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Using Classical Music As a Form of Social Control

samzenpus posted more than 4 years ago | from the feeling-of-dread-in-f-minor dept.

Music 721

cyberfringe writes "Classical music is being used increasingly in Great Britain as a tool for social control and a deterrent to bad behavior. One school district subjects badly behaving children to hours of Mozart in special detention. Unsurprisingly, some of these youth now find classical music unbearable. Recorded classical music is blared through speakers at bus stops, outside stores, train stations and elsewhere to drive away loitering youth. Apparently it works. Detentions are down, graffiti is reduced, and naughty youth flee because they find classical music repugnant."

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A Clockwork Orange (5, Funny)

plover (150551) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355090)

You are aware that A Clockwork Orange [imdb.com] was fiction, aren't you? It was a movie and not a documentary.

Re:A Clockwork Orange (4, Informative)

Shadow of Eternity (795165) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355130)

They're probably repelling people by playing it really loudly and with horrible quality. Classical music has a lot of high notes and when played poorly it's a lot like listening to nails on a chalkboard.

Re:A Clockwork Orange (5, Funny)

The Clockwork Troll (655321) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355182)

droogs, don't filly with the ludwig van.

Re:A Clockwork Orange (1)

rnturn (11092) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355206)

Maybe they could use Crumb's "Black Angels" which was supposed to be played at volumes "on the threshold of pain". (I have listened to it loud but haven't pushed my speakers -- or my hearing -- quite that far.)

Re:A Clockwork Orange (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31355248)

The first time I heard this, it was fairly loud, and the screeching violins startled the hell out of me. That whole piece in general gives me the chills.

Re:A Clockwork Orange (0, Flamebait)

MrMista_B (891430) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355446)

So, deliberate torture, then.

Fuck Britain.

Re:A Clockwork Orange (-1, Flamebait)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355546)

i hope your not from the united states of water boarding, or you'd be a massive hypocritiser

Blame Einstein then (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355148)

Though he did it in reverse, musicalising weapon...THE weapon, if there ever was one.

Re:A Clockwork Orange (5, Informative)

SpaghettiPattern (609814) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355382)

You are aware that A Clockwork Orange [imdb.com] was fiction, aren't you? It was a movie and not a documentary.

Don't forget that Alex DeLarge actually liked Ludwig Von. He was appalled by what was done in order to let people dislike his music.

Re:A Clockwork Orange (2, Interesting)

mrmeval (662166) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355400)

It is a human melody played on the flesh of the incompetent. Those too feeble to know good from evil, right from wrong. Graphitist and rapists alongside murderers and thieves. I shall enjoy you trogs being ground to dust. Defilers of space and wisdom that you are.

Re:A Clockwork Orange (1)

outsider007 (115534) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355486)

This thread gives me a nice warm vibraty feeling all through me gutty-whats

Re:A Clockwork Orange (1)

madsenj37 (612413) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355566)

My first thought. What I came here to read. Thank you.

Shades of Clockwork Orange (0, Redundant)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355092)

It was set in the UK, IIRC.

Hmm. . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31355094)

Clockwork orange anybody?

A Clockwork Orange (5, Interesting)

fear025 (763732) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355098)

from A Clockwork Orange:
Alex: No. No! NO! Stop it! Stop it, please! I beg you! This is sin! This is sin! This is sin! It's a sin, it's a sin, it's a sin!
Dr. Brodsky: Sin? What's all this about sin?
Alex: That! Using Ludwig van like that! He did no harm to anyone. Beethoven just wrote music!
Dr. Branom: Are you referring to the background score?
Alex: Yes.
Dr. Branom: You've heard Beethoven before?
Alex: Yes!
Dr. Brodsky: So, you're keen on music?
Alex: YES!
Dr. Brodsky: Can't be helped. Here's the punishment element perhaps.

Re:A Clockwork Orange (5, Insightful)

Kuroji (990107) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355120)

And that's exactly what it's going to do -- the youth of Britain will identify ALL classical music as repugnant based on its use and the majority will want nothing to do with it. Indeed, they will want to see it burned.

Maybe they should use some music whose artists aren't several hundred years dead, then perhaps the artists could have a very interesting discussion as to the use of their music...

Re:A Clockwork Orange (3, Insightful)

Simple-Simmian (710342) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355178)

Chavs yes, the rest of the youth not so much.

Re:A Clockwork Orange (4, Insightful)

pushing-robot (1037830) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355184)

Maybe they should use some music whose artists aren't several hundred years dead, then perhaps the artists could have a very interesting discussion as to the use of their music...

I suggest Rage Against The Machine.

Re:A Clockwork Orange (5, Funny)

that this is not und (1026860) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355256)

Yes!

But with the voice redubbed in as Donald Duck.

Re:A Clockwork Orange (1)

guyminuslife (1349809) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355386)

"FUCK YOU! I WON'T DO WHAT YOU TELL ME! ...MOTHERFUCKER!"

(The rest of this comment is just filler text so that I can get the above quote past Slashdot's caps-lock filter. Yes, it is supposed to be all-caps. Yes, it's like yelling. It is supposed to be like yelling.)

Re:A Clockwork Orange (2, Informative)

dcollins (135727) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355254)

"Maybe they should use some music whose artists aren't several hundred years dead, then perhaps the artists could have a very interesting discussion as to the use of their music..."

Case study: http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/0,1518,672177,00.html [spiegel.de]

Re:A Clockwork Orange (1)

halowolf (692775) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355438)

Please, no more Britney.

Re:A Clockwork Orange (1)

mim (535591) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355504)

And that's exactly what it's going to do -- the youth of Britain will identify ALL classical music as repugnant based on its use and the majority will want nothing to do with it. Indeed, they will want to see it burned.

or not..."It had been a wonderful evening and what I needed now, to give it the perfect ending, was a little of the Ludwig Von."

Re:A Clockwork Orange (4, Insightful)

justin12345 (846440) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355570)

They should switch to country western. No loss there.

Next problem... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31355104)

Groups of retired people, hanging around busstops.
Pestering innocent by-passers...

Re:Next problem... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31355280)

Groups of retired people, hanging around busstops.
Pestering innocent by-passers...

At least they're not subjecting children to GOOD music, like Rick Astley or past and modern day boy bands like Boyzone, Back Street Boys, or American Idol winners. (I think) we can thank the RIAA for their political input into the issue. Children, thank goodness, won't be conditioned to hate good, modern day popular music.

An idol child is an idol mind. Why aren't there parents forcing their children to study math when they are not in school, and spank them (or at the least, slap them on the wrist with a ruler) if they look like they are day-dreaming instead of concentrating. The kids to day are missing out on proper parenting like when I was a child some 20 years ago. If childhood isn't tough then it isn't a proper childhood. You can thank home schooling for causing children to be spoiled. These Liberals have caused our children today to want to do things like stand in front of a convenience store and smoke, causing people to develop cancer through second hand pollution. When I was a kid society had Family Values. Kids should be indoors playing video game, not outdoors in front of bus stops!

Great... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31355108)

Like classical music needed less fans, now they've made people actively afraid of it.

Re:Great... (0, Offtopic)

dsavi (1540343) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355116)

Whoops, didn't mean to post that as an anonymous coward... o_O

Re:Great... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31355246)

Whoops, didn't mean to post that as an anonymous coward...

As if that was YOU! You're just trying to take credit for my insightful comment. :)

Re:Great... (4, Funny)

Pentium100 (1240090) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355134)

Don't worry. If this method is continued then, by natural selection, more and more young people will stop hating classical music and may even start liking it. The cool guys will be those who can finish the graffiti or whatever before running away.

Re:Great... (3, Insightful)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355358)

The operators of a shopping centre near my home have started doing this in an area where teenagers tend to hang around outside. The thing is the spot the kids are using is ideal for the purpose. Its out of the way and a bit dirty. Nobody else goes there and its not really a place people walk through. So I don't really see a point beyond a vague "we don't like them" sentiment.

No surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31355110)

The speaker is probably mounted on a CCTV.

Calculus Gang (5, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355114)

But it's attracting the Calculus Gang and the Bach Gang. They wrote 30,000 digits of pi all over the bus stop last week. Cost the city 20 grand to remove it all.

Re:Calculus Gang (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31355220)

It was the XKCD gang. They thought they were being funny.

Horrible! (5, Insightful)

Wingfield (872389) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355128)

I don't agree with this at all! How many of these kids who may have grown up to enjoy classical music are turned off by it forever? How many children will avoid their school music programs now, which have positive effects on everything from social development to grades? This makes me so angry.

Re:Horrible! (1, Insightful)

gzipped_tar (1151931) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355204)

I think kids don't enjoy classical music because most of their music experience are from listening to CD records. And recorded music is just a BAD thing to listen to. To make things worse, today's sound engineers produce highly post-processed recordings that hides the "imperfections" but also removes the little things that makes the music alive.

Your home theatre/ipod/whatever never beat a live performance in a real music hall.

And now this. Classical music eardrum piercer. Guess this is yet another form of government bailing-out for the recording industry[sic].

/me posting this listening to Beethoven's Grosse Fuge op.133 ;p.

Re:Horrible! (3, Funny)

Capsaicin (412918) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355264)

[R]ecorded music is just a BAD thing to listen to ... /me posting this listening to Beethoven's Grosse Fuge op.133

You're posting during a live performance? Have some respect dude. ;)

Re:Horrible! (1)

gzipped_tar (1151931) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355306)

Nope ;p I just can't get the mood of spitting into the Slashdot firehose without listening to some extremely ill-recorded music ;)

Re:Horrible! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31355472)

Don't worry, he's posting by speaking silently into the phone. Now it's only a matter of time before he wreck a nation.

Re:Horrible! (2, Insightful)

martas (1439879) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355410)

human audition, like all perception, is a system that computes a lossy representation of raw stimuli it is presented with. this representation is highly lossy, and while the degree to which it is [in]sensitive to various aspects of the original stimulus varies highly from person to person, certain aspects of this lossiness are almost for very large portions of the population. thus, it is possible to conduct a study measuring the degree to which the difference between on original and reproduced stimulus created by a specific external coding/reproducing mechanism can be perceived by a certain portion of the population. in this case, one could conduct a double-blind study asking individuals to identify the immediate source of a musical piece. if a significant portion of test subjects perform better than random, and also report that, for example, music from an mp3 file played through a computer with a decent sound card is less pleasant for them than a live performance, then your (rather unscientific) claim about losing "the little things that make music alive" would be confirmed. i am not aware of any studies of this nature, and a brief internet search didn't turn up any relevant results. i have heard opinions such as yours before, however, based on my intuition (any nothing more), here's my personal opinion on the matter:
1) the quality difference between an average bitrate mp3, CD quality, and live performance is perceptible for at least some portion of the population, likely a significant one.
2) the average person who listens to music would consider this quality sacrifice negligible. i.e., given the practical impossibility of listening to live performance while driving, studying, working, running, playing, dining, dancing, et cetera, normal encoding of music is "good enough".
3) all human perception is relative in nature. this statement may not be precise (you can't get used to 500F weather), but it is often correct. in this case, i believe that after a period of adjustment, even the most highly trained musical ear can be re-trained to be able to enjoy and appreciate lower-quality musical recordings just as much as it would enjoy perfect reproduction of the music.

Re:Horrible! (2, Interesting)

vxice (1690200) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355348)

how exactly would they be turned off of it by hearing it while loitering. Presumably they already don't like it since it appears that it drives them away, and without the music they still loiter etc. Now if the music was played before cops came and beat them up to remove them then they disliked the music you would have pavlovian condition yes. But in this case the music already elicits a negative response itself. one might ask what awful state our youth are in that the classics repel them but remember the classics are the pieces of art that you like to say you like and don't necessarily honestly like.

romanes eunt domus (4, Funny)

Ekhymosis (949557) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355138)

graffiti was written in special glow in the dark compounds all over london tubes in klingon, ancient greek, hieroglyphics and linear-b soon after.

Re:romanes eunt domus (1)

novium (1680776) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355496)

Linear B is Ancient Greek. /end random pedantry. But Linear A would be cool.

They'll grow to like it and... (3, Funny)

noz (253073) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355142)

A new renaissance will be born!

Re:They'll grow to like it and... (1)

bemymonkey (1244086) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355266)

One can only hope...

Ask the Artists (4, Interesting)

dcollins (135727) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355144)

One might ask what the artists would think of this usage?

Fortunately, we have a pretty similar situation with more current music being used a torture device against Guantanamo detainess, and the rock musicians who protested against that usage:

http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/0,1518,672177,00.html [spiegel.de]

Re:Ask the Artists (2, Funny)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355516)

Fortunately, we have a pretty similar situation with more current music being used a torture device against Guantanamo detainess,

Oh, yes, thank God we are torturing other people so that we might learn how people feel about their music being used to torture.

Now, if we could only create a robotic toenail remover that was controlled entirely by emacs extensions, so we could get Richard Stallman's opinion on software freedom vs physical liberties and human rights.

Just wait... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31355152)

Someday soon, we'll be blasting death metal in nursing homes...

Re:Just wait... (3, Funny)

gomiam (587421) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355538)

blasting death metal

You mean shrapnel, right? Or perhaps that would be "blasting metal death"...

Of course (3, Funny)

gzipped_tar (1151931) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355156)

Children perform the bad behaviors because of file sharing and disrespect of copyright. Playing music in the public for free only gets things worse.

Will someone please think of the children?

Re:Of course (3, Insightful)

nospam007 (722110) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355260)

"Playing music in the public for free only gets things worse."

Why do you think they tried classical music in the first place?
Playing contemporary music costs more than removing the graffiti.

Re:Of course (1)

Capsaicin (412918) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355296)

...disrespect of copyright. Playing music in the public for free only gets things worse.

But it's not for free. The authorities using this music pay for public performance licenses. Copyright is being respected, you can breathe easily.

Re:Of course (5, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355488)

Strange. We're thinking of the children when we strip away the freedoms of the adults, and appearantly we're thinking of the adults when we're stripping away the freedoms of our kids. In other words, when we're taking away from everyone, we make everyone happy... or something like that must be the logic.

It'll stop in a few years (5, Insightful)

AuraSeer (409950) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355160)

"Youths" don't stay young forever. Before very long they'll be adults, with legitimate reasons to be at stores and train stations and bus stops, but they still won't like the music. Any place that continues to play it will be driving away a whole lot of customers.

Re:It'll stop in a few years (1)

Onthax (1322089) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355200)

Easy there, that makes sense and this is the government we are talking about

Re:It'll stop in a few years (5, Funny)

AuraSeer (409950) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355240)

Easy there, that makes sense and this is the government we are talking about

Oh, if we're talking about the UK government, that's even easier. Just mention to a local official that the music contains lots of "sharp" notes. They'll spring into nanny mode, and require that all the speakers be entombed in Nerf so that nobody cuts themselves.

Re:It'll stop in a few years (2, Insightful)

slimjim8094 (941042) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355346)

Teenagers don't have legitimate reasons to be at stores and train stations and bus stops?

I can't figure out why kids would prefer to hang out at some bus stop or a train station when they could be hanging out somewhere cooler.

Maybe they'll grow up as well as old (5, Insightful)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355362)

Classical music is quite enjoyable. You can point to plenty of musical/acoustic reasons why this is the case, as in the songs feature things that people find pleasing to hear. It is not the sort of thing that you require intense training to appreciate because it is all intellectual or something, and the actual sound is awful, it is simply nice to listen to.

The primary reason that youth seems not to like it is a cool factor thing, not because the music itself is in some way offensive. When you grow up, you hopefully realize that is pretty stupid, and can enjoy it.

Re:Maybe they'll grow up as well as old (1)

ae1294 (1547521) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355402)

Classical music is quite enjoyable.

Depends... ever hear it played on a pc-speaker?

Re:Maybe they'll grow up as well as old (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355498)

Hmm... does the Tetris-Theme count?

classical music is defective (1)

r00t (33219) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355456)

Yes Mozart, we recognize that it's possible to play some sections much louder than other sections. Tricking me into cranking up the volume with quiet parts just so that you can hurt my ears with other parts is childish.

Actually, I doubt it was really that awful centuries ago. The orchestra would have been burned at the stake or worse. Abusive dynamic range is probably a modern misinterpretation.

Re:Maybe they'll grow up as well as old (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31355482)

When you grow up, you hopefully realize that is pretty stupid, and can enjoy it.

I highly doubt that. If you have been conditioned to associate classical music with something unpleasant (punishment, detention, the notion you are not welcome, etc.) I don't think you'll be able to enjoy it later on.

It takes as little as a single spoiled meal that caused you stomach pain, to dislike a food for a very long time. Humans quickly associate things with something bad in order to avoid it in the future.

Re:It'll stop in a few years (2, Insightful)

SpaghettiPattern (609814) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355366)

"Youths" don't stay young forever. Before very long they'll be adults, with legitimate reasons to be at stores and train stations and bus stops, but they still won't like the music. Any place that continues to play it will be driving away a whole lot of customers.

You are basically saying today's youths are so much different than youths a century ago. Possibly, taking into consideration that intelligence increases over generations, their intellect is more advanced and their reasoning for disliking classical music is taken with a great deal of consideration.

I'll give you that I represent your words very freely indeed. But consider that Bach and Mozart are among the most skilled musicians that ever lived and that their works have stood against the tooth of time. I would not be surprised when a percentage of the "recalcitrant youths" will start liking and maybe appreciating classical pieces.

My take is that the dislike of classical music is fed by group pressure, possibly to stand up against one's parents. And, as less and less parents show an exclusive liking of classical music, it will become less and less "uncool" to listen to it.

I recall Jaco Patorius, possibly the most virtuoso and influential bass guitar player that ever lived, saying he liked any kind of music as long as it's played well. He even liked country and western.

Now, let me find my ropes, straitjacket, eye clamps, artificial tears and the almost forgotten long play records of Ludwig Von. Then I'll invite a "youth" over and "we" will have a swell time appreciating classical music.

Re:It'll stop in a few years (0, Troll)

Gordonjcp (186804) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355384)

Bach was a good composer. Mozart is umitigated shit. Why it remains so popular, I have no idea - in its day his music was just mass-produced commercial crap similar to Stock, Aitken and Waterman "Hit Factory" releases.

Re:It'll stop in a few years (1, Flamebait)

Mindcontrolled (1388007) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355462)

Oh god, the voice of reason. Finally someone sharing my hate of Mozart! Thank you, Sir, I shall cling on to the last shreds of my belief in humanity for a bit longer. That aside, you stated yourself why Mozart remains popular - it is crappy pop, simple as that. (Except for the requiem, maybe.)

Re:It'll stop in a few years (1)

quantaman (517394) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355422)

"Youths" don't stay young forever. Before very long they'll be adults, with legitimate reasons to be at stores and train stations and bus stops, but they still won't like the music. Any place that continues to play it will be driving away a whole lot of customers.

Just pick a new genre every 5-10 years :)

However I'm guessing that it's only the repeat troublemakers who would actually hear enough Mozart to develop an aversion.

And those repeat troublemakers probably end up forming most of the adult troublemakers too. Those stores and train stations may find it advantageous to keep the music blaring when they grow up (noting they'll lose the business of a few good adults who were troublemakers as kids).

Note I think the article is also a lot of hype. I doubt there's many students developing a pathological fear of Mozart, though they may be learning to associate it with discipline and authority which could make them uncomfortable. However I think the best explanation of the youth deterrent came from the article "It's pretty uncool to be seen hanging around somewhere when Mozart is playing."

Re:It'll stop in a few years (2, Interesting)

martas (1439879) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355528)

good point, and frankly there's something about the uk that is very baffling to me: they seem to be a very anti-youth and anti-child society. can anyone explain to me why they seem to hate their new generation so much??

So? (3, Funny)

Farmer Tim (530755) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355172)

Most adults I know can't stand classical music either, so I doubt this will have a long term effect on listening habits; who knows, being exposed to it might actually get more kids interested in it. And as someone in their late 30's who can still hear frequencies up to 20kHz I'd much rather this than those buzz generators, as long as the sound quality isn't too bad and they don't play too much Satie (I don't want to fall asleep and miss my bus).

Re:So? (2, Insightful)

Capsaicin (412918) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355344)

Most adults I know can't stand classical music either.

I would hazard a guess and say that the people who dreamt up this scheme don't either. I do wonder why this is news though, this idea was tried out at least a decade ago.

This tactic is being used against adults also. (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31355194)

Where I live there is a notorious corner for crack cocain, prostitution, bloody fights, and anything you can imagine.

Despite constant city owned surveillance equipment the activity continues.

The local Diner installed speakers and pipes out jazz, classical, etc. I find it to be kind of nice mood music, for an elevator.

  It has cut down on the drug dealers, kids hanging out, street performers, and the homeless who are normally sitting on the sidewalk asking for change. Apparently the softly played music is enough of an annoyance that they go away.

Miles Davis - 1
Bach - 1
Panoptic sort - 0

Re:This tactic is being used against adults also. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31355226)

Where I live there is a notorious corner for crack cocain, prostitution, bloody fights, and anything you can imagine.

Really, do all of your stories have to begin this way?

WWII (1)

Dutchy Wutchy (547108) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355202)

Weren't many "atrocities" committed in World War II by avid listeners of classical music, and social movements formed that threw out classical arts? In 30 years, will they be blasting turn-of-the-millennium music?

Re:WWII (2, Funny)

gzipped_tar (1151931) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355224)

Still, classical music as a weapon is far inferior a choice compared with The Funniest Joke in the World, especially considering its application history in the WWII.

Oh no (1)

XanC (644172) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355292)

Please don't make me remember that joke. I remembered two words of it once, and spent several weeks in hospital.

Re:Oh no (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355408)

I heard that the Germans tried it on teenagers at Hamburg railway station but it just led to a lot of thoughtful criticism and the purchasing of U2 CDs.

Re:WWII (1)

martas (1439879) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355550)

yes, i remember how during my time in Auschwitz they'd collect the weakest of us every month into a room, and blast that joke through the speakers. all over the camp the ground would shake for several minutes from the laughter of those inside. once i overheard a few words (they never bothered to put proper sound insulation around the place), and had to tie myself up with some barbed wire that was lying around just to keep my sides from bursting.

aaaah, there's the /. post that's finally gonna guarantee me a place in the warmer parts of hell!

Video Games Live? (2, Insightful)

marcansoft (727665) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355238)

I wonder what they'll think of Video Games Live [videogameslive.com] . Will "repugnant" classical music + awesome video game tunes make their heads explode?

Why classical? (1)

Air-conditioned cowh (552882) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355290)

Why not blast gansta rap at the poor, hapless souls during detention, with the lyrics changed to reflect what da Head "T" will do to them if they continue to question the value of his bling. Then, out of protest, we will get Mozart blasted out of tinny little mobile phones on the bus-ride home.

It's a sin! (5, Insightful)

bistromath007 (1253428) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355298)

Why do Brits keep reading dystopian fiction to get ideas? Why aren't we bombing them for it?

Re:It's a sin! (2, Insightful)

martas (1439879) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355568)

answer 1: that's the only kind of literature they're good at creating. why do you think shakespeare started in comedy but ended up in tragedy?
answer 2: 'cause we don't want to waste perfectly good bombs. they're gonna destroy themselves pretty soon as it is.

Easy solution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31355300)

Noise isolating earphones anyone? I'm shure theres some cheaper solutions available. Destroying the speakers, drinking to the point that you start to enjoy classical music, or bring an old school boombox!

Could not remotely work here (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355318)

Anyone under the age of 18 here has two earphones firmly attached to their ears, blasting loud enough for you to hear it, standing a good ten feet away from the teen. It just has to block out any noise under 130dB.

The Year 1812, Festival Overture in E flat major (4, Funny)

dido (9125) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355326)

Pyotr Ilych Tchaikovsky, Op. 49. I'd like to hear them play that on the 5th of November at the Houses of Parliament...

Hamburg, Germany has this for years (2, Interesting)

hvdh (1447205) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355334)

Hamburg central station started playing classical music about 10 years ago. The reason was to drive off junkies; there's a saying thay certain drugs in combination with classical music lead to a bad trip.

Revenge... (4, Funny)

guyminuslife (1349809) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355352)

There's only one solution. Bring a boom-box to the bus stops, and start blasting Dr. Dre like it's 1992.

Take that, old farts!!! HAHAHAHAHA!!!!

Re:Revenge... (2, Funny)

BiggerIsBetter (682164) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355464)

There's only one solution. Bring a boom-box to the bus stops, and start blasting Dr. Dre like it's 1992.

Take that, old farts!!! HAHAHAHAHA!!!!

1992? Dude, you ARE one of the old farts!

Well, the musicians suck... (1)

pbooktebo (699003) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355360)

The caliber of musician you can get to go out to a subway at 2 a.m. and play for hooligans isn't great... Now, if they could get Yo-Yo Ma...

What's that? A "war against youth"? (5, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355364)

When did our kids becomes our enemies? It seems the UK do about everything in their power to alienate their youth. I really don't know about the UK, but is there really such a big problem with "unruly youths" that you have to bombard them with "deterrents" that seem to come from the privy closet of Marquis de Sade?

What sadist comes up with those things? And why do I have the gut feeling that the only reason this is targeted at kids is just that they can't vote and thus can't kick the bastard off his comfy chair?

Re:What's that? A "war against youth"? (2, Funny)

ae1294 (1547521) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355418)

off his comfy chair?

well I have to say, the chair is rather nice. I wasn't expecting that...

Re:What's that? A "war against youth"? (2, Funny)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355466)

C'mon, could someone post the obvious Spanish Inquisition joke so we get it out of the way and can continue a sensible discussion? Please?

I'm usually the first to pick up a good punchline, but obvious jokes are boring.

Re:What's that? A "war against youth"? (1)

mjwx (966435) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355500)

but obvious jokes are boring.

Obvious joke is obvious.

Re:What's that? A "war against youth"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31355530)

This has nothing to do with recent development. Remember that a few decades ago, it was perfectly fine to hit children with wooden rulers, sticks, belts, whatever was at hand. Not punishing children was but a temporary fad.

Older generations always felt the need to discipline younger ones.

In my opinion, life is but a war of generations. The older ones cling to their beliefs and are afraid to get replaced by younger ones.

Just like any animal the old have to ensure their dominance lest they become obsolete.

Re:What's that? A "war against youth"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31355532)

When did our kids becomes our enemies?

There's a good documentary called War On Kids that poses exactly the same question.

Math, Music, and Madness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31355390)

A large amount of classical music is based on mathematics, and multiple generations have failed to produce adequate math skills.
The modern mass populace dislikes classical music.

A reason for this might be because their brains have been rewired to dislike math by cultural and educational systems. Therefore their brain's cannot process the information that classical music contains.
The brain will repulse something it does not understand, or be interested by it. Which would explain the reason for classical music lovers, and the mass populace who hates math and thereby hates classical music.

Just a theory, make sure to spot holes

Come on (1)

wilwad (1515985) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355406)

I read the story expecting the opposite: expected it to say it was turning bad kids around by bringing the burning candlelight of classical music into their dark lives. Disappointed. I love Classical Music.

why not (1)

extraqwert (983362) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355436)

Actually, a large part of the classical music is religious. Which could be considered a form of social control

Taste in music (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31355444)

You have to wonder if this only works on kids with particular taste in music? Metal was my introduction to Classical Music.

Look at Venezuela (2, Informative)

frenchbedroom (936100) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355522)

Compare this to what they do in Venezuela... teaching classical music to poor kids from the ghettos.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/El_Sistema [wikipedia.org]

Unintended consequences (2, Interesting)

EEBaum (520514) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355524)

If being put in a room by myself with hours of Mozart was a punishment, my teacher's pet self would quite likely have started causing problems.

I wonder if, to counter that, they would have the same consequence be a punishment to one kid and a reward to another.

Tooting Bec, London, UK. (1)

micronicos (344307) | more than 4 years ago | (#31355526)

Tooting Bec is my local underground station in South London and they have been playing classical music in the foyer / ticket hall for several years.

The sound quality is good. The volume level is reasonable.

I asked one of the staff whether he enjoyed the music and he said 'some of it' & he also said that it kept young people from loitering.

Next time I will try and find out more on London Underground (a part of Transport for London) policies on noise and social exclusion.

Personally I enjoy the few seconds of classical music I hear as I stroll down to the escalators.

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