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Facebook's Plan To Automatically Share Your Data

Soulskill posted more than 4 years ago | from the how-thoughtful dept.

Privacy 142

Giosuele sends in this excerpt from TechCrunch: "In anticipation of a slew of new features that will be launching at f8, today Facebook announced that it was once again making changes to its privacy policy. One of the biggest changes that Facebook is making involves applications and third-party websites. We've been hearing whispers from multiple sources about these changes, and the announcement all but confirms what Facebook is planning to do. In short, it sounds like Facebook is going to be automatically opting users into a reduced form of Facebook Connect on certain third party sites — a bold change that may well unnerve users, at least at first."

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142 comments

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Nooooo! (4, Insightful)

Island Admin (1562905) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640288)

Letting all the users of slashdot access my friends ... I see trouble in future :P

Re:Nooooo! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31640312)

What do you get when you take a primitive tribal spear-chucker and put him in a technological civilization? Modern-day homie-g thugs, who don't know precisely why they are thugs, they just know it's the black thing to do, everyone else is doing it, and getting an education would be "acting white".

Re:Nooooo! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31640390)

Do you realize in your attempt to go on a racist troll, you pretty much described the plot of Crocodile Dundee?

As for Facebook, all this means is that I have to double check that all the info I've given them is erroneous.

Re:Nooooo! (4, Insightful)

sopssa (1498795) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641474)

As for Facebook, all this means is that I have to double check that all the info I've given them is erroneous.

Including name? Having a fake name makes it really awkward to use Facebook with your friends and relatives and so on.

But this is finally a thing that really made me thinking of just closing my Facebook account. Not just opt-out from the new features again and again, since they just seem to always be more and more privacy intrusive.

This doesn't use any kind of login button but shares the data automatically to a website when you visit it, so they instantly know who you are along with other data. IP data is still anonymous enough (from the view point of website operator - they don't know who you are without going through police with a valid reason), but now the third party website owners have your name and other details without you never giving them those.

And just wait until every website will start to require you to use this. A good path for throwing all the anonymous cowards off the net and to get everyone comment and visit websites under their real name.

Re:Nooooo! (2, Funny)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 4 years ago | (#31643020)

Having a fake name makes it really awkward to use Facebook with your friends and relatives and so on.

Really less than you'd think.

I started going by "PopeRatzo" after being nominated for an Oscar in the Best Supporting Actor Category in Twelve Monkeys back in '96 and told all my friends that I'd be going by that handle. This way, they realize it's me whenever I post on Facebook and I don't get bothered by fans or butter-face Jennifer Aniston.

Now you'll have to excuse me. Ange is coming out of the tub and wants me to give her a hot oil massage. But first I'll have to lock all those screaming effing back in their cages.

Re:Nooooo! (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 4 years ago | (#31643048)

Sorry, that last line was supposed to read: "screaming effing kids", but I was having trouble typing with one hand in my lap.

Re:Nooooo! (4, Funny)

DMUTPeregrine (612791) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640370)

That's ok, you don't have any friends.

Re:Nooooo! (3, Interesting)

AliasMarlowe (1042386) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640898)

That's ok, you don't have any friends.

I deleted all of my friends. At least from my Facebook account.
Then I made all information on FB visible to friends only, and nothing accessible to applications, advertisers, etc. Then I deleted all photos, personal data, posts, and so forth. It takes a while, as Facebook has settings links for different things in several places. The account remains active, but is utterly devoid of content (even my birth date has "typographical errors"). That must make me a Facebook zombie, of sorts.

Re:Nooooo! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31640932)

Brainz.... Perhaps you should include some zombie like pictures?

Re:Nooooo! (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31642762)

Shouldn't this be modded as funny?

I mean, it is the same as not being on Facebook, with the pointlessness of having an account.

As for me: What is this Facebook you speak of?

Re:Nooooo! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31641606)

Yeah, do you really want all the GNAA and Goatse trolls to have access to your wife?

Re:Nooooo! (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 4 years ago | (#31642954)

Letting all the users of slashdot access my friends

I don't think my Mom will mind.

I love being AC (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31640302)

Precisely for things like this.

Agreed, 110% (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31640394)

"You will dress only in attire specially sanctioned by M.I.B. special services. You'll conform to the identity we give you. Eat where we tell you. Live where we tell you.

From now on, you'll have no identifying marks of any kind. You will not stand out in any way.

Your entire image is crafted to leave no lasting memory with anyone you encounter. You are a rumor, recognizable only as deja vu, and dismissed just as quickly. You don't exist. You were never even born. Anonymity is your name, silence is your native tongue.

You are no longer part of the system. You are above the system, over it, beyond it. We're "them." We're "they." We are the Men in Black." - Zed, to Agent J & Agent K from the film "MEN IN BLACK"

See subject-line above...

facebook, myspace, friendster, orkut (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31640314)

I don't understand what is wrong with everyone on the internet. You cry about privacy but willingly give out your real-life information to these websites. Each and every one of these social networking websites exists for one purpose and that's to sell your information, your demographics to advertisers and generate revenue.

None of these sites are altruistic establishments who seek to serve the public good guarding one's privacy. At the end of the day you're engaging in opt-in Big Brother and it's far more disturbing than the advanced police state that exists in the UK and is growing in the United States of America.

Doesn't matter if you're using a throwaway freemail account because even then it's ridiculously easy to find one's real-life information. Just stop going there, delete your information and send their company a strongly-worded letter demanding they remove your information.

Re:facebook, myspace, friendster, orkut (5, Insightful)

sopssa (1498795) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640496)

Well, in this case the sharing of information to third party websites will be done automatically and you are automatically opted-in to the feature. I don't cry about privacy when I can decide when, what and how I give it out. When it happens automatically like here, then I'm sure as hell will complain about it.

Quit WHINING. (-1, Flamebait)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640774)

I don't cry about privacy when I can decide when, what and how I give it out.

And you can!

Every time Facebook changes their Privacy Policy, they send users an email. You are free to log in and add restrictions as you wish. You are also free not to use Facebook.
Quit WHINING.

Re:Quit WHINING. (1)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641062)

your response is not valid in the case when you are OPTED IN by default to have your previously restricted information given away

Re:Quit WHINING. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31641362)

..when you are OPTED IN by default..

'Opted in' doesn't mean what you think it means.

Re:Quit WHINING. (0, Flamebait)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641388)

Certainly it is. Even if you are "opted-in", you can then "opt-out".

But it's irrelevant.

Most of the people bitching about this don't use FB. The people who do either don't care or "opt-out" as they are free to do.

It's a non-issue.

Re:Quit WHINING. (1)

AndGodSed (968378) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641622)

Well... yes and no.

A large chunk of FB users might not know what this means and then not go through the effort of opting out, some might even use FB from their mobile phone most of the time (I know of a few of my friends who are on the road a lot and FB/Tweet from their phones) and might not know about this for a few weeks.

If the opt-out option is there it is certainly less of an issue than sensationalised in TFA, but there is still opportunity for peoples personal information that they would like to have restricted to FB to be shared on other sites and used by other companies who they did not give consent to.

Why not a default "opted out have to opt in" policy instead of an "opted in have to opt out" policy?

Re:Quit WHINING. (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641880)

A large chunk of FB users might not know what this means and then not go through the effort of opting out...

We hate it when Government tries to play Big Daddy and tell us what to do like children, how about we all let people fend for themselves with Facebook? They send out an email letting users know about things like this. If FB users can't figure it out, well, there's more trouble than this brewing for them. I think most will have a clue. Most will do nothing as is their right, the rest will lock things down or stop using FB. Choice!

Re:Quit WHINING. (1)

AndGodSed (968378) | more than 4 years ago | (#31642092)

Case in point: Users clicking on dodge links or opening dangerous attachments in e-mails.

Or how about people STILL falling for those 419 emails? Heck Oprah had a show dedicated to it and yet people STILL fall for the most basic scams.

Why would someone who ignores a notice from their bank not to send out personal information or reply to a mail asking for their banking details take heed of a facebook mail telling them they can opt out from giving personal information?

You have to cater to the lowest common denominator and work yourself up from there.

Re:Quit WHINING. (1)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641990)

they opt you in and lob your information to all their partners. then you come along after notification and opt out. see the problem?

Re:Quit WHINING. (5, Insightful)

pentalive (449155) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641112)

Why is it every time Facebook gets a new idea, everyone must scramble to update their settings - why not just assume people want to keep their information private? They could even have a single new setting that acts as a default:

When Facebook adds a new feature that shares my information in a new way:

(a) Share my information automatically, I can stop sharing later

(b) Do not automatically share, I can begin sharing later.

That way those who care can keep their data private or at least not be surprised by the new way their data is being shared, and those who find that they enjoy sharing their data in new ways can always be on the cutting edge.

Once you set your default, you can go back at your leisure and change the setting to share or to not share. Usually you will not have to do anything because the default sets the sharing the way you like it.

Ob Disclaimer: I don't use Facebook or any of those other new-fangled things.

Re:Quit WHINING. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31641308)

Because that's not how the Jew who owns it operates [businessinsider.com] .

Re:Quit WHINING. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31641402)

Why is it every time Facebook gets a new idea, everyone must scramble to update their settings - why not just assume people want to keep their information private?

Because the basic purpose of facebook is to share information. An assumption that you desire privacy is counter to the idea of using facebook.

Also its far more profitable to sell your information upfront before giving you the "opt out" choice than to only sell the information of the few people who choose to "opt in".

Re:Quit WHINING. (5, Insightful)

YourExperiment (1081089) | more than 4 years ago | (#31642562)

Why is it every time Facebook gets a new idea, everyone must scramble to update their settings

Because it's far easier for the site to make money that way, and they really don't care about your privacy (although it is wise for them to maintain the facade of caring).

Re:Quit WHINING. (3, Insightful)

PeeAitchPee (712652) | more than 4 years ago | (#31642712)

Because most people are too stupid and / or lazy to be bothered to mess with the privacy controls. Facebook knows this, and exploits it (like many other sites) to build their pool of demographic / advertising data. That's why the controls are generally buried several menus deep and hard to find. It's no different than being subscribed to an online vendor's email newsletter by default unless you *uncheck* that box during checkout. Every time Facebook adds a new feature, it gives them another chance to add to the pool and increase their ad revenue. And you can't blame them really, being that the service is free for its users and selling ads is their primary revenue source.

Re:facebook, myspace, friendster, orkut (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31641156)

You're an idiot. How do you think social network will make money? Selling info back and forth within the company?

You opted in when you gave them your data. (2, Insightful)

Orgasmatron (8103) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641330)

Their policy means nothing, since they can always change it on a whim. The only way to have control over your information and privacy is to control it yourself.

Anyone feel like making a distributed peer to peer facebook clone where each user runs (or at least has the ability to run) their own server?

Re:facebook, myspace, friendster, orkut (3, Interesting)

DigitAl56K (805623) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641334)

Exactly!

Quoting the draft from TC's report:

In order to provide you with useful social experiences off of Facebook, we occasionally need to provide General Information about you to pre-approved third party websites and applications that use Platform at the time you visit them (if you are still logged in to Facebook). Similarly, when one of your friends visits a pre-approved website or application, it will receive General Information about you so you and your friend can be connected on that website as well (if you also have an account with that website).

Wait, Facebook, you don't "occasionally need to provide" anything. I did not ask or want you to provide "useful social experiences off of Facebook".

P.S. THIS STINKS OF BEACON

Re:facebook, myspace, friendster, orkut (1)

heptapod (243146) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641450)

Mmmm, bacon.

Re:facebook, myspace, friendster, orkut (1)

AndGodSed (968378) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641712)

My thought exactly lol.

Re:facebook, myspace, friendster, orkut (1)

blai (1380673) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640498)

I don't understand what is wrong with everyone on the internet. You cry about privacy but willingly give out your real-life information to these websites.

I am putting my information up on a widely used platform where I can easily exchange information with the people I want. The fact that the platform is a 3rd-party website is not at all voluntary.

Re:facebook, myspace, friendster, orkut (1)

Dumnezeu (1673634) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640682)

I don't understand what is wrong with everyone on the internet. You cry about privacy but willingly give out your real-life information to these websites.

"We" (I'm not part of the "we") willingly give it away, because that's what their TOS say: if you use false information, you don't exist, therefore your account will be deleted, because it doesn't belong to anyone (or you are impersonating someone, which is against the law in any country on Earth).

Re:facebook, myspace, friendster, orkut (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31642184)

You're kidding yourself. It's like the other AC wrote: The purpose of social networking sites is to earn the owners money by sharing personal information. Whenever privacy gets in the way of that, these sites will find new ways to get what they want. When you swallow the bait, do you really think there's no line attached to it? Yes, they're offering a service. No, it's not free.

What real life information really? (5, Funny)

Macka (9388) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640704)

They know my full name and the name of my wife; my birthday and home town and a google email address. That's it. What's the big deal about that? It's not like they have access to any of my bank details, credit cards, NI number, passport number, or anything that would really cause me grief if it got into the wrong hands.

Stop making a mountain out of a mole hill. Sheesh !

Re:What real life information really? (5, Insightful)

mellon (7048) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640850)

You're kidding, right? Those are the details that an identity thief needs to impersonate you. Social engineering is a well-understood art, and the people you do it to are still living in the 20th century and don't realize that everybody's birthdays and relationships are effectively public knowledge, so if you can give them that information about a person you want to impersonate, they will believe that you are that person and then give you the information you need to get the other details.

Some institutions are starting to wise up to this, but it's hard to know which institutions you do business with are wise to this, and most people don't check, even if they are among the very small percentage of people who realize they should. Do you know what your bank's information protection policy is, what an employee has to do to get fired for violating it, and whether or not that policy is actually enforced?

Subtle satire is subtle (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31640940)

Whoosh.

Re:What real life information really? (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641946)

Please say "fraud artist", identity exists separately from documentation (at best, documents merely confirm that the issuer has certain beliefs about the person depicted on the documents, at worst, they don't mean anything).

Re:What real life information really? (1)

Larryish (1215510) | more than 4 years ago | (#31643102)

I have noticed that my bank does not ask me for picture ID when I make a deposit.

The receipt shows not only the deposit amount but also the resulting account balance.

Anyone who wants to know how much I have in my account has merely to know the account number and deposit one dollar to the account.

Re:What real life information really? (1)

AndGodSed (968378) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641750)

It's not like they have access to any of my bank details, credit cards, NI number, passport number, or anything that would really cause me grief if it got into the wrong hands.

Yet.

Re:facebook, myspace, friendster, orkut (1)

Talizorah (1773088) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641186)

I think that your post does a wonderful job of highlighting the hypocrisy and reality of this recurring issue. The reasons you outlined above are why I don't belong to MySpace, Facebook, or any other "social networking" websites, and probably never will in the future. Whenever you use anything freely, it is a privilege; so it is no wonder that many of these websites now feel an increasing sense of entitlement to user-contributed information.

The naivete displayed in the replies to your comment are astounding. Others are quick to point out that they wouldn't cry about this issue if they had a say in the "when and what" of how their information was sold. If only the American right to privacy gave us such direct control over our information, and was transmutable to such an extent on social networking sites that it superseded the TOS! Ultimately, our privacy is our own burden. If we choose to give our information freely to these websites, then we should expect what they choose to do with it to change as often as their TOS and Privacy Policies.

Re:facebook, myspace, friendster, orkut (1)

mazarin5 (309432) | more than 4 years ago | (#31642722)

I don't understand what is wrong with everyone on the internet. You cry about privacy but willingly give out your real-life information to these websites.

I absolutely disagree with this, but I don't have time to discuss it now. If you want to discuss this further, you can reach me here:

Dan Cruz
656 Maple Ave.
San Diego, CA
Home: (901) 271-5342
Work: (901) 887-4040 x523
Cell: (901) 279-8601

You can reach me at my $65k/yr job from 8 to 2, and then I go to the gym for an hour. If you have to reach me next week, I'll be on vacation with my wife Julia for six days, so call my cell. Also, this reuben sandwich is dee-licious!

I see; tit for tat... (3, Insightful)

ibsteve2u (1184603) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640398)

If you reserve the right to burden Facebook with the truth about yourself and your most sensitive information, then they reserve the right to relieve themselves of that burden by revealing it to whomever they see fit.

The e-reward for e-trust.

Re:I see; tit for tat... (1)

digitalchinky (650880) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640788)

Well, if they piss off their user base too much, said user base will up and move to the next social networking site that does have a modicum of stability and privacy. Simple as that.

Re:I see; tit for tat... (2, Insightful)

quickgold192 (1014925) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641118)

Doubtful. The majority of the Facebook user base cares little about actual privacy, and instead just wants a way to show as many people as possible how sick the party was last night and how stoked they are about Friday, but get this - Wednesday is the new Thursday; how awesome are they for thinking that one up?

Their version of protest is creating a Facebook group titled "OMG stop our Facebook overlords!!! 100,000 members and we can change teh world!!!"

New law of physics? (4, Funny)

BrokenHalo (565198) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640402)

One thing faster than the speed of light is the frequency with which Facebook changes its privacy policy to suck in the unwary. (Units deliberately left undefined.)

I can see it now... (5, Funny)

mace9984 (1406805) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640424)

Sexy Girl: FB Update - Just got out of the shower... LOCATION: 123 Main St. Creepy Man: FB Update - Just zipped up pants. 123 Main St. Broadview Security: Targeted Ad - Hey! Sexy Girl, Now is the time to think about home security!

Re:I can see it now... (5, Funny)

Dragoniz3r (992309) | more than 4 years ago | (#31643114)

I just went to that address and there was definitely no sexy girl zipping up her pants. Just some old fat balding guy. I want my money back.

Tracking and XSS for the masses (5, Interesting)

xarragon (944172) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640464)

And this comes as a surprise to anyone? The real danger is the proliferation of these services into everyday life. We already have examples of employers that demands access to prospective worker's Facebook accounts in real life. How long before you are viewed as being 'suspicious' for not having an account and sharing all your intimate details with the rest of the world? Everyone is doing it, why not you? Do you have anything to hide? I am also sure that Facebook themselves will in no way use the third-party data in order to track their users visits on other sites, would they?

Re:Tracking and XSS for the masses (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31640822)

How long before you are viewed as being 'suspicious' for not having an account and sharing all your intimate details with the rest of the world? Everyone is doing it, why not you? Do you have anything to hide?

Read Ben Elton's "Blind Faith". It depicts a not-too-distant future where society has become pretty much exactly what you just described.

Re:Tracking and XSS for the masses (3, Insightful)

Chuq (8564) | more than 4 years ago | (#31642100)

We already have examples of employers that demands access to prospective worker's Facebook accounts in real life.

We do? Is that legal? Easy answer: "I don't have a facebook account". It's none of their damn business.

Re:Tracking and XSS for the masses (2, Interesting)

xarragon (944172) | more than 4 years ago | (#31642502)

Yes, there was a case a while back where the interviewer requested to become a friend to the potential employer. I can't find the link unfortunately, but it was a female recruit that was overwhelmed by the question and answered "yes"..

Re:Tracking and XSS for the masses (1)

SpekkioMofW (711835) | more than 4 years ago | (#31642550)

"We already have examples of employers that demands access to prospective worker's Facebook accounts in real life." Can you provide URLs or anything? It's not that I don't believe you (I absolutely do) but I want to see these for myself and to share with my library management class. I tried finding articles on my own, but my Google Fu must not be strong today.

But (3, Insightful)

davidjgraph (1713990) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640526)

Are third party sites any more capable of doing anything complex with this information than Facebook? The extent to which I noticed facebook profiled me is the ads on the side would say "free gifts if you're male, 67 years old and live in Sausageville". Let's face it (no pun intended), Facebook probably gives prospective advertisers and third-party sites looking to use profile information some complex sounding presentation about the way that break down demographics to the point that an individual can be uniquely identified 24 seconds before they even think about logging into Facebook. But really, 99% of ads are based on sex, age and where they live, I'm sure a lot more companies than Facebook know this information, I think we're somewhat over-estimating technology companies' ability to mine data. OK, once I told a FB friend to not be such a baby and they got some ads about gifts for new parents. Maybe we should have a social experiment where we try to affect the ads by what we post. "Man, I wish I could get a cheap rate mobile, easy date in my area , cartoonize myself" should be a good starting point...

---
This user was referred to this thread via their Farmville syndication feed. Farmville automatically linked their fruit and vegetable interests to breaking world news and current affairs. Their response on Slashdot.org has been logged and helps us build up an in-depth profile of the deepest workings of their mind, thanks!

Re:But (1)

Eberlin (570874) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641312)

I see you have Farmville Masteries in Onions, Peppers, and Corn as well as a stable full of horses. Here are free coupons for $.99 off your next Taco Bell purchase!

Re:But (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31641572)

As a computer scientist specializing in data mining, I'd like to say that you'd be surprised.

Re:But (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31641798)

Don't know the nitty gritty of the deal but I do know Facebook is working with Omniture beyond providing tools for FB App marketers [techcrunch.com] . -- Their soon going to start aggregating data between Facebook and Omniture's 2o7.net network [omniture.com] .

Not necessarily a surprise. My CEO is buddies with the guys at Omniture. He came in a few weeks ago talking about it.... and how we could make money with them too. =) It's all about money folks. Every, Single, Thing.

Re:But (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31642066)

Facebook has ads? Honestly I've never seen one. Someone I work with says they do too, but when I mentioned I'd never seen one she did say they were only in those applets or silly game things like Farmville and others. Since I block all those crappy games, quizzes, and "send a ", I never see any ads.

Re:But (1)

socsoc (1116769) | more than 4 years ago | (#31642454)

Unless you're running adblock, they're on the right. In plain sight.

Spin (0)

stovicek (1768794) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640562)

"After feedback from many of you".. Apparently Facebook is confusing "many" for "most" or "all".

Re:Spin (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31641196)

Useless

my name is fred f stone (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31640582)

i live at 69 rockit drive
my hobbies include

banging my neighbors wife betty
and of course my own wifey wilma

want to be my friend ( sing it mister rogers style of course )

Adult sites (3, Funny)

Rik Sweeney (471717) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640592)

Hopefully they won't partner with adult sites...

Richard is watching Porn Movie of the Day on SexSexSex.com, the dirty dirty bastard.

Re:Adult sites (1)

cerberusss (660701) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641026)

Hopefully they won't partner with adult sites...

Richard is watching Porn Movie of the Day on SexSexSex.com, the dirty dirty bastard.

<3 Richard's wife likes this!

Re:Adult sites (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31641780)

That's not a real site! ...I checked.

Re:Adult sites (1)

genner (694963) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641892)

That's not a real site! ...I checked.

It is now.

UK Data protection rules (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31640638)

I'm pretty sure just giving peoples data out to third parties without their consent breaks the UK data protection rules...

Re:UK Data protection rules (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31640750)

So what? There's a new new article here every other week how Facebook violates German privacy laws. Guess what? They aren't a German company. They don't care.

Re:UK Data protection rules (4, Interesting)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640996)

The UK and EU data protection laws do not apply to US companies. A few UK companies use this to work around them by requiring you to give explicit permission for them to share your data with a single US company, which is then free to share your data with everyone.

Think of Facebook as your press release (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31640688)

Twitter/Facebook are flooded with advertisers so if you can't beat em join em. Use it as a press release page only.

i used to complain (2, Insightful)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640742)

about the cranky losers who constantly trumpet the fact they don't have a television, whenever the subject comes up

however, i am now that cranky loser, for facebook: every time facebook comes up as an issue, i will trumpet the fact i don't have an account, and never will, and feel smugly superior for that fact

it's nothing but a bonfire of vanities. you're just not that interesting, none of us are, sorry

free your time and free yourself from endless navel gazing and obviously, get some privacy: lose facerbook, permanently. declare your freedom from shallowness and corporate exploitation

if you have real friends, they won't need this stupid contrivance to maintain their friendship with you. the rest are just acquaintances, not really friends, and you work far too hard to maintain some ridiculous fake mask for their sake. they don't really matter to the quality of your life, unless you're shallow, in which case you don't have that much quality of life to begin with

lose facebook. you're life will improve

Re:i used to complain (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31641226)

You're also illiterate. Loser.

As a hiring manager you would have 0% chance of being employed by me.

Re:i used to complain (2, Insightful)

quickgold192 (1014925) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641234)

I honestly do not like Facebook, although I have an account that I'll use about once a month. The problem with not having a Facebook account is the same problem with not eating out: Eating out every meal is expensive and, if you're a decent cook, you usually find the food pretty awful. However, if you work in an environment where everyone eats out every meal, you're pretty much forced to eat out as well unless you want to alienate yourself. Get new friends? In a job where you move every 6 months and your coworkers all just graduated college with you, you're pretty much stuck with what fate gave you.

Re:i used to complain (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31641254)

Keep feeling smug. However you still have an account at Experion, Transunion and Equifax. They sell your information and don't tell you.

Re:i used to complain (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31641306)

I've got some news for you. Even though you're not on Facebook, you're still on Facebook.

I finally gave up on the idea of internet anonymity a few months ago, realizing that if I didn't take charge of my own PR, someone else would.

Re:i used to complain (1)

shentino (1139071) | more than 4 years ago | (#31643172)

Been there, feel your pain.

I've already had my personal information involuntarily published on the internet...by someone untouchable that knew I couldn't do a damn thing about it.

Re:i used to complain (0, Redundant)

schmidt349 (690948) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641390)

My Facebook profile identifies my religious and political views, my intellectual interests, and past and present occupations. What part of any of that obtains in "shallowness?"

A computer isn't a trivial toy, even though you can use one to play video games and argue on Slashdot all day. By the same token, Facebook isn't "endless navel gazing" even though you can use it to trumpet your superiority to your fellow man, whether that comes from flashy clothes or smug overgeneralizations like yours. Facebook is a powerful tool for social organization of all kinds, from sex to business to international politics and everything in between.

If you don't like the tool, or you don't like its privacy policy, that's fine; don't use it, and feel free to criticize the shortcomings you have problems with. But get off your high horse. You aren't a better person than I am because you avoid "shallowness," or because you refuse to acknowledge the value of your individuality. We are all interesting in different ways to different people, and there's nothing wrong with making that available to the rest of the world. Maybe you aren't the kind of guy to care about what kind of clothing I wear, but if my friend or her sister does that doesn't make her "worse" than you are in some metaphysical sense.

Re:i used to complain (1)

Colz Grigor (126123) | more than 4 years ago | (#31642436)

lose facebook. you're life will improve

I made the decision to drop off Facebook on February 17th (nothing special about the date, my brain just remembers little details like that). I had in excess of 200 family, friends, and acquaintances, about 125 of which updated semi-regularly. Facebook's "push" mechanism and its critical mass of people was a very convenient way to keep up with the people I care about. For me, it wasn't a bonfire of vanities or shallow, like you suggest, because keeping up on the lives of friends is interesting and valuable. I can see it being a "garbage in, garbage out" kind of system, though: if you only update shallowness then perhaps you only keep shallow friends, and so for you Facebook relationships lack any sort of depth. My "real" friends are scattered around the world on five continents, and it would be a major time drain to have to have one-on-one conversations with each of them to keep up on their lives.

"Losing" Facebook was painful, socially, and I'm not entirely certain that my life has yet improved. Kind of like Google "leaving" China; sometimes we have to make hard choices based on our ethics. But I do agree with you that every time I read about Facebook privacy issues, I snicker just a little bit. Still, I hope that someday a company that convinces me that they are trustworthy develops a social networking tool that has a critical mass of people while simultaneously allowing me to access the information in the manner of my choosing. I haven't seen it yet, and my hopes aren't high.

reductio ad absurdum (4, Funny)

sweatyboatman (457800) | more than 4 years ago | (#31642530)

I know exactly what you mean! I feel the same way about the telephone!

Sure you can use it to keep up with friends and family who live far away, but that's what letters are for. If you have real friends, they wont need this contrivance to maintain their friendship with you. And think about all the things you'll be able to talk about as if they were new if they come to visit. Ah the joys of limited connectivity!

And I mean, talk about annoying! I know that as soon as I install one in my house, it's gonna start ringing, interrupting work, interrupting dinner, interrupting sleep. And nine times out of ten it's going to be someone I don't know trying to sell me something I don't need. And what do you want to bet that the phone company isn't listening in?

That's why I say,

lose the telephone, you're (sic) life will improve

Re:i used to complain (1)

Buelldozer (713671) | more than 4 years ago | (#31642754)

That's a nice diatribe, wrong, but nice.

Perhaps what you're describing is how many people use Facebook, and perhaps that's just how you envision all users using Facebook.

My family uses it somewhat differently. It's an excellent way to share pictures, stay involved with each others lives by sharing highlights (and lowlights) of what's happening, and just generally be social with each other. I also communicate with my brother who is stationed in Iraq. The soccer team my son plays on uses it much the same way. It's an ad-hoc way to share pictures, distribute information on when the next practice is, where everyone is staying for the next tournament, etc.

Just because you're angry at the kids on your lawn with bicycles doesn't mean us whippersnappers, I'm 38, haven't figured out a thing or two about convenient communications.

So? (0, Redundant)

DogDude (805747) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640832)

So what? Everybody who gave all of their personal information to a new company willy-nilly technically agreed that they could change their policies at will.Sure, nobody reads all of the legal-ese, but you're voluntarily giving VALUABLE personal information to a FOR PROFIT company. What did people THINK would happen? Did people think that Facebook would, as a corporate entity say, "We don't really want the revenue from selling our users' information?" I don't understand how people can be so naive.

You'll get used to it (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640880)

a bold change that may well unnerve users, at least at first.

Now give me a moment while I slowly turn up the burner under my stew pot full of live frogs.

so what (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31640926)

I don't get it when people say privacy is dead because of facebook. Facebook only has access to data IF YOU PUT IN ON FACEBOOK. You put sensitive data on facebook, and complain when facebook shares that with others. If you don't put something on facebook, facebook does not have that info (except for possible tracking cookies that I'll explain how to fix). If you don't want something public, don't put it on facebook, it's very simple, and also clear private data in firefox+use BetterPrivacy to kill flash cookies, and then any issues with cookies are gone. If you are concerned about privacy of data, SIMPLY DO NOT PUT THAT DATA ON FACEBOOK.

Oblig Colbert (4, Funny)

bacon volcano (1260566) | more than 4 years ago | (#31640946)

"I value my privacy. I've been very consistent about that. I've said it on my TV show, my Twitter feed, my Facebook page, my live web Colonoscopy cam."

- Stephen Colbert

http://www.colbertnation.com/the-colbert-report-videos/267560/march-17-2010/united-states-census-2010 [colbertnation.com]

automatically opting users into (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31641416)

Facebook is going to be automatically opting users into...

The phrase 'automatically opting users into' sounds like someone just picked three words at random to postfix to automatically.

Only a fool would publish personal info (1)

Low Ranked Craig (1327799) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641502)

I use Facebook because a number of my friends do, but I did not use real information when signing up. My birthday, address, etc are not correct. My birthday is close, the city is different as is the zip code. Birth date and zip code are 2 of the primary ways credit card companies use to verify you when calling in (plus your SSN, which I give to no one). FB does not need this information and I do not provide it to anyone I don't have to. It's not paranoia, it's prudence.

Re:Only a fool would publish personal info (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31641786)

Certain data like name, address, and date of birth are often public records that can be mined by anyone who's willing to look for it. Check the site http://www.lookupanyone.com/ for instance, you just might find yourself and your family members and friends in there (I actually found that site by googling my full name). They say they use sources like "courthouses, county and other government offices". Apparently the government's privacy policy is a lot worse than that of Facebook.

hah (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31641508)

Dislike!

Another one bites the dust. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31641548)

I just closed and deleted [wikihow.com] my Facebook account. I'm sick of fussing over my profile and repeatedly having to reconfigure the site to NOT broadcast my information. Screw 'em.

My 2p worth of rambling (1)

asdf7890 (1518587) | more than 4 years ago | (#31641842)

To be honest I don't care about the info I have on FB. All they have is my name, an incorrect birth date, a low resolution indication of my general location, and a list of people that I am linked with in some way. Nothing of much value to any third party that I can think of.

What does bother me though is the idea of someone passing on my information (whether I care about the information or not) for profit. I I'm to be hored out to the world I'll do the horing and have the profit thankyouverymuch. If someone else wants to try gain from my info maybe I'll let them, but it is only common curtsey to ask for permission rather than automatically opting me in.

From a technical point of view I assume this linking of you to your FB account (and from there to other information and linking information FB holds) is going to be done by the 3rd party web site making a client-side request to FB (this request, being client-side, would contain your FB session ID cookie value) which then redirects to a script on the 3rd party site with some sort of session ID that can be used to make further requests to FB server side. This would not be difficult to block if you run a cleaning proxy (strip out requests to FB pages from with pages that were not served from an FB server to start with) or simply by using a separate browser. By "separate" I mean really separate: not common add-ons for instance (flash cookies, if you aren't in the habit of blocking flash by default, are cross-browser and even survive through "private browsing" mods) - true separation might mean having to run it in a VM or some such construct (which may, in turn, mean I can't be bothered enough for the hassle).

If I were to ever see signs that a site had gone prying into what information there is about be out there I would never revisit that site or those relating to it, and would recommend that my contacts do the same. Unfortunately I'm in a minority - most people are not as bitter, anal, and vindictive enough to carry out threats of "never coming back" so in the long run my avoidance of such sites won't make much difference to them in the grand scheme of things.

Re:My 2p worth of rambling (1)

socsoc (1116769) | more than 4 years ago | (#31642734)

It's whoring you whore.

Re:My 2p worth of rambling (1)

asdf7890 (1518587) | more than 4 years ago | (#31642852)

I failed at being a pimp too. Due to being dyslexic I wasted all my money on a warehouse.

Re:My 2p worth of rambling (1)

socsoc (1116769) | more than 4 years ago | (#31643150)

That may be good digs to make into a brothel.

Facebook making your browsing habits public (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31642168)

I noticed several Facebook apps that allow you to see who is reading your home page and how many times. In other words, your Facebook browsing habits are available to random apps which then publish it to the world. And there is no opt in or opt out for this.
This is like google letting every one see the keywords you typed in alongside your name and photo.
Facebook is evil.

Re:Facebook making your browsing habits public (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31642620)

Not true. The applications that claim to do that (or perhaps you're misreading their claims) are actually just looking at posts you've liked, comments you made, tags you've added, and such. They do not, as far as I know, have access to page views.

Re:Facebook making your browsing habits public (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31643110)

However, Facebook have disclosed that all page views are logged. They just don't use that information for anything... YET.
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