone. Get over it. People make lots of promises every day and they are effectively meaningless.

Hope this guy didn't leave any personally identifiable tracks.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (2, Insightful)

Danse (1026) | more than 4 years ago | (#31265008)

There was no lying and no stealing from anyone. Get over it. People make lots of promises every day and they are effectively meaningless.

Seriously? You don't see telling the government that you will take pay cuts in exchange for financial assistance and then not doing it as lying? This isn't even at all like Gitmo. At least there they've been making significant efforts even though they didn't meet their goal. The bankers just flat out lied because there's no effort involved in taking a pay cut. Lying in order to get money is generally considered fraud, yes?

Re:Some sympathy some not so (1)

Pete Venkman (1659965) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264034)

It seems to me that this could be the work of a whistleblower, but then I don't see why he/she would claim to be a hacker--unless Latvia does not protect against retaliation toward whistleblowers.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (4, Insightful)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | more than 4 years ago | (#31265892)

Heck, America doesn't protect it's whistle blowers. Why should Latvia?

Re:Some sympathy some not so (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 4 years ago | (#31266136)

Because Latvia is part of the EU, and wants to impress it's (relatively) new friends.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31264064)

Bad and illegal are different things. He has clearly violated laws by obtaining access to this information.

We may think that individual instances of criminal conduct are beneficial. Under U.S. law those individuals may be able to claim the affirmative defense of "necessity," claiming that they violated the law because the benefit of the violation outweighed the harm done. Here, it's unclear whether Neo knew, when he broke the law and accessed this information, that there would be a benefit to doing so.

Ultimately, this case illustrates the problems that arise when corruption puts law and morality at odds with one another. That doesn't mean Latvians should welcome and encourage vigilantism; it only means they have a corruption problem that needs to be addressed.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (3, Insightful)

Rary (566291) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264080)

If there's any indication that Neo has done anything bad (other than choosing a really pretentious and unoriginal alias) I don't see it in TFA.

Then you must not have read this sentence, found in both TFA and TFS: "On the one hand of course he has stolen confidential data... and he actually has committed a crime."

Just because some of the information in some of the stolen documents should be made public doesn't change the fact that he stole the documents. Having a good reason to commit a crime doesn't make it not a crime. It might, in some circumstances, get you leniency in sentencing, but it's still a crime.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (5, Insightful)

GoCoGi (716063) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264194)

A "crime" is not necessarily "bad".

mod parent up (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31264302)

++ Insightful

Re:Some sympathy some not so (4, Funny)

westlake (615356) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264938)

A "crime" is not necessarily "bad".

But a conviction still puts you behind bars.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (1)

Danse (1026) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264210)

If there's any indication that Neo has done anything bad (other than choosing a really pretentious and unoriginal alias) I don't see it in TFA.

Then you must not have read this sentence, found in both TFA and TFS: "On the one hand of course he has stolen confidential data... and he actually has committed a crime."

Just because some of the information in some of the stolen documents should be made public doesn't change the fact that he stole the documents. Having a good reason to commit a crime doesn't make it not a crime. It might, in some circumstances, get you leniency in sentencing, but it's still a crime.

The fact that the crime was committed against those who were themselves engaged in criminal acts may cause the courts to consider it a justified act committed to prevent a much greater crime (i.e. the theft of large amounts of taxpayer money).

Re:Some sympathy some not so (1)

fulldecent (598482) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264284)

>> the theft of large amounts of taxpayer money

I don't think that's officially a crime anywhere anymore

Re:Some sympathy some not so (0, Troll)

Rary (566291) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264534)

The fact that the crime was committed against those who were themselves engaged in criminal acts may cause the courts to consider it a justified act committed to prevent a much greater crime (i.e. the theft of large amounts of taxpayer money).

I don't know about Latvia, but around here vigilantism isn't looked on too kindly by most courts.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (3, Interesting)

Danse (1026) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264952)

I don't know about Latvia, but around here vigilantism isn't looked on too kindly by most courts.

Depends on the circumstances I think. It's not like he stole the documents at gunpoint or something. This being a non-violent, non-destructive crime, I think they may be more lenient. That is, at least, if the courts aren't as corrupt as the banks.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (1)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 4 years ago | (#31265444)

You must be new here. Look at how most e-crimes have worked out. What seems sensible rarely ends up occurring.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (1)

Danse (1026) | more than 4 years ago | (#31265628)

You must be new here. Look at how most e-crimes have worked out. What seems sensible rarely ends up occurring.

Yeah, I'm new here ;-P My thinking on this case is that they'll have to tread carefully if the public sees this guy as a hero for exposing corruption. To punish him too harshly could trigger bad things for the government. Even if the courts throw the book at him for some reason, there would likely be a lot of public pressure for a pardon.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (1)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | more than 4 years ago | (#31265906)

Of course not- the courts are bought and paid for representatives of the financial class.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (1)

Clandestine_Blaze (1019274) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264660)

The fact that the crime was committed against those who were themselves engaged in criminal acts may cause the courts to consider it a justified act committed to prevent a much greater crime (i.e. the theft of large amounts of taxpayer money).

I really hope so, but I don't have much faith in the court system anywhere after reading about what happened to the Google Executives in Italy.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31265428)

In Italy, the state and (established, old) media are very closely linked, so it is no surprise that an unrealistic judgement has been made against a new media company.

It's all about the business and money.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (4, Insightful)

JoshuaZ (1134087) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264248)

Committed a crime and did something bad are not the same thing always. Sometimes the moral or ethical act is against the law. It doesn't take much effort to give historic or current examples. Just a few people off the top of my head who've committed crimes that are morally either ok or the right thing to do: off the top of my head: abolitionists in the pre-Civil War US, protestors in Iran, and whoever gave Wikileaks their leaked documents about Guantanamo.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (0, Offtopic)

Rary (566291) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264480)

I agree, "criminal" doesn't necessarily mean "bad". I kind of took it from your comment that you were implying he hadn't done anything criminal, because the leaked information should be public anyway. I'm just saying that, while leaking the information may not necessarily be criminal, and certainly isn't bad, obtaining it was definitely criminal, and there's not enough information to determine whether or not it was bad.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (1)

Derosian (943622) | more than 4 years ago | (#31266172)

Don't forget about the whole bunch of founding father's of the USA, being traitors and committing great crimes, ect, ect.

"Pentagon Papers" is the cite you're looking for (1)

jeko (179919) | more than 4 years ago | (#31266188)

The People have an absolute right to know what their government is doing. There's no other way for a democracy to function. Nefarious governments always try to hide behind "state security" laws. The Heroes who blow the whistle get charged with treason.

The Textbook US example from 1971 -- The Pentagon Papers [wikipedia.org]

In brief, at the time the US Government was assuring the public we were about to get out of Vietnam, they were actually planning a massive expansion. Deep Blue Patriot Daniel Ellsburg, a RAND corporation military analyst and Marine officer, handed the evidence of the lie to the New York Times. He was tried for espionage.

It's too bad we didn't have another man of Ellsburg's character and conviction when Bush was parroting, "Yellowcake, yellowcake."

Whoever this goofy kid is, I think he might be one of the few geeks who deserve the name "Neo."

Re:Some sympathy some not so (1)

mandelbr0t (1015855) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264300)

Having a good reason to commit a crime doesn't make it not a crime. It might, in some circumstances, get you leniency in sentencing, but it's still a crime.

Not going to disagree with you there, but willingness to commit crime can sometimes be the moral action when the law protects the immoral. There are few people that are so brave, and their actions should be lauded regardless of their criminality. One man's villain is another man's hero. Of course, the only positive thing that can be said about moral, criminal acts is that you get to be self-righteous. If you get caught, you still go to jail. On the other hand, King Richard eventually pardoned Robin Hood. Good people are eventually vindicated.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (1)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264336)

Of course, "stealing confidential data" (from a non-government source), where the confidentiality is self-defined by the owner, is exactly the kind of DMCA type violation we regularly decry here. What you (and TFA) are suggesting is that the act of acquiring the data is a crime in and of itself, rather than the criminal use of the data.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (1)

Rary (566291) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264518)

The DMCA is about copyright protection and reverse engineering. It has nothing to do with hacking into information systems to obtain data.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (1)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264766)

It was exactly the "act of attempting it is a crime itself" aspect of the reverse engineering provisions that I was referring to.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (1)

Rary (566291) | more than 4 years ago | (#31265152)

But breaking into computer systems was a crime before the DMCA, and will continue to be a crime even if the DMCA disappears tomorrow.

Its the Batman defense. (1)

WarlockD (623872) | more than 4 years ago | (#31265526)

"I can beat up anyone I want as long as I am doing it for the public good"

I am not saying Batman or this guy isn't doing good work, but he is steeping on allot of toes here. The banks are going to want to throw the book at him and the politician are going to be mad that their corruption/indifference is shown. Even if the "people" are on his side, its going to be hard to argue in a democracy he shouldn't be punished.

Also, he has to have some strong ethical guidelines here. Joker gets away with murder because he knows Batman cannot kill him. Batman goes to great lengths to make sure he doesn't kill anyone no matter what they have done. What does this guy have? Will he release these bankers home address? How about personal information about them? Lets say there IS outright bribery and he shows it by getting the bankers personal account number and information. Will he do the due diligence and, at the very least, blank out the personal account numbers/SS# etc before he releases it to the public?

Its quite probably hypocritical of me to be rooting for this guy, but in the end its why Batman is my favorite comic hero. Its not his inelegance or physical strength, its that he never breaks his rules under any circumstances. Hell, I want to say even stronger than Superman, as he has the power of a near god. Superman can afford to be infallible.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (1)

umghhh (965931) | more than 4 years ago | (#31266266)

Here in Germany stealing data from banks is ok.

At least as long as banks in question are in Switzerland and stolen data can help in 'fixing' the budget deficit or so their propaganda says.

Re:Some sympathy some not so (1)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 4 years ago | (#31265296)

Well do you want people poking around your accounts even if they are not giving information that will lead to identity thief.

Say for example the following...
They see a bunch of sales at a liquor store. Then they have an idea that you are a drinker/partier and give this information to your health insurance company so they can deny coverage.

Or How much porn you actually buy, say you were running for politics or put on the impression you are of strong moral values.

Or lets just say you are spending a little extra and not letting your wife know and that information is given to her and jump to a conclusion that you are cheating or doing something else.

Lets just access your EZ-Pass information and find out you have been speeding.

There are a lot of laws on the books. Most likely you have broken a few yourself. The reason for the unreasonable search laws and a attempt to protect privacy is because otherwise we will be drowning in fines and legal suits for our lives.

Dear Robin Hood (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31263874)

After you have enlightened Goldman Sachs [baselinescenario.com] , please give some money to the U.S.A to pay the remaining balance of its lease of Alaska from Russia.

Yours In Riga,
K. Trout

Can't help myself (1)

msavory (1734428) | more than 4 years ago | (#31263876)

Bunch of Fapa's.

Latvia? Not USA? (1)

Andy Dodd (701) | more than 4 years ago | (#31263928)

" An example of a juicy tidbit he revealed is that managers of a Latvian bank did not take the salary cuts they promised they would after the government bailed them out of economic trouble."

Are you sure he's actually talking about Latvia and not the US?

Oh wait, AIG's execs had the balls to promise nothing and actually give themselves *bonuses* for running their company so far into the ground that it needed a bailout.

Re:Latvia? Not USA? (1)

BlueTrin (683373) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264186)

I think it is an attribute of any category of people which have power within a country. You can find pretty much examples in every country ...

Re:Latvia? Not USA? (1)

billybacs (1440925) | more than 4 years ago | (#31265006)

IIRC, AIG paid bonuses to the peons of the company that performed adequately, rather than the executives themselves. But I could be mis-remembering the details. At a normal worker's level, the bonuses really do help morale extensively, especially if they weren't aware of what exactly they were doing. It's the execs' responsibility to lead the company effectively. If they were actually giving themselves bonuses, then never mind anything I just said.

His service.... (0, Troll)

rshol (746340) | more than 4 years ago | (#31263972)

...was almost as valuable as that of the hacker(s) who brought us the Climategate files from East Anglia. The crime of the Latvian Bankers is small potatoes compared to the scam those capitalizing on feared but unproven anthropogenic climate change are running.

Re:His service.... (0, Troll)

Improv (2467) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264020)

Actually, the "climategate" stuff just shows us how nutty some strands of American conservativism have become - one gets a bunch of people who, not understanding the context of the mails or much of the science, jump on language that might naïvely seem to be evidence of fraud, but on closer examination by anyone willing to look, turn out to be completely innocuous. False crises arn't really a PR problem in the long run - they just go on the list of things certain people will be embarassed about in a few years.

Re:His service.... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31264144)

Except by their own admission they were lying and purposely manipulating the data to suit their political beliefs.

Unlike the conservative nutcases (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31264258)

. . . who would never admit that they were lying and purposely manipulating the data to suit their political beliefs.

Re:Unlike the conservative nutcases (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31264370)

. . . who would never admit that they were lying and purposely manipulating the data to suit their political beliefs.

Yeah, tu quoque is always so persuasive, and true too!

Quoque? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31265022)

Quoque? Doesn't that mean "also"?

The climate scientists in fact rarely lie, although they sometimes make mistakes. It's not politically fashionable to say that on Slashdot, though, even though it's true. But the partisan conservative creeps who "oppose" them only lie. They haven't made a single honest argument yet.

There is no "quoque."

Re:His service.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31264754)

Well shit, other than that minor little "detail", let's bash conservatives instead!

Re:His service.... (1)

wintercolby (1117427) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264198)

Mod parent as troll, please. Absolutely nothing to do with the current topic, and is persuing an agenda for a different arena.

Robin the Hood... (5, Funny)

JackPepper (1603563) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264032)

stole from the government and gave to the overtaxed. This guy is copying from the government and pasting to the people. He's more like a "Neo the Document Liberator?"

Re:Robin the Hood... (1)

idontgno (624372) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264908)

At least it wasn't lupins [youtube.com] .

Re:Robin the Hood... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31266306)

It's never lupins.

STOP THE PRESSES! (0, Troll)

DarthVain (724186) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264062)

Latvia has banks? :) sry.

Re:STOP THE PRESSES! (2, Funny)

godrik (1287354) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264090)

Every country has banks. The real news is that they have Internet ! :)

Anonymous Coward (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31264416)

I bet they have much faster internet than you have. Just check download speed in Latvia neighbours Lithuania etc..

"Neo" (1)

Low Ranked Craig (1327799) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264066)

How original.

Re:"Neo" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31264180)

Well I guess its better than p33nGobbler, but what do I know I'm not a l33t h4x0r

Re:"Neo" (1)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 4 years ago | (#31265472)

Bet he'd be really pissed if he's had the name for a decade or so.

Angle-grinder man being supplanted? (1)

seniorcoder (586717) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264102)

If he is from Britain, maybe it is angle-grinder man who has been reborn with new super-powers. http://www.zimbio.com/10+Real+Life+Superheroes+Who+Have+Actually+Made+a+Difference/articles/KK4rSsSTgOq/2+Angle+Grinder+Man [zimbio.com]

Re:Angle-grinder man being supplanted? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31264536)

Viva hombre de la Ángulo-amoladora!

el hombre de la Ángulo-amoladora es un campeón de la gente!

Re:Angle-grinder man being supplanted? (1)

CorporateSuit (1319461) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264856)

Whoever designs a website with a 10-part, ad-laden article which OPENS A NEW WINDOW EVERY TIME YOU CLICK ON THE " GO TO PART N+1" needs his head violently pressed against a cheese grater until he fixes it.

Re:Angle-grinder man being supplanted? (2, Insightful)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 4 years ago | (#31265522)

#5 succcks, she basically stops stupid people that put themselves in bad situations from learning any lessons. Stopping drunk chicks from leaving with guys is stupid. To top it off she's sexist:
"I protect the single girl living in the big city," Terrifica told ABC in 2002. "I do this because women are weak. They are easily manipulated, and they need to be protected from themselves and most certainly from men and their ill intentions toward them."

twitter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31264114)

What's the actual link or username for said twitter feed? No article states it.

Re:twitter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31265348)

http://twitter.com/neo4ata

Not that much different... (1)

MoriT (1747802) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264142)

...than investigative reporters going through people's trash. Now, releasing those bank account numbers so individuals who so wished could withdraw what they like, that would be Robin Hood-style.

How about here in the states? (2, Funny)

greymond (539980) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264176)

I'd like to see someone give out information on the financial businesses that received bailout funds, but rather than just hearing about executives at bankrupt companies getting paid millions in bonuses, how about we just be told their bank account numbers, routing numbers, and other personal information so we can bail ourselves out of their mess?

I find it hard to take seriously a group called... (4, Funny)

DigitalReverend (901909) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264206)

FAP Army.

Re:I find it hard to take seriously a group called (1)

Xoltri (1052470) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264724)

Nice catch, but knowing the internet, it was probably on purpose.

Danger (2, Interesting)

Elektroschock (659467) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264222)

I mean, when you think of international conferences, most ^evil^ lobbyists use the wi-fi in the conference hotel. The presentation is boring, so 60% of them read their mails during the conference. Of course a criminal could just monitor their traffic, read their mails and grab their access passwords, then sent their mails and stuff to wikileaks. It is a danger to our national security because it is technically feasible but no one does. So the protection against criminal action is actually ethics not technology. The real danger is that Robin Hack gets famous and popular, and these pratices get spread by kiddies who enjoy to "Hack the Banksters". Or maybe the Chinese do, no idea.

Who? Wha? Huh? (1)

ArcadeNut (85398) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264252)

What does Russell Crowe have to do with this again? Maybe you mean Kevin Costner?

Re:Who? Wha? Huh? (4, Informative)

SOdhner (1619761) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264430)

He's playing Robin Hood in a new movie that's not out yet.

Someone Mentioned this a Few Days Back. (3, Interesting)

BJ_Covert_Action (1499847) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264264)

I don't recall who, or on what thread, but someone posted a comment a couple days back that said something along the lines of, "People used to cheer for bank robbers. It will happen again." I figure this was a reference to John DIllinger [wikipedia.org] and the like. It appears that whoever it was that said that has some decent predictive powers...or at least a good bit of luck every once in awhile.

Re:Someone Mentioned this a Few Days Back. (1)

tool462 (677306) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264904)

It appears that whoever it was that said that has some decent predictive powers...or at least a good bit of luck every once in awhile.

Or it's the guy who leaked the data ;)

Re:Someone Mentioned this a Few Days Back. (1)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 4 years ago | (#31265486)

Cheering for bank robbers depends on whether or not your money was in said bank... :P

Wait, didn't I see this in a Nintendo DS game...? (1)

MindlessAutomata (1282944) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264322)

THE YATAGARASU STRIKES AGAIN!

If at first you don't succeed.. (5, Insightful)

pacbowl (1653493) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264390)

If the First, Second and Third Awakening People's Army didn't rattle enough cages effectively, what makes them think the Fourth will prevail?

Go Braliukas Go! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31264454)

Go Braliukas Go!

Hacker? Not really (4, Informative)

hammeraxe (1635169) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264482)

I think calling the guy a hacker is a bit over the top. Basically what he did was change the document id numbers in the URL. The information he was accessing was not secured in any sensible way: the login page could be bypassed by simply entering an address by hand. It's pretty much an epic fail of the company that made the system (unless the flaw was introduced intentionally for some reason). Source: http://translate.google.com/translate?js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=1&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.diena.lv%2Flat%2Fpolitics%2Fhot%2Fneo-no-4ata-mes-bijam-parsteigti-ka-mums-tik-ilgi-lava-datus-kopet&sl=auto&tl=en [google.com]

Re:Hacker? Not really (4, Informative)

ACS Solver (1068112) | more than 4 years ago | (#31266008)

The BBC article doesn't entirely reflect the situation. I live in Latvia and do know better ;)

The main thing they're not mentioning is the origin of that data. It wasn't just "downloaded" from the State Revenue Service via a hack or somesuch. This part has made headlines here - it turned out that the Revenue Service's internal system that contains information on all tax payers had no security, at all. You could view the confidential info by accessing an unsecured URL. And just by changing the entry id parameter in the URL, you could get to information about different tax payers, as the parent says. Any moron could get that data and apparently the "hackers"/whistleblowers in question downloaded it over the course of a couple months.

Latvia is no US and of course the organizations here don't have the same kind of security experience that organizations from big countries. Still, this is an important governmental organization we're talking about and the security hole in question is blatant and obvious. As such, many here have doubts that it was accidental, it's quite possible that the Revenue Service was sabotaged.

This Neo guy and his organization are apparently planning now to release information about the financial activities of a bunch of organizations, including governmental ones, as allegedly they believe it will help the society here, create more responsibility, etc. They have, banks aside, so far released information about the salaries of police and public transportation employees. The bank is a separate story really, it got bailed out when the recession hit hard here, and this bailout has in itself been a subject of much contention.

Not a Hack (4, Informative)

MrTripps (1306469) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264492)

"The nation's security council discussed the breach and expressed concern that only 50 percent of the country's 175 state-run data systems have security oversight. President Valdis Zatlers called for immediate action to install proper security on all systems. Computer experts concluded that the breach did not constitute a cyber-attack and was the result of poorly developed software and systems management." http://www.kansascity.com/2010/02/24/1770170/cyber-whistleblower-stuns-latvia.html [kansascity.com] I'd hate to be that CIO.

Re:Not a Hack (1)

arose (644256) | more than 4 years ago | (#31266256)

Pretty much any hack relies on exploits...

Correction to the story (5, Informative)

karuna (187401) | more than 4 years ago | (#31264650)

The summary is completely wrong. The actual history in short is as follows: Latvian Neo claims that the anonymous group 4ATA has downloaded about 7.4 million tax statements from the Latvian tax authority website that is used by businesses to submit their tax declarations electronically. It was done over 3 months period before the IT department realized that something is wrong. The stolen data includes practically full information about salaries and payments received by employees of all Latvian public and private enterprises.

4ATA is now periodically releasing the detailed pay information of certain public companies one at a time. He is careful to remove actual names of employees and for many this data seems trivial. But with this he is trying to prove that the claimed austerity measures undertaken by the government to fight the economic crisis is a big lie. However, the periodic release is annoying politicians who can't find a way to stop this leak.

As for Neo walking the fine line, he downloaded the data without circumventing any security measures as he claims that the website was open to everyone. The hole was one specific URL normally used by an authorized user to review his own statements. Each document in the total database is assigned an ID number and by sequentially changing the ID number in the said URL, everyone could download the whole database as no authorization was checked by the script on the server. After some time the tax department notice irregularities and noticed the developer of the system but they were rather slow to fix the breach. When they finally managed to get the act together, Neo had already downloaded about 98% of the database.

Neo?? (2, Funny)

stonedcat (80201) | more than 4 years ago | (#31265680)

How has this not been tagged "thematrix" yet?

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>