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Insomniacs, the Phantoms of the Internet

kdawson posted more than 4 years ago | from the knitting-the-raveled-sleeve-of-care dept.

Social Networks 234

theodp writes "Ever since she was a toddler, freelance writer Lily Burana has been a Stay Up Late kind of girl. When her kindergarten teacher asked students 'What time do you go to bed?,' young Lily felt compelled to lie rather than rat out her own mother by saying, 'Oh, between midnight and 1 a.m.' She still suffers from insomnia, but has discovered that Facebook is the Promised Land for the awake and alone. She finds comfort in the company of others who, like her, live counter to the conventional rhythm of a sunny-day world."

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234 comments

Anybody here? (3, Funny)

LostCluster (625375) | more than 4 years ago | (#31397974)

Wow... am I the only one in this thread at this time of day?

Re:Anybody here? (5, Funny)

Slack0ff (590042) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398016)

I find it funny this story popped up around 2am est as well. Now back to facebook...

Re:Anybody here? (4, Funny)

siloko (1133863) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398050)

From TFS:

She finds comfort in the company of others who, like her, live counter to the conventional rhythm of a sunny-day world

Like most people in Britain then . . .

Re:Anybody here? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31398082)

the UK closes down at around 2300 GMT

Re:Anybody here? (3, Funny)

KingKiki217 (979050) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398296)

It's pretty cloudy; I dunno if he'll be able to see the joke whooshing by.

Re:Anybody here? (2, Interesting)

rve (4436) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398650)

I think jokes about the UK rain are often based on a comparison of a London winter with a mediterranean summer.

Some facts from wikipedia.

Annual precipitation from high to low:

Amsterdam: 30.69 inches (never go there, most depressing climate in the world, a year with 30 sunny days is considered exceptionally sunny)
Paris: 25.28
Jerusalem: 23.20
London: 22.91
Marseilles: 22.83

The climate isn't all that bad :)

Re:Anybody here? (2, Funny)

amRadioHed (463061) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398554)

Maybe, but what's really bad is there are parts of the US that seem to close down by 2300 GMT too.

Re:Anybody here? (2, Insightful)

Gerzel (240421) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398166)

I don't use facebook. I am up late a lot nd a bit of an insomniac

Still I have classes in the am.

need to gotol bed, but duno if I will

Re:Anybody here? (5, Insightful)

sopssa (1498795) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398046)

I would guess a lot of slashdotters fall in to this category or at least at some point have. But the difference is that I enjoy the quiet and alone time during night and hence would stay away from sites like Facebook. You get insane amount of work done during night time - there's no people chitchatting all the time nor can you really go out somewhere so you don't get lazy. It does however lead to weird sleeping patterns, but as long as you don't need to go anywhere in the morning it doesn't really matter anymore.

Re:Anybody here? (1)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398460)

This. I'm most productive in the middle of the night when I can rack equipment at our datacenter, write code, etc. without being bothered by anyone.

Re:Anybody here? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31398130)

12:30am here. I'm not planning on going to sleep till ~2:00am. 9-5 programming without a flexible schedule is hell.

Managers: Why can I show up at 5am (and leave at 2pm) and that is considered great but showing up at 10am (and leaveing at 7pm) is bad!?

Re:Anybody here? (3, Interesting)

doug (926) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398346)

I'm rarely in before 10am, often closer to 11. But I've found that answering a few customer emails at 2am helps. The folks in Asia get an answer sooner, so they're happier. I've done it regularly and that my boss has asked when I actually sleep. It's enough that I don't get any grief when I zone out in the afternoon. I'm not sure how many bosses are like that, but there is at least one of 'em.

Re:Anybody here? (1)

GNUALMAFUERTE (697061) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398158)

Not only not the only one ... And I'm in a different timezone. It's 4:33 A.M down here (Argentina).

I was precisely thinking about that fact (that I need to be up at 8 A.M tomorrow). But I can't help it. I can't go to bed before 5 A.M.

Now, one thing is staying on slashdot. It's pathetic but in it's own cool, geek way. Staying 'till 4 A.M in facebook is just truly pathetic. Well, being at facebut at any time of the day must be pathetic.

Re:Anybody here? (2, Funny)

amRadioHed (463061) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398564)

So what about if you have one tab open to /. and another tab open to facebook? Is that pathetic yet geeky-cool or just plain pathetic?

Only problem (-1, Flamebait)

gmhowell (26755) | more than 4 years ago | (#31397980)

Yes, she's pretty cute, and a nightowl, but I saw some reference to a husband, therefore, I am no longer interested.

Re:Only problem (-1, Troll)

macraig (621737) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398104)

Are you gonna cum all over yourself when you learn that she was a stripper and wrote a book about it?

Say What You Like About Facebook.. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31397984)

..but their PRs damned quick to put out some crap on how simply lovely its togetherness is anywhere theres a big, bad story on how its founders steal your passwords and go through your emails. RESPECT!

Re:Say What You Like About Facebook.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31398038)

why is this flamebait ?!
- what is this, love Facebook day on Slashdot :-) how simply wonderful.

Maybe we can have like, a meaningful exchange, or something, want my Picture, email, and password?
- or you can go hack an account or two instead, must be more interesting than modding down the Truth.

How about... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31398056)

How about making the US of A into a GLOBE shape so we can dot people around it in successive "timezones" that way Americans could be on facebook 24 hours a day. Using this concept some people would be awake in the original US of A when on the other side of this GLOBE some of them could be sleeping!

Time Zones (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31398076)

Once forums, IRC channels, and other websites that are driven by user-created content reach a certain size, there is no longer a difference between "daytime" and "night time" because while Americans slumber, Europeans are waking up, and Australians are coming home from work. "Peak" time ceases to mean anything once you're factoring in physical location and have at least two "peak" times. You use the same forum as others, but probably know different mods, OPs, and key players.

It is important that the Internet hang-out be user-driven, because groups who select content to publish tend to originate in geographic proximity, and a single time zone becomes favored.

Facebook isn't a place where it's easy to intrude on a social network in a geographical location outside your own, so I don't understand why the author isn't using a broader term.

Re:Time Zones (2, Interesting)

Haymaker (1664103) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398302)

This. Having played free WoW servers before (and idling in their official IRCs), I've seen how time of the day gets blurry when others aren't as constricted to the same schedule as you are.

Not only that, but there are OTHER insomniacs in OTHER time zones, meaning interaction can depend more on "when they happen to be awake" and not "what time they're usually up"

Re:Time Zones (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31398436)

Just as I read the title, I thought "IRC". I've been on IRC channels at different times of the day, and it was an interesting experience to say the least.

"insomnia" is probably the wrong word (4, Insightful)

seifried (12921) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398078)

Insomnia (307.42, DSM IV, pg. 599) [doesn't every geek have a copy of the official guide to crazy human behavior?] is not the word I would use (I don't have a problem getting to sleep or maintaining sleep). I'm a night owl. My whole life I have basically lived ~8 hours behind wherever I live (i.e. I go to bed at 4-5am local time), and I sleep for 8 to 8.5 hours like a clock (seriously, my primary experience of sleep is I put my head down and then *poof* I'm awake, rested, and it's 8 to 8.5 hours later). Fortunately I have found a way to use this to my benefit (tech writer/minimal interruptions, cover stuff that happens at night). But honestly the though of a "regular" 9-5 existence sort of ... well horrifies me (when do you normal people run errands? and rush hour, like WTF? you realize that you can belt across a city at 2pm in like 15 minutes, but at rush hour that will easily take an hour). Also added advantages: the internet (locally) is faster (the normals are asleep), no phone/email/SMS/IM/etc. interruptions(the normals are asleep) and as a result I am far more productive.

Re:"insomnia" is probably the wrong word (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31398176)

I've been the same way all of my life, a "Night Owl", awaking around Noon to 2 PM, and never to bed before 4 to 8 in the "morning", I saw some great early morning meteor showers when I was young hiding behind the living room curtains so I didn't get caught being awake at that hour, and for the last 30 years I've been a late night radio programmer, it works.

Bet if you told your doctor about it, they'd make a chemical attempt to "fix" your sleeping patterns to match theirs (it's not right after-all).

Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome is the right word (5, Interesting)

MichaelCrawford (610140) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398186)

Wikipedia has a good article [wikipedia.org] on Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome.

As I write this, I am at work at 11:30 PM. I got to work at 8:00 PM. When my coworkers come in in the morning, I'll be heading home to sleep.

I have been this way for as long as I have had conscious memory. My mother tells me that I have been this way since I was a newborn in the hospital.

Lots of treatments have been proposed with many studies being done, some with thousands of test subjects. Not one single treatment has ever been demonstrated to work in a statistically significant way.

Thus the best advice that the medical community can give us "Night Owls" is to find some way to accomodate it. That's why I took up computer programming in the first place. My degree is in Physics, but I'm afraid that teaching morning classes just doesn't work for me.

I have lots of friends who have DSPS as well. I met most of them by hanging out at Dennys at three in the morning.

Re:Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome is the right word (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31398264)

Hah this is me. No matter what the effort, short of constant hard-core benzos, I always eventually revert to going to bed at 6am.

Re:Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome is the right word (1)

seifried (12921) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398324)

Amen brother. One thing I read proposed that as a recessive genetic (dis)order it really makes sense to have a small minority of people who like to be awake at night to stand watch over the rest of the tribe/group.

Re:Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome is the right word (1)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398360)

Sounds like me. I sleep from morning to afternoon and I get a "concentration boost" between around 23:00-01:00, I can only assume "normal" people get that around noon. Even when I force myself to live normal hours I still find myself "waking" around 23:00 even if I've been slogging through the day dog tired. It's been this way for as long as I can remember, my mother used to call me the family night watchman. I've tried to adapt my life as you have, working a job as sysadmin that allows me to work shifts which is nice in the evening and night shifts and pure hell in the morning shift.

Lately I've wondered if maybe some of the nootropic [wikipedia.org] drugs might be able to help normalize my rhythm but I'm reluctant to start popping pills unless absolutely necessary.

Re:Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome is the right word (1)

seifried (12921) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398376)

With respect to new drugs: why fight your body? Seriously. I've also found that as an *alert* night type person you can easily make a killing.

Re:Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome is the right word (1)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398442)

With respect to new drugs: why fight your body? Seriously. I've also found that as an *alert* night type person you can easily make a killing.

It limits your career options for one and also tends to interfere with normal family life (being on 2 different schedules) which might become more problematic as the kids grow older.

It's never been a problem with my work, except... (1)

MichaelCrawford (610140) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398502)

... when I worked for shops that had the idea that they should start every work day with a 10:00 AM team meeting.

I have worked at two companies that did that. Typically I'd come staggering in at 10:05 looking like I just crawled out of bed, because I really did just crawl out of bed.

If I ever made my 10:00 AM meetings on time, it was usually because I had been up all night working. I would then go home to sleep after the meeting.

I've been a coder for twenty-two years now. Other than those two companies, no one has ever had a serious problem with it. Lots of employers have expressed annoyance with the hours I keep, but the quality of my work has always been a persuasive argument.

Re:Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome is the right word (1)

amRadioHed (463061) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398620)

Yeah, I've always been a night owl and for the past few years I'd been working a noon-8pm shift. Even with that not so terribly late shift there was a lot of opportunities to socialize that I'd been missing out on. It will be a challenge for me, especially at first, but for my next job I'd really prefer something more standard.

Re:Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome is the right word (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31398526)

I have lots of friends who have DSPS as well. I met most of them by hanging out at Dennys at three in the morning.

I thought I was the only one that did that. All the people that I knew was like "Why the hell would you do that? No one else does that!" Vindicated at last.

Re:Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome is the right word (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31398580)

I used to have DSPS since birth and the last 15 years have been a long nightmare trying to fit in with the 9-5 schedule of normal life at University and at work... ..until 4 weeks ago. Then I got the new medicine Agomelatin [wikimedia.org] and it totally changed my life. Today I woke up and got out of bed at 0730, no alarm clock or anything. I haven't done that naturally since before Kurt Cobain shot himself.

It's undergoing clinical trials in the US (1)

MichaelCrawford (610140) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398604)

That Wikipedia article says that Agomelatin is undergoing clinical trials in the US. I wonder if there is some way I can get myself included in the trials.

Re:Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome is the right word (1)

religious freak (1005821) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398602)

I have lots of friends who have DSPS as well.

Sweet! Now I've got an official four letter acronym for my syndrome. I truly have arrived~

Re:Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome is the right word (1)

Bent Mind (853241) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398694)

I've been this way for my entire life, as have my wife and kids. Personally, I have always just believed that the one-size-fits-all model of human behavior is wrong. Unfortunately, I seem to be in the minority in this opinion. It is nice to know that it is being studied. Thanks for the link. It is an interesting article.

Re:"insomnia" is probably the wrong word (5, Funny)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398252)

OK. I'm just guessing, but the structure and pacing of your paragraph lead me to think that you might benefit from less caffeine in your diet. :-)

I haven't been getting enough sleep lately (1)

MichaelCrawford (610140) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398262)

In part it comes from trying to fit myself into a schedule that doesn't work for me, in part it's because I find my new job so absolutely fascinating that I never want to go home.

Just this weekend I decided that I must ensure I get enough sleep every night. I'm part way back to normal, but when I got home from work Friday afternoon, I was totally wrecked. It's going to take a few more days before I'm back to normal.

Re:"insomnia" is probably the wrong word (1)

seifried (12921) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398452)

Actually I cut caffeine out about 5 years ago; all the local Starbucks/Second Cup coffee shops know that "Kurt drinks decaff. Do not give this man caffeine; it makes his nauseous and jittery" (seriously, regular coffee makes me pukey, so I don't drink it). Perhaps you are not used to people being awake and alert at 2am and are projecting a bit =).

Re:"insomnia" is probably the wrong word (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31398340)

as a PhD student at a university in Germany you can work whenever and wherever you want (if your prof/advisor approves, and you don't have any seminars to hold). this way it's easy to run errands that can only be done when 'normal' people work

Re:"insomnia" is probably the wrong word (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31398570)

I don't know about you, but I behave exactly like you described, except for one other thing I dislike strong sunlight, so vampire would be better instead of Night Owl for me. Sometime I occasionally skip an entire sleeping session but that's a different story.

Anything else? (4, Funny)

macraig (621737) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398090)

She was a stripper, is there anything else I need to know? I probably won't hear anything else after the word stripper, anyway....

I'll be here all night.

Lily Burana (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31398120)

Lily Burana is the original name of the tune for "rock-a-bye baby".

anyone know of an evolutionary purpose to owl-ism (1)

JimBobJoe (2758) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398124)

Assuming that everything genetic can be explained as having an evolutionary purpose, does anyone know of an evolutionary purpose to a large group of people having a different schedule than everyone else?

I assume that the owls are meant to be sentinels for the tribe, watching late at night making sure that no one's on their way to attack. But perhaps there are more reasons I haven't thought of yet.

Re:anyone know of an evolutionary purpose to owl-i (3, Insightful)

tagno25 (1518033) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398156)

Assuming that everything genetic can be explained as having an evolutionary purpose, does anyone know of an evolutionary purpose to a large group of people having a different schedule than everyone else?

Maybe they are suppose to be the stronger of the genetic pool and replace the weaker day walkers?

Re:anyone know of an evolutionary purpose to owl-i (1)

.tekrox (858002) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398194)

Explains it perfectly - Staying up late to Man the Internet

Re:anyone know of an evolutionary purpose to owl-i (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398366)

I assume that the owls are meant to be sentinels for the tribe, watching late at night making sure that no one's on their way to attack. But perhaps there are more reasons I haven't thought of yet.

Like making surprise attacks on other tribes?

Re:anyone know of an evolutionary purpose to owl-i (1)

silentcoder (1241496) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398412)

"Assuming that everything genetic can be explained as having an evolutionary purpose"
- A patently false assumption - humans have had no evolutionary purpose for an appendix for millions of years - but our DNA hasn't gotten rid of it - even though, prior to modern medicine it was in fact a detriment (it can get infections and kill you - dead people don't breed). Evolution is the PRIMARY driver of genetic factors but by no means the sole one. Often a genetic factor will survive or develop which is good for one use and be kept despite occasional disadvantages. One example is the sickle-shape of red-blood cells, this shape has certain anti-infection advantages which let it develop and survive despite the fact that it's not the ideal shape for their job (when it goes too far - you get sickle-cell anaemia).

Having said that, evolution remains the primary driver of genetic change and preservation and in this case there are numerous evolutionary advantages to having a small percentage of the tribe in a sleep-cycle directly out of synch with everyone else. You mentioned acting as sentinels - indeed, some being awake at night would make them more readily aware of threats to the tribe - and they could then wake up others up, regardless of whether it was a conscious plan or just coincidence - it added survival.
Moreover the gene would have other obvious survival advantages. Ability to steal food and mates when the majority of the tribe is asleep for example. Reduced competition for resources since most of your fellow tribesmen aren't around to chase you off.

Re:anyone know of an evolutionary purpose to owl-i (1)

EdZ (755139) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398608)

humans have had no evolutionary purpose for an appendix for millions of years - but our DNA hasn't gotten rid of it

Logic fail. Our appendix has been useless, but there is no evolutionary pressure to actively remove it (apart from a handful cases of appendicitis, it essentially causes no harm at all), so it stays in it's redundant state.

Re:anyone know of an evolutionary purpose to owl-i (1)

silentcoder (1241496) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398698)

Logic fail yourself amigo. A handful of people who die from appendicitis before breeding > Zero people who get any benefit from having an appendix.
It's a small evolutionary pressure indeed, but it's non-zero. Well it used to be, since we invented appendectomy's the evolutionary pressure in humans have effectively become zero since we can entirely prevent the negative aspect from impact on the likelihood of breeding.

Re:anyone know of an evolutionary purpose to owl-i (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31398562)

They are our night sentinels!!!!!

Re:anyone know of an evolutionary purpose to owl-i (1)

dltaylor (7510) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398588)

There are "ultra-larks", too (delayed sleep phase and advanced sleep phase syndromes).

If, in a group of 30-50, there were a couple of people up and (naturally) awake 'til 3-4 AM, and a couple who woke up naturally at about the time those went to sleep, then invading humans, and, in earlier times, other predators, would have less chance of catching the whole band napping.

Pure supposition, of course.

Could be nothing more than simple SNPs. If it were to confer some hunting advantage over a better prey than other wakeful times, then, presumably, nearly whole bands might have shifted.

Given the regimentation of most modern societies, it will nearly always be a mating disadvantage, but just successful enough to remain in play.

So far, lefties haven't been exterminated, either, despite some rather concerted efforts in the US and elsewhere, and the higher incidence of industrial accidents.

Or you could move to a city that never sleeps. (2, Insightful)

Rivalz (1431453) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398168)

You could always learn a foreign language of those on the opposite side of the globe. Never have to worry about no one being up the more languages you know.

Soldier's rhythm (3, Funny)

vikingpower (768921) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398196)

The article makes an interesting point: her husband "keeping up a soldier's rhythm". I suffered from exactly the same problem during childhood and adolescence, until the Dutch Marines made the error of accepting me in their ranks. It totally cured me. ( Being daily kicked and yelled out of your bunk at 5 am is a sort of a horse's medicine, but Gawd - did it work !! )

Re:Soldier's rhythm (3, Funny)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398228)

The article makes an interesting point: her husband "keeping up a soldier's rhythm".

Actually, that was a complaint about his habit of chanting those military "marching songs" while they're having sex. "I don't know, but I've been told... In, Out. In, Out..."

Or so I imagine.

Poor girl (5, Funny)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398202)

This is obviously a desperate cry for help from Lily - she's never been able to escape the shadow of her more famous sister, Carmina.

sliding window (2, Interesting)

zlel (736107) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398206)

I'm not insomaniac, but for various reasons I used to sleep at about 2am. And then it became 3am. And then it became 4am. after a while the sliding window slid so much that I started sleeping at 8pm. There was a time I got used to be awake at about 4am, but this time not before bed, but after. It was terrible when I was trying to keep my working day life with my 4am nights, until i realized that if I let it run its course, I could decide where it should stop.

Re:sliding window (1)

physicsphairy (720718) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398294)

I have found that I can either go to sleep at the same time every night, or go to sleep when I feel tired. The latter results in something like you describe. My sensation is that there are cycles of alertness and tiredness (which I guess is a good adaptation--your body should encourage you to get rest without constantly sabotaging your functionality) and you have to hit on the right point of the cycle in order to fall asleep peaceably.

I generally "reset" by going a day entirely without sleep or with only a small nap in the morning.

Re:sliding window (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31398370)

I have a similar thing to your sliding window.

Unless I am very disciplined or workout extremely intensely before bed, I want to stay up until 4 or 6am. Then it pushes my schedule around the clock in a way that doesn't benefit me with society.

I propose that we slow Earth's rotation.

If Earth rotated at about 30 hours instead of 24, I probably would be all set.

One Step Further (4, Interesting)

McBeer (714119) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398210)

conventional rhythm of a sunny-day world

My problem goes a step further. I like to stay awake for 20 hours and then sleep for like 10. I spend the same amount of my life sleeping/awake as a normal person, just in longer chunks. Trouble is, left to my own devices, I effectively "stay up" 4 hours later each night untill I wrap back around. Before I had a job I could actually live like that. It was kind of a strange sensation brushing my teeth with my roommate at midnight; She was going to bed, i just got up.

you brush your teeth with your roommate? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31398332)

> "It was kind of a strange sensation brushing my teeth with my roommate at midnight; She was going to bed, i just got up."

Have you never heard of a toothbrush?

Re:you brush your teeth with your roommate? (1)

mikael_j (106439) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398352)

"in the company of; alongside, along side of; close to; near to:"

Re:One Step Further (1)

BikeHelmet (1437881) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398410)

I've met many people with clocks like yours. I prefer to stay awake for ~18 hours, but 6 hours sleep isn't enough for me. (9 is about perfect) Usually I compromise on 17/7. It's an unfortunate necessity to match a work schedule.

Don't worry though - in 2 centuries, when we're in space, you'll be the norm. Everyone will look back and think how crazy we were to synchronize ourselves to the sun, rather than what our bodies demand.

Acceleraton effects ? (0)

ls671 (1122017) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398216)

I have never seen anything about this mentioned but I have always wondered if acceleration could have an effect on people who "live counter to the conventional rhythm of a sunny-day world." People could react differently to it.

I wonder if acceleration could play a role. A fact is that at around noon standard time, our bodies decelerate at the highest rate especially when standing close to the equator. At midnight, our bodies would be accelerating at the highest rate. This is due to the way the Earth rotates on itself while rotating around the Sun.

Standing at the equator, we are moving at a surface speed of about 1700 km/h. This makes us move in space 3400 km/h slower at noon than at midnight !!

Nice timing... (1)

Shemmie (909181) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398280)

I wish I'd noticed the article earlier, seeing as I've just been awake all night. Aw well, off to work.

Funny... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31398288)

I find this same comfort on 4chan's /g/, having flame wars with neckbeards at 4am in the morning.

3:15am but it still isn't late.... 6am... 8 am.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31398320)

3:15am :) haha

It's like they know me (1)

Cmdrm (1683042) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398356)

As a university student my sleep patterns aren't really patterns, in fact sleep is something I barely recognize anymore. Bed time; does that count time in bed with laptop or other reading material? Oh, if you want really awesome dreams, on like 4 hours of sleep, eat peanutbutter before bed. Best Dreams EVER!

Insomnia (1)

kidsizedcoffin (1197209) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398374)

I stopped taking naps when I was three, and have had insomnia ever since. Luckily I have discovered the joy that is amitriptyline.

Lost (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31398426)

My brothers and sisters I've finally found you!

why insomnia? delayed sleep phase, more likely (1)

dltaylor (7510) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398430)

I had a sleep study done (lots of wires and other sensors, on infrared camera).

The doctor told me that I should not get up before 11AM.

The genes that regulate your sleep phase are known, and there are alleles that not only shift some of us later, but also there is advanced sleep phase disorder.

There is currently no cure (it would take a retrovirus, most likely), but some people can deal with the day better if they get DAILY (no skips), strong, early, solar-spectrum light.

Because we are constantly stressing our bodies with out-of-phase wakefulness in the industrialized world, there is a higher incidence of stress-related illness.

Re:why insomnia? delayed sleep phase, more likely (2, Interesting)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398490)

I'm one of these folks. I use solar-spectrum bulbs in my bedroom that are on a timer to come on early in the morning. This puts me on a normal sleep schedule with the rest of US Central Time when I need to be. Otherwise, I sleep in until 10-11am and don't go to bed until 3-4am.

Insomniacs? WTF idiot journalist (4, Insightful)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398532)

What does insomnia have to do with being nocturnal? Night owls still sleep, they just sleep in the daytime! Insomniacs can't sleep at all, the poor buggers. It figures, it was written by a journalist. They aren't the sharpest pencils in the box, you know.

Re:Insomniacs? WTF idiot journalist (1)

kalidasa (577403) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398640)

Insomniacs can sleep. We just take much longer to get to sleep and wake at the drop of a hat, and so never get the amount of sleep we need. Oh, and I live in EST

There is one site even better than Facebook. (1)

Luke has no name (1423139) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398574)

4chan predates Facebook by four months, and has a lot more active chatter during the night hours than Facebook.

i'll bet... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31398584)

she's fat

Segmented sleep. (1)

1%warren (78514) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398622)

Article From WikipediaModafinil [wikipedia.org]

I'm an earlybird, and a nightowl. In the middle of the day I tend to get really sleepy. I often wondered wether the eight hours model really fits everyone. Two sets of four hours would suit me way better. I finally did some research, and found that page pretty much by accident - the only other article that links there on Wikipedia is "Siesta".

There is an interesting drug to treat daytime sleepiness, Modafinil [wikipedia.org]. There could be added effects from it - weight loss & mood elevation. Sounds too damn good to be true - or healthy.

Night Code (1)

DrGamez (1134281) | more than 4 years ago | (#31398660)

I work the later half of the day (5pm to 1am) so I just shift my entire day over. I get home around 1am, and do most of my programming until around 4 or 5am, then wake up at 1pm and start the process over. I find the quiet of the night perfect for getting rid of distractions, and none of that pesky sunlight to give me glare!

Two conditions, not one (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31398676)

People who sleep weird hours are not insomniacs. An insomniac is someone impaired by inability to sleep.

For me, it is common to be awake from midnight to six a.m. or not, depending on my mood. I sleep when I am sleepy. I usually get eight or more hours of sleep a day, when you add the time up. If I wake up and "can't sleep," I go "yippee!" and get up, whatever the time. I am not an insomniac.

I hardly ever go to Facebook. I have better things to do.

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