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2010 Salary Survey Highlights IT Woes

Soulskill posted about 4 years ago | from the and-what-happened-to-my-toy-budget dept.

Businesses 332

CWmike writes "Trapped between flat salaries and ever-increasing workloads, IT professionals are about to explode. That's the top takeaway from Computerworld's 2010 survey of nearly 5,000 IT workers. 'Bonuses and benefits are way down, and workloads and work hours have increased. Meanwhile, salaries are stagnant (rising just a microscopic 0.7% on average), and — not surprisingly — satisfaction is on the wane.' Another finding of note is the shrinking female IT workforce. Have a look-see at how IT fared in your neck of the woods with this smart look-up tool."

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332 comments

You control your own destiny (4, Insightful)

alain94040 (785132) | about 4 years ago | (#31737274)

career experts say you have to take a strategic approach to your job search and application process. The best candidates are always taking steps to manage their careers...

I fully agree. If you sit passively and wait for your next raise, you may be waiting for a while... But if you are proactive, good things eventually happen to you. Contribute [github.com] to an open-source project. Become the co-founder [fairsoftware.net] of a cool iPad app or whatever cool idea people are trading nowdays...

It doesn't pay off instantly, but a year or two later, your resume stands out from the crowd, and more importantly, you may not even need a resume anymore to get a great job!

What?!? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#31737464)

Really?

What jobs are you talking about?

Most of the jobs that actually pay a salary don't give a rat's ass about any F/OSS projects you've worked on. Recruiters want to know what your paid experience was. If you're applying for your typical corporate IT department (read a MS shop), no one really gives a shit. They want their laundry list of skills and at least 2-3 years experience with each.

I would be astounded if someone post a job description that says FOSS experience a plus.

Re:What?!? (5, Interesting)

Sarten-X (1102295) | about 4 years ago | (#31738210)

From the listing for the job I now hold (emphasis mine):

BS in Computer Science, MS is preferred.
Knowledge of data structures, algorithms, and complexity analysis.
Fluency in two or more of: Java, HTML, JavaScript, AJAX.
Strong analytical and troubleshooting skills.
Working knowledge of Microsoft Windows and Unix (preferably Linux).
Working knowledge of SQL and data warehousing principles.
Knowledge of PHP, Perl or Python a plus.
Open source experience/contribution with any Linux or open-source projects.

The company uses a lot of open-source projects in their work. Being familiar with the open-source community (especially the self-managed, team-oriented development and the community-driven support system) is practically required for the job.

This is what happens when you stop looking for just a "typical corporate IT department" and start looking for actually decent jobs. With no previous paid employment, I'm starting at a salary roughly equal to the average given by the linked search. You may now be astounded.

Re:What?!? (4, Informative)

jdunn14 (455930) | about 4 years ago | (#31738332)

Actually as a person currently look to hire F/OSS experience would be a definite plus. It shows that an applicant is really interested in the field and the work. Granted, we're not the corporate IT office you refer to, but if an applicant for our software position (if anyone is curious and interested in north central FL.... http://tdt.com/news/jobs/softwareengineer.htm [tdt.com]) was actually interested enough in programming to do outside projects that would be a positive.

In general you need something to make you stand out, and contributing to or starting a project is a reasonable way to stand out. I interviewed some current master's students and was optimistic until it was clear that they did exactly what coursework required but weren't interested in exploring for their own interest.

Re:What?!? (0, Flamebait)

commodore64_love (1445365) | about 4 years ago | (#31738564)

>>>Most of the jobs that actually pay a salary don't give a rat's ass about any F/OSS projects you've worked on.

That's because it's considered a hobby. Also they have no way of measuring how much work you actually did. It's not the same as paid experience where they KNOW you spent 40 hours/52 weeks doing it each year.

I wonder if they had these kinds of surveys in the 1800s or pre-WW2 1900s?

Somehow I can't imagine an engineer sitting in his primitive wood-paneled office and saying, "I wish I made more money," or "This job is not satsifactory." More likely he looked out his window at the distant farms and thought, 'I'm glad I don't have to shovel ____ for a living.'

Re:What?!? (3, Insightful)

tsm_sf (545316) | about 4 years ago | (#31738680)

If you're applying for your typical corporate IT department (read a MS shop), no one really gives a shit.

Agreed, but if you think this ends with their hiring practices you are probably in your early twenties. An IT shop that isn't excited about an applicant's FOSS experience will never be a positive work environment.

Caveat mancipior.

Re:What?!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#31738782)

I'm currently hiring developers for a "corporate IT department". FOSS experience isn't actually a requirement - but it's certainly a big plus.

Re:What?!? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#31738886)

My Current company: http://www.onehippo.com/en/company/career/senior+consultant?backpage=en/company/career [onehippo.com]

(...)
Qualifications:

        * University degree
        * Extensive knowledge of Java, Spring, JSP, JSF, Wicket, SpringMVC, or other (Java) frameworks;
        * Familiar with content management systems and portals;
        * Standards like JSR 168,286/170, REST;
        * Application servers like Tomcat, JBoss;
        * Open source projects such as Lucene, Jetspeed Portal, Hippo CMS, Cocoon, Jackrabbit;
        * knowledge of open source libraries en testing frameworks;

        * agile methodologies like XP and Scrum;
        * Web technologies like AJAX, JavaScript;
        * Quality is important to you, so you work precise and use best practices when possible.
        * quick learner with a natural interest for new technologies;
        * creative mind;
        * eagerness to excel, but capable of working in a team with people probably smarter than yourself ;-).
(...)

Exactly. (1)

khasim (1285) | about 4 years ago | (#31737490)

In addition to developing your skills for your current job, you need to focus on your NEXT job.

Where do you want to be and how do you plan to get there?

Re:Exactly. (4, Insightful)

commodore64_love (1445365) | about 4 years ago | (#31737848)

On the other hand, after a year without a job, I decided to just take whatever was offered (i.e. $30,000 below my former salary). In 2011 I'll look for something better but for now, having a job is better than not having a job.

I'm also working lots of paid overtime to make-up some of the loss.

Re:Exactly. (1)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | about 4 years ago | (#31738290)

Same with me- just trying to hang in there at this point. In an effort to get more hours working on a project that is viewed by consulting company management as "non-billable hours", have even offered to cut my hourly just to get more hours.

And the stress level on my billable project is way up, as Fortune 500 company expects 40 hours worth of work a week on a project that I'm limited to only billing 20 hours a week on. I'm being stubborn on that one though- sooner or later they'll notice that I'm only hitting 1 deadline in 5 and ask why.

Re:Exactly. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#31738928)

sooner or later they'll notice that I'm only hitting 1 deadline in 5 and fire me

FTFY

Re:You control your own destiny (5, Interesting)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 4 years ago | (#31737520)

I still find something trouble about the notion "take your happy pill and be glad you have a job..." It's certainly true, but it allows companies to railroad over employees, and not just IT departments specifically. But these companies will suffer if they can't find a way to make up a lack of salary increases with some sort of compensation when the job market opens up.

The bigger point is that IT is not alone in this. All sorts of departments are basically being told to do more with less, and expect no monetary compensation in the short-term for it.

Re:You control your own destiny (5, Interesting)

PPH (736903) | about 4 years ago | (#31738166)

Its not just money. In my last job (as an engineering grunt in a large corp.), I was paid pretty well. OK, I'll be honest....very well. But they had that attitude; 'be happy we're handing you piles of cash and shut up'. So I left. For less money (initially). They just couldn't figure it out when they tried to get me to come back. Its not just about the money, its about the culture at the company. And theirs stank.

This is why women steer clear of a lot of IT jobs. They have a much greater sensitivity to interpersonal factors. And when a company, or industry, starts playing behaving like assholes, they leave (or just never show up). Women are like canaries in coal mines.

Re:You control your own destiny (-1, Troll)

erroneus (253617) | about 4 years ago | (#31738476)

I have to agree with you there. Women are basically inferior workers. They just don't put in the amount of time and work that men do. I have known women who DO work like men and you know what happened to her? She became the publisher of the newspaper where I worked and she deserved it. So it's not that women are being held back by anyone else -- it's that they are holding themselves back. Men, on the other hand, shame one another when they aren't giving 110%. When I see a fellow man giving less than I would give, I feel a twinge of shame and doubt his masculinity. In the world of men, this is rather typical.

And yeah, women ARE way too sensitive. It's a problem where they are failing to adapt and, instead, expect the workplace to adapt to them. Which would seem more logical? Change the environment or change the person? In spite of that obvious answer, people are expecting the environment to change. Weird right?

Re:You control your own destiny (5, Interesting)

Grishnakh (216268) | about 4 years ago | (#31738590)

This is why women steer clear of a lot of IT jobs. They have a much greater sensitivity to interpersonal factors. And when a company, or industry, starts playing behaving like assholes, they leave (or just never show up). Women are like canaries in coal mines.

Exactly. And then various people start hand-wringing, asking "why aren't more women in IT or engineering", and trying to "fix" the problem, when in fact there's no problem at all. Women have seen that these careers mostly suck, and have decided to pursue other careers instead. I'm an engineer, and I wouldn't recommend this job to anyone unless they're the type of person (like me) who simply can't see themselves doing anything else in life. I know I never would be any good as a manager or really any job where I need to interact with people a lot, so basically for me it's either engineering (as an individual contributor) or some type of skilled labor like auto mechanics. Engineering obviously pays better (though it's debatable how much), so that's what I went with. If you have any people skills at all, I'd recommend doing something else for a living. However, if you live outside the USA, this advice should be ignored, as things are very different elsewhere. Germany, for instance, is still very strong in engineering, and I doubt companies there treat their engineers as poorly as American companies do.

Re:You control your own destiny (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#31738608)

This is why women steer clear of a lot of IT jobs. They have a much greater sensitivity to interpersonal factors. And when a company, or industry, starts playing behaving like assholes, they leave (or just never show up). Women are like canaries in coal mines.

There are good or at least decent companies to work for so I doubt this explains the gigantic sausage party that is IT. By and large, most women look at the world in terms of relationships both with people and with objects such as tools they use. By and large, most men appreciate the relationships they specifically want to participate in but view the rest of the world in a more utilitarian fashion. IT is all about utility and pragmatism. It's not a surprise that most IT folks are men while i.e. most teachers are women. Women either don't have the IT skillset or don't wish to do that kind of work and that's why many of them don't choose IT as a career path.

Honestly I don't see what the big deal is with this issue. Not every demographic disparity is because of racism or sexism, though that idea appeals to people who just refuse to admit that women are different from men and tend to have different preferences. I think they refuse to admit this because they think that saying "women are different" is the same thing as saying "women are not our equals" and that just isn't true. If anything, refusing to appreciate their differences is a disservice to them, a denial of the way they want to be. I think you'll find that actual discrimination against women is rare, that most men prefer a co-ed environment over a sausage party and would be glad to see more women who share their interests.

This reminds me of the absolute lunacy perpetuated in the name of feminism. Professors and others have been fired merely for suggesting that a woman's brain is "wired differently" than a man's brain, nevermind that this is demonstrably true. I think the same people who can't deal with such realities are the same ones who would automatically assume the scarcity of women in IT must be due to sexism. If some kind of discrimination is really going on, it's probably not sexism. It's probably discrimination against obesity, as the few women I've ever seen who were highly skilled in IT were all rather chunky. It's a shame this is so important to people because the bottom line in a workplace is whether they can do the job, not whether they make good eye candy, but this does happen.

Re:You control your own destiny (5, Funny)

couchslug (175151) | about 4 years ago | (#31738860)

"Women are like canaries in coal mines."

If I find them passed out or dead around the office, I'll be sure to evacuate!

Re:You control your own destiny (2, Interesting)

MBGMorden (803437) | about 4 years ago | (#31737546)

That's basically what I'm looking at. I've spent enough time working with enough types of obscure proprietary apps to have all sorts of ideas on how to do the concept of them right. There are tons of things that there are niche markets for out there that you'd never think of, and that reality alone is why the existing apps cost a fortune often for old buggy software written in VB6 (or worse). These programs cost tons of money not because they're really any good, but rather because often times there's just no good competition to offer alternatives.

I'm still working my day job, but in my spare time I'm writing a lot of various little tools and such. iPhone development, .NET app development, etc. If any of them turn out to be marketable, then great, I'll market them. If not, I'll probably just put the code under the GPL and give it away. Either way, a lot of time success will be achieved through extra-curricular work - not working a salaried job. It's at least worth a try.

Re:You control your own destiny (5, Interesting)

RichMeatyTaste (519596) | about 4 years ago | (#31737754)

The article is fairly accurate, as is your reply.
If you are working your way up the tech ladder you should really be living as transient a lifestyle as is possible. This means renting rather than buying a home, not buying roomfulls of furniture (harder to move all of your stuff), limiting debt, etc.
If you are able to be mobile and local opportunities are limited you will always have options elsewhere. I am fortunate that I live in an area that is still growing (Raleigh, NC) so I still have plenty of opportunities locally; I would be in trouble if I had to move right now (house needs work, would need to hire a mover, would probably lose a little money, etc). I know some guys who are stuck in areas like Boston, NYC, Michigan (multiple cities), etc who can't sell their house (not only is no one buying, they owe more than it is worth) which means they can't afford to move at the moment. If I could get them down here I know of multiple jobs they could get but they just can't make a move.

Re:You control your own destiny (4, Insightful)

Grishnakh (216268) | about 4 years ago | (#31738772)

If you are working your way up the tech ladder you should really be living as transient a lifestyle as is possible. This means renting rather than buying a home, not buying roomfulls of furniture (harder to move all of your stuff), limiting debt, etc.

Don't forget not getting married, or if you do, marrying a housewife and not a woman with any career aspirations beyond perhaps working at the mall.

would need to hire a mover,

Moving isn't quite as hard as you make it out to be; I've done it many, many times. These days, the best way to do it is to use a freight shipper. I used ABF when I moved cross-country in 2000, and it worked out quite well: you get some friends and move all your stuff into a trailer, close it up, and then the company comes with their semi-tractor and takes it away. 10 days later, your trailer shows up at your new home, ready for you to unload it.

Whatever you do, NEVER hire a full-service moving company like Mayflower. They'll hijack your stuff and hold it hostage, demanding extra payment for you to get it back. If you don't have any friends to help with your ABF move, then you can hire local movers (like from Craigslist) at each end to do the work for you. With locals that don't have any connection to the trucking company, you don't have to worry about anyone hijacking your belongings.

I know some guys who are stuck in areas like Boston, NYC, Michigan (multiple cities), etc who can't sell their house (not only is no one buying, they owe more than it is worth) which means they can't afford to move at the moment.

They can, but they'd have to walk away from their homes. They really should look into this; if they're underwater any significant amount, and don't want to be stuck in their current location for the next decade or more, then they NEED to walk away. House prices are NOT going to go up significantly for 5-10 years; it'll take them decades to recoup what they've paid for their homes. It's easier to just walk away, take the credit hit, and buy a new house in a few years (or at most, 7). Also, they can try to do a short-sale, which has less of a negative effect on your credit score.

Re:You control your own destiny (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#31737896)

Thanks, man. For the past 10 years, I've worked at the same company which has always trained me and treated me well. Well, that all went to hell in a handbasket when we were sold. Now I'm frustrated, pay frozen for 3 years, they want more and compinsate less. Benefits are costing more, what benefits they didn't cut.

You are absolutely right in being proactive. I'm honing my Linux/UNIX skills, scripting skills, and even thought about participating in an open source program. I did in fact notice a co-worker who has participated in an open source program and he really does stand out.

Thanks for being positive.

Re:You control your own destiny (1)

walterbyrd (182728) | about 4 years ago | (#31738362)

If you want to be a business person, not an employee, then why learn software development? Just hire some dirt-cheap offshore bozo from rentacoder for next to nothing.

"shrinking female IT workforce"? (4, Insightful)

Vinegar Joe (998110) | about 4 years ago | (#31737456)

Re:"shrinking female IT workforce"? (4, Insightful)

shemnon (77367) | about 4 years ago | (#31737984)

Maybe they are going into a better paying industry.

http://newsone.com/nation/news-one-staff/more-women-considering-stripping-in-struggling-economy/ [newsone.com]

Or maybe they are running away from an industry that considers jokes like that acceptable.

Re:"shrinking female IT workforce"? (4, Insightful)

CAIMLAS (41445) | about 4 years ago | (#31738640)

How is that an unacceptable joke (or even a joke, necessarily - it's an extrapolated guess based off of disjointed but related data)? I know of a guy who left IT to become a Chip'n'Dale stripper because it paid better and was less stress (go figure). Woo, nakedness - big deal! If it's acceptable to say "men are leaving IT for construction jobs" (some are) why is stripping (physical labor for work) any more offensive?

If you want equality, then you better want it equally. People are sick of this "equally better" PC bullshit the women's lib movement has been pushing for the past 50 years. If you can do the work, great: step right in and pull up a chair, etc.

Re:"shrinking female IT workforce"? (1)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | about 4 years ago | (#31738642)

I'd guess that it takes at least a hundred employed people to support one stripper.

If the economy continues to be bad, this will not end well.

Plus- 2 of the 3 strippers I've known were messed up by the work and the 3rd skitters along the edge and may lose it at some point.

Re:"shrinking female IT workforce"? (2, Insightful)

GigsVT (208848) | about 4 years ago | (#31738812)

I'd guess that it takes at least a hundred employed people to support one stripper.

That's kind of silly logic. I guess it's based on some misconception that economics are zero sum, or that some services are inherently worth more than others. Being a stripper is employed. It's providing a service that people want, just like an auto factory or an amusement park or a grocery store.

Re:"shrinking female IT workforce"? (1)

dkleinsc (563838) | about 4 years ago | (#31738996)

I'm not sure about that particular article, but the trend in general is nothing new, and not a joke. When the economy goes south, more women end up doing sex work in order to make ends meet. One could argue about the morality of that decision, but the reality of it is hard to dispute.

Re:"shrinking female IT workforce"? (4, Insightful)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | about 4 years ago | (#31738224)

Possibly, but maybe not to where you are expecting.

The thing is, if you're in IT, you're probably smart. You understand basic math. For example, you can easily see that [(weekly pay) / 60] [(weekly pay) / 40]. If you're expected to work longer hours for less pay, you'll understand that you're getting paid less. There's a reason overtime is supposed to be time +; it's because it's shitty work that makes you neglect your Real Life. Women are just as smart as men, and they are surely aware of the same basic math. Why end up as a slave with worse pay than retail sales? It's not worth the hassle. I'm sure a lot of folks are moving into management, HR, and other fields that don't have 3am emergencies.

For what's it's worth, my pay is 165% of what I made at my first post-grad job in 2004. I've left a job that wanted me to work 60+ hours a week "because I'm a computer guy" (I'm an EE). Now, I never work overtime. I've also got an 8% raise coming up this summer. If you look for better work and hold the same level of loyalty to a company as they do to you (i.e. none at all) then you can be more successful at home and at work.

Re:"shrinking female IT workforce"? (3, Funny)

eth1 (94901) | about 4 years ago | (#31738878)

...and other fields that don't have 3am emergencies.

My female keeps talking about quitting and raising kids, so this can't possibly be right...

Rate of inflation (2, Informative)

Lord Byron II (671689) | about 4 years ago | (#31737478)

What was the inflation rate last year? Zero? Slightly negative? As long as your wages increase faster than inflation, then your purchasing power is going up. And .7% is better than the 0% raise I got.

Re:Rate of inflation (2, Informative)

ckblackm (1137057) | about 4 years ago | (#31737714)

According to the BLS, the annual rate of inflation for 2009 was -0.4%, whereas Jan '10 was 2.6% and Feb '10 was 2.1%. (Dec '09 was > 2% as well).

Re:Rate of inflation (1)

darkstar949 (697933) | about 4 years ago | (#31737914)

Inflation in part depends upon where you are and speaking purely from the stand point of the United States, the national average was -0.4% for FY2009; however, for FY2010 we are already sitting at 2.35% so any nominal raises have already been overtaken by inflation [Source [usinflatio...ulator.com]].

Re:Rate of inflation (3, Insightful)

smooth wombat (796938) | about 4 years ago | (#31737920)

As long as your wages increase faster than inflation, then your purchasing power is going up.

Not quite. While your salary might beat out the rate of inflation, other things need to be considered. For example, I was notified my rent is going up starting next month by 9.8%. The actual amount happens to coincide with the exact amount of my monthly pay increase. In other words, I'm treading water because my pay increase will now go towards my rent increase.

On top of this, mother nature decided to force my decision on replacing my 12-year old car, I'm taking classes to (hopefully) get out of this urine-soaked hell hole (thank you Krusty) which are costing me over $1,400 per class and whose prices are also going up in the coming semester and my electric rate just rose by 30%.

So, while my pay increase was higher than inflation, it is completely overwhelmed by everything else that is going on.

Re:Rate of inflation (1)

smooth wombat (796938) | about 4 years ago | (#31738090)

Correction. That should be (thank you Sideshow Bob) and not Krusty, though one could argue that it was because of Krusty that Sideshow Bob was the way he was.

Re:Rate of inflation (4, Insightful)

jellomizer (103300) | about 4 years ago | (#31737922)

Not really...

If your pay goes at the same rate as inflation it means your value in the company even after an other year of experience hasn't increased. Normally you should expect a 10% increase in your pay per year until you reach 15 years of experience then it will slope down as your years experience is having a slower rate of return.

Re:Rate of inflation (1)

war4peace (1628283) | about 4 years ago | (#31738402)

If you're counting the US only, maybe it was.
I am living in a totally different country (somewhere in Eastern Europe). I got hired by a large multinational company (a very large one indeed) in June 2007. I got promoted twice. My responsibilities tripled (I was a Helpdesk Analyst, then a Team Lead, now I am a Service Delivery Manager and in couple months will move to another position, or so they said), my salary raised 0% in all this time. I mean ZERO. No raise. No compensation. Nothing.
I am paid in local currency. Local currency took a sharp decline compared to Euro (roughly 30%). So where I was getting (let's say) 1000 Euro per month in 2007, I am now getting around 700. And most prices here are in Euro (rent, IT stuff, cars, electronics, houses, pretty much everything with a net value over 100 Euro... is specified in Euro).
I like what I am doing and the department is nice. However, the way the company is treating its employees plainly sucks. My purchasing power went down 30%, if not more, and I started working week-ends and overtime and taken night shift just to try being on par. And still am not on par with prices around. I work more, but I am poorer.
You might ask why don't I get the hell out of here. Well, I'm just fixing to climb the ladder a bit more before I do, and them jump boats with a large salary increase somewhere else (hopefully). But keep in mind, if you think -5% is a lot, think -30%.

Re:Rate of inflation (1)

AthleteMusicianNerd (1633805) | about 4 years ago | (#31738418)

They exclude the price of food and energy in those numbers though. If inflation is going up(which it always does), the purchasing power of your savings is going down. Furthermore, inflation is an increase in the money supply, not an increase in prices.

Re:Rate of inflation (1)

Znork (31774) | about 4 years ago | (#31738496)

What was the inflation rate last year?

Most measures of inflation are highly politicised; what may be a somewhat useful simplification in a local economy is far from reality in a situation with global wage arbitrage.

The largest deficiency IMO is the failure to account for asset price inflation, a failure which is inherently connected to the boom/bust cycles (most politicians don't want to see interest rates raised, which the central bank would be force to if any of the more 'real' inflation measurements were used or non-fractional banking/market set interest rates were used, with the end result that we get basically uncovered money creation and financial crisis when loan expansion turns to contraction).

On the positive side, last year had a 'real' deflation of between 1-4%. So you got a great wage increase. On the negative side, that would be after a decade of 5-15% 'actual' inflation per year. A bit ahead of most peoples wage increases.

Re:Rate of inflation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#31738880)

Yeah inflation is flat, but not for me. The crap I buy has had a marked increase in price over the last 8 mo to 12 mo. Freaking Diet Coke's at Mickey D's moved from $1.60 to $2.50, candy bars are now a buck 25 at 7/11, and I cannot get out of Chili's without spending 40 dollars per person (yes i'm fat, personal choice). Point is, the crap I buy has inflated significantly this last year. WTH is deflating to balance my fast food!

Re:Rate of inflation (1)

GigsVT (208848) | about 4 years ago | (#31738890)

The CPI has been gamed and tricked out so much that you can't believe it.

For example they have this idea about cheaper substitutes. Basically as the price of something nice goes up, you'll use a cheaper substitute, so they change their baseline to include the cheaper substitute instead.

The classic example here is "hamburgers for steak". Which the BLS has responded to:

http://www.bls.gov/cpi/cpiqa.htm#Question_3 [bls.gov]

Their rebuttal, if you read it carefully, actually admits that they do substitute less desirable goods within categories, just not technically hamburger and steak because those are in different categories. But they will substitute cheaper cuts of steak for nicer ones if it suits their tinkering.

Silicon Valley is dry as hell (1)

MillionthMonkey (240664) | about 4 years ago | (#31737498)

If anyone wants a good Java programmer in the Bay Area email MillionthMonkey at gmail...

Re:Silicon Valley is dry as hell (1)

bz386 (1424109) | about 4 years ago | (#31737608)

Bullshit. After 1 minute of searching I found this: http://www.google.com/intl/en/jobs/uslocations/mountain-view/swe/software-engineer-business-applications-mountain-view/index.html [google.com] "Strong programming skills in Java or C/C++ and extensive knowledge of Unix/Linux and scripting skills (Perl, Shell, Python, XML) " Oh, I thought you said "good Java programmer". Thought so...

Re:Silicon Valley is dry as hell (1)

MillionthMonkey (240664) | about 4 years ago | (#31738740)

I knew someone was going to find an ad for an unfilled position at Google (entry level at that) and then declare that anyone who lives on the peninsula must be unemployable.

Google initially sets you up with a 20 minute phone screen interview where they ask you puzzle questions over the phone. I called last year and got all the puzzle questions that the dude asked, except for some algorithmic one about enumerating collinear points in 3D. I had only found the shitty O(N^2) solution before the phone call ended and as per Google policy I got screened out for that type of position. ("Should your interests or skillset change and you want to pursue a different position here at Google..." Maybe I'll talk to one of the cafeteria chefs, if they're still there.)

What's really annoying is that nobody around here can come up with good interview questions- i.e. technical questions relating to the position. They all ask stupid puzzles instead. The algorithmic ones have easy O(N^2) solutions, and O(N) solutions that make you think a bit. But often some comp sci researcher once wrote some paper on a way to do it O(log N), so of the six applicants (on average) who apply for the position, you have to be the guy who comes up with that one. Basically to get a job you have to study the puzzles. Although I've occasionally seen the same stupid puzzle surface in different interviews, I refuse to study puzzles.

Monkey? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#31737634)

With a contact email like that it's a wonder you haven't gotten more offers. I can really use someone who fails a basic self-awareness test.

female (0, Flamebait)

Spy Handler (822350) | about 4 years ago | (#31737558)

Another finding of note is the shrinking female IT workforce

If you're female there is no reason to go into IT... nursing pays better, comes with better benefits, better hours, way less stress, no bullying from male coworkers, no worries about your job going offshore to Inida, more respect from the general community, just a better future period.

In fact males should also go into nursing, but constantly being made fun of (such as being called Gaylord Focker) might be too much to take for most men. However, it is undeniable that healthcare is the wave of the future in the United States; aging population and an entitlement mentality ("I deserve free healthcare as a Gaea-given right") means the demand for healthcare will grow and grow and never stop growing until the nation is bankrupt. So men should suck it up, go back to school and get a medical degree, and leave the codemonkeying to the Indians.

Re:female (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#31737734)

Male nurses are either:

1) gay
2) an "angel of death" who poisons/malmedicates people to the brink of death, so that he may "save" them.

Re:female (3, Interesting)

walterbyrd (182728) | about 4 years ago | (#31737740)

My sister has been a nurse for many years. I once suggested to her that more men would be willing to work as nurses if they just changed the named. The name "nurse" (also a synonym for breast feeding) is clearly emasculating. There are plenty of men in every other of health care. My sister actually agreed.

Re:female (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#31738918)

My sister has been a nurse for many years. I once suggested to her that more men would be willing to work as nurses if they just changed the named. The name "nurse" (also a synonym for breast feeding) is clearly emasculating. There are plenty of men in every other of health care. My sister actually agreed.

You talked about breasts with your sister. Hah-hah. Are you from West Virginia?

How do you circumsize a West Virginian? Kick his sister in the jaw. Zing!

Re:female (2, Insightful)

commodore64_love (1445365) | about 4 years ago | (#31738010)

>>>it is undeniable that healthcare is the wave of the future in the United States

Except that the U.S. government is paying LESS than actual cost of procedures, so many doctors are quitting the profession due to increasing losses. You're better off to stay in a profession that doesn't have top-down price fixing (i.e. commercial, engineering or programming).

Re:female (1)

nmonsey (785344) | about 4 years ago | (#31738096)

The problem with your logic is that writing code is fun. Changing bedpans or dressings or being around sick people is not fun.

Re:female (3, Insightful)

eln (21727) | about 4 years ago | (#31738190)

The nursing crisis isn't going to change because people going into nursing misunderstand where the need is. The whole reason the nursing crisis exists is because we have a bunch of aging baby boomers who need someone to take care of them when they get old and decrepit. A whole ton of people have heard about the nursing crisis and decided to go back to school for nursing. The problem is, most of them are going into Labor and Delivery nursing, which is not where the need is. Nobody wants a career cleaning up incontinent old people, they want to take care of cute babies. So, I predict you're going to have a bunch of disgruntled nursing graduates complaining that they can't find work while nursing homes and other providers of geriatric care complain they can't find enough qualified nurses.

If you want to be guaranteed a job for the next 30 years or so, go into geriatric nursing. Unfortunately, you'll be spending the next 30 years changing diapers for 90 year olds, but at least you'll always have steady work. Depending on whose IT department you work for, this may or may not be an improvement over your current situation.

Re:female (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#31738220)

If you're female there is no reason to go into IT... nursing pays better, comes with better benefits, better hours, way less stress, no bullying from male coworkers, no worries about your job going offshore to Inida, more respect from the general community, just a better future period.

In fact males should also go into nursing, but constantly being made fun of (such as being called Gaylord Focker) might be too much to take for most men. However, it is undeniable that healthcare is the wave of the future in the United States; aging population and an entitlement mentality ("I deserve free healthcare as a Gaea-given right") means the demand for healthcare will grow and grow and never stop growing until the nation is bankrupt. So men should suck it up, go back to school and get a medical degree, and leave the codemonkeying to the Indians.

This seems to hold true for many professions where it is male dominated. Look at the physical sciences in academia. Very few woman are stupid enough to do 60 hours a week working after spending 10-15 years of advanced schooling and then 3-6 more years of advanced training and only get paid 80k a year if you're lucky. The job application is a pain and very competitive plus once you have the job you're no longer doing science but spending all your time writing to get more money so others can do the science for you. Not to mention putting off childbearing until their thirties or later.
And yes I am a man and stupid enough to go through this crap. I'd rather do this then deal with MDs. Hell I'd rather open my wrists then deal with MDs most of the time - quicker, cheaper and more efficient.

Re:female (1)

Kiaser Zohsay (20134) | about 4 years ago | (#31738368)

My SO is taking nursing classes right now, in a class that is mostly female with a handful of males sprinkled in. It turns out that hospitals need a certain number of male nurses for specific tasks (heavy lifting, if you will) and the relatively small number of men going into the field means that those men that do pursue a career can have their pick of jobs.

I'll just stay here and keep grinding code though.

Re:female (1)

techhead79 (1517299) | about 4 years ago | (#31738408)

This is the dumbest thing I've read in a while. So you're basically telling anyone that is in the field to drop what they are doing, retrain for a new field where virtually none of the college credits they currently have will do jack for them...pushing them further into debt all because IYO health care is the wave of the future.

People in the IT field are closer to the BIOtech field than medical health care. Talk about brain drain...telling a bunch of bright people to stop what they are doing so they can service others. Do you honestly want that a**hole that took your phone call at tech support to be responsible for the care of your mom or dad when they get older? Customer service is a joke in the IT field for a reason...personality does not mix well with others. And your solution is to have them all jump on the medical band wagon?

Re:female (2, Insightful)

goldmaneye (1374027) | about 4 years ago | (#31738546)

As someone with several family members in nursing, one of whom does research on the factors that are driving nurses to leave the profession, I wanted to correct some of the misconceptions in your comment. First, there's still bullying in nursing, sometimes from patients, sometimes from management, sometimes from co-workers; second, there's plenty of stress, since most hospitals assign enormous patient loads to their nurses to cope with the nursing shortage or to keep costs down; and third, there are definitely long hours, with shifts that can last twelve hours or more. Don't think the shortage will necessarily improve pay or benefits, either, which are currently on par with salaries in IT. Nursing jobs don't go to India, but hospitals fill the gap by importing nurses from overseas.

Re:female (1)

AthleteMusicianNerd (1633805) | about 4 years ago | (#31738554)

Well said. Also, if you're a hot female...why even work. Just marry some rich guy, spend all day at the spa or boinking the pool boy...wait 10 years, take half his shit, and collect alimony for the rest of your life.

Re:female (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#31738638)

Aren't there men in India?

Re:female (2, Informative)

CAIMLAS (41445) | about 4 years ago | (#31738852)

Wow, seriously? Do you know anything about nursing?

If you're female there is no reason to go into IT... nursing pays better, comes with better benefits, better hours, way less stress, no bullying from male coworkers, no worries about your job going offshore to Inida, more respect from the general community, just a better future period.

There are plenty of reasons to not go into IT. Nursing pays worse (IT 5 years experience = 50k; nursing 15 years experience = 50k), the hours are usually worse (no such thing as 9-5s or holidays, and everyone is "on call" almost all the time), constant bitchiness and "office politics" cattiness (if you want to hear someone lie about someone else, listen to an orderly...), and (very likely) increased hours + shifts with decreased pay in the very near future (on account of the increased burden that will be put on healthcare due to recent legislation).

Nurses get no respect, either. Orderlies get more, from what I've observed. It's a similar situation to IT (not programming, IT), where you're in the position to have responsibility but often have no ability to do anything about it. Doctors treat nurses like shit, typically. Administrators are similar to IT management: they haven't a clue what's going on but damn it, they're going to tell you what to do. Except with nursing (unlike computing) the balance of life (or health) and death often hangs in the balance, and stupid mistakes made by others often do directly fall on your shoulders.

In fact males should also go into nursing, but constantly being made fun of (such as being called Gaylord Focker) might be too much to take for most men.

No, the biggest problem would be having a predatory and/or inherrently bitchy (female, not that it matters) jerking you around for stupid political reasons.

There's a good reason why nurses have the highest percentage of illicit drug use in the country by career. Their jobs suck. I'd rather go into law enforcement.

Re:female (1)

Kozz (7764) | about 4 years ago | (#31738900)

If you're female there is no reason to go into IT... nursing pays better, comes with better benefits, better hours, way less stress, no bullying from male coworkers, no worries about your job going offshore to Inida (sic), more respect from the general community, just a better future period.

Yeah, but the challenge is that in some areas, it's nigh to impossible to get into a nursing program unless your grades are in the top 7% of the applicants that year (or some incredible number). My sister has been trying to get into a nursing program in Oregon for quite some time. Perhaps if the teaching positions for nursing paid more, there would be a greater number of instructors, resulting in higher enrollment capabilities, and so on (trickle down).

Of course I'm not an expert in this field (I'm an IT guy, too) and perhaps my sister's experience is unique, but that's not the impression I've been getting.

Re:female (1)

couchslug (175151) | about 4 years ago | (#31738930)

Great troll, except nursing has plenty of rough schedules, doesn't always pay well, and is frequently hectic. Patients are often demanding, not to mention contagious (I'd rather have RSI than MRSA, TYVM!).

Accountants and marketers running the show... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#31737600)

This is exactly what happens when you have non-technical accountants and marketers making technology-related decisions. Look at the executives for nearly any American company. You'll find the number of technical people at or near the top is virtually none.

Accountants are concerned with one thing: the next quarter's numbers. Software and IT infrastructure, on the other hand, often takes longer than that to properly implement and to see their benefits. So these accountants ignore IT, and often do what they can to deny funding, especially if it won't result in a near-immediate balance sheet gains.

In the past, when America still had some manufacturing base, engineers often had a prominent place within the leadership of most companies. They could think beyond the next quarter's financial results, and saw how technology could make their companies more efficient in the long run. Unfortunately, these people have retired or been forced out.

America now generates its "wealth" not through the creation of tangible goods and improving productivity at existing enterprises, but rather by creating and selling a variety of bullshit financial instruments. Things won't improve until technical folks are making the calls, rather than accountants and marketers.

IT professionals are about to explode (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#31737640)

I work with a bunch of them, and I've been hiding behind the penguin on top of my television so as to not get so messy.

Yup, no raises these days. (1)

Kenja (541830) | about 4 years ago | (#31737782)

But on the plus side, I get to work from home where naps are a daily event and pants are optional.

Marketing (5, Interesting)

Prien715 (251944) | about 4 years ago | (#31737856)

I love this survey. I write software; it's what my degree is in, and it's what I do.

I can choose "Software developer", "Software engineer", or "Programmer/analyst". I like engineer. It sounds fancy; that's what the concentration was in school.

Salary went up in my region by 6.3% -- that's better than I've seen in 3 years. But what if I choose developer. That's what I call myself on my resume. My salary went down 1%.

That's why this survey is laughable. And they use average. Everyone else in the statistics community switched to median years ago. Where's your sample size per category? And seriously, 10 years experience as the first hurdle? No standard deviation either?

Re:Marketing (1)

MBGMorden (803437) | about 4 years ago | (#31738102)

And they use average. Everyone else in the statistics community switched to median years ago.

Median IS an average, as is the mean, which is what you're probably thinking of. If they simply state "average" though, then it's possible that they went with the median over the mean (or not - it really doesn't indicate either way).

Re:Marketing (1)

DeadDecoy (877617) | about 4 years ago | (#31738728)

No, median is the number in the middle of everything. Index [N/2 rounded up if odd] or the average of the two middle numbers if even. The median is used in concert with the average to determine if your data is skewed one way or another; useful if you want to know whether you're dealing with a guassian or poisson distribution. I believe the mean is typically synonymous with average though. If they state average, I suspect they used count(N)/N.

Re:Marketing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#31738990)

The median is not an average, it is the middle number in the series. Example 1, 2, 3, 4, 100. The median is 3 where the mean is 22.

Re:Marketing (1)

royallthefourth (1564389) | about 4 years ago | (#31738628)

...and don't forget that "Web Developer" is still another choice. For some reason writing programs that happen to get executed by a web server puts us into totally different territory.

Re:Marketing (1)

CAIMLAS (41445) | about 4 years ago | (#31738936)

I was thinking much the same thing. However, it is a good "omg I'm not making enough" benchmark, particularly for those in urban areas.

For instance, I'm currently making 15k+ less than my job description (or a half dozen variations of the description) make - and I'm at the intersection of their Mountain and North Central parts of their survey. That's a substantial discrepancy.

They'd have been better served with a larger sample size as well as a metro-size sub-categorization as well.

Visa cap increase (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#31737862)

So many unemployed IT workers, yet according to tech sector managers we don't have enough and need to raise the cap on visas again.

I dunno mang, (2, Insightful)

melted (227442) | about 4 years ago | (#31737946)

My pay nearly doubled in 2010. Maybe it has something to do with me working on my skills portfolio for over a decade and pent up demand for those skills.

One thing for sure - if you want to make more money, you need to ALWAYS be thinking on what skills you could acquire to achieve that goal. Any retard can poorly code up a web page - why would anyone pay a pretty penny for that?

Another life's lesson - if you want to grow, you need to move. Don't sit on your ass in the same job for a decade. Change teams, companies, industries, roles. If you don't do this, the best you can hope for is a 5% merit raise, and that's in a fat year.

Re:I dunno mang, (4, Interesting)

Itninja (937614) | about 4 years ago | (#31738182)

if you want to make more money, you need to ALWAYS be thinking on what skills you could acquire to achieve that goal.

Well, that, and working for one of the few companies that can afford large pay increases. Ones level of skill really has very little to do with ones salary. I had a job working as a one-man IT dept making something like 30K/year. I wanted more money. My boss said 'you're not worth it', so I quit. Seven month later, after a string of weirdos and losers who would work for that salary, I was offered my job back for nearly double. Three years later I was at 66K/year. But I quit again for another job offering more. Now I am at about 80K/year. New skills needed to 'climb' in this way? Zero.

It was all timing, luck, and playing against the 'unkempt, slovenly IT' type in job interviews.

Re:I dunno mang, (1)

Seakip18 (1106315) | about 4 years ago | (#31738702)

Yep. You don't get more money by showing your worth...you get it by someone buying into the promise of your worth.

Every story I hear just reinforces the idea that if you want more money, find a job elsewhere.

Re:I dunno mang, (1)

melted (227442) | about 4 years ago | (#31738732)

>> for one of the few companies that can afford large pay increases

What part of "you need to move" did you not understand? :-) There's no way I'd have gotten to my level of compensation had I stayed with just one company. Change jobs every couple of years. Build great reputation along the way. That's all there is to it.

Re:I dunno mang, (1)

walterbyrd (182728) | about 4 years ago | (#31738254)

I have worked in IT for 30 years. To me, you sound like a staffing company recruiter.

if you want to make more money, you need to ALWAYS be thinking on what skills you could acquire to achieve that goal.

Of course recruiters will always say that, no skin off their noses. Truth is: you can acquire all the skills you want, if you don't have recent, paid, professional, enterprise-level, verifiable, experience, in those skills, then your skills count for nothing. Don't take my word for it, look at the job ads.

Don't sit on your ass in the same job for a decade. Change teams, companies, industries, roles.

Yeah, great advice, employers just love job hoppers - ask any employer about what they think of job hoppers. IMO: one of the key reasons that US employers have such a strong preference for offshore guest workers is that offshore quest workers can not easily change loves.

Re:I dunno mang, (1)

melted (227442) | about 4 years ago | (#31738830)

I don't know, I practice what I preach. I change jobs every 2-2.5 years. Sometimes stay in the same company, sometimes move to another. So far I have no complaints.

And you're right about having verifiable experience, but there's nothing preventing you from acquiring this experience while doing your current job, if it's not too drastically different, or in a different team within your current company. Lateral moves within the company are always easier.

Dissatisfaction with IT jobs is increasing (1)

walterbyrd (182728) | about 4 years ago | (#31737950)

A recent study suggests that IT people really don't seem to like their jobs very much. Apparently, only 4% of IT people found themselves "highly engaged" with their jobs -- a number that has dropped from the still low, but not as low, 12%, two years earlier. There are concerns, of course, for what this means for companies and their IT staff. It certainly raises some questions about whether or not this is a potential issue going forward, and how companies might deal with this. Are the problems caused by the way IT people are treated? Or does it have more to do with their own worries about the future of the IT profession? And given that so many people in IT aren't particularly enthusiastic about their jobs, how can that be dealt with?

http://www.techdirt.com/blog/itinnovation/articles/20100216/0318428178.shtml [techdirt.com]

All that, but still the best job in the US... (1)

Itninja (937614) | about 4 years ago | (#31738006)

At least according to this report [cnet.com]. Can't really say I disagree. Of the friends and family who do have jobs now, I think mine is the best. Maybe not in term of money, but certainly in a money-to-suckiness kind of way.

Blame (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#31738238)

IT pay better start going up real quick now because as time goes on it's going to get harder and harder for your average lefty Slashtard to keep blaming Bush and the Republicans for this. After the current Commander-in-Chimp* and the Democrap morons in Congress get through with their spending, you'll be lucky to have a pot to piss in.

*Remember all the lefties referring to George Bush as a "chimp"? It works for Obama too. Nothing racist about it; turnabout is fair play.

Econ 101 (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 4 years ago | (#31738322)

In a perfectly competitive market, the price of a commodity equals its marginal cost.

When that commodity is you, "marginal cost" -> "subsistence mode of existence".

Just hope that you die before our imperfectly competitive economy reaches this particular state.

well, shit. (2, Funny)

archangel9 (1499897) | about 4 years ago | (#31738380)

brb, blocking that piece of crap misinformed survey site from our HR/CxOs. According to them, my salary is right on track.

Depends where you are (2, Interesting)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | about 4 years ago | (#31738392)

The report there lumped where I am now (Alaska) with the job hell I just left (Oregon/Washington). I'm looking at an 18% raise for next year and I still get almost three months off.

I moved up here and had three offers within a month of getting here and had one of the places I turn down call me back and offer 5% more.

I figure by 2011 I'll be able to get another 20-25% in salary.

Welcome to the rest of the USA (1)

Xistenz99 (1395377) | about 4 years ago | (#31738488)

I don't need to read a chart about dwindling salaries, bonuses, and etc with increase in hours, this is already the same with every business out there in down economic. Save the box of Kleenex because there aren't enough to go around IT guys.

IT field avoidance should be a no-brainer (0)

walterbyrd (182728) | about 4 years ago | (#31738556)

Occam's razor: off-shore labor is a lot cheaper, therefore employers will off-shore every possible job. If you do your job sitting in front of a computer, then your job can probably be off-shored - if not now, then certainly in the near future.

Furthermore, the simple laws of supply and demand dictate that the few jobs that are not off-shored, will have a glut of qualified applicants. The experienced developers who have their jobs off-shored, will clearly try to leverage their existing training and experience into the few remaining IT jobs that can not be easily off-shored. This causes a glut, and drives down wages.

The IT worker glut will be increased even more by improved automation of information system maintenance, standardization of software, and non-IT specialists who are increasingly sophisticated with information technology.

There can be nothing to stop this devastating trend, due to the following:

1) Corrupt USA politicians
2) USA IT workers are not willing to organize
3) Influential corporations have effectively distorted the issues

So there you go, it's as simple as that.

IMO: this trend is presently in it's infancy. The present trend has very little to do with the present economic slump. In fact, when the US economy recovers, this trend will accelerate even faster. The present situation for US IT workers is much better now, than it will be five years from now.

http://techtoil.org/doku.php?id=articles:no-brainer [techtoil.org]

So what? (4, Interesting)

ned14 (1354671) | about 4 years ago | (#31738580)

Firstly, IT workers != computer programmers. In there are support staff, data entry people, helpdesk, admins and so on. For some of those, the writing is without doubt on the wall and your pay/conditions per work unit is going to carry on dropping. For others, the annual pay rises may have slowed but the trend is accelerating. What else would you expect from a still infant industry heading into its teenage years?

If I were a betting man, I would say that anything which isn't tied to locality and is not specialist/niche in nature is doomed to become as crappy as any normal job. Locality is real important because boilerplate services which are not niche such as auto maintenance are highly localised to the customer, and hence a mechanic or plumber in a rich neighbourhood will tend to earn loads for identical work done elsewhere. Compare auto maintenance costs between Berlin and Addis Ababa for example.

As my daddy said to me many, many years ago, the secret to high earnings and excellent work conditions in the free market is to be perceived by those with money as being able to do something valuable which is perceived as hard to find elsewhere. I know a guy who fits spiral staircases - he's good at it, but his talents are hardly unique. Yet Elton John had him fit a spiral staircase in one of his houses a few years ago, then the other celebs saw it and suddenly he's putting in spiral staircases all over the world and charging six or seven times the normal cost. In the end, it is cheaper to pay seven times the odds and avoiding finding your own worker when your opportunity cost per hour is like US$500!

The second thing my daddy said to me is to leave the free market when you start thinking of having children. The free market will throw you away if you get sick or you lose your reputation which someone influential can easily cause. He suggested a highly unionised public sector job where if you feel a bit peaky you can just go on sick leave for twenty years. Personally, I wish there were some middle ground between excellence being rewarded and the dead but safe hand of guarantee, but we as a society are still too torn between the old Babylon myth even after all these millenia later :(

I would also say that from my personal perspective as a specialist IT consultant, work is still paying US$750-1000/day upwards but the recession means that there is simply a lot less of such work, so much so that you have to find other sources of income which are usually totally unrelated to IT as so to prevent reputation damage. However in my subjective opinion there is certainly no pressure to reduce payments for high quality specialist work, if anything in some fields the rate is actually rising as more skilled professionals quit permie jobs for their own IT consultancy business. At the top end things keep on getting better, and at the bottom they keep on getting worse. Just like the wage gap in all Western countries since the 1980s!

Cheers,
Niall

Who gives a SHIT (1)

fregare (923563) | about 4 years ago | (#31738596)

My job was outsourced forever. Now all you stupid fools are going to find out what it's like. Do you really think Americans are actually better than Chinese or Indians? Welcome to that giant sucking sound. In commerce most of the work is crap and there is very little creativity or innovation. I did more creative work for my Master's than I have in all of my 25+ years of stupid commercial IT work. Welcome to hell. :-)

I am in the same boat (1)

KharmaWidow (1504025) | about 4 years ago | (#31738758)

I am not in IT but my employer is doing the same: increasing costs of healthcare contribution, decreasing benefit packages and vacation time, and skipping raises.

But, I have to point out that the cost of living has generally decreased according to the Obama admin.. And, while many of us are doing more work, an even greater amount of us are doing the same amount of work - in some cases, less. I question the ideology that one gets a raise simply for putting in time. The cost of labor is a huge problem for American companies causing them to leave (move jobs from) major states and the country altogether. I would prefer to keep my job at my current pay than to lose it.

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