×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Oracle Shuttering OpenSSO

kdawson posted more than 4 years ago | from the single-sign-off dept.

Oracle 128

mdm42 writes "OpenSSO is one of the best open source web Single Sign On projects out there. Sun Microsystems made OpenSSO open source in 2008, so it's sad to see how, after absorbing Sun, Oracle is shutting down this amazing project, labelling it 'not strategic' and dismembering the few parts they think are worthwhile for their own SSO effort. They started by freezing the next express release, and during the last few weeks they have been removing all the open source downloads from the OpenSSO website and removing content from the wiki. Fortunately, a Norwegian company called ForgeRock has stepped up to the plate in an attempt to salvage the project under the new name OpenAM."

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

128 comments

MySQL next? (3, Interesting)

Bearhouse (1034238) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544424)

Sadly, probably yes...

Re: Maybe not (3, Insightful)

colinnwn (677715) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544476)

MySQL would be a very high profile project to kill. I think it is more likely they would provide much less support and engineering resources for it going forward, leaving it to the community outside of Sun to keep it feature and bug competitive.

Re: Maybe not (3, Interesting)

Bearhouse (1034238) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544540)

I think it is more likely they would provide much less support and engineering resources for it going forward, leaving it to the community outside of Sun to keep it feature and bug competitive.

Pretty much what I meant...but a fork surely won't be as credible with the corporate suits as a product with Sun behind it.
Shame, MySQL & Ooffice are both great products IMHO.
Maybe a white knight (with a Red Hat?) will take it over, but I'm sure if they're too successful than Larry will find a way to stymie it...

Re: Maybe not (-1, Troll)

Anpheus (908711) | more than 4 years ago | (#31545726)

It's feature or bug competitive? I've never gotten that impression from MySQL. PostgreSQL has always come across as more featureful and "safe" to run.

Re: Maybe not (2, Insightful)

jhol13 (1087781) | more than 4 years ago | (#31546256)

Why? MySQL is a goose laying golden eggs. Why would Oracle kill it?

They will charge for the support and engineering, just like Trolltech and Sun did.

Re: Maybe not (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31547692)

Why? MySQL is a goose laying golden eggs. Why would Oracle kill it?

Are you nuts? That fucker is full of GOLDEN EGGS!!! Haven't you heard of killing the goose that lays the golden eggs?

Geez, kids these days.

Re: Maybe not (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31548008)

Give it 1-2 years, then it isn't as high profile any more. Support will dwindle with uncertainty, which is what will be as long as they have an obviously competing product (regardless of what they say)
Remember, they have made a 5 year commitment to "supporting" it - but there's no marketing plan other than to keep people in doubt with uncertainty.

Re:shuttering (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31544642)

You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

Re:MySQL next? (4, Insightful)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544730)

Why so sad? This only proves that you can't kill an open source project; any worthwhile project will have someone else pick up the development, with or without forking it. If Sun attempts to "kill" MySQL, somebody else will pick that up too. Sure, repurposing the paid developers formerly working on the project is a real loss to the project, but not a fatal one.

Re:MySQL next? (3, Informative)

sadov (450985) | more than 4 years ago | (#31545318)

Apropos -- Oracles acquisition of Sun for russian regional representations approved by russian Federal Antimonopoly Service of the Russian Federation at 19 March.

The main condition of this approvement -- 4 years of MySQL support & development and saving of Open Source status of this project.

You may found this verdict at agency site (unfortunately only on Russian now ;) :

http://www.fas.gov.ru/merger/decisions032010/a_29515.shtml

Re:MySQL next? (2, Funny)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 4 years ago | (#31545774)

http://www.fas.gov.ru/merger/decisions032010/a_29515.shtml

I ran that link through Google Translator, and it came back with: "All your queries are belong to us" and "MySQL will be renamed OurSQL".

Re:MySQL next? (4, Insightful)

seebs (15766) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544812)

Gee, if only we had PostgreSQL doing just fine as an alternative, then I wouldn't mind so much if MySQL went away.

Re:MySQL next? (3, Informative)

dgatwood (11270) | more than 4 years ago | (#31545534)

And don't forget Ingres, SQLite (which is good enough for a lot of low-bandwidth stuff that MySQL has historically been used for), Drizzle (MySQL fork), and probably at least a half dozen others....

Re:MySQL next? (1)

seebs (15766) | more than 4 years ago | (#31545552)

Yeah. sqlite is AMAZING.

pseudo (my project for a thing like fakeroot, only more bulletproofed) uses sqlite as its backend, and it's been a dream to work with.

Re:MySQL next? (1)

Pengo (28814) | more than 4 years ago | (#31547362)

Yup. :) I have done a bunch of small pet projects w/my work using sqlite and it's been awesome.

For quick and dirty data-processing tasks, it's a god-send.

Re:MySQL next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31546682)

Firebird DB is a very good and solid product.

Re:MySQL next? (1)

the_womble (580291) | more than 4 years ago | (#31547682)

The problem is with stuff that is already built on MySQl, and the availability of MySQL. All the low end CMSs use MySQL, so do quite a few big ones. ALl the cheap web hosts offer MySQL.

MySQL is also, IMO, easier to learn.

The Sun Also Sets (3, Insightful)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544428)

Another nail in the once proud legacy of Sun.

Re:The Sun Also Sets (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31544484)

Why can't Oracle just leave OpenSSO open source but no longer maintain it? Why the need to rename the project or software? I hope the management at Oracle and the former Sun roast in Hell.

Re:The Sun Also Sets (2, Interesting)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544514)

Because they want to monazite any parts of it they can pilfer. I used to refer to this practice as 'Frankensteining', but when it comes to Oracle I don't want to tarnish the good name of Frankenstein.

Re:The Sun Also Sets (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31544728)

Because they want to monazite any parts of it they can pilfer.

They want to mine rare earths [wikipedia.org] from their software?

Re:The Sun Also Sets (2, Interesting)

plover (150551) | more than 4 years ago | (#31545304)

Is it? Or is OpenSSO simply inconsequential?

I've never understood the appeal of SSO solutions. Joe Sixpack doesn't give a damn. It's never been made simple enough for him to "get". A handful of geeks may think it's awesome. But the rest of the real world doesn't care.

Snoracle is probably totally safe with this.

Re:The Sun Also Sets (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31545544)

Joe Average in my organization sure cares. All the constant bitching about having to to enter usernames and passwords for everything on our network has completely gone away since we implemented an SSO solution for it all. Maybe the average home user doesn't care, but it's extremely naive to say that most people just don't care about SSO. They do. Even if they don't know it.

Re:The Sun Also Sets (2, Interesting)

mobby_6kl (668092) | more than 4 years ago | (#31545578)

Yeah, I'll second this. We thankfully have an SSO solution at our company, and everybody seems to love it. I'm myself not an "average user", but even I would probably kill myself in short order if I had to manually enter my credentials every time I accessed on of our internal systems. And not only it's more convenient, it's also probably more secure, since users don't need to have a bunch of post-it notes with passwords stuck to their monitors.

Re:The Sun Also Sets (2, Interesting)

Tacvek (948259) | more than 4 years ago | (#31546394)

Most SSO in organizations I've ever seen seem to work by connecting the user directory to Kerberos, and use that for authentication to everything. Depending on how well IT department set up token forwarding, you may need to enter your credentials to access many systems, but everything in the company, from signing into the Windows Domain, to authenticating to the database uses Kerberos, so you have exactly one password to remember.

Re:The Sun Also Sets (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31546804)

It's not really *single* sign-on if you have to enter credentials more than a *single* time, regardless whether it's the same credentials or not. We have real SSO, where you login once (usually into the active directory) and then are automatically authenticated for most everything else, including all our internal webapps.

Standardizing all the authentication (so there was a single password), was our first step in moving towards a complete SSO implementation.

Re:The Sun Also Sets (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31547000)

I agree - SSO is nice when it's done properly. But unfortunately, I work for Oracle.

And Oracle has what ~they call an SSO~ for most of their internal stuff, but it isn't really. I.e. it's the same credentials but you have to separately enter them on every freaking page. Webmail? Enter your SSO. Procurement? Enter your SSO. Timesheets? Changing your employee details? You get the idea.

What's worse is that on top of this there's still a handful of systems that don't use the SSO, like the IP phone consoles and the teleconferencing solution they have.

Re:The Sun Also Sets (1)

Eskarel (565631) | more than 4 years ago | (#31547774)

Why because Oracle canned a crappy Single Sign on Product which pretty much only integrated with Sun's other equally shitty server products?

I love Java and I love the standards which Sun developed to create it, but Sun's implementations of their own standards are pretty shocking. That's a lot of the reason they tanked in the first place.

This is the way of MySQL too? (4, Interesting)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544430)

This may be a test to see if they get attention for shutting down an open source project they inherited in order to also in the long run do the same to MySQL and possibly also other OpenSource projects.

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (2, Insightful)

PFAK (524350) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544560)

Well, considering, there is no official announcement from Oracle that they are pulling OpenSSO from their product lineup. This article/blog entry is mere speculation.

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (2, Insightful)

Chyeld (713439) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544822)

Information on the Wiki being removed, all of the 'opensource' versions removed for download, all updates to the same removed, leaving only the pay "enterprise" version avaliable?

Let me guess, in a previous life you worked in Baghdad handing press announcements concerning the Allied troop advances for the Iraqi government.

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31545018)

Well, considering, there is no official announcement from Oracle that they are pulling OpenSSO from their product lineup. This article/blog entry is mere speculation.

No, not "speculation", rather "observation".

SPARC (0)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544582)

Will see the same fate.

Re:SPARC (2, Interesting)

argoth (21958) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544640)

Losing SPARC doesn't make much sense for Oracle. They already are closing down their x86 business and all the talk from them has been about investing in / focusing more on their SPARC (read more expensive) integrated system offerings

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (4, Insightful)

BitZtream (692029) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544614)

Or it could be that no one actually gave a shit about OpenSSO outside a very small group of people.

Its funny that everyone assume Oracle is being evil when a simple bit of common sense makes it pretty clear that its a waste of resources from pretty much every perspective to Oracle.

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (3, Insightful)

NeutronCowboy (896098) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544780)

Just like MySQL? I can't see the business case that will cause Oracle to keep MySQL around. A low-end version into the DB market? Just slap a few limitations on an actual Oracle DB, and presto - low-end version with a trivial upgrade path to "the real thing."

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31545270)

The low-end (and free) version of Oracle is called Oracle XE. It supports just one cpu and has other limitations.

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31545286)

Which is why you probably aren't a business man. MySQL still has plenty of people who are loyal to the MySQL brand and will continue to use it, whether it's Sun or Oracle who's owning it. Anyway Oracle already has a version of their database you can use for limited use.

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31545898)

Nonsense.

Which is why you probably aren't a business man.

If people are only using MySQL for the brand, then they don't give a damn whether it's a restricted version of Oracle branded as MySQL.

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (1)

petermgreen (876956) | more than 4 years ago | (#31546586)

I don't think it's the brand that brings people to mysql. You can't just drop in replace one DB with another in most cases.

IMO there are a few reasons people use mysql
1: it's free (as long as you don't try to link it into a commercial app)
2: it's included with almost every linux distro and linux based webhosting package
3: nearly all webapps are built to work with it.

IMO the most sensible thing to do would be to stagnate but not kill mysql while at the same time using code from mysql to build a mysql compatible interface to oracle and a tool for migrating data from mysql to oracle.

Then they can push that as a soloution for those who have outgrown mysql.

IMO if oracle kills mysql the users are far more likely to migrate to either a mysql fork or another FOSS database than they are to a light edition of oracle.

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31545504)

They already had that - remember Oracle 10 XE? It was free for production use, although limited (single processor, RAM limit, etc.). I suspect it didn't generate enough low-end market penetration. There is a huge installed base of MySQL. If Oracle can enhance MySQL with good migration tools (one-way, of course), then they potentially have a much greater strategic advantage than simply providing XE versions of Oracle.

- T

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31545902)

Have you ever actually installed Oracle? Do you know what it takes to run an Oracle instance? Do you know how to train all your devs, most of whom probably rely on a recipe for table creation or an actual install script for setting up their own databases, on how to work with an Oracle database?

I don't see how you'd "limit" Oracle to make it more like MySQL.

Besides, if you want a dumbed-down Oracle, don't all of you just use Postgres?

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31546472)

The closet thing in the stable to MySQL is OracleLite and that hardly qualifies as it is a different market completely. Besides, they already bought a lot of the bits to add to MySQL before they got Sun :)

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (1)

fm6 (162816) | more than 4 years ago | (#31547746)

Funny thing, Oracle seems to see business cases where other people don't. They bought RDB, SleepyCat, InnoDB, all of them database products that have zero synergy with their existing database. All have flourished under Oracle; in the case of RDB (which was originally for the VAX [wikipedia.org] , and still only runs on HP's DEC legacy platforms), Oracle's support is the only thing that has kept the product alive.

Whenever Oracle acquires another company, there's always somebody claiming that they bought it just to shut it down. (I kept hearing that about Sun, even the economics of such a move are absurd.) When it's a database application company, that's usually the consensus (as with PeopleSoft). And yet I can't recall the last time Oracle actually did that. Sure, they shut down useless blue-sky projects (and Sun has a lot of those) but the products that had any momentum at all tend to do quite well under Oracle.

This guy makes a business case for Oracle MySQL:

http://bit.ly/81x9t [bit.ly]

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (1)

Eskarel (565631) | more than 4 years ago | (#31547770)

Well the issue is that Oracle doesn't scale down very well. All that power and all those features come at a pretty hefty price tag in terms of disk space, memory and CPU. According to the DBA guys, setting up a new Oracle instance at work takes about 10 GB of SAN space without even adding any data to it. Not the kind of thing you'd do lightly if you didn't need any of that power, even discounting cost.

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (2, Insightful)

DMUTPeregrine (612791) | more than 4 years ago | (#31545104)

This is the first time I've heard of OpenSSO. Now, I'm not a web developer, but isn't OpenID much more popular as a SSO service?

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31546062)

You are clearly unqualified to comment on the significance of OpenSSO in the federated identity management marketplace. This is a hugely important nascent market, and Oracle's decision to shutter OpenSSO has nothing to do with OpenSSO's insignificance - quite the contrary. Buying Sun in order to eliminate such competition was very much one of Oracle's primary considerations, and you are either completely ignorant or intentionally misrepresenting the facts for your own ulterior motives to say something so completely off-base.

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31546784)

At least there's still OpenID [wikipedia.org] .

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31544786)

As a Snorkel employee (Sun->Oracle) I'll add a simple comment. If it isn't profitable or strategic, it will be shuttered or turned loose to the community to support. It is *as simple as that*.

Does that mean VirtualBox too? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31547130)

Now that Oracle has its own VM solution...

Not strategic? (1)

Burz (138833) | more than 4 years ago | (#31547364)

Do they want us to go from a situation where SSO in Windows is the standard on LANs, to SSO in Windows to Facebook or Windowslive servers becomes the standard in the Internet?

Because that is the direction that Microsoft is going in with what was Active Directory.

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (5, Insightful)

Kjella (173770) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544842)

Reality check: Nobody buys a company and just carries on because unless it was really mispriced in the market, you've gained nothing. You might as well have put the money in a stock fund. In closed source companies this means projects get canceled, reprioritized, product portfolios are aligned and they search high and low for the claimed synergies they were supposed to get. What happens in open source companies? Exactly this same. There's been quite a few of these stories now and they're all full of trivial projects and tin foil hat conspiracy. I just checked Digg and THEY got better stories than this. I'm quite the geek but still... stuff that matters. Or is at least cool, interesting or funny in a nerdy way. But not "Minor corporate politics" for 100$, I'll pass Alex.

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (3, Insightful)

copponex (13876) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544850)

The information asymmetry involved in technology make it a very lucrative place to be. A vast majority of people don't understand the differences between Windows and Linux, much less the difference of open and closed source.

Oracle is determining what parts of Sun are profitable, and planning to abandon the parts that are not. The abandonment of unprofitable Sun products will be touted as their commitment to open source. The privatization of Sun products will be touted as their commitment to innovation, or some other meaningless phrase.

If it makes you feel any better, that was also the policy of Sun. And Microsoft. And Apple. If you are ever on the wrong side of a profit equation for a company, you will be screwed. This is as certain as death and taxes.

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (1)

dgatwood (11270) | more than 4 years ago | (#31545728)

Actually, the fact that Oracle is slashing and burning stuff immediately after an acquisition seems like a pretty good indication that this really wasn't the S.O.P. for Sun, which may explain why they had to accept a buyout to stay afloat....

Re:This is the way of MySQL too? (1)

fm6 (162816) | more than 4 years ago | (#31548098)

Oracle is determining what parts of Sun are profitable

Or potentially profitable. Sun has some good products that don't do as well as they might, due to inept management and marketing.

Proprietary product, anyone? (2, Insightful)

Night64 (1175319) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544490)

Oracle is probably trying to leverage her own Identity Management product against IBM and Novell, who are kings on this market.

OSS FTW... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31544498)

because it was OSS, it can be forked and survive. :)

Re:OSS FTW... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31545366)

...or OSS FTL? If it had a viable business model behind it, they wouldn't be killing it off.

Re:OSS FTL... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31546268)

Faster Than Light, indeed

mo3 Up (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31544550)

best. Individuals fucking market part of GNAA if else up their asses percent 0f the *BSD We'll be able to

Risks and Benefits of OSS (5, Insightful)

olyar (591892) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544726)

As much as this is a bummer, it's actually a great example of the OSS model at work.

If this was a closed source solution, where the company got acquired and the product wasn't strategic, the solution would just be gone.

With OSS though, another company - for whom the solution is strategic - can step in and pick up the project.

Re:Risks and Benefits of OSS (2, Interesting)

BitZtream (692029) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544838)

Yea, and pretty much any time some propritary software package is terminated, it is almost certainly available for sale to someone else so it can be taken over if its worth it to someone.

The reason it doesn't happen is because the projects that get cut are the ones that no one cares enough about to continue development.

The license of the software pretty much no effect on its ability survive, its worth to someone else does.

Re:Risks and Benefits of OSS (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31544978)

Not true.

Let me cite an example in the exact same market space: CA acquired Netegrity because they wanted SiteMinder even though they (CA) already had a web SSO product. In addition to SiteMinder (their main business) Netegrity had a provisioning product. After the acquisition closed CA shot their in house SSO product and shot Netegrity's provisioning product.

CA would never have even considered selling either product to anyone else at any price for two reasons:
* why compete with a product you created when you already own it
and
* it's better to migrate your existing customers on the "to be killed" product over to the strategic product than to sell them off along with the product you're killing.

This happens throughout the software industry every time there's an acquisition and some overlapping products. The acquirer decides which products will live on, which will be shot immediately and which will be put onto life support until customers can be gently moved off onto the strategic product.

The only difference here, as the grandparent says, is that someone can grab the code and resources and carry on.

Re:Risks and Benefits of OSS (3, Insightful)

petermgreen (876956) | more than 4 years ago | (#31546704)

Yeae. and pretty much any time some propritary software package is terminated, it is almost certainly available for sale to someone else so it can be taken over if its worth it to someone.
Bullshit

Buying out a propietry requires a substantial chunk of cash up front. So it's only an option if one of the following applies.
1: you are big enough to buy it out
2: you can convince another company that it's worth thier while to buy it out, take it over and sell you licences.
3: you can get enough of the community together to buy it out.

And even if you can get the money together the owner still has to be willing to sell. They may not be especially if they consider killing the project to be a strategic move.

Copying the code of an opensource project and setting up repositries OTOH is so cheap that anyone can do it. Minimal maintenance (accepting bugfixes, dealing with new OS releases etc) is some work but should be managable by a few interested users working together.

And why do I care? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31544816)

What does this OpenSSO do for me that Kerberos doesn't?

If Oracle wants to do something useful with the Sun assets, they should kill off java. Java is an abomination upon the IT world. I have yet to see a well-written unbloated java app.

Case in point: RSA rewrote their entire SecurID one-time token server in java. What used to be a fast, nimble application that started within 15 seconds now takes 15 minutes to start. RSA recommends [rsa.com] 60 gigs of free space. The previous version [rsa.com] required 200 megabytes.

Re:And why do I care? (-1, Troll)

binarylarry (1338699) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544920)

Yeah but 100% of Oracle's products are Java-based. So killing Java would be slightly moronic (like you).

Re:And why do I care? (1)

longfalcon (202977) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544996)

Oracle database is 100% Java?
Berkeley DB is 100% Java?
really?

Re:And why do I care? (1)

eric2hill (33085) | more than 4 years ago | (#31545892)

Oracle database is not Java based, but does require Java as a key component of the system. Pretty much all of the admin tools are written in Java, but the core database is C++.

Berkeley DB is written in C and has API's available for C, C++, Java, and others.

There is also the Berkeley DB Java Edition which is pure Java.

Re:And why do I care? (1)

deniable (76198) | more than 4 years ago | (#31546640)

Not the good ones. The core is still a good product. The java stuff they pile on top needs to die.

Scandinavians again. (0, Flamebait)

unity100 (970058) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544820)

please, those who have the tendency to batter me with hardliner conservative arguments in discussions, make a mental note - this is one of the cases i always give examples of success of social democracies, and how heavy regulation and keeping-in-check of corporations spurs innovation far more than the reckless corporate owned environment does. an american company, which lives in a land in which corporations rule, shuts down something useful, and that useful thing gets immediately salvaged by a company which lives in a land in which corporations are heavily kept in check and regulated. and again, another scandinavian country.

Re:Scandinavians again. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31544884)

But didn't the innovation happened in the capitalist country?

Re:Scandinavians again. (0, Troll)

unity100 (970058) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544938)

are you aware of the number of open source projects that have been spawned in scandinavia, or greatly contributed to by scandinavia ? one of them is linux.

Re:Scandinavians again. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31548240)

are you aware of the number of open source projects that have been spawned in scandinavia, or greatly contributed to by scandinavia ? one of them is linux.

Another one is MySQL.

(And WTF is with the "Anyone who doesn't think corporate oligarchy is the cat's pajamas = Troll' mods?)

Re:Scandinavians again. (2, Informative)

spun (1352) | more than 4 years ago | (#31544976)

Depends on whether you would call the UK circa 1970 a capitalist country or not. The inventor [wikipedia.org] of the relational database was British.

Ironic (2, Insightful)

ritzer (934174) | more than 4 years ago | (#31545192)

This has got to be the height of irony. Lamenting, a commercial entity is dropping a project that doesn't make money... But, isn't the beauty of open source related to the fact that those who care, can pick up the source and make it work? So, prove it.

Love it. (2)

toriver (11308) | more than 4 years ago | (#31545568)

- Hi we are Sun and we have this portal. You want to buy a commercial license for it?
*buys*
*six months pass*
- Oh hi we decided to drop that portal and switch to this Liferay-based Webspace solution none of our techs really know anything much about?
*grumble*
*a year passes*
- Oh hi again, we were just bought by Oracle and will be abandoning Webspace, would you like to switch to this WebLogic-based monstrosity instead?
*curses*

That is in addition to the OpenSSO/IDM kerfuffle.

Here we go again (1)

realinvalidname (529939) | more than 4 years ago | (#31545768)

Like I posted a few weeks back [slashdot.org] , /. needs to save a template to re-use each time they feel the need to write a story about a marginally-relevant, minimally-staffed, largely-forgotten Sun project that Oracle shuts down.

Re:Here we go again (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31547502)

marginally-relevant, minimally-staffed, largely-forgotten open source branch of a Sun project that Oracle shuts down, while retaining the actual project.

Fixed.

Jasig CAS - OpenSSO Alternative (1)

amasiancrasian (1132031) | more than 4 years ago | (#31546652)

Why not use Jasig CAS instead? Not that it will be any consolation that Oracle is trying to profit off its expensive SSO solution, but CAS is easy to implement with a Java and Ruby version available, and hundreds of universities are using them. We're a private business and we use CAS easily with phpCAS and RubyCAS-client. It's easy to use and implement, and systems such as PeopleSoft can easily be CASified. While it's sad OpenSSO is being discontinued, CAS is not an option likely to disappear any time soon. We strong recommend those considering replacing their OpenSSO system to move to CAS.

Dollar value for open source assets (1)

Alan426 (962302) | more than 4 years ago | (#31546788)

Another way to look at this move is that open source projects have a significant dollar value, if for no other reason that the project may compete for market share with other products. One could certainly see the strategic benefit of supporting a "hard to kill" project to compete with a market leader. Now, we have an example of such a project becoming an acquisition target.

This is no different than a company which buys out their competitor for the purpose of "integrating" (e.g., shutting down) a competing product line. Luckily, unlike proprietary solutions, this project will fork back to the community and live on, albeit without Sun's corporate backing.

Source code history backed up? (1)

Simon80 (874052) | more than 4 years ago | (#31546862)

OpenAM appears to have simply imported a snapshot of the tree into SVN. Interested parties should probably back up the entire CVS history of OpenSSO using a tool like, for example, cvssuck, in before it is "unpublished".

What about Shibboleth? (1)

graphicartist82 (462767) | more than 4 years ago | (#31546928)

I'm surprised no one has mentioned Shibboleth. Shib is pretty popular in the higher-ed space. There is a bit of a learning curve when first playing around with it, but once you get it up and going, it's very powerful. It does more than just your average SSO by providing federated authentication across organizations while maintaining user security. The project page is at shibboleth.internet2.edu [internet2.edu]

OpenSSO will continue to live (1)

pfigura (1308835) | more than 4 years ago | (#31547250)

I've actually been involved with the OpenSSO project during the last 2 years or so, and I honestly don't think it will disappear at all. It had a very active and vibrant community which supported it, many of which have already made the jump to help ForgeRock.

On top of that, OpenSSO/OpenAM already has some terrific features. Its Agent interface is superb, the SAML engine is rock solid, FEDLETs are ahead of their time, and it even had a well documented API for integrating directly into your own application. That's not to say that OpenSSO didn't have room to expand (I found its STS service to be "finicky"), but I expect many of these issues will be addressed by ForgeRock.

I understand that Oracle already has it's own IAM suite, but I think dropping OpenSSO will be something that they regret.

OpenSSO is dead. Long live OpenAM!

unfortunate naming (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31547824)

An unfortunate name choice. OpenAM translates to turkish as "Open Vagina"

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...