Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Texas Approves Conservative Curriculum

Soulskill posted more than 4 years ago | from the great-school-board-or-greatest-school-board dept.

Government 999

Macharius writes "Today, the Texas Board of Education approved 11-4 a social studies curriculum that will put a conservative stamp on history and economics textbooks, stressing the role of Christianity in American history and presenting Republican political philosophies in a more positive light. The article goes on to mention that Texas's textbook approvals carry less influence than they used to due to digital localization technology, but is that even measurable given how many millions of these textbooks will still be used across the country?"

cancel ×

999 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

digital localisation (1)

fotoguzzi (230256) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458372)

they didn't have that when i was in school.

What? (5, Funny)

Tr3vin (1220548) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458374)

They have books in Texas?

Re:What? (5, Interesting)

Mordok-DestroyerOfWo (1000167) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458450)

I just finished grad school in Texas and was dumbfounded on how many arguments I got when I had to teach human evolution. Some of the most basic things that we take for granted as fact were just thrown to the wayside. Fortunately college has a way of forcefully opening your mind, but I really feel for these kids up until that point. No history book is going to be 100% objective, but it is still something that we should strive for.

Re:What? (5, Insightful)

pitchpipe (708843) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458706)

I, as a former conservative Christian (now an atheist), find it strange that they feel that god needs the government's help to promote his message. They're going to help GOD ALMIGHTY to get HIS message out because he's obviously having a hard time doing it himself. Kind of like how they are fucking screaming mad if you suggest taking "In God We Trust" off of the currency, meanwhile we spend just about as much as the rest of the world combined on our military.

In God We Trust... but not with much.

Re:What? (1)

Kell Bengal (711123) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458766)

Fellow member of the unborn-again choir here. I think Tom Lehrer's song Who's Next said it best:

Egypt's gonna get one too,
Just to use on you-know-who,
So Israel's getting tense,
wants one in self-defence,
The Lord's our shepherd says the psalm
But just in case... we'd better get The Bomb

OXYMORON ALERT (1, Flamebait)

Philip K Dickhead (906971) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458816)

"Republican Philosophy?"

Philosophy is literally, the love of knowledge.

Render unto Cesar. (5, Insightful)

mosb1000 (710161) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458830)

I would think more Christians would be for removing "In God We Trust" from the money. For one thing, it's obviously a huge lie. Also, it's really ironic if you think about it.

If they want to put something that reflects Christian values on the money, they should use "Render unto Cesar".

Re:What? (0, Offtopic)

MillionthMonkey (240664) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458482)

What do you think Lee Harvey Oswald used for his sniper's nest- an easy chair?

Re:What? (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458810)

They have books in Texas?

What do the think the Repository was for?

Hahahahahah (2, Interesting)

unity100 (970058) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458380)

had the founding fathers of usa, each of whom were intellectuals following the age of enlightenment principles and age of reason heard this 'role of christianity in founding of usa', im sure they would laugh their asses out. but probably franklin would just prefer to open windows on both ends of the long hall in his mansion, and just sit in the middle on a stool naked, as he sometimes preferred to do.

ill leave to you, finding which of your founding fathers was the one who said 'religion is but a useful tool to control the masses'. and if you dont know what i was talking about benji, you have loooooong reading to do.

Re:Hahahahahah (1)

hey! (33014) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458474)

but probably franklin would just prefer to open windows on both ends of the long hall in his mansion, and just sit in the middle on a stool naked, as he sometimes preferred to do.

Gosh, he left that little detail out of all the self-improvement advice in his autobiography. The more I learn about that man the more I find to admire.

Re:Hahahahahah (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458640)

they would laugh their asses out.

Ouch. I've never heard of someone laughing so hard they caused a distended colon.

Damn intarweb! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458840)

Google has failed me!

which of your founding fathers was the one who said 'religion is but a useful tool to control the masses'.

OK. I can't find it and I really don't want to go on a reading-all-the -founding-father-letters-notes-books-etc... binge.

I'm guessing Franklin. Jefferson could have said it too.

I'll shit in my pants if it was Adams, so let me know before I shower and change.

Washington....nah.

Anonymous Coward (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458384)

Saying Texas "approved" christian indoctrination isn't quite correct. The school board yesterday and prior has been discussing and weighing the topics and having open discussion. Last night during this discussion, all but one liberal board member walked out. The votes are held between present members only.

Don't blame this one of zealous republicans. The blame, if any, lies with lazy liberals.

I agree with some of the changes in the textbooks. Hip hop in schoolbooks? Disgusting.

Re:Anonymous Coward (1)

MillionthMonkey (240664) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458626)

There is a 30 day public comment period now, but they are still expected to approve the books on a final party line vote.

Re:Anonymous Coward (1)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458654)

That's rich! Zealous Republicans want to add right-wing propaganda to textbooks, and you blame liberals for it.

It's about time (-1, Troll)

Reikk (534266) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458386)

The left-wing cooks have been trying to spread their socialism and atheism through schools for a long time. It's about time we got back to good, old-fashioned American, Christian values

Re:It's about time (5, Insightful)

Mordok-DestroyerOfWo (1000167) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458486)

Do you like the fire department? The public library? Public education? Guess what...you like socialism! We really need to throw away the false dichotomy between Capitalism and Socialism. There is room for the two to coexist. I am a Christian myself, but I will fight to the death to prevent a Theocracy of any kind from taking hold in the United States.

Re:It's about time (3, Insightful)

dosius (230542) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458690)

A lot of fundies these days *don't* like the above. As a fundie I used to say, and I have heard other fundies say, that parents sending their children to public school instead of homeschooling them were shirking their parental responsibility to "train up a child in the way he should go" (Proverbs 22.6a KJV).

I still would prefer to homeschool, if I could find materials that weren't written by and for FUNDIES! >_

-uso.

Re:It's about time (1, Troll)

Reikk (534266) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458732)

The fire department could be improved by privatizing it, and making it only available to those who purchase their services, sort of like fire insurance.

The public library is a waste of tax money. It hurts book publishers. If you want to learn something, pay those who worked hard to create the book. This is no better than stealing music and movies on the internet.

Public schools should be eliminated and replaced with a voucher system so kids can get a quality, Christian education. Finally kids would be allowed to pray in school and actually say the pledge of allegiance, because these atheist nut jobs don't want to say "under god". I have news for you atheists, you will all be "under god" as you are burning in hell.

Nice trolling! (1)

spun (1352) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458896)

Honestly, I don't believe that you believe what you are writing for a second, but I love a good troll, so I'll play along.

You really don't think through the consequences of your ideology, do you? What would happen if the fire department were privatized? It would fail. If you don't put out a fire blazing in a building that is not covered, what happens? Does the fire just go out on its own? Or does it spread to the buildings of those covered, as well?

Fighting fires is a public good. Putting out your neighbor's fire helps you, as well. The free market can not efficiently allocate resources in the case where there are externalities, either public goods like fire fighting, public libraries, public schools, and roads; or public bads like pollution. To illustrate: an educated populace creates more value than an uneducated one. If everyone were forced to pay for their own education, we would have a less educated populace, as fewer people would be able to afford it, or would consider it valuable. We would have a less educated populace, creating less value, and we would be worse off overall.

Re:It's about time (5, Informative)

MillionthMonkey (240664) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458750)

Don't bother replying to that guy. All his posts have always looked like that. Real short, idiotic, and hostile.

80-90% of them quickly sink to -1 and all the rest get 5, which probably reflects a political polarization among moderators.

Re:It's about time (2, Informative)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458804)

I like my fire department. Now, I don't know about yours, but my fire department is not socialistic. See, the local fire department where I live is a private organization made up of volunteers. They operate by running fund raisers and otherwise getting donations.

Re:It's about time (1)

Kell Bengal (711123) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458812)

I think any smart Christian has to agree that theocracy is a bad idea. After all, nothing guarantees that the state religion has to be the one you happen to believe in.

Re:It's about time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458820)

You're an idiot. Being against those things makes one an anarchist, not anti-socialist.

Re:It's about time (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458748)

Yeah, that First Amendment is for atheists and pinko liberals anyways.

Re:It's about time (1)

pitchpipe (708843) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458860)

It's about time we got back to good, old-fashioned American, Christian values

Now I know that the Mormons claim that Jesus visited North America after he was "resurrected," but I wasn't aware that they actually converted. It's like the person that said they only used the King James version of the bible, because if "[Middle English] was good enough for Jesus, it's good enough for me!"

Note To Self: (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458388)

Don't hire kids from Texas, they they do not have a real education

Re:Note To Self: (3, Interesting)

BitHive (578094) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458492)

It's pretty much common knowledge that Texas and is an educational wasteland: http://www.edgetech-us.com/Map/EduLvls.htm [edgetech-us.com]

Re:Note To Self: (1)

wealthychef (584778) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458694)

that map only shows where people move to after they get advanced degrees. It does not necessarily mean education in Texas is substandard, although I'm not saying it means the opposite either.

Re:Note To Self: (3, Funny)

Bemopolis (698691) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458894)

Speaking from personal experience let me say that yes, education in Texas is substandard. Unless that standard is Mississippi.

Re:Note To Self: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458746)

Too bad the rest of the US bases its education system on what happens in Texas... Sigh...

Re:Note To Self: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458550)

And the clowns in San Francisco do?

http://www.cal.org/topics/dialects/ebfillmo.html [cal.org]

Republican political philosophies? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458396)

"Today, the Texas Board of Education approved 11-4 a social studies curriculum that will put a conservative stamp on history and economics textbooks, stressing the role of Christianity in American history and presenting Republican political philosophies in a more positive light."

I wonder how they show the Republicans ending slavery in the US in a positive light?

Hey Dumbass... (2, Insightful)

Xaedalus (1192463) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458558)

Abraham Lincoln was a REPUBLICAN! It's about time the GOP reclaim their long-long-looooooong forgotten mantle as the party that ended slavery and created the platform for modern civil rights.

Re:Hey Dumbass... (4, Insightful)

wealthychef (584778) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458712)

Screw the GOP and the DNC. How about if We the People reclaim our mantle of "government by the people?"

Re:Hey Dumbass... (1)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458790)

It would be a lot easier for the GOP to do that if they hadn't spent the past 35 years embracing the "Southern Strategy".

Re:Hey Dumbass... (1)

jeff4747 (256583) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458796)

The Republicans don't do more to embrace Lincoln because in Lincoln's era the Republicans were the liberal party and the Democrats were the conservative party.

Since the parties have switched sides since then, it gets rather awkward for the modern conservatives to invoke the memory of a liberal.

Re:Hey Dumbass... (2, Insightful)

Nimey (114278) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458888)

Also, last month there was a Facebook meme going around that MLK, Jr. was a Republican and isn't the GOP awesome for always championing liberties, etc., you get the idea.

The purveyors of this meme shut up rather quickly when it was pointed out that MLK was a liberal & as such would be unwelcome in the current GOP.

My mind threatens to break every time I try to understand where these people are coming from.

Re:Hey Dumbass... (1)

nvrrobx (71970) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458876)

Hey dumbass, the Republican party of today is very different than the Republican party of Lincoln's age.

Re:Republican political philosophies? (1)

je ne sais quoi (987177) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458630)

What's ironic about your statement is that the "conservative stamp" these turkeys approved includes teaching the speeches of Jefferson Davis alongside those of Lincoln, who was a Democrat [congress.gov] . It just goes to show you that LBJ didn't overestimate when he said "there goes the south for a decade" while passing JFK's civil rights bill. The realignment was so severe it now threatens to rewrite history, literally.

In other news... (1)

lordsid (629982) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458414)

In other news, today, Knowledge was drug out in the street and shot in the best interest of revisionist history.

Why Texas? (2, Interesting)

msauve (701917) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458418)

California has half again the population of Texas. Is there no CA state approval for textbooks? Seems that CA and TX should balance each other out, politically.

Re:Why Texas? (4, Informative)

Lobo42 (723131) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458586)

From the NY Times:

"California is the largest textbook market, but besides being bankrupt, it tends to be so specific about what kinds of information its students should learn that few other states follow its lead."

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/14/magazine/14texbooks-t.html?scp=3&sq=texas%20education&st=cse [nytimes.com]

Re:Why Texas? (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458692)

Seems that CA and TX should balance each other out, politically.

Yeah, because having rabid right wingers and rabid left wingers results in a lovely balanced situation every time! :-P

No, positive crazy plus negative crazy gives you a big fat zero (as opposed to a skinnier zero).

To torture a Spinal Tap quote, if the leftists are fire and the rightists are ice, the children will get the educational equivalent of lukewarm water.

Re:Why Texas? (1)

The Archon V2.0 (782634) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458742)

California has half again the population of Texas. Is there no CA state approval for textbooks? Seems that CA and TX should balance each other out, politically.

Like matter and antimatter? So if we move one next to the other, they'll annihilate each other?

Oh, please, oh please be true.

Can someone explain please (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458420)

I don't know much about this issue. Can someone who does tell me what the conservatives wanted in the books, what the liberals wanted in the books, and what actually happened? All I saw on the news was someone use the race card against the conservatives, which doesn't speak well of either side to me.

Re:Can someone explain please (5, Informative)

mdwh2 (535323) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458574)

You could RTFA :) It contains several of the amendments that were passed.

To comment on a few:

Mr. Bradley ... won approval for an amendment stressing that Germans and Italians were interned in the United States as well as the Japanese during World War II, to counter the idea that the internment of Japanese was motivated by racism.

Yes, obviously that means it can't have been an issue of race...

In the field of sociology, another conservative member, Barbara Cargill, won passage of an amendment requiring the teaching of the importance of personal responsibility for life choices in a section on teen suicide, dating violence, sexuality, drug use and eating disorders.

The topic of sociology tends to blame society for everything, Ms. Cargill said.

Wow - are they going to stop blaming images, films, porn, rock music and computer games for these things too?

Re:Can someone explain please (1)

modmans2ndcoming (929661) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458604)

They tossed out the founding fathers (who only get a light brushing in most history books to begin with) to talk about great heroes to the USA like Reagan, Rush and Bush.

Re:Can someone explain please (5, Informative)

BitHive (578094) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458610)

Here's an excerpt from: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/11/us/politics/11texas.html?src=me [nytimes.com]

There have also been efforts among conservatives on the board to tweak the history of the civil rights movement. One amendment states that the movement created “unrealistic expectations of equal outcomes” among minorities. Another proposed change removes any reference to race, sex or religion in talking about how different groups have contributed to the national identity.

The amendments are also intended to emphasize the unalloyed superiority of the “free-enterprise system” over others and the desirability of limited government.

One says publishers should “describe the effects of increasing government regulation and taxation on economic development and business planning.”

Throughout the standards, the conservatives have pushed to drop references to American “imperialism,” preferring to call it expansionism. “Country and western music” has been added to the list of cultural movements to be studied.

References to Ralph Nader and Ross Perot are proposed to be removed, while Stonewall Jackson, the Confederate general, is to be listed as a role model for effective leadership, and the ideas in Jefferson Davis’s inaugural address are to be laid side by side with Abraham Lincoln’s speeches.

Early in the hearing on Wednesday, Mr. McLeroy and other conservatives on the board made it clear they would offer still more planks to highlight what they see as the Christian roots of the Constitution and other founding documents.

“To deny the Judeo-Christian values of our founding fathers is just a lie to our kids,” said Ken Mercer, a San Antonio Republican.

Re:Can someone explain please (0)

T Murphy (1054674) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458842)

I've heard claims that some schools in the south don't actually teach students who won the civil war. Given how distorted these textbooks are getting, it (sadly) sounds plausible. Anyone know for sure?

"I reject notion of separation of church and state (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458424)

“I reject the notion by the left of a constitutional separation of church and state,” said David Bradley, a conservative from Beaumont who works in real estate. “I have $1,000 for the charity of your choice if you can find it in the Constitution.”

Oh boy.

Oh, please, Please, PLEASE (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458644)

Let there be a liberal, homosexual Jewish Lawyer step up to the plate on this one. Pleeeeeaaasssse?!

Re:"I reject notion of separation of church and st (1)

canajin56 (660655) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458688)

You might be thinking of telling him "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances." and collecting on that bet. But like all Republicans who say it's not in the constitution, he'll say "I said 'Separation of church and state' and your quote doesn't mention that at all." They argue that just because they can't pass a law involving any religious institution in any way, doesn't imply they have to be separate. They can mandate all sorts of things religion-related, it just says they can't pass a law!

Re:"I reject notion of separation of church and st (5, Interesting)

Bemopolis (698691) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458852)

Well, then you can say to him that the Constitution says nothing about the right to own guns. He might be thinking of telling you about the Second Amendment says "...the right to bear arms shall not be infringed", but you could just respond that that is ambiguous, as it doesn't specify whether they mean "arms" as in weapons, or "arms" as in the upper extremities. Maybe Madison was just concerned about the government chopping them off, as he may have heard that they do in Muslim lands. Then perhaps that jagoff will resort to references of those coeval extra-constitutional writings, wherein the phrase "separation of church and state" can also be found.

Ah, the joys of willful ignorance.

Re:"I reject notion of separation of church and st (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458696)

First Amendment - "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances."

1st, the very first word of the amendment is "Congress." It doesn't say anything about any of the states, but this has been normally implemented at the state level as well, by law or otherwise. 2nd, I can't see how a board of education allowing textbooks stress "the role of Christianity in American history" counts as a "law" or how it establishes a religion, or how it prohibits anyone's free exercise or any other religion, or anything else mentioned in the amendment.

Liberals and other anti-Christians have taken the original text and intent so far out of context as to barely resemble it at all. In fact, in many many cases, the implementation of this imaginary "separation of Church and State" has in fact violated the real 1st amendment by prohibiting many people's free exercise of their religion and their freedom of speech, and their right to peaceably assemble, merely because it may have happened on some public property.

Re:"I reject notion of separation of church and st (5, Insightful)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458760)

"Liberals and other anti-Christians"

I hate to break it to you, pal, but the vast majority of liberals in this country are also Christians.

It's pretty pathetic seeing the right-wing talk about 'states rights', when they only care about that concept when it suits them.

Re:"I reject notion of separation of church and st (4, Informative)

wealthychef (584778) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458818)

I'm an atheist, but he's right. The Constitution does not mention separation of Church and state -- it merely forbids the establishment of any religion. Or am I wrong here? What does it mean really to "separate Church and state?" The idea of a secular state is an excellent one, but I wish the Constitution were clearer on some of these points.

Really? (4, Interesting)

mosb1000 (710161) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458428)

Will they also emphasize the decline and perversion of Christian values in Government? How about the fact that the inclusion of Christian values in government affairs necessarily renders them un-Christian? I'm not sure how "conservatives" ever became associated with Christian values.

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458538)

Why is that? Look at history, what have christian 'values' been over the centuries? It seems to fit the bill just fine to me.

Re:Really? (3, Informative)

mosb1000 (710161) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458666)

Various institutions have co-opted the name (most notably the Catholic Church, but there have been many others including the Republican Party). But just using the name doesn't make it Christian. I don't think an institution or organization can even be christian, I think that's reserved for people.

Jesus was completely clear that we should lead by example, and not by ordering each other around, claiming moral superiority, or threat of force. That puts just about every political party and government institution outside the realm of practicing Christian values.

Re:Really? (5, Interesting)

je ne sais quoi (987177) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458730)

Heh, I'm sure somewhere you can find in one of Jesus' sermons something about tax cuts for the wealthy and how socialism is the work of the devil. Oh right, maybe not:

Jesus spoke remarkably often about wealth and poverty. To the poor he said, "Blessed are you poor, for yours is the kingdom of God," (Luke's version). To the rich he said, "Do not lay up for yourselves treasures on earth," and "go, sell what you have, and give to the poor." When the rich turned away from him because they couldn't follow his command he observed, "it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God."

I'm sure what he really meant to say is that these things are okay as long as it's not the government who is doing these things, then it's a work of the devil.

Re:Really? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458542)

I'm not sure how "conservatives" ever became associated with Christian values.

I believe it was a fairly well documented strategic move by the Regan administration. Or was it Bush senior? Either way, the Republicans did it to counter act the image of them being all about the rich protecting the rich and grab some extra working class votes.

Panned out pretty well, much to the annoyance of anyone who believes in conservative economic policies, but not in Jesus.

Re:Really? (3, Insightful)

bananaquackmoo (1204116) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458652)

Panned out pretty well, much to the annoyance of anyone who believes in conservative economic policies, but not in Jesus.

In addition to the annoyance of those of us who believe in Christian values, but not in conservative economic policies.

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458628)

The founding fathers were pretty Christian. The problem is, they were the wrong Christian. They were made second class citizens because of their religion. The founding fathers could have simply made a new Christian nation of their own. Instead, they made separation of church and state so that they wouldn't have the same problems their parent nation had.

Separation of church and state in the United States was created mostly by Christians. Separation of church and state is the Christian thing to do.

Re: Really? (1)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458638)

I'm not sure how "conservatives" ever became associated with Christian values.

They're associated with the term, not with the values.

On that topic, FWIW, apparently a lot of churches / religious leaders are taking umbrage at Glenn Beck's rant against religion's traditional support for social justice.

Re:Really? (1)

Snarkalicious (1589343) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458676)

Short Version: Dixiecrats needed a place to run to when their party picked up the civil rights banner and later picked a Papist for the national ticket. They took with them with them the low information voters they'd been buying off for years in the southern states the represented. Nixon was more than happy to have those states in his camp, even though he was far to cynical to embrace their evangelism in the same way later Republican candidates did. Hence, the Party of Lincoln became something else entirely as the Military Indutrialists made nice with the worst face of modern Christianity, regardless of the deep and inherent conflicts that exist between the Mixed Testament Biblical and Lassaiez Faire Corporatist philosophies.

Short Short Version: Politcal expedience.

Re:Really? (1)

wealthychef (584778) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458898)

I'm not sure how "conservatives" ever became associated with Christian values.

Really? Could it be because they talk about Christianity a lot, and Democrats, not so much? I'm not saying Christian Republicans are "more Christian" than Christian Democrats, but obviously Democrats don't talk about Christian values very often. Republicans do a lot more. So people with lots of religious concerns tend to be Republicans. Isn't that obvious? Which part am I getting wrong?
By the way, "becoming associated" is something that happens in an individual's brain, not in reality. So the association seems to be one that YOU buy into. Are you sure most people share that?

Conservative stamp (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458436)

Conservative stamp = Red badge of gayness

oh no! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458440)

what if they teach about the constitution and shit? THAT WOULD BE BAD!!!!

Re:oh no! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458618)

As a European I've never understood why republicans are labeled red in the USA. In Europe the color red in a political context symbolizes politics leaning left (socialist) and blue is right (conservative).

Look at the flags. China = Red, Soviet = Red.

It hurts reading these: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458448)

Crap, might influence more than just Texas:

[..] influence beyond Texas because the state is one of the largest purchasers of textbooks.

And our wannabe historians:

“The Enlightenment was not the only philosophy on which these revolutions were based,”

plus

“I reject the notion by the left of a constitutional separation of church and state”

Orwell Gets it Again (3, Insightful)

Avin22 (1438931) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458478)

FTFA: "They are going overboard, they are not experts, they are not historians," she said. "They are rewriting history, not only of Texas but of the United States and the world." "Who controls the past, controls the future. Who controls the present, controls the past." ---- 1984 by George Orwell

Re:Orwell Gets it Again (1)

canajin56 (660655) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458716)

Actually if you consult your new Texas-brand Textbook, you'll find that it was George W. Bush who said that ;)

Oh Noes! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458490)

We can't have any respect for the non-liberal historical perspective in education! That would be terrible.

Think of the kids wearing Che Guevara t-shirts who think he was a guy with a cool hat who rode a motorcycle in the name of Social Justice. It might upset them if their revisionist history lessons were revised, and that might make them sad.

Re:Oh Noes! (3, Insightful)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458584)

Yeah because in high school that's what they teach. How totally awesome Che Guevara was!

It's funny seeing how conservatives react to this, as if it's some sort of game of revenge.

You set up a strawman about Che Guevara and then argue in favor of revisionist history, as long as it supports your political views.

Metaphorical assassination (1)

istartedi (132515) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458496)

Another shot from a school book repository. The real God has an ironic sense of humor, I think.

Adding Friedman and Hayek to economics coverage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458500)

Seems like econ 101 to me. They surely can't spend the entirety of the course on Keynesians.

Meh (1, Troll)

jav1231 (539129) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458504)

The fact that anyone else in the rest of the country gives a damn is an example of how eroded state's rights have become. Why should I care? I don't live in Texas. What if this were another country? Would it be our business? No. It's really not any other state's. Local decisions like this will help or harm them.

democracy can only survive with education (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458680)

If you indoctrinate the people early with your "education" then democracy fails. They will go and vote the way they've been programmed to believe. It's done in communism, and religion fights so hard to control education for the same reason, they can maintain power via a pretend democracy by subverting education.

Re:Meh (1)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458700)

Yeah who cares if everyone else in society gets a shit education, as long as you got yours, right? It's not like your fellow countrymen can affect your life at all. You are an island!

Re:Meh (2, Insightful)

jeff4747 (256583) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458710)

The fact that anyone else in the rest of the country gives a damn is an example of how eroded state's rights have become. Why should I care? I don't live in Texas.

Because the people who print textbooks do not print a different version for every state. States with a large enough market, California and Texas get their own editions. Every other state can buy either the California or Texas editions.

Thus, these decisions in Texas will influence the education of a very large swath of the US.

Re:Meh (1)

McBeer (714119) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458724)

The fact that anyone else in the rest of the country gives a damn is an example of how eroded state's rights have become. Why should I care? I don't live in Texas.

People care because textbook manufacturers try to create copies that appeal to the largest markets possible. Thus when Texas, a very large market in and of itself, cooks up a crazy curriculum for itself, the textbooks used nationwide get sucked down with it.

Re:Meh (2, Insightful)

bckrispi (725257) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458802)

Maybe we care because the curriculum that gets established in Texas often winds up being used in classrooms across the country.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/14/magazine/14texbooks-t.html?pagewanted=all [nytimes.com]

The state's $22 billion education fund is among the largest educational endowments in the country. Texas uses some of that money to buy or distribute a staggering 48 million textbooks annually -- which rather strongly inclines educational publishers to tailor their products to fit the standards dictated by the Lone Star State. California is the largest textbook market, but besides being bankrupt, it tends to be so specific about what kinds of information its students should learn that few other states follow its lead. Texas, on the other hand, was one of the first states to adopt statewide curriculum guidelines, back in 1998, and the guidelines it came up with (which are referred to as TEKS -- pronounced "teaks" -- for Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills) were clear, broad and inclusive enough that many other states used them as a model in devising their own. And while technology is changing things, textbooks -- printed or online --are still the backbone of education.

Inappropriate Textbooks (5, Funny)

ChaosCon (1503841) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458512)

Reminds me of the old (ooooooooooooooooolllllllllllddddddd) textbook my calculus teacher has that managed to sneak through Texas book approval. It had four graphs printed right next to each other, the first of which was a step function, the second a parabola, the third was 2 sqrt functions forming a right-facing parabola, and the last was a right facing absolute function. This was the first time the graphs had been printed in color, too, so the *ahem* naughty word really popped.

Not a big surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458518)

Its not a big surprise that the Republicans want to change history to make themselves look good (in contrast to telling the truth). Aldlph Hitler did the same thing. I wouldn't even be surprised if the likes of Ann Coulter reviewed old Nazi propaganda films in order to get the right idea of how to change history. When they have to lie, you know they are not to be trusted, nor respected.

This debate is Ridiculous! (3, Insightful)

bigjarom (950328) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458524)

It doesn't matter which side wins in this debate in Texas. Either way young Texas children will still grow up with no idea how many provinces there are in Canada, what language they speak in Egypt, or who the president of France is.

Re:This debate is Ridiculous! (1, Funny)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458606)

Either way young Texas children will still grow up with no idea how many provinces there are in Canada

Zero. Canada is a myth and does not exist.

what language they speak in Egypt

English if they know what's good for 'em, gawd durn it!

or who the president of France is.

Wait. There's an old rhyming mnemonic for this. I see England, I see France, I see President Underpants. Yeah, that's it!

Hah! (4, Informative)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458556)

Take that, O reality with your liberal bias!

Once I was worried. (1)

hyperion2010 (1587241) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458566)

As much as this concerns me, the underlying assumption here is that kids actually learn things from textbooks. I find that assumption lacking giving the complete failure of our educational system no matter what they are trying to teach other than that school sucks and the government gives you money.

Re:Once I was worried. (1)

bananaquackmoo (1204116) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458670)

Haha, I was almost worried for Texas, but you sir raise a very good point.

Re:Once I was worried. (1)

ich1 (1629855) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458740)

But the kids can't be expected to sit through 12 years of this and not pick up SOME of it.... The reason, in case anyone is too lazy to read the article, that this matters to anyone outside of Texas is that many school districts follow Texas's lead concerning which textbooks to purchase.

Another Chinese Import (5, Insightful)

Concern (819622) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458600)

Frankly I'm surprised the politicization of classroom materials hasn't been more flagrant and widespread. I'm also wondering why there isn't more of a flip-flop between liberal and conservative influence on school curriculums as voting blocks swing between conservatives and liberals?

The ping pong of history books that was dramatized in 1984 was also a reality as power shifted and people and principles went in and out of favor in Chinese and Russian totalitarian states. I imagine now we will see it here.

Did we think we were going to make China more democratic? We are the tail and they are the dog. We are becoming more like them every day. The high castes of the conservative party long for it. They see the setup of China's ruling class - the iron grip on history - the apparently successful stifling of dissent - and salivate.

If Thomas Jefferson can be "deemphasized" in American History and the separation of church and state can be erased from the history books, there is no longer any break on this. Freedom of ("liberal") speech is not far behind. Make no mistake, this is a bellweather for how much further our society can fall. It also suggests the way America could balkanize, as different regions of the country no longer share a common history.

Nice process they used (3, Funny)

Infonaut (96956) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458656)

From the article:

There were no historians, sociologists or economists consulted at the meetings, though some members of the conservative bloc held themselves out as experts on certain topics.

Come on, NYT! Why on God's conservative, 10,000-year old earth would legislators consult so-called experts? F*cking New Yorkers have no common sense.

Dude (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458698)

Ever since when were history textbooks in general not biased, favoring whites, Christians, and Western civilization?

Rewriting history... (0, Troll)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458704)

... The fist step towards gaining control over people, is to gain control over their minds. Monkey see, monkey believe, monkey do.
And now FOX News is becoming your history and science source.

Please, to the majority of Americans, who are still healthy real Americans: Let Texas secede. Or throw them out. Let Mexico have them if they want. You’d do yourself something good.
But wait Mexico, there’s more! You can also get Alabama for the low, low price, of one Taco Bell in every town! ;)

Next up for the TX Board of Education . . . (2, Funny)

StefanJ (88986) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458778)

Round down the value of Pi to three, like it is in the Bible.

30 day unpaid suspension for teachers using European measurements like millimeters in the classroom.

Add Red Meat Studies to curriculum.

Found Flat Earth Research Institute. Curves of round Earth lead to unclean thoughts. Flat Earth would be easier to navigate around.

Rewrite history so that America won its freedom from the British at the Alamo.

Texas schools to be connected with special filtered internet which only allows access to Conservapedia, foxnews.com, and Amway.com.

OK, now that my knee is done jerking... (4, Interesting)

istartedi (132515) | more than 4 years ago | (#31458788)

OK, now that my knee is done jerking and I've at least skimmed TFA, there are some interesting tidbits.

Dr. McLeroy pushed through a change to the teaching of the civil rights movement to ensure that students study the violent philosophy of the Black Panthers in addition to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s nonviolent approach. He also made sure that textbooks would mention the votes in Congress on civil rights legislation, which Republicans supported.

This might not be such a bad thing if it leads students to learn more. For example, in going over materials regarding the Panthers, they might learn that group exercised 2nd ammendment rights. It was the fear of Blacks with guns that led to some of the first (the first?) gun control measures in California. The law was, IIRC, signed into law by... Ronald Reagan!

I'd love to be there when a student raises his hand in class to ask the teacher why a Republican would sign gun control legislation, or presents this fact in an oral report about the Panthers.

Oh, and I wasn't taught this in school. I knew nothing of it until I moved to the Bay Area and learned more about the Panthers simply because I heard they got started in this area. That caused me to become curious and read up on their history. School certainly didn't teach it.

Hearing the adults argue about all this will probably teach the kids in ways that neither side anticipated.

Biznat"ch (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458838)

share. *BS"D is

Futher evidence... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31458854)

...that the USA should secede from Texas.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>