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Another ACTA Leak Discloses Individual Country Data

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 4 years ago | from the forced-transparency dept.

Government 133

An anonymous reader writes "On the heels of the earlier leak of various country positions on ACTA transparency, today an even bigger leak has hit the Internet. A new European Union document [PDF] prepared several weeks ago canvasses the Internet and Civil Enforcement chapters, disclosing in complete detail the proposals from the US, and the counter-proposals from the EU, Japan, and other ACTA participants. The 44-page document also highlights specific concerns of individual countries on a wide range of issues including ISP liability, anti-circumvention rules, and the scope of the treaty. This is probably the most significant leak to date since it goes beyond the transparency debate to include specific country positions and proposals."

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133 comments

Tiny penis (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31322848)

Rob Malda's penis is tiny.

Re:Tiny penis (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31323158)

A couple weeks ago, while curb crawling near the service station in the industrial park, I had to take a piss. As I entered the john, Barack Obama -- the messiah himself -- came out of one of the booths. I stood at the urinal looking at him out of the corner of my eye as he washed his hands. He didn't once look at me. He was busy and in any case I was sure the secret service wouldn't even let me shake his hand.

As soon as he left I darted into the booth he'd vacated, hoping there might be a lingering smell of shit and even a seat still warm from his sturdy ass. I found not only the smell but the shit itself. He'd forgotten to flush. And what a treasure he had left behind. Three or four beautiful specimens floated in the bowl. It apparently had been a fairly dry, constipated shit, for all were fat, stiff, and ruggedly textured. The real prize was a great feast of turd -- a nine inch gastrointestinal triumph as thick as his cock -- or at least as I imagined it!

I knelt before the bowl, inhaling the rich brown fragrance and wondered if I should obey the impulse building up inside me. I'd always been a liberal democrat and had been on the Obama train since last year. Of course I'd had fantasies of meeting him, sucking his cock and balls, not to mention sucking his asshole clean, but I never imagined I would have the chance. Now, here I was, confronted with the most beautiful five-pound turd I'd ever feasted my eyes on, a sausage fit to star in any fantasy and one I knew to have been hatched from the asshole of Barack Obama, the chosen one.

Why not? I plucked it from the bowl, holding it with both hands to keep it from breaking. I lifted it to my nose. It smelled like rich, ripe limburger (horrid, but thrilling), yet had the consistency of cheddar. What is cheese anyway but milk turning to shit without the benefit of a digestive tract?

I gave it a lick and found that it tasted better then it smelled.

I hesitated no longer. I shoved the fucking thing as far into my mouth as I could get it and sucked on it like a big half nigger cock, beating my meat like a madman. I wanted to completely engulf it and bit off a large chunk, flooding my mouth with the intense, bittersweet flavor. To my delight I found that while the water in the bowl had chilled the outside of the turd, it was still warm inside. As I chewed I discovered that it was filled with hard little bits of something I soon identified as peanuts. He hadn't chewed them carefully and they'd passed through his body virtually unchanged. I ate it greedily, sending lump after peanutty lump sliding scratchily down my throat. My only regret was that Barack Obama wasn't there to see my loyalty and wash it down with his piss.

I soon reached a terrific climax. I caught my cum in the cupped palm of my hand and drank it down. Believe me, there is no more delightful combination of flavors than the hot sweetness of cum with the rich bitterness of shit. It's even better than listening to an Obama speech!

Afterwards I was sorry that I hadn't made it last longer. But then I realized that I still had a lot of fun in store for me. There was still a clutch of virile turds left in the bowl. I tenderly fished them out, rolled them into my handkerchief, and stashed them in my briefcase. In the week to come I found all kinds of ways to eat the shit without bolting it right down. Once eaten it's gone forever unless you want to filch it third hand out of your own asshole. Not an unreasonable recourse in moments of desperation or simple boredom.

I stored the turds in the refrigerator when I was not using them but within a week they were all gone. The last one I held in my mouth without chewing, letting it slowly dissolve. I had liquid shit trickling down my throat for nearly four hours. I must have had six orgasms in the process.

I often think of Barack Obama dropping solid gold out of his sweet, pink asshole every day, never knowing what joy it could, and at least once did, bring to a grateful democrat.

Warning! Uninformed first post (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31322866)

I have nothing to say.

Fascinating (5, Insightful)

NeutronCowboy (896098) | more than 4 years ago | (#31322938)

I can understand why diplomats tend to like their meetings and discussions to be private. It's a hard enough dance between a few select people in a government that it doesn't need to be complicated by the public getting involved.

However, in this case, this is hardly a private conversation. Business is involved, pretty much all the world's governments are involved, and the only group not at the table is the largest and the one with the most to lose: actual people. I'd like to see what kind of justification politicians will come up with to argue that corporations can make suggestions, governments can provide input, but god forbid the people actually have a say in the way this sausage is made.

Unfortunately, I'm pretty sure that the end of the Internet as we know it is near. Too many organizations with too much clout have too many reasons to see the current Internet go away. I don't know what will come in its place, but I'm pretty sure I'll look back at the 90s/early 00s with nostalgia.

Re:Fascinating (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31323126)

Start prepping your wireless mesh network.

Re:Fascinating (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31323266)

Soon to be illegal in the UK (and where you live too).

Re:Fascinating (1)

Amouth (879122) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323352)

I'm aiming for a VPN/Tunneling SubInternet - i currently do this with friends/family/work - makes life a lot easier.

Re:Fascinating (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31323354)

Not illegal if I can figure out how to set my WiFi to accept any password with WEP.

Re:Fascinating (1)

Lifyre (960576) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323410)

Why not just setup WEP with some crazy password? That way cracking it is the price of admission... it's not like WEP isn't trivial or anything...

Re:Fascinating (1)

dafdaf (319484) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323560)

Nice idea, but even using an *open* AP can get you in a lot of troubles in some countries. - And I'm not even speaking about cracking a pwd for access...

Re:Fascinating (1)

Lifyre (960576) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323600)

What defines open? I'm not surprised an unprotected network could get you in trouble in many countries but if I'm using WEP it's not unprotected and wouldn't be open would it? I didn't give them the password... Those "malicious hackers" broke into my system and abused it...

Re:Fascinating (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31323604)

Just name the router the password. You could always claim you typed it into the wrong box.

Re:Fascinating (1)

Aczlan (636310) | more than 4 years ago | (#31324232)

Set the SSID to be "key_is_12345678910". Anyone who cannot figure that out doesn't deserve to get on.

Aaron Z

Re:Fascinating (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31324356)

Real geeks use cardinals instead of ordinals. "key_is_0123456789"

Re:Fascinating (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31323136)

However, in this case, this is hardly a private conversation.

In which case are any international agreements of any sort a private conversation? Imho, if it affects me in any way, it should never be a private conversation.

Re:Fascinating (3, Insightful)

Spad (470073) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323138)

On the upside, it could finally reverse the effects of the Eternal September by dramatically upping the level of technical knowledge required to operate anything interesting on the Internet.

Re:Fascinating (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31323588)

That would only reduce the need for a peer-to-peer capable network structure. When the Internet turns into a top-down content delivery system for the computer illiterate masses, there won't be affordable network access for the rest of us. Eternal September is what pays for the network, tragic as that may be.

Re:Fascinating (1)

snowraver1 (1052510) | more than 4 years ago | (#31325232)

What? You don't make any sense... How are the providers supposed to deliver their OMG HD SO PRETTIES video without fat pipes? I predict nice download speeds, and crappy upload speeds. Something like we already have.

The mesh will never happen. It's a chicken-egg thing. Going point-to-point is too pricey, broadcast has crappy distance, and who get's to pay for the intercity links?

Welcome to Internet 2.0, or as I like to call it, iINTERNET.

Re:Fascinating (1)

ae1294 (1547521) | more than 4 years ago | (#31325826)

The mesh will never happen. It's a chicken-egg thing. Going point-to-point is too pricey, broadcast has crappy distance, and who get's to pay for the intercity links?

Hummm I tend to recall something called FidoNet which existed, a little over one hundred years ago. It was kind of like a mesh network but wasn't a real time network due to cost. Perhaps we will need to return to our roots for the answer. alas it was so long ago it might be hard to track down those answers.

Re:Fascinating (2, Insightful)

EdIII (1114411) | more than 4 years ago | (#31325364)

finally reverse the effects of the Eternal September

I suggest we just isolate all of them and lock their web browsers to the URL they are probably going to anyways..... 4Chan. (kidding)

dramatically upping the level of technical knowledge required to operate anything interesting on the Internet.

Seriously... I *fucking* hope so. It's apathy right now that keeps people from obtaining the skills needed to be creating/operating the kind of networks and infrastructures capable of truly stopping ACTA's goals.

Mesh networks are not the complete solution (no interlinks between cities and peer/transit relationships connecting them to the rest of the world), but I believe that if you couple Mesh Networks with technologies like TOR, FreeNet, and Darknet connected to the standard offerings we can create a layer of communication on the Internet that is effectively impossible to police and stop.

Unlesss....... they outlaw encryption entirely and start running around with drones triangulating rogue transmissions to put those people in a 're-education' camp. A darker more futuristic version of Pump Up The Volume.

This is where it has to go before we can finally put a stop to this stupidity. I guess what I am saying is that I want the war to start already dammit. While I am still young enough to fight it.

Re:Fascinating (1)

Lifyre (960576) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323318)

Finally we shall realize the Sprawl universe! Corporations will be kings, the government will be little more than a glorified group of pencil pushers, and hackers will glide through cyberspace slicing ICE with hot decks...

Huh... Except for that last part and the crazy space people we're not that far away. Man I wanted an Ono-Sendai when I was a kid.

Re:Fascinating (1)

ciggieposeur (715798) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323492)

I'm pretty sure I'll look back at the 90s/early 00s with nostalgia.

I already look back at the 80s/early 90s with nostalgia.

Re:Fascinating (3, Interesting)

rtb61 (674572) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323852)

That these documents have been purposefully leaked and there is indication of opposition to it's content is proof of the exact opposite. It is pretty much certain that in most modern democratic countries that most of the conditions of ACTA would be opposed by the general public and result in disruptive public opposition.

The reality is, it is too late to try a force this through, to force the will of the corrupt minority against the will of the democratic majority. Not that this effort should be ignored or the the perpetrators of it should be publicly exposed and called to account for their corrupt activities, their intent to purposefully subvert the growing public expression of democracy.

A full public investigation should be made of who was involved, who sponsored and supported that involvement, who actually wrote up those bits of proposed corrupt legislation, what private interests were involved whilst 99.99etc percent of the electorate were specifically excluded and, of course what criminal prosecutions need to be considered.

Re:Fascinating (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31323932)

it doesn't matter. they have more money. they will win.

Re:Fascinating (1)

Caesar Tjalbo (1010523) | more than 4 years ago | (#31324324)

So? We get a new version, 'not half as bad as that evil ACTA'. Made by politicians who try to be fair and balanced, taking every side into account. And we're still getting screwed, but this time we say "thank you".

Re:Fascinating (5, Insightful)

DaveGod (703167) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323908)

I'd like to see what kind of justification politicians will come up with to argue that corporations can make suggestions, governments can provide input, but god forbid the people actually have a say in the way this sausage is made.

It's all secret so everyone gets to blame unspecified others. When it comes to publish this thing governments will be disowning provisions they worked very hard to put in place. Why couldn't the public participate? Well YOUR government fought hard for that but the others wouldn't let them, of course.

Governments are supposed to have power because they also have accountability, but that requires transparency. Even if all the politicians really were doing their very best with only our interests at heart that would not be good enough. They must be seen to be doing so, just like justice must be seen to be done, an agent must be seen to act on behalf of his principal and a professional must be seen to be independent.

We give them some room for national security and so on, in the hope that the bond of trust is so sacrosanct they would be unable to break it, or at least that someone would feel it and the truth would come out. Naive perhaps, but it's happening right here with these leaks. There's a good egg somewhere.

Re: Not Fascinating but Depressing (2, Insightful)

gink1 (1654993) | more than 4 years ago | (#31324512)

For those of us who love what the internet has to offer in terms of information, entertainment and news the very idea of the Internet becoming "the CorporateNet" is depressing.

After the takeover we will still be able to do many things - after we have logged in with our credit card.

Then CorporateNet can charge us for every download and access (and it will not be cheap!)

What can we do? If we fight like hell we can delay things for a while, but eventually money will rule out. So be prepared.

Re:Fascinating (3, Insightful)

drsmithy (35869) | more than 4 years ago | (#31325502)

I'd like to see what kind of justification politicians will come up with to argue that corporations can make suggestions, governments can provide input, but god forbid the people actually have a say in the way this sausage is made.

Easy - the people already had their say when they elected said politicians.

I do love the title though (3, Funny)

Saishuuheiki (1657565) | more than 4 years ago | (#31322948)

"Special Measures Related to Technological Enforcement Means and the Internet"... ...really? the internet too? I thought it was just gonna shut down my warez BBS, but now they've gone too far

Eh? (5, Funny)

algormortis (1422619) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323004)

This is probably the most significant leak to date...

Seems like people have forgotten about the R Kelly incident already.

This Is Your Brain (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31323030)

This is your brain on Slashdot.

This is your brain on POT [google.com] .

Defend Gulag Amerika: Smoke Pot !!!

Yours In Berkeley,
K. Trout

hmm (3, Funny)

Sumbius (1500703) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323034)

Time to slashdot some diplomat's webpage? "We have taken your homepage hostage. Surrender your ACTA and come out of your meeting room hands up."

Re:hmm (1)

Foobar of Borg (690622) | more than 4 years ago | (#31324684)

"Surrender your ACTA and come out of your meeting room hands up."

Or come out of your meeting room hand up and then surrender your ACTA. Just remember the two key elements. Hands to be put up and ACTA to be surrendered.

Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (5, Insightful)

tlambert (566799) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323054)

Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid?

Basically, they are saying:

"We can't write working code because the only people willing to write this kind of code are incompetent morons. Skilled engineers think this type of code is a bad idea, and won't touch it. Rather than rethinking our position to be more in line with reality, we want laws that make illegal to circumvent the swiss cheese code that we can actually hire someone to write." ...and now we are trying to foist this stupidity off on the rest of the world?!? No wonder they get upset about their dirty underwear going public.

-- Terry

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (3, Insightful)

Spad (470073) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323180)

Anti-circumvention is a necessity because unbreakable DRM is an impossible dream; there simply isn't any way to give the user a lock and let them open it without also giving them the key, no matter how much you try and hide it.

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (2, Interesting)

wgaryhas (872268) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323272)

Anti-circumvention is a necessity because unbreakable DRM is an impossible dream

So why does that make anti-circumvention a necessity?

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (4, Interesting)

Spad (470073) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323376)

Because without it they couldn't stop you from breaking the DRM and disseminating the How-To to a wider audience, who would then be very hard to catch actually infringing. With Anti-Circumvention laws you can both discourage people from breaking the DRM (or at least telling people about it) and take legal action against anyone who does, whether they've actually done anything "illegal" beyond circumventing the DRM or not.

Anti-Circumvention laws are "Attempted Copyright Infringement".

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (2, Insightful)

langelgjm (860756) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323498)

Because without it they couldn't stop you from breaking the DRM and disseminating the How-To to a wider audience, who would then be very hard to catch actually infringing.

Yeah, that's worked real well. How many tutorials for ripping DVDs [google.com] can you find in a few seconds on Google?

With Anti-Circumvention laws you can both discourage people from breaking the DRM (or at least telling people about it) and take legal action against anyone who does, whether they've actually done anything "illegal" beyond circumventing the DRM or not.

If they haven't done anything beyond circumventing DRM, why should we care? The harm comes from infringing copyrights, not from circumventing DRM. Anti-cirumvention provisions are an "attack the tool" approach that's both ineffective and misguided.

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (3, Interesting)

causality (777677) | more than 4 years ago | (#31324158)

If they haven't done anything beyond circumventing DRM, why should we care? The harm comes from infringing copyrights, not from circumventing DRM. Anti-cirumvention provisions are an "attack the tool" approach that's both ineffective and misguided.

Agreed, but unfortunately that won't stop them from financially (and/or by incarceration) ruining the lives of anyone they can catch doing it. Things like justice and sound policy are the least of their concerns.

It's like the way the Inquisitors obviously did not believe in the power of their religious message, but that didn't stop them from threatening and torturing (and worse) anyone whom they found inconvenient.

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (2, Interesting)

azenpunk (1080949) | more than 4 years ago | (#31324800)

Infringing upon copyrights is not harmful. It is the current state of copyright law that is harmful in reality. Violating copyrights by file sharing pretty much always helps small artists and may or may not lower revenue for large artists. Diminishing an entitlement granted to some is not harmful.

I know it's nitpicky but its' hard to have honest discussions on this topic and it's one of my pet peeves. Nothing against you, I am just having a digital outburst.

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (1)

calmofthestorm (1344385) | more than 4 years ago | (#31324144)

Unwillingness to adapt fossilized business methods to the new economy. Happens every generation or two

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (1)

ppanon (16583) | more than 4 years ago | (#31324456)

Actually a more apt description is: unwillingness to migrate from obsolete business methods based on now-defunct scarcity to less profitable business methods adapted to the new operating environment.

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (1)

calmofthestorm (1344385) | more than 4 years ago | (#31324558)

Well there have been a few companies to add value with DRM, providing features in exchange for the lost utility (I'm thinking Steam here). In exchange for them managing their rights for you, you get to have...your rights managed, in terms of hard disk crashes, multiple computers, etc.

I admit Steam has its issues, but this is the sort of adaption I like to see...realizing that it's no longer all take and no give.

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (5, Insightful)

langelgjm (860756) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323402)

Anti-circumvention provisions, particularly as they have been applied in the US, are often used as an anti-competitive device to block legitimate competitors from making interoperable or replacement products. Anti-circumvention provisions also effectively make legal tasks illegal. E.g., ripping a portion of a DVD for commentary or criticism is allowable under fair use, but the process by which one would do so is illegal because it involves violating the DMCA, even though the end result is not illegal.

Besides, do such provisions actually add anything useful? In order for anti-circumvention to be violated, the underlying work must be copyrighted. In any case of real harm, then the underlying copyright would be infringed as well, in which case you could sue for infringement. If an access control was circumvented but the copyright was NOT infringed, then what harm could there be? On the contrary, it is precisely those situations that we would want to allow for interoperability, etc.

If the argument is because it stops the spread of anti-circumvention tools, it doesn't. Dozens of DMCA-violating tools are a click of a mouse button away from being installed.

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (1, Insightful)

dave562 (969951) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323250)

This thinking isn't new. It is the exact same thinking that has been prevalent among law enforcement and the government for as long as I've been working with networked computers. In the early to mid-1990s when I was young and cutting my teeth on all of these systems, there weren't any laws in place to punish offenders. The systems were wide open, using default passwords, hosting services that were wide open, etc. The hardest part of hacking a system was getting access to it, either by finding a dial up via wardialing or actually getting physical access to the site (in terms of phone switches and the like).

Two decades ago the government started passing a lot of laws that made it illegal to access systems that you don't own or have permission to audit. They never really locked down the systems. They never passed any laws that made it necessary to develop secure systems. They just implemented some pretty severe punishments for messing with the systems.

Rather than lock down the systems completely, they are going with surveillance and record keeping. Of course systems are way more hardened than they were in the past, but exploits are constantly coming out. Law enforcement online is like law enforcement in the physical world. They just want to clean up after the fact and try to hold some people accountable for illegal actions.

As responsible citizens our only choice seems to be to stop consuming the content that the corporations want to protect, while at the same time standing up for our Constitutional rights as we drag them online. We should be able to speak freely, peacefully assemble and the like. As far as I can tell, ACTA has to do with copyright law and intellectual property. If you aren't swapping warez or pirating movies and music and books, you should be fine.

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (1)

selven (1556643) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323264)

No, they're saying:

We're probably going to either die or become dramatically weaker in the next few decades because the internet has made our presence superfluous. However, we can make $$$BIG_MONEY for five extra years if we slow the internet down a bit with our sheer number of lawyers.

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (1)

aaandre (526056) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323454)

Going public and going to be passed as a law for the public.

The fact that a few people are aware and pissed off does not mean that all of the people won't be governed by this new law soon.

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31323810)

It's particularly stupid since the ostensible goal of the treaty is to reduce infringement.

The problem with that, is that if it's illegal for you to access the protected medium, then you might as well just let someone else do it, and copy their unprotected medium. i.e. if you can't legally watch cable TV on your MythTV, then instead of subscribing to cable TV, just torrent the TV shows. If you can't legally play a BluRay disc on your computer, then illegally obtain the .mkv and legally play it. Both approaches are illegal, but one of them is a hell of a lot more convenient and cheaper for the user. Guess which one the wallets have been voting for.

It doesn't make sense to grant a monopoly to market, if the monopoly holder isn't going to sell to that market. If they're going to abstain from doing business (either by refraining from selling DRM-free media, or by making it illegal to use DRMed media), then they have no stake in the market to lose (they'll lose $0 per year due to piracy); granting them copyright is not only pointless, but it will be violated.

DRM and the anti-circumvention provisions are a pro-piracy policy. If ACTA's aim is to reduce piracy, it ought to outlaw DRM and repeal the anti-circumvention provisions. If you forcefully make the copyright holders take the money, then some people are going to offer the money.

And if the idea of government forcefully making them take the money is repellent to you laissez-faire types, then why have government involved by creating copyright law at all? Either centrally plan it in a sensible way (copyrights and no DRM) or leave it to a totally free market (no copyrights at all, and everyone has to do their best to keep their trade secrets). The current approach of half-measures is bloody fucking stupid and everyone is losing as a result. And it looks like ACTA just wants to make things worse.

Circumvention prohibitions are the second dumbest, second most anti-busines and anti-consumer bullshit to hit the industry. The first dumbest and anti-everyone bullshit, were the access controls itself. Government enforcing that stupidity was just the government's way of helping the industry shoot itself in the foot. Sometimes a senator needs to just take a fool's money and then ignore the fool.

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (2, Interesting)

kirillian (1437647) | more than 4 years ago | (#31324284)

It doesn't make sense to grant a monopoly to market, if the monopoly holder isn't going to sell to that market. If they're going to abstain from doing business (either by refraining from selling DRM-free media, or by making it illegal to use DRMed media), then they have no stake in the market to lose (they'll lose $0 per year due to piracy); granting them copyright is not only pointless, but it will be violated.

And that's the whole crux of the argument against the huge fines imposed - they aren't losing money because they are not even providing a product in the market that the pirates are serving. Hence, the damage supposedly caused is actually non-existent.

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (1)

ppanon (16583) | more than 4 years ago | (#31324630)

Yep. It's the "War on Piracy by individuals". More of your tax dollars and peoples lives to be wasted, like on all those other "War on <vice>" efforts. There's ways to change public perceptions and alter behaviour via education and public policy, at least when it's in the public interest (see smoking, drunk driving). The problem for ACTA proponents is that the continuation of media publishing and distribution cartels is not in the public interest.

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (1)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323838)

Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid?

Maybe, but not for the reason you suggest.

"We can't write working code because the only people willing to write this kind of code are incompetent morons. Skilled engineers think this type of code is a bad idea, and won't touch it. Rather than rethinking our position to be more in line with reality, we want laws that make illegal to circumvent the swiss cheese code that we can actually hire someone to write."

The reason they can't write "good" code in this area isn't that they can't attract "skilled engineers" -- a problem that could mostly be addressed by throwing more money at the problem, which there lobbying efforts in favor of anti-circumvention laws show that they are more than willing to do, but that the problem is fundamentally intractable. Everything the consumer needs to decode and access the media has to be avaialable, otherwise authorized use won't be possible. But once that's there, you have to prevent the user from using it. Effective technical measures are, therefore, fundamentally impractical, hence, anti-circumvention rules. Are proposed, to limit access to the information necessary to circumvent the fundamentally flawed technical measures.

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31325084)

The analogy which springs to my mind is of a person who picks the locks on the doors or windows of your house, but doesn't steal anything. If I'm following the logic, you're suggesting it is OK for someone to do just that, and if they manage to pick the locks, it is your own fault for not installing suitable locks. However in the physical world, breaking and entering (without stealing anything) is a crime in most jurisdictions. I'm not stating that I'm for or against the illegality of this, just that I get the logic that's being applied here with regards to the anticircumvention provisions. If your position is that anticirumvention laws are unjust, then it seems to me that it follows that you would have to consider any attempts to break into your home/car/etc fair, provided nothing it stolen and no damage done.

On the more general topic of copyrights/patents/IP, the entire concept is rather goofy: it is in all cases simply an artificial restriction for the sole purpose of enriching one party at the expense of another. While a seemingly widely-accepted concept these days, it is at heart a forced involuntary redistribution of wealth, dressed up with a lot of rhetoric designed to make its existence appear noble when under minimal scrutiny...

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (2, Insightful)

snowraver1 (1052510) | more than 4 years ago | (#31325448)

Your analogy sucks... Break and enter is a serious crime compared to theft because there could be people inside, and someone could get hurt. Also, with break and enter you are invading someone's personal space, which is not the case with DRM bypassing.

A better analogy would include a car and would go something like this... It would be like if you bought a car that would require an oil change every 6 months but once the 6 months had expired, your car would not work at all until you changed the oil again. You, being a knowledgeable, handy, and attractive male, attempt to change the oil filter yourself, only to find that you can't use any filter, you have to buy their filter, or your car won't start. In addition to being knowledgeable, handy, and attractive, you also happen to be clever and dismantled the original oil filter, and used parts of it to make your car start regardless of the unapproved oil filter. You hop in and pull onto the street, only to be pulled over and given a $250,000.00 fine by the most evil cop ever (likely a T-1000).

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (1)

Cabriel (803429) | more than 4 years ago | (#31325566)

So, we all should be allowed to break into your house because your locks aren't adequate enough to keep the skilled and determined ones out?

Your house is the code. Your doors and windows are the DRM. You can add more locks and/or more sophisticated locks, but as long as the door /window is there, someone can get in whether by lock-pick or brute force.

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31325716)

Bro, if you want a copy of my couch you can have one.

Re:Anyone else think anticircumvention is stupid? (2, Insightful)

nasch (598556) | more than 4 years ago | (#31325796)

No, I should be allowed to break into my own house if I want to. I bought the house (DVD). Just because it came with a lock (DRM), why should I be prohibited from opening it?

Sneakernet? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31323154)

Neighborhood wireless BBS? Somebody put up a tower and let people in the neighborhood connect to it with subscriber units?

Group of people rent the fire hall for the weekend and throw down some gigabit switches?

I doubt strongly people will just accept dropping file sharing. Do we start wasting actual police resources in raiding swapping parties and neighborhood wifi meshes?

Re:Sneakernet? (2, Interesting)

oldspewey (1303305) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323534)

Do we start wasting actual police resources in raiding swapping parties and neighborhood wifi meshes?

The most interesting part of this question is the word "we"

Who do you mean by "we"? Who's resources are "we" wasting? My hunch is that the people conducting these negotiations behind closed doors have little if any problem having you spend your own (tax) dollars in order to police your own behaviour, while the "content owners" get free enforcement of their right to make profit.

Oregonians, call Senator Ron Wyden (4, Informative)

langelgjm (860756) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323286)

Any Oregonians, call Senator Ron Wyden. He is a member of the Senate Finance Committee, and the US Trade Representative Ron Kirk (lead US man behind ACTA) is scheduled to testify before the committee this week, discussing the US trade policy agenda. In January, Wyden sent a letter to Kirk inquiring about the lack of transparency and questionable provisions in ACTA. Ask Wyden to grill Kirk on ACTA!

Re:Oregonians, call Senator Ron Wyden (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31323326)

Here's the complete list of Senate Finance Committee members:

http://finance.senate.gov/sitepages/committee.htm [senate.gov]

Unfortunately none of them are from my state.

Re:Oregonians, call Senator Ron Wyden (1)

zero0ne (1309517) | more than 4 years ago | (#31324030)

Chuck is on there, I shot em message on their form.

Maybe I'll give em a call tomorrow as well to voice my opinion.

Re:Oregonians, call Senator Ron Wyden (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 4 years ago | (#31324328)

None of them are from my state, but it doesn't matter, because Boxer and Feinstein are in Disney's pocket anyways.

Just walk away (5, Insightful)

TSHTF (953742) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323308)

I don't think there's much chance of changing the American negotiators views on this, but I'm still going to contact my representatives in Congress. Nothing will likely come out of it. If you are a /.er in a more reasonable country, say New Zealand or Canada, I beg you to contact your MPs and demand transparency in this process. We shouldn't have to find out about the progress of negotiations through leaks.

Re:Just walk away (1)

oldspewey (1303305) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323576)

more reasonable country, say New Zealand or Canada, I beg you to contact your MPs and demand transparency in this process

Fat chance. The current Canadian government has spent the last 4 years actively dismantling the institutions of democracy and transparency. They love the fact this is all taking place in complete secrecy.

Re:Just walk away (1)

mcfedr (1081629) | more than 4 years ago | (#31324974)

Ive written to my british MPs and MEPs serveral times, and had not satisfactory replys

Re:Just walk away (1)

Kalriath (849904) | more than 4 years ago | (#31326012)

Fat chance, the New Zealand government has spent the last two years actively dismantling the institutions of democracy and transparency.

I stole the line from the Canadian, but it's just as relevant here.

History being made. (1)

maillemaker (924053) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323382)

For good or ill, I sense history being made here, folks. Basically the world is coming to grips with a global communications system, and is hammering out an accord on how it can be used.

Re:History being made. (5, Insightful)

TSHTF (953742) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323484)

I think people are upset because this accord is being hammered out in secret behind closed doors, and citizens of the affected countries are only aware of progress on the treaty through leaks.

There's a correct way to "come to grips" with these problems, and that way is by discussing these issues in the open, and allowing for review and comment on what's going on.

Re:History being made. (4, Insightful)

ciggieposeur (715798) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323572)

For good or ill, I sense history being made here, folks.

Me too. This is the DMCA all over again.

Basically the multi-national corporations are coming to grips with a global communications system, and is hammering out an accord on how it can be used.

FTFY.

As long as we do not criminalize (2)

Geert Jalink (1738722) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323406)

How can you explain your children that they are 'criminals' if they download music or video?

Even for addults it is difficult to understand that downloading a nice song for your music collection has a very high fine.

Re:As long as we do not criminalize (2, Insightful)

Thoreauly Nuts (1701246) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323644)

How can you explain your children that they are 'criminals' if they download music or video?

You don't. You explain to them that corporations and governments are criminals and then teach them how to defend themselves from them by using darknets, etc.

Re:As long as we do not criminalize (2, Funny)

Sloppy (14984) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323950)

How can you explain your children that they are 'criminals' if they download music or video?

By telling them that they're criminals if they don't download and use the original purchased medium [wikipedia.org] instead.

So I guess the way to explain it to the children, is to say that "criminal" is a synonym for person.

WootC fp (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31323418)

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The irony of trying to keep ACTA secret (4, Insightful)

drDugan (219551) | more than 4 years ago | (#31323502)

does anyone else find it comic and rather ironic that almost exclusively
because the countries involved have tried to keep this a secret, that ACTA
negotiations now get far more attention than they would otherwise?

I feel this needs even more attention, and more clearly explained and broadly
disseminated explanation of what is at stake both for individuals and for
emerging cultures as they join the ranks of "western" strong-copyright regimes.

Re:The irony of trying to keep ACTA secret (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31323816)

It's just you. If you step out of your basement, you'll notice that not one word about ACTA has made the evening TV news or the local newspaper.

Re:The irony of trying to keep ACTA secret (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31323890)

Is it? Nobody I know knows anything about ACTA, not even a fellow slashdot reader

Streisand Effect (1)

Sparx139 (1460489) | more than 4 years ago | (#31324718)

It always happens in these sorts of situations. Australia's clean feed filter, Iran, the list goes on.

Re:The irony of trying to keep ACTA secret (1)

DinDaddy (1168147) | more than 4 years ago | (#31325678)

Unfortunately, only on sites like /.

Mainstream press and mainstream people are oblivious.

Re:The irony of trying to keep ACTA secret (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31325804)

Getting attention from /. types is to be expected for such a law. The real issue is that non-techies don't know or care, and they will not care until their son/daughter gets jailed for torrenting 16 songs.

Just watch. By the time the public catches up on what's going down, the laws to enforce ACTA will have long entered into effect.

Government is run too much like a business (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31323998)

Business culture has saturated government to the point where it can only communicate via the means established by business. People in government are more comfortable in business meetings and negotiations than they are listening to and communicating with the electorate.

When they have to communicate with the electorate they resort to pure pr or advertising strategies.

Boycott (3, Insightful)

korpenkraxar (1731280) | more than 4 years ago | (#31324132)

I fear this is the only action that content owners will pay any attention to, and I do not mean, stop buying and continue pirating the media. Ignore their new products, on the Internet and in real life. Put pressure on your favorite artists and writers. Tell your friends.

Am I the only one pleasantly surprised by this? (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Brave Guy (457657) | more than 4 years ago | (#31324494)

I've been following the whole ACTA fiasco for a while, and was getting increasingly nervous about the whole "behind closed doors" thing. Of course, many of the proposals, particularly from the US, are obviously big-corp-funded crazy talk, and the secrecy of the whole process is abhorrent. However, now that I've seen an official document for the first time, I'm actually pleasantly surprised, in that it's not as bad as I expected.

I find it reassuring that there are quite a few notes where the EU has explicitly disagreed, apparently even indicating that this is not a point on which they will give way in some cases, e.g., on restricting any damages for infringement to actual damages and rejecting any notion of punitive damages entirely, or where they want to insert wording with the anticircumvention provisions to provide for safeguarding the benefits of certain limits on IPR (which would presumably leave open the door to excluding otherwise fair use from the anticircumvention protection).

Re:Am I the only one pleasantly surprised by this? (1)

Pteraspidomorphi (1651293) | more than 4 years ago | (#31324864)

On the other hand, the U.S. and Japan governments should be quarantined from the rest of the world.

Outrageous (1)

raxhonp (136733) | more than 4 years ago | (#31324570)

This article has been posted more than 2 hours ago and only 60 comments so far.

That leaves me voiceless.

Re:Outrageous (1)

Pyrus.mg (1152215) | more than 4 years ago | (#31325042)

The PDF link turned everyone off. They're almost like goatse. Especially so in this case now that I think about it.

Contacting Senators is worthless (1)

DustyShadow (691635) | more than 4 years ago | (#31324634)

I've contacted my Senators on a variety of issues and almost every time I get a response. On this issue, however, I have sent the EFF form in to them about 20 times and have not once received a response. I take that back, the first time I sent it, one of them responded with an email about health care.

Re:Contacting Senators is worthless (1)

winwar (114053) | more than 4 years ago | (#31325200)

"On this issue, however, I have sent the EFF form in to them about 20 times and have not once received a response."

And you were expecting a response to a form letter why? I'm sure an aide put a tick mark in the appropriate column, assuming they even know about the issue.

"I take that back, the first time I sent it, one of them responded with an email about health care."

So you actually did get a response. Obviously the aide sent the wrong form letter but heck, what's one form letter for another. If you want any chance at a more personalized response then you need to send a personalized letter.

Go Canada (1)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 4 years ago | (#31324978)

It makes me proud that of the whole world apparently we are the ones fighting this.

I imagine various EU members have the most to be pissed about looking at this document. The birthplace of PyratBiran and no outcry? Lots of liberal countries there that have remained silent. I'd be pissed.

Re:Go Canada (1)

hibiki_r (649814) | more than 4 years ago | (#31325078)

You'd be surprised at which European governments actually support what. For example, the Government of Spain, which call themselves Socialists and everything, are big fans of IP rights, if just because the big media groups help them win elections. They lack the balls to put an actual ban on P2P, but they have no qualms in setting up a rather large tax on pretty much anything that could copy media. Then, they wonder why piracy is rampant over there.

Social networking (1)

Trogre (513942) | more than 4 years ago | (#31325536)

I think we need to make sure the general masses are aware of these closed-door shenanigans, and one vector is the likes of social networking sites. I assume there's already something like a "Stop ACTA" group on Facebook? If not, someone should make one.

It might be one instance where geeks have legitimate cause for using such marketing-demographic-trawling sites as Facebook, twitter, bebo, etc.

Re:Social networking (1)

sowth (748135) | more than 4 years ago | (#31325744)

Then join one. A quick facebook search turns up a couple groups (apparently there is a namespace collision with ACTA). Two "Fuck ACTA" (created by same guy?) and one "ACTA Awareness"

We Need To Hire Our Own Lobbists (2, Insightful)

Black Gold Alchemist (1747136) | more than 4 years ago | (#31325984)

Here's how to restore real democracy world wide. First, we need to create a web-based lobbying organisation to lobby for our views. What we need are lobbyists world wide who will actually go in a bribe the senators and congress people like the corporate ones. Not meaningless PACs that send in worthless petitions. We need a system where all of us could contribute say, $30, and that hires the lobbyists. That's the carrot. Now for the stick. There are scandals everywhere in politics. There are likely scandals "in waiting" hidden in the politics. So, we tell the senators "if you don't do what we want, we will bring up X during the campaign." There's nothing they can do about it, because if they sue us, we just launch the scandal, and their career is over. Now, what if they try to make the lobbyist organisation illegal? The bribe/scandal machine goes into overdrive to defend itself. This is not the best form of democracy on the planet, but it works.

Second, we must destroy the music and media companies. They are a big threat to freedom world-wide (organised religion and moralism is in front). We need some kind of advertising based model for media delivery, over the internet. Think about if there was a website where you could play any song you wanted - like pandora or whatever. You could submit your music and it would get voted based on "views". Once it hit a certain number of views, we would create a CD of your music and sell that in stores or wherever. Young people (who buy music), often hate corps like Monsanto or whatever they see as bad. So lets use all those stories about teenagers sued by the RIAA to create a negative PR campaign, so the Obama voter types will hate the RIAA go for the service as an alternative.
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