×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

New "Hairy" Material Is Almost Perfectly Hydrophobic

Soulskill posted more than 4 years ago | from the water-the-chances dept.

Biotech 133

drewsup writes "Wolfgang Sigmund, a professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Florida, has created a material modeled after spider hairs that acts as a nearly perfect water-repelling surface. Quoting Science Daily: 'A paper about the surface, which works equally well with hot or cold water, appears in this month's edition of the journal Langmuir. Spiders use their water-repelling hairs to stay dry or avoid drowning, with water spiders capturing air bubbles and toting them underwater to breathe. Potential applications for UF's ultra-water-repellent surfaces are many, Sigmund said. When water scampers off the surface, it picks up and carries dirt with it, in effect making the surface self-cleaning. As such, it is ideal for some food packaging, or windows, or solar cells that must stay clean to gather sunlight, he said. Boat designers might coat hulls with it, making boats faster and more efficient.' Hairy glass, anyone?"

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

133 comments

Hydrophopic (3, Funny)

Stooshie (993666) | more than 4 years ago | (#31391072)

People call me hydrophobic but it's like water off a ducks back to me.

Re:Hydrophopic (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31391148)

Can they make a material that repels nigger grease? It sure is disappointing to be at a hotel and want to swim in the pool, only to see a big nigger family is already in it. When that happens, you can look at how the water reflects the sunlight and see a film of nigger grease or nigger oil floating on top. That's just unsanitary and it ruins the pool for everybody who doesn't want to feel like a greasy nigger. Do niggers never use shampoo for their nappy hair or something? Or do they use shampoo and then pour about two bottles of canola oil on their heads afterwards? Though I thought nigger oil was a natural secretion produced by the nigger, I could be wrong.

Re:Hydrophopic (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31391296)

sure they can do that, but it requires some honkies to lose their balls.

Re:Hydrophopic (-1, Offtopic)

nscott89 (1507501) | more than 4 years ago | (#31392646)

This is THE most racist post I have ever seen on /. . I hate it when people like you do crap like this and call it being racially aware.... I hate racism. I hate racists. Somebody ban this racist idiot please.

Re:Hydrophopic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31392712)

This is THE most meta-racist post I have ever seen on /.
I hate meta-racism. I hate meta-racists. Somebody ban this meta-racist idiot please.

Re:Hydrophopic (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31392740)

If that's the most racial post you've seen then you have not been here long.

I wrote that "racist" post. I'm not racist. I'm a troll. If saying "grass is green" was effective as a troll then i would say that. It isn't, so i say "nigger." It obviously worked on you, you really seem to have got your panties in a bunch over it.

Best way to deal with racism is to not take racial things so goddamned seriously. Getting so upset over it is the exact opposite of realizing that "racial" differences are superficial and don't matter because we're all human beings. If someone is discriminated against like in the workplace, by all means take action, do something about it, cuz that's just plain wrong and no, i would never do that or support someone who does that. But if someone says things that don't actually reflect how they feel about black people or any other group, just cuz you find it offensive, why get upset about that? Does it never occur to you oversensitive politically correct types that your whiney reaction is exactly what the troll is counting on?

Re:Hydrophopic (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31392940)

It's great that we realise this, but how about we look at why the fuck someone has a need at pissing off people and being a 'troll'?

I'm not a fan of the excessive PC tripe either, and when I was a little less mature I was angry at people for being overly sensitive and not allowing me to discuss taboo subjects, but that doesn't mean that attempted attention grabbing propaganda through a "door in the face" methodology is appropriate. Learn some tact and patience and address the issue earnestly please.

Re:Hydrophopic (1, Offtopic)

TheCarp (96830) | more than 4 years ago | (#31394022)

> It's great that we realise this, but how about we look at why the fuck someone has a need at pissing off > people and being a 'troll'?

> I'm not a fan of the excessive PC tripe either, and when I was a little less mature I was angry at
> people for being overly sensitive and not allowing me to discuss taboo subjects, but that doesn't mean
> that attempted attention grabbing propaganda through a "door in the face" methodology is appropriate.
> Learn some tact and patience and address the issue earnestly please.

Actually, reading his response shows quite a bit of tact and patience.

I don't know about you, but, I got a good chuckle out of the troll. Thats the thing though, nobody really complains about a lot of nonsense posts if they are genuinely funny. I am glad to see we have a community where people can and do just post what comes to their mind, even if it is just a joke.

Many things will offend someone, but something like this can actually start a discussion that is, in some small way, useful. Where else do you see issues of political correctness really being brought up and discussed in a rational manner? Not until someone comes out with something that has offensive tones.

Without someone pushing the boundaries, how does anything move forward?

In short, fuck em if they can't take a joke, seems reasonable to me.
-Steve

Re:Hydrophopic (4, Funny)

biryokumaru (822262) | more than 4 years ago | (#31393058)

Best way to deal with racism is to not take racial things so goddamned seriously.

Whoa, now. This is the internet. The internet is serious business.

Re:Hydrophopic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31393662)

...he is not being racist....

Re:Hydrophopic (2, Funny)

shentino (1139071) | more than 4 years ago | (#31392724)

You bring up a good point about resistance versus viscous liquids, such as oil or ink or tar.

Re:Hydrophopic (2, Interesting)

telomerewhythere (1493937) | more than 4 years ago | (#31394010)

Actually note this from the article :

Although he hasn't published the research yet, Sigmund said a variation of the surface also repels oil, a first for the industry.

It also says that the Hydrophobic properties are based on physics alone and not chemistry. And ...

the UF surface may be the most or among the most water phobic. Close-up photographs of water droplets on dime-sized plastic squares show that the droplets maintain their spherical shape, whether standing still or moving. Droplets bulge down on most other surfaces, dragging a kind of tail as they move. Sigmund said his surface is the first to shuttle droplets with no tail.

I thought it is pretty cool stuff.

Re:Hydrophopic (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31393070)

Let me guess, Wolfgang Sigmund isn't BLACK, is he.

But your country is soon going to be 50% non-white. Then, within ten years of that, it will be 80% non-white. What will it be like then?

Like any other third world hellhole, that's what. And all because you believed everything the TV told you, about 'diversity' being 'our strength'. What absolute rot.

Your children are going to HATE you for what you have allowed to happen to THEIR country.

yee (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31391074)

. Spiders use their water-repelling hairs to stay dry or avoid drowning, with water spiders capturing air bubbles and toting them underwater to breathe.

Oh we'll see about that...

Time to do some original research of my own

Gore-tex (1)

googlesmith123 (1546733) | more than 4 years ago | (#31391088)

So when can i chuck out my gore-tex jacket for something like this?

Re:Gore-tex (2, Interesting)

Hadlock (143607) | more than 4 years ago | (#31391130)

I doubt this material "breathes" the same way gore-tex does. Enjoy your sweat bath! :)

Re:Gore-tex (3, Funny)

the brown guy (1235418) | more than 4 years ago | (#31391138)

just put the spider fibres on the inside of the jacket and it repels the sweat.

Probrem solved

Re:Gore-tex (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31392424)

Wouldn't it just repel the sweat back onto you then?

Re:Gore-tex (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 4 years ago | (#31394592)

I must be missing something, or the somebody modded without noticing a joke. We've had materials that would do a good job of sheeting water for sometime, but they don't breathe and one ends up getting very sweaty. If you don't put it on the inside, you probably would be able to have the moisture evaporate in between the hairs. Mainly because it's unlikely that steam would interact the same way.

Also if you were to team it up with something that was somewhat polarized, you might be able to get an amazing amount of moisture wicked through the material with none coming in.

Raw Data Video (4, Informative)

cyberfunk2 (656339) | more than 4 years ago | (#31391116)

Available here free of charge:

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/suppl/10.1021/la903813g [acs.org]

Re:Raw Data Video (3, Informative)

cyberfunk2 (656339) | more than 4 years ago | (#31391334)

Warning.. movies appear to be in crap-tastic Indeo 5 format

Re:Raw Data Video (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31391394)

These are scientists, not video hardware technicians!

If you send them instructions along with a meerschaum pipe and some beard clippers as tokens of good will, they should be able to figure it out.

What's in a name? (4, Funny)

SEWilco (27983) | more than 4 years ago | (#31391224)

Hairy food packaging. I think someone will come up with a better name for that material.

Re:What's in a name? (-1, Offtopic)

dzfgg (1761592) | more than 4 years ago | (#31391538)

Hairy food packaging. I think someone will come up with a better name for that material.

Hairy food packaging. I think someone will come up with a better name for that material.

Hairy food packaging. I think someone will come up with a better name for that material.

Hairy food packaging. I think someone will come up with a better name for that material.

Hairy food packaging. I think someone will come up with a better name for that material.

http://www.wellbbiz.com/productlist.asp?id=s1 [wellbbiz.com] (UGG) http://www.wellbbiz.com/productlist.asp?id=s61 [wellbbiz.com] (JACKET) http://www.wellbbiz.com/productlist.asp?id=s9 [wellbbiz.com] (JORDAN SHOES) http://www.wellbbiz.com/productlist.asp?id=s55 [wellbbiz.com] (TSHIRTS) http://www.wellbbiz.com/productlist.asp?id=s60 [wellbbiz.com] (JEANS) http://www.wellbbiz.com/productlist.asp?id=s53 [wellbbiz.com] (HANDBAGS) http://www.wellbbiz.com/productlist.asp?id=s45 [wellbbiz.com] (sunglass)

Hairy food packaging already exists: (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31391822)

it's called "fur".

Re:What's in a name? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31393470)

I don't know... Maybe the Kiwi's have an idea?

One problem ... (1)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 4 years ago | (#31391230)

"See, it repels water .." STOMP! SQUISH! "... used to repel water."

So much for the self-cleaning materials idea.

Re:One problem ... (1)

cerberusss (660701) | more than 4 years ago | (#31393724)

So much for the self-cleaning materials idea.

I don't care about self-cleaning materials. I want a frictionless toilet.

Kinda funny, but when reading The Mote in God's Eye [wikipedia.org] , this idea was put forth by the science fiction writer after aliens altered and improved human technology. Loved it.

Do boats go faster because it repels water? (4, Interesting)

wisebabo (638845) | more than 4 years ago | (#31391234)

Would there be a (very) thin layer of air between the boat and the water? Would there be a reduction in friction akin to the thin layer of water created when a skater's skates press down on the ice?

Or would boats go faster because no barnacles or mussels could become fastened on the hull of a boat? (I've heard that this used to be combatted with very toxic copper based compounds, no idea what they use now). If these microscopic hairs that were lifted from spiders work really well in preventing "fouling", why haven't whales evolved the same?

Just askin'.

Re:Do boats go faster because it repels water? (4, Insightful)

Guillermito (187510) | more than 4 years ago | (#31391660)

Since when evolution guarantees an optimal anatomical structure? If the whale body is "good enough" to survive and reproduce under the environmental conditions whales tend to live in, then why they should have evolved the same microscopic hairs that we see in spiders?

Re:Do boats go faster because it repels water? (5, Informative)

rattaroaz (1491445) | more than 4 years ago | (#31392306)

Also, since when did evolution stop? Who knows if in another 100 million years, the whales may evolve microscopic hairs.

Re:Do boats go faster because it repels water? (3, Interesting)

osu-neko (2604) | more than 4 years ago | (#31393214)

Indeed. It's worth nothing that, relatively speaking, whales are a fairly new evolutionary development. The first whales appear on the scene a mere 50 million years ago. The other question is one of competition. Some astoundingly suboptimal, inefficient designs have survived in nature for millions of years when they lacked significant competition or pressure in their niche. Whales don't seem to face a lot of competition or pressure, even less since we thinned their numbers in recent centuries.

Long story short, whales are unlikely to be anywhere near an optimal solution for their niche, and are unlikely to become one anytime soon.

Re:Do boats go faster because it repels water? (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 4 years ago | (#31394334)

Long story short, whales are unlikely to be anywhere near an optimal solution for their niche, and are unlikely to become one anytime soon.

Especially if the Japs keep eating them.

Re:Do boats go faster because it repels water? (1)

sjames (1099) | more than 4 years ago | (#31395668)

Then, rather than all that swimming about, they can just spin their own fish nets :-)

Re:Do boats go faster because it repels water? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31395746)

Assuming the Japanese leave any whales alive that long.

Re:Do boats go faster because it repels water? (1)

fucket (1256188) | more than 4 years ago | (#31392838)

Why would you think that evolution guarantees an optimal anything?

Re:Do boats go faster because it repels water? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31394954)

Which is exactly what he implied. So you just repeated his statement instead of refuting it.

Re:Do boats go faster because it repels water? (1)

davidbofinger (703269) | more than 4 years ago | (#31395692)

Since when evolution guarantees an optimal anatomical structure?

Evolution is pretty good at finding local hilltops. It may have trouble figuring out it needs to get off this hill to reach a higher one over there. The short term advantage for whales, when they first went aquatic, was probably to reduce their hair. They've climbed that hill to nakedness and now they can't see their way to a skin covered in spider hair.

If the whale body is "good enough" to survive and reproduce under the environmental conditions whales tend to live in

This is a bad interpretation of Darwinism. Under natural conditions there were always some whales under stress and dying for one reason or another, otherwise the whale population would increase until there were. If better skin would have saved the dying whales then evolution would have selected for better skin. Which I'm sure it did, even if it didn't achieve perfect skin, what they have now is obviously better than the average artiodactyl's.

then why they should have evolved the same microscopic hairs that we see in spiders?

Good question. One answer is that I'm not sure what effect little hairs would have on whales. They're so big that they're obviously way into the high Reynolds number regime where pressure drag dominates over skin friction. In that environment it's not always intuitive what you want your skin to be like. Sometimes you want laminar flow, sometimes turbulent, etc..

The more likely answer is that whales have only been in the water for a few tens of millions of years, and they're big so that's probably only a few million generations. Before that their ancestors were using hair for very different purposes and when the whales went into the water evolution picked the low-hanging fruit by getting rid of their hair altogether. If evolution had looked ahead and thought, "I'll keep this and try to make it low-drag," they might be better off, but evolution doesn't look ahead or think.

Whales haven't come up with anything new and clever in the skin department but that's not hugely surprising. Give them time and perhaps they will but it probably won't be homologous to hair.

Re:Do boats go faster because it repels water? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31392156)

actually sharks have unidirectional scales and dolphins are hairy, neither are affected by barnacles like whales

Re:Do boats go faster because it repels water? (2, Insightful)

anthony.vo (1581427) | more than 4 years ago | (#31392300)

Probably because barnacles evolved to attach to whales too. I'm just guessing, but the pressure for survival is probably greater for barnacles to attach to whales than for whales to get rid of barnacles, as they are not that affected by barnacles anyways.

Re:Do boats go faster because it repels water? (1)

shermo (1284310) | more than 4 years ago | (#31392486)

That's the idea behind wet and drying the bottom of a boat. It's not a smooth finish, so it's supposed to provide a layer of trapped water between the boat and the flowing water.

Re:Do boats go faster because it repels water? (1)

shentino (1139071) | more than 4 years ago | (#31392748)

Whales might shed dead cells off their hides, and having an expendable regenerative hull certainly makes cleaning easier.

It's one fringe benefit for snakes shedding skins.

Re:Do boats go faster because it repels water? (1)

Psion (2244) | more than 4 years ago | (#31393170)

Snakes get barnacles? All these years of amateur herpetology wasted.

Re:Do boats go faster because it repels water? (3, Informative)

Shark (78448) | more than 4 years ago | (#31393232)

(I've heard that this used to be combatted with very toxic copper based compounds, no idea what they use now).

When I worked for some ship systems company, they used the desalination slurry (byproduct of the freshwater-making systems). Basically, they made the water around the ship too salty for things to want to stick around... Literally.

Re:Do boats go faster because it repels water? (1)

RobVB (1566105) | more than 4 years ago | (#31393704)

From the Wikipedia page on dental denticles: [wikipedia.org]

Studies have found that the denticles create tiny vortices that reduce drag to make swimming more efficient. Denticles also allow sharks to swim silently compared to other fish that generate considerable noise when they ply the water.

Less drag means you can either go faster with the same power, or need less power (and use less fuel) at the same speed.

Re:Do boats go faster because it repels water? (1)

orkysoft (93727) | more than 4 years ago | (#31394798)

If these microscopic hairs that were lifted from spiders work really well in preventing "fouling", why haven't whales evolved the same?

Why haven't migratory birds evolved jet engines?

Re:Do boats go faster because it repels water? (2, Interesting)

MacOS_Rules (170853) | more than 4 years ago | (#31395596)

Because just because you're ultra-hydrophobic, doesn't mean you're good at solving the problem of fouling.

The toxics are being phased out, but there's not much yet to replace them.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biofouling [wikipedia.org] is a very complex subject, with a lot of research dollars behind it these days.

The skinny of it is that many proteins will expose their hydrophobic cores and thus denature onto these ultra-hydrophobic surfaces; I'd imagine these surfaces to be excellent in pure water, and terrible in anything non-ideal (aka, the ocean).

Inside tire treads? (1, Interesting)

caywen (942955) | more than 4 years ago | (#31391256)

I'm sure the uses are limitless, but one thing I wonder is what would happen to a car's traction through puddles if you put this material in the treads of tires?

Re:Inside tire treads? (5, Insightful)

krnpimpsta (906084) | more than 4 years ago | (#31391390)

Not to crap on your idea, but I don't think that would work. Tires are like pencil erasers. They lose material as you use them. Anything you put on the outside of a tire, that makes contact with the ground, will be rubbed off in less than a few hundred miles. For example, if you look at a new tire, it will typically have little nubs or rubber hairs all over it (these are a result of the molding process). After you drive on them for a few hundred miles, you'll see they get rubbed away/off.

Re:Inside tire treads? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31391494)

But it's hairs all the way down!

Re:Inside tire treads? (1)

caywen (942955) | more than 4 years ago | (#31391742)

Certainly the inside of treads also get their share of weathering. However, it would remain to be seen if this material could withstand those conditions. Especially since the composition itself is flexible and using more hardy compounds would be an option.

Re:Inside tire treads? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31391442)

Normal tyres work because the water is forced into the treads, and the rest of the tyre is in contact with the road. If the tyre material actively repels water the effect would be similar to using racing slicks in the wet: you'd have almost no grip.

Re:Inside tire treads? (1)

poopdeville (841677) | more than 4 years ago | (#31393578)

Unless you put the material in the treads, effectively increasing the flow rate through the tread at any given force. That's a gain for efficiency.

Re:Inside tire treads? (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 4 years ago | (#31394628)

Potentially it might be useful on the walls of the tires as well, as getting the water to sheet off as quickly as possible adds a bit to fuel efficiency. If it sheets the dust and dirt off as well that's a bit of a bonus.

Re:Inside tire treads? (1)

sjames (1099) | more than 4 years ago | (#31395696)

You might find that you'll get super hydroplaning. Then they'll wear away.

Videos (1)

nitehawk214 (222219) | more than 4 years ago | (#31391264)

This article is worthless without videos.

Re:Videos (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31391392)

This article is worthless without videos.

Feeling a little right-brained today, are we?

Hairy and hydrophobic... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31391352)

... I asked my cat and she somehow didn`t look surprised. How many lifes does this new stuff have?

Self Cleaning (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31391686)

Sure it will be self cleaning for dirt, but I imagine that a something this hydrophobic is going to be a grease magnet. I can't wait to clean the chinese food off my spider coat.

Re:Self Cleaning (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31391786)

At first I was going to make a snide comment along the lines of "ever heard of soap, aka a surfactant" but then I realized that if you can't really wet this substance, would it actually clean up with soap or not? I would guess yes, because the soap would still attach to the grease/oil but it may be a moot point anyway. Ever seen an oil soaked lotus leaf? That is a natural hydrophobic material, whose hydrophobic properties are also derived from its physical structure and not its chemistry. You also have to understand, this material isn't like a fur coat. It is 20 microns thick. Human hairs are 100 or so microns thick. Not long, thick.

A new invention of RMS! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31391712)

And it was discovered on the same day that Richard Stallman entered the labo- oh wait!!

The Man in the White Suit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31391750)

Is it basically indestructible too?

The Problem (4, Informative)

carp3_noct3m (1185697) | more than 4 years ago | (#31391800)

The current problem they are having with it is that it is very fragile. If they can figure out how to apply this technique and keep it durable and mass producible then this really will change a lot of things. Its also pretty interesting how they note that we imagine things like this to have some uniformity, but they found that the pattern is strangely abstract, with some fibers being curved and some not etc. Anyway, cool stuff regardless.

A lot of energy is lost to friction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31391828)

Coating a ship with this could save a large percentage of fuel used. Once a ship is in motion a lot of the energy is used to overcome friction.

Sweaty, hairy, stinky people (2, Funny)

marciot (598356) | more than 4 years ago | (#31392040)

Sound true enough to me. Sometimes the people who don't shower are also hairy and disgusting.

I Feel Better Already (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31392070)

I'm sure all those loose broken-off nanohairs, are going to do ahhhhhh my ahhhhhtsm-heeeee ... ahzm-whiiiiiiiiifffffffffff ... asthma .... ahhhhhhh - a lot of good.

After all, they're technological. And therefore completely different from natural irritants - sucha as cat's hairs, pollen or random bursts of chelisserae (don't ask). :)

Re:I Feel Better Already (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31392866)

I didn't ask, I googled. But really? Chelicerae? Well, good thing you're not spider man...

Faster boats (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31392100)

Yeah, that's neat, but can I use it to climb walls?

Nottingham Univ. super hydrophobic demo (5, Informative)

magus_melchior (262681) | more than 4 years ago | (#31392162)

Here's the video [youtube.com] . Fascinating stuff-- the first sample is a copper plate with copper oxide crystals coated in a material very similar to Teflon.

Russians invented it already (1)

Nephrite (82592) | more than 4 years ago | (#31392430)

There is a punk rock group in Russia named "Hairy glass" (translated from Russian of course, original reads "Volosatoye steklo")

Hmm... (1)

fuego451 (958976) | more than 4 years ago | (#31392746)

What happens when there is a surfactant in the water?

Also, not so sure that most spiders can stay completely dry like a polar bear can.

Oh, by the way, don't bother trying to trademark the name 'Polar Hair'. It's already taken.

Re:Hmm... (1)

^_^x (178540) | more than 4 years ago | (#31395550)

Well, with existing tech, I have some shirts I got a few years ago with a nanomaterial coating based on small hairs - if you're splashed with a little water, it will bead up and roll off. It washes normally though because once detergent is added it soaks in with no problem.

old news and the hype is only partly true. (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31392844)

Superhydrophobicity by thin trapped air layers is not new at all - I recall seeing a seminar in my physics department ~10 years ago. The self-cleaning aspect does work nicely, but generally the surface structures lack the durability to last long enough to be useful. It also doesn't work for boat hulls because the air slowly dissolves into the water until the trapped air layer is lost.

Hairy Coats (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31392850)

A commercial application could be using the hairs as a water resistant surface on coats and rain jackets. If these hairs are mass producible, then a process similar to artificial fleece production could be constructed. This would surely be highly profitable if sold in high rain environments like the NW of the US and South American countries.

Hairy Metal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31392932)

I see a whole new genre of Watermusic coming. Hopefully it eliminates rap.
Take a RIDE RIde Ride ride... on hairy metal.

Then again, you are covered in spider hair... (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#31394064)

What good is it not to touch water, when you are touching a spider hair surface instead? I can keep dry just as well, by covering it in a rubber suit. ^^

yes! 7p (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31394288)

minutes. At home, Ireecoverable operating systEms, hapless *BSD

mod 0p (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31394356)

Discussions 0N

Battery/Fuel Cell Air Cathode? (3, Interesting)

Black Gold Alchemist (1747136) | more than 4 years ago | (#31394390)

It seems like this would be good as a battery/fuel cell air cathode. You could put this stuff, then a layer of activated charcoal, then a current collector. This would cause the water-air interface to be somewhere inside the activated charcoal, so you would end up with a huge surface area of the air/water interface. This would improve alkaline fuel cells of all types (aluminium, iron, zinc and hydrogen).

Why use spider hair (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31394932)

'A paper about the surface, which works equally well

When it seems the paper the wrote works equally well?

*ducks*

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...