Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

One Quarter of Germans Happy To Have Chip Implants

samzenpus posted more than 4 years ago | from the identified-coward dept.

Privacy 170

justice4all writes "If it means shorter lines at the supermarket, a quarter of Germans would be happy to have a chip implanted under their skin. The head of Germany's main IT trade body told the audience at the opening ceremony of the CeBIT technology exhibition that one in four of his countrymen are happy to have a microchip inserted for ID purposes."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

He looks like Gargamel (4, Funny)

kainewynd2 (821530) | more than 4 years ago | (#31337706)

“We just carried out a survey and one out of four people are happy to have a chip planted under their skin for very trivial uses for example to pass gates more quickly at a discotheque for example and to be able to pay for things more quickly in the supermarket,” said Scheer. “The wilingness of the population to accept our technology is certainly given.”

"Bwa-haha-haha," Scheer continued. "After this, world domination will be within my grasp!"

Pie and cake were served soon afterwards.

Re:He looks like Gargamel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31337724)

The cake is a lie.

Re:He looks like Gargamel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31337786)

The cake is a pie.

Re:He looks like Gargamel (1)

Iman Azol (1735258) | more than 4 years ago | (#31340048)

No, the cake is pi.

Re:He looks like Gargamel (5, Insightful)

MRe_nl (306212) | more than 4 years ago | (#31337972)

I can't find their "survey" at BITKOM http://www.bitkom.org/en/Default.aspx [bitkom.org] , but i'm wondering how many Germans were polled (four?). Most Germans I know would not want this AT ALL.
 

Re:He looks like Gargamel (5, Insightful)

pv2b (231846) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338114)

Most Germans I know would not want this AT ALL.

Indeed. It would seem 3 out of 4 Germans do not want this.

Re:He looks like Gargamel (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31338778)

Basically the nazi philosophy doesn't include privacy, but it does include quick check-in to death camps, just what this would be perfect for.

Re:He looks like Gargamel (2, Insightful)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338220)

They'll just get them inserted into the left forearm.

Re:He looks like Gargamel (1)

ipquickly (1562169) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338282)

Just let it be inserted into the left buttock. Just where my wallet is.

Cashier: "how do you want to pay for this".
Customer: ...

you get the idea

Re:He looks like Gargamel (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338418)

Really?

Re:He looks like Gargamel (1)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338506)

I would prefer not to get screwed in that location, thank you.

Re:He looks like Gargamel (2, Insightful)

icebike (68054) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338372)

How bad must the supermarket lines be for anyone to answer in the affirmative?

Why would a prosperous country like Germany have so few supermarkets that there were lines at all, other than the day before a holiday?

Now street muggers would have to carry scalpels? If your money is in your wallet they take the wallet. When your money is in your arm...???

Re:He looks like Gargamel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31338990)

Its true. They polled everyone in the sales team and they all agree that one quarter of germans want chip implants. Now all they have to do is remove their brains.

Not an informed choice. (5, Insightful)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | more than 4 years ago | (#31337714)

If you would have asked people in the 50's if they would prefer DDT sprayed on their crops to kill the insects, creating cheaper food. They would have said yes. They didn't know the consequences, and were only presented with the benefits. As is the case here. How many of those who said they would be willing fully understand the security issues associated with that choice?

Re:Not an informed choice. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31337772)

I'm not even convinced of the benefits. How long does it take to swipe a mag-stripe versus swiping you palm? I'd hazard that they take the same amount of time.

Re:Not an informed choice. (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338242)

Swipe a card? How quaint.

My card has PayPass -- I just wave my card in front of the reader to pay, and a signature isn't required.

Re:Not an informed choice. (1)

morari (1080535) | more than 4 years ago | (#31339878)

That means that you're already part of the problem then...

Re:Not an informed choice. (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#31337792)

Yeah. Did you hear about that idea the Microsoft VP had? A way to improve internet security, you should vote yes!

Re:Not an informed choice. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31337794)

I fully understand the security issues of walking around with bits of plastic and paper in my pockets, relying on them to pay for stuff, identify myself, etc. Given the choice, I'd prefer an single electronic chip, thank you very much. If you're in front of cavemen about to "invent" fire, will you try to scare them off by telling them about the dangers of arson, death by fumes and the great fire of London?

Re:Not an informed choice. (3, Insightful)

geekmux (1040042) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338038)

I fully understand the security issues of walking around with bits of plastic and paper in my pockets, relying on them to pay for stuff, identify myself, etc. Given the choice, I'd prefer an single electronic chip, thank you very much. If you're in front of cavemen about to "invent" fire, will you try to scare them off by telling them about the dangers of arson, death by fumes and the great fire of London?

Do you fully understand? Really? How many times have you had your credit card number stolen? Oh, that few, huh? Really? It's never happened yet? 15 years you've been using them and nothing? Wow. Yeah, sounds like it's a real issue...

And the "single-chip" theory for ID purposes will become bullshit just as soon as someones tag is "cloned", and we'll all be forced to provide a picture ID again.

Sorry, this is nothing more tech for the sake of tech, with the side "benefit" of tracking and controlling the masses.

Hell, we get all defensive when we get targeted spam that proves that someone was tracking where you surf online, and you think it won't be ten times worse when they can track your every move?

Re:Not an informed choice. (2, Interesting)

plover (150551) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338284)

How did you get from "chip implant" to "track every move"? The read range for many RFID technologies is measured in centimeters, not meters. (It varies by frequency and other factors.) If tracking every move meant "place a reader in every doorknob" then maybe I'd buy your argument.

On the flip side, are you one of the 99% of people who carries a cell phone? Not only is your every movement known already, regardless of your proximity to anything but a cell tower that could be miles away, but is instantly accessible by law enforcement (and who knows who else.) By carrying the phone, you are a willful participant in your own tracking.

Perhaps your tin-foil hat is just a bit maladjusted.

Re:Not an informed choice. (1)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338334)

yeah, it would definitely be impossible to put a reader in every business' doorway and track people that way.

Re:Not an informed choice. (5, Insightful)

plover (150551) | more than 4 years ago | (#31339588)

I'll say it again: if you are one of the people carrying cell phones, quit complaining about RFID tags "tracking you". That little candy-bar-sized transmitter clipped to your belt is actively broadcasting your location every single minute to a computer up to 40,000,000 cm away, and the phone network is making your location instantly globally available to anyone with the proper authority. Not only that, but the phone network is RECORDING your location even when not asked, so they can correlate your previous locations for as far back as they keep a history.

These complainers are screaming "I AM RIGHT HERE!!!" at the top of their lungs every single minute, with a blinking strobe light mounted on top of their tinfoil hats; the phone company is writing their location down every time they hear them; and yet they're afraid that someone is going to spend thousands of dollars outfitting a building with secret door readers just to see who comes in, never mind that cameras are already pointed at those doors. Right.

"I need a perspective check on Aisle 1, please."

Re:Not an informed choice. (1)

DocHoncho (1198543) | more than 4 years ago | (#31340170)

How DARE you bring such a reasonable opinion to an otherwise irrational debate. You must be new here.

Re:Not an informed choice. (1)

icebike (68054) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338544)

How did you get from "chip implant" to "track every move"? The read range for many RFID technologies is measured in centimeters, not meters.

Ah, not true. http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/goodtogo/ [wa.gov]

Read range is a function of power. Improvements in technology may increase read ranges for tags. Generally, the read range of a tag is limited to the distance from the reader over which the tag can draw enough energy from the reader field to power the tag. Tags may be read at longer ranges than they are designed for by increasing reader power.

The limit on read distance then becomes the signal-to-noise ratio of the signal reflected from the tag back to the reader. Researchers at two security conferences have demonstrated that passive Ultra-HighFID tags, not of the HighFID type used in US passports, normally read at ranges of up to 30 feet, can be read at ranges of 50 to 69 feet using suitable equipment

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radio-frequency_identification [wikipedia.org]

Re:Not an informed choice. (1)

plover (150551) | more than 4 years ago | (#31339538)

Of course it's true. Please re-read what I said (that you even quoted!) The read range for many RFID technologies is measured in centimeters, not meters. Not all RFID technologies can be picked up at 21 meters.

Yes, I am fully aware that certain types of RFID tags are capable of being detected at 21 meters or more. Near-field RFID, however, has a max range of 1 meter or so (commercial near field RF readers claim less than a 50 cm range.) An implantable tag could use a technology that travels far less than 20 meters.

Re:Not an informed choice. (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 4 years ago | (#31340102)

The read range for many RFID technologies is measured in centimeters, not meters.

Reading the debate in this part of the thread, I have to disagree. My view is that it's not even a hard problem to extend the range at which an RFID is read (an RFID which can be read at 10 cm by a "normal" reader, can be read at 10 meters by a reader with 40 dB more gain). A bigger antenna, more sensitive receivers, and/or more power is all you need. For example, a store could station antennas at choke points (store entrances and internal places) or turn its entire ceiling into a phased array, allowing the store owner to track numerous RFIDs at once. The only real obstacle is money. If an RFID tracker yields $0.10 per customer visit and there are 1,000 RFID tagged customer visits per day on average, then the system will return $36,500 per year. That's probably good enough to justify a half million dollar system in today's economic climate per store. A business that has a hundred stores like the above would be justified in spending $50 million in total on the system. Now, I doubt such systems will show up right away, but in a high RFID usage society, money has been left on the ground. Someone will pick it up.

Re:Not an informed choice. (5, Insightful)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#31339338)

So why not keep that single chip in your watch band, clothing or a ring on your finger? What is so attractive about embedding it in your body?

Re:Not an informed choice. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31337936)

If you would have asked people in the 50's if they would prefer DDT sprayed on their crops to kill the insects, creating cheaper food. They would have said yes.

What's up with. Your weird punctu. Ation?

Re:Not an informed choice. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31337998)

250 million people per year get malaria, and one million of them die every year. Them and their families would LOVE to have DDT sprayed again.
Propaganda is awesome isn't it?

Re:Not an informed choice. (2, Informative)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338342)

No, they wouldn't, because DDT is largely ineffective against mosquitoes in many places. Sometimes it even exasperates problems with other pests. Other pesticides are more effective.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DDT#Mosquito_resistance_to_DDT [wikipedia.org]

Re:Not an informed choice. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31338668)

Don't you get exasperated when problems are exacerbated?

Re:Not an informed choice. (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338174)

I think you are assuming way too much ignorance.
Maybe they just don't worry as much about government interfering in their lives as people in the US do.
Reminds me of an episode of the Britcom Yes Minister.
The EU wanted to issue universal ID cards and the Minister was freaking out because he was sure that the people of the UK would never stand for it.
When he was asked wouldn't the other EU nations put up a stink about it he said.
"The Germans will love it and the Spanish and Italians will ignore it. Only the British will be angry about it."
It could just a cultural bias in that a good percentage of Germans would be willing to trust their government for the benefits that this offers.

Re:Not an informed choice. (0, Flamebait)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338810)

Because after all, the German government has such a long history of being worthy of trust.

Re:Not an informed choice. (1)

Aussie (10167) | more than 4 years ago | (#31339460)

Close

On the EU ID card:

  "the Germans will love it, the French will ignore it and the Italians and the Irish will be too chaotic to enforce it. Only the British will resent it."

Cell phones and credit cards. (1)

Valdrax (32670) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338452)

If you would have asked people in the 50's if they would prefer DDT sprayed on their crops to kill the insects, creating cheaper food. They would have said yes. They didn't know the consequences, and were only presented with the benefits. As is the case here. How many of those who said they would be willing fully understand the security issues associated with that choice?

I think people aren't completely ignorant of the implications of such a device, nor are they necessarily more likely to carry irrational beliefs that the device is safe than irrational fears of phantom threats. It doesn't matter. People will willingly sacrifice the distant risk of tyranny for day-to-day convenience, and as much as I disagree with that decision, I can't call it an irrational one.

After all, if I asked you to carry around a device that would let the government track where you are at all times with little more than a warrant, would you accept? What if that device let you find friends and family in exchange for letting them keep in touch with you? Chances are you've already got a device like this.

It's called a cell phone. As much as I hated it at the time, I got one too, years ago, essentially because of peer pressure. Now that I'm used to having it and all its features (e.g. maps and web browsing), I doubt I'd give it up. But that was a choice to sacrifice some privacy and anonymity in exchange for convenience.

I've done the same thing with credit card purchases. The grocery store doesn't need some special customer card to keep track of everything I purchase -- my credit card number suffices for any good CRM system. But it's easier than carrying cash, especially when the grocery store doubles as my ATM.

When you consider that, just how much more danger is having a chip in your arm really? What are they going to be able to track that they can't already?

Re:Cell phones and credit cards. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31339930)

ok so your logic is.... because you chose to make those sacrifices, that means others should consider them ok? I find it interesting that some social groups want to make crimes out of superficial bullshit like making fun of skin color, culture or religion, but when it comes to controlling one's own privacy, suddenly they go cold. Why? Privacy plays a much bigger part in the psychological health of the average individual. Being able to decide how much or how little privacy one wants in his life is a cornerstone of living in a free society. Of course, this is a form of power and those in authority would like to take that waway. Allowing the government to decide this by simple vote (if that) hardly counts as such. I don't want to be tracked. I don't want to be monitored. I'm not cattle. Get out... and don't find cute little ways to ensure I stay ostracized because I don't share every aspect of my life on public forums so my employer and the government can monitor it all.

The danger is in the little steps. each time you take one, it doesn't look like a big deal because you're recentering your expectations a little bit at a time. I guess we really are going to have to learn about orwell's nightmare the hard way. With ever more complete records of one's life available to ever growing institutional authorities, it's only a matter of time before every little decision he makes is arbitrarily judged negatively, resulting in punishment. Then there's the probability of the data being used preemptively against him, further limiting his liberty. Why? Institutional culture believes that its imperatives should be at the top of everyone else's stack. Being micromanaged sucks. When it's done with technology, the painful results are magnified.

Re:Not an informed choice. (1)

alcmaeon (684971) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338960)

"They didn't know the consequences, and were only presented with the benefits."

What fucking German hasn't heard of World War II, the last time they thought a totalitarian state was a good idea?

Re:Not an informed choice. (1)

Iman Azol (1735258) | more than 4 years ago | (#31340108)

Congrats on picking DDT, the marketing myth that has killed millions of people.

Re:Not an informed choice. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31340190)

DDT is a good pesticide. I've read articles debunking the whole DDT = dead eagles argument against the use. I'm much more concerned about the plastic industry. BPA and such

movie rights! (1)

Michael Kristopeit (1751814) | more than 4 years ago | (#31337744)

someone snatch up the black and white movie rights.

Well, hey... (3, Insightful)

pushing-robot (1037830) | more than 4 years ago | (#31337780)

Those tattoos and armbands were bloody handy.

...

...

OH NO, IT'S GODWINZILLA! AIEEE!

70 years ago... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31337796)

...much, much more than a mere 25% of Germans were quite eager to carry their era's form of identification and "go along with the crowd". /end-of-thread, Godwin invoked.

Re:70 years ago... (1)

Mr Pippin (659094) | more than 4 years ago | (#31337960)

THANK YOU! Just what I was thinking.

Re:70 years ago... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31338504)

Now all they need is IBM to administer this. Did Germany just Godwin itself?

What benefits? (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#31337798)

Really, I don't see any benefits in using chip implants in humans. Yes, it makes sense for cattle who can't positively identify themselves, for pets who slip out of their tags, etc.

Re:What benefits? (1)

plopez (54068) | more than 4 years ago | (#31337924)

Since most people tend to behave like cattle, it all starts to make sense. As for the benefit, it may make identifying your burned and mutilated easier to identify after you are killed in a terrorist attack.

Re:What benefits? (2, Insightful)

kronosopher (1531873) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338700)

As for the benefit, it may make identifying your burned and mutilated corpse easier after you are killed in a terrorist attack

(fixed that for you) A false-flag terrorist attack perpetrated by the same government that implanted your chip. In-fact after analyzing your movements they found a high probability that your position would be at the aforemention attack and concluded you are expendable and your death is acceptable collateral damage. Meanwhile, the other cattle like yourself believe this an authentic terrorist attack and therefore call for the government to enact more degrading laws in the name of "security". Furthering their agenda to subjugate and enslave the masses. It's all very promising, let me tell you. Never worry about your children again, get them implants. Never pay for anything again, just walk out of the store and it's automatically deducted from your chip's credits. Your car, now tied to your chip, so you never worry about it being stolen. Life will be so much easier... Except when you break the law (everyone invariably does because there are so damn many). Officials turn off your chip and that store's doors no longer open for you. Your car won't turn on. You can't spend your money. Your children are located via GPS and taken. You're trapped in a system in which you don't exist. Getting chipped make us safer and our lives more convenient

Re:What benefits? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31339304)

I love that book!

Re:What benefits? (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338336)

There's not really much benefit. The major upside is that you can't ever forget your wallet, and it's going to be a bitch to steal your card. (If the guy in front of you is trying to pay with a stump, then it's probably stolen.)

However, electronic tracking of people does have its place. [projectlifesaver.org] (I wrote the code for those transmitters.) Some people will wander away and be unable to ask for help or even realize that they are dying of exposure.

Gestapo sagt: (-1, Troll)

cosm (1072588) | more than 4 years ago | (#31337820)

Halt! Ihre Mikrochip bitte!

Oh, WOULD be happy (1)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 4 years ago | (#31337872)

Yeah, I kinda figured that was the case. But for a second there I was about to be very upset that Germans had become cyborgs before we even had the option.

But now that I think of it, if they already had chip implants but only 25% were happy about it that'd be kinda disturbing. I mean why'd they get them then? Overhyped marketing claims seems plausible. Another option would be government coercion. Which then raises the question: Why didn't they design the chips to alter the recipient's mind so that they'd be happy to be chipped? Maybe they did but that feature is only 25% effective?

Could be worse (0, Troll)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 4 years ago | (#31337880)

At least the Germans weren't stating an opinion on whether they should forcibly implant microchips into people of OTHER nationalities.

1 in 7 Also want the Berlin wall back (5, Informative)

markass530 (870112) | more than 4 years ago | (#31337916)

So take anything the Germans want with a grain of salt http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE58G5GS20090917 [reuters.com]

Heh (2, Interesting)

Rix (54095) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338724)

That's mostly West Germans who don't want pay for rebuilding East Germany.

Cheap Germans? That's unpossible.

This is bullshit (1)

Fanro (130986) | more than 4 years ago | (#31337944)

I am having a hard time finding the original survey questions (probably for good reasons)
Even so, this smells like bullshit.

The only (apparent) quote I could find: "Jeder vierte Deutsche (23 Prozent) würde sogar einen Computerchip im Körper tragen, wenn es ihm bestimmte Vorteile verschafft"

~ "every fourth German would even carry an "Computerchip"(e.g. an integrated circuit/microprocessor) in their body if that would result in certain advantages"

Like anyone would refuse to wear a pacemaker with a integrated circuit.

References to "for identification purposes" or "under their skin" appear to be made up.

Re:This is bullshit (1)

Nikker (749551) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338604)

“We just carried out a survey and one out of four people are happy to have a chip planted under their skin for very trivial uses for example to pass gates more quickly at a discotheque for example and to be able to pay for things more quickly in the supermarket,” said Scheer. “The wilingness of the population to accept our technology is certainly given.”(emphasis mine)

It really reveals the parts of the communities that apparently agree with this to likely be young people (discotheques) and maybe a few mothers (supermarkets) but really where is the meat and potatoes in this survey? Lets see some numbers, video and charts, at lest pretend you really did this. We don't know how many people were actually asked (maybe just 4) and how they were asked. As far as security of implanted chips go its already been proven to be a joke, you could put a reader in your pocket and have a field day in a subway or busy restaurant. Its like having your credit card stuck to your forehead and now it seems they won't even require a signature when the payment is made. Surveys can easily be cherry picked by asking unclear questions and selling the answers to the person taking the survey and we don't even know how many people were asked. People like this continue this type of business should be put away for a very long time, this is not the first time the manufacturer of a device found survey results that said their idea is a good one.

Re:This is bullshit (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338728)

Its like having your credit card stuck to your forehead

Why the whole credit card? The number would suffice.

Re:This is bullshit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31339408)

Funny thing is, German supermarket lines are already crazy fast compared to the US. They're simply faster scanning things, and you bag your own shit / load your own cart, with bags you brought yourself or can buy for 10-20 cents (even the plastic bags are nice, not thin cheap garbage). It is a bit of PITA to wait for someone paying with a card...cash goes much faster.

Re:This is bullshit (5, Informative)

gerddie (173963) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338638)

There is a presentation [bitkom.org] . The secons slide on page two sais:

Question: For which advantages would you carry a computer chip inside your body?

  • 72 % never
  • 23% for certain advantages (total)
  • 5% don't know

----

  • 16% faster rescuing
  • 12% increased security
  • 5% more comfortable shopping
  • 4% access control
  • 6% unspecified advantages

Re:This is bullshit (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338880)

In other words, 72% of the people asked refused to be chipped, no matter what benefit you would offer them.

It's all in the wording...

Re:This is bullshit (1)

mhelander (1307061) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338680)

But if talking about pacemakers, why would the number be so low as only 23% ?

Re:This is bullshit (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338846)

Someone hand that guy an insightful mod: This thread is worthless without the original question.

How about "do you think it would be a good idea to have a chip implanted, e.g. to pay in the supermarket or to open your home doors?"

If that's the wording, 25% sounds like an awfully LOW turnout. Appearantly 75% of the people are still smart enough to notice that being cattle-tagged is not something they'd want. And that means that even half the people with an IQ below 100 could identify it as a DUMB idea.

And 50% of Americans! (2, Insightful)

plopez (54068) | more than 4 years ago | (#31337962)

I suspect even a greater percentage of Americans would agree to be chipped. Or have their children chipped to prevent their kidnapping by the ever present child molester.

Man, I have become really cynical.

Re:And 50% of Americans! (1)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338518)

Better yet, how about a chip to constantly measure the levels of alcohol, THC, and narcotics in their children's bloodstream. I'm pretty sure we have the technology to do this now... first they'll mandate it for parolees, then parents will insist on it for their minor children, pretty soon anybody that doesn't have one will be considered a Unabomber-like Luddite. On the bright side, geeks will pretty quickly hack a remote reader for these chips, so they'll know exactly which girls to attempt to pick up at parties...

Come to think of it, I want my daughter to come equipped with an alarm that goes off when it detects rohypnol!

Re:And 50% of Americans! (1)

GayBliss (544986) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338736)

Better yet, how about a chip to constantly measure the levels of alcohol, THC, and narcotics [...]

If the chip could actually deliver the alcohol, THC, and narcotics to the bloodstream... it would really be a hit.

Re:And 50% of Americans! (1)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338856)

Hmm... they currently have the technology to implant a pump that keeps the insulin levels in your bloodstream at a steady level... it shouldn't be too hard to adapt this technology to other substances. My alcoholic girlfriend was actually highly functional with a constant level of alcohol in her bloodstream... it wasn't until she got jaundice and wound up in the hospital, where they cut off her alcohol supply, that she started experiencing DTs and hallucinating. Likewise, I believe heroin addicts function fairly well with a constant level of the drug in their system... you may be on to something here! At least until the pump, your liver, or your kidneys fail, it might be fun.

Re:And 50% of Americans! (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338896)

Why do you think you'd get asked if your kids should be chipped? They're already collecting their blood for DNA samples without even telling you, what gives you the idea they'd ask you whether you want to have your kids chipped?

Why wouldn't you? It's for their safety! You do not want your kids to be safe? What kind of parent are you! You are unfit, so the CPA has to step in and declare it a good idea. Now shut up and you may be allowed to take your kids home with you.

Re:And 50% of Americans! (1)

dangitman (862676) | more than 4 years ago | (#31340326)

Or have their children chipped to prevent their kidnapping by the ever present child molester.

He must be one busy guy!

Come On Guys (2, Funny)

BJ_Covert_Action (1499847) | more than 4 years ago | (#31337996)

Seriously? If we're going to be inserting something under our skin, can we at least get some super powers out of it too? I don't need to have invasive surgery to buy the latest copy of Cosmopolitan quicker. I do need to have invasive surgery to shoot fire out of the palms of my hands.

Raise your standards Germany. Have some dignity!

Re:Come On Guys (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338362)

I got Sony-branded low-light vision upgrades.

It is AWESOME.

Re:Come On Guys (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31340178)

You don't need invasive surgery for that, simply inject yourself with the latest Plasmid from Ryan Industries!

EVOLVE TODAY!

Just to note... (0, Troll)

eepok (545733) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338044)

The Germans and their willingness to fall in step with just about anything should not be assumed to be a universal characterization of Western civilization.

3 in 4 (1)

vext_atl (1758080) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338056)

Three in four Germans are not happy with chip implants. Gotta love statistics!

Good work guys... (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338072)

I've also heard that the next generation of chips will be able to keep track of how many freedom points you have generated by working...

The other 75% understood the question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31338080)

25% probably thought it was about chipping other people. You know, criminals and old people.

ignorance (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31338152)

they're just not well informed. do they haz teh internetz in Germany?

Sample Size (1)

adrianturner (1734410) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338208)

Oh yes, we conducted loads of research to produce our statistics, we asked a whole 12 people, three of whom we work with!

Re:Sample Size (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338946)

Actually, this was conducted internally. And we'll find out who those 9 defectors were!

How often do I have to say it, secret ballots are a nuisan... wait, is that mike open?

Cancer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31338304)

Don't these things cause cancer after a short time?

Re:Cancer? (1)

sampas (256178) | more than 4 years ago | (#31340282)

Why, yes, there have been studies on chips and cancers. You can read about it in mainstream media like, oh, the Washington Post [washingtonpost.com] -- "There's no way in the world, having read this information, that I would have one of those chips implanted in my skin, or in one of my family members," said Dr. Robert Benezra, head of the Cancer Biology Genetics Program at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York." But hey, that's just some wacky oncologist talk.

Einkaufen macht frei (0, Flamebait)

Ralph Spoilsport (673134) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338426)

good grief. And what next? Why not just become a brain in a juice bucket [wikipedia.org] and not even bother living and embodied life of risk and adventure?

If there are more than 2 lines the straight odds are that "the other like" will move faster. In fact - I have an idea - just herd the human race itself into some oven, and let the machines rip each other off. They'll be able to do it so much faster and easier without us.

Maybe the Nazi pigfuckers simply didn't look at things in a big enough way.

Why not barcodes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31338456)

Why not use barcodes instead, these are more reliable and I think they already have experience with it

I wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31338562)

I wonder what percentage of Texans would think this was a good idea. I'm thinking 85%.

Re:I wonder (1)

Areyoukiddingme (1289470) | more than 4 years ago | (#31339198)

You'd guess wrong. Texas is saturated in the "chip in the body is the Mark of the Beast" meme. They don't need to know any of the good reasons to refuse an implanted RFID chip - they have a perfectly serviceable bad reason.

What For? (1)

bitspotter (455598) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338578)

I'm a little unclear on this concept. Why exactly would I want to have an ID chip implanted in my body for that I couldn't get from one that's in my pocket?

I suppose it would make it harder to steal, lose, or forget. But really? I haven't had any of those things happen to me in over 15 years.

And sometimes, I *want* to leave my ID at home.

Re:What For? (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338814)

I'm a little unclear on this concept. Why exactly would I want to have an ID chip implanted in my body for that I couldn't get from one that's in my pocket?

It makes it easier to pay at a nudist place. :-)

According to MY survey ... (1)

PinkyGigglebrain (730753) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338586)

50% voiced strong opposition to being chipped.

The other 50% is undecided.

The undecided responded to the question with a "Meow" before returning to her nap, but since it is neither yes or no was counted as "No Opinion".

See how much fun statistics can be! Learn to manipulate public opinion for fun and profit, ask me how!

I Would Be Happy to Have an ID Chip Implant (1)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 4 years ago | (#31338606)

I Would Be Happy to Have an ID Chip Implant...

If I could reprogram it to identify me as anyone I wanted to and to not respond at all when I didn't want it to.

Re: Me too, IF... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31339026)

The benefit:
Combined credit card and drivers license that can't be stolen or forgotten, and is easier to swipe.

The risk:
THEY can track you.

To get the benefit without the risk, we need a way to deactivate the chip any time we don't want it on (i.e. any time we're not buying something or showing ID). Even with limited range, this isn't possible with passive chips it seems (unless you make a tin foil hat for your fingertip chip).

One Quarter of Germans Happy To Have Chip Implant (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31339060)

...other three quarters displeased with their implants.

Hitler gave everyone a Volkswagen (1)

AthleteMusicianNerd (1633805) | more than 4 years ago | (#31339388)

This is the classic bait and switch. It amazes me how naive people can be. You'd think they learn after finding out that Hitler's promise of a Volkswagen was a bad idea.

oh those krazy krauts (1)

heptapod (243146) | more than 4 years ago | (#31339512)

Less than a century ago 1/4 of German citizens were unhappy about receiving tattoos on their left forearm.

How times have changed!

psych (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31339536)

For all we know the concluding question could've been:

Do you not not want a chip implant in your skin?

And the results are:

Yes (25%)

No(25%)

Undecided (50%)

Free loaders (1)

ppetrakis (51087) | more than 4 years ago | (#31339560)

How much do you want to bet that this is the same percentage of
the population that's living on the governments dime?

Damn! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31339810)

I read the headline as CHIMP implants!

Nazis had pieces of flair that they made the Jews (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 4 years ago | (#31339864)

Nazis had pieces of flair that they made the Jews wear. This seem like a high tech ver of that.

In Related News: One Quarter of Germans Stupid (1)

gweihir (88907) | more than 4 years ago | (#31340256)

Seriously, this number is likely not characteristic for the Germans, but more likely a characteristic of larger groups of randomly selected people. I seriously doubt that most of the agreeing people do even begin to understand the implications.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?