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Yoctonewton Detector Smashes Force Sensing Record

CmdrTaco posted more than 4 years ago | from the stop-being-so-sensitive dept.

Science 214

KentuckyFC writes "A team of physicists has measured the smallest force ever recorded, at 174 yoctonewtons (yocto=10^-24), beating the previous best by three orders of magnitude. Their measurement device consists of a few dozen beryllium ions trapped in magnetic and electric fields using a device called a Penning trap. These ions vibrate at between a few mega and kilohertz, frequencies that can be accurately measured by bouncing laser light off the ions and measuring any Doppler shift they cause. Being charged, the ions are highly susceptible to the tiny forces associated with stray magnetic and electric fields, which change the frequency at which the ions vibrate. Hence the super-sensitive measurements. They team says that straightforward modifications should allow them to measure single yoctonewtons in the near future. This sudden leap in sensitivity could cause a problem for the system of SI prefixes, which don't yet come any smaller than yocto."

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214 comments

Yocto! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31774486)

G R Double-E N Leaves
G R Double-E N Leaves

It's so easy! Happy-go-lucky!
We are the world! We did it!
Hyuu! Hyuu! Hyuu! Hyuu! Osu! Osu! Osu! Osu! (Ai!)
Yocto! Yocto!
Daigaku gohgaku
Yocto! Yocto!
Shachoh shuunin
Happa ichimai areba ii. Ikite iru kara lucky da!

Yocto! Yocto!
Tohsen kakujitsu
Yocto! Yocto!
Nihon daihyoh
Yannaru kurai kenkoh da.
Everybody say yocto!

Still not sensitive enough... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31774778)

...to detect the attractive force a Linux nerd radiates out to women.

Re:Still not sensitive enough... (4, Funny)

wc_paladin (989918) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774814)

So you admit it's an attractive force.

Re:Still not sensitive enough... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31774996)

Don't forget to pay SCO your $699 dollar licensing fees, you cock-smoking tea baggers!

Re:Still not sensitive enough... (1)

TheVelvetFlamebait (986083) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775474)

Hmm. Maybe it technically is a force that attracts, although anyone who's experienced it would hardly call it attractive...

Re:Still not sensitive enough... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31774830)

Only problem there is that you really don't need to measure the "weak attractive force" that a Linux nerd radiates toward women as it is completely swamped by the "strong repulsive force" also radiated in the same direction.

This is no big deal. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31774496)

This is no big deal.

Re:This is no big deal. (1)

f3rret (1776822) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775444)

Well to theoretical physicists and cosmologists it is.

Any deviation to Newtonian gravity at atomic scale might end up proving the presence of alternate brane universes or give empirical evidence that could offer new insights into the nature of the universe as it is envisioned by M-theory.

This is a big deal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31774510)

A Big Fucking Deal

Huh? (2, Interesting)

Rallias Ubernerd (1760460) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774522)

Your comming up with miniscule amounts of movement, and your worrying about finding the proper prefix? Who hasn't hearsd of Scientific Notation?

Re:Huh? (5, Funny)

thedonger (1317951) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774540)

Who hasn't hearsd of Scientific Notation?

I haven't hearsd of it.

Re:Huh? (3, Funny)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774582)

Who hasn't hearsd of Scientific Notation?

I haven't hearsd of it.

Don't worry, you have a large selection of hearsding aids to choose from.

As long as you have good sighst...

Re:Huh? (3, Funny)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774810)

Who hasn't hearsd of Scientific Notation?

I haven't hearsd of it.

Don't worry, you have a large selection of hearsding aids to choose from.
As long as you have good sighst...

And if you don't have good sighst, I hearsd that there's a way to fix that as long as you can tatse well.

Re:Huh? (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775394)

This humorous thread has gotten a bit offtopic, but I'd like to unhumorously add that there's a surgical procedure [wikipedia.org] that will cure nearsighstedness, farsighstedness, astigmatism, and cataracts, all at the same time.

The downside is you're paying $15,000 to have needles poked in your eyes.

Re:Huh? (1)

flanaganid (900938) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775408)

But if you don't have good sighst or good hearsding, then your other sesnes will be heightsened.

Re:Huh? (2, Interesting)

cc1984_ (1096355) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774568)

Your comming up with miniscule amounts of movement, and your worrying about finding the proper prefix? Who hasn't hearsd of Scientific Notation?

Scientific notation may be good in science, bad for general press.

Can you imagine someone selling a 1x10^12B HardDrive?

Re:Huh? (1)

Rallias Ubernerd (1760460) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774614)

I thought they measured hard drives in bytes, which is powers of two. And if everyone knew of it, we wouldn't have such a problem with nitwits.

Re:Huh? (1)

Stooshie (993666) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774684)

"... bytes, which is powers of two ..."

The "B" in "1x10^12B" does refer to Bytes. Had he used a small "b" it would have been bits (which are binary and can be measure in powers of 2).

The example represents 1 PB (PetaByte)

Re:Huh? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31775134)

"... bytes, which is powers of two ..."

The "B" in "1x10^12B" does refer to Bytes. Had he used a small "b" it would have been bits (which are binary and can be measure in powers of 2).

The example represents 1 PB (PetaByte)

That reminds me of an introductory CompSci class that I took in community college. A student asked the teacher:

Student: "What's the difference between a byte and a bit?"

Teacher: "Seven."

I laughed out loud, noone else in the class got it.

Re:Huh? (1)

jonnythan (79727) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774790)

They've never sold hard drives that way. Not since I can remember anyway, and that goes back to my first 540 MB hard drive.

For hard drive manufacturers, one megabyte is 1,000,000 bytes.

Re:Huh? (3, Insightful)

vegiVamp (518171) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775524)

No. For hard drive marketing people, one megabyte is 1,000,000 byte, just as for ISP marketing people, unlimited is until we tire of you.

Re:Huh? (1)

TwiztidK (1723954) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774816)

Hardrives are measured in bytes, 10^5 bytes is a gigabyte [wikipedia.org] . However, memory is also measured in bytes, 2^30 bytes is a gibibyte (although often refered to as a gigabyte).

Re:Huh? (1)

mdwh2 (535323) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774992)

I'd support measuring bytes in scientific notation if only to stop the dubious and pedantic "it's gibibyte" claims. (I've never heard anyone refer to it as gibi etc when speaking it.)

Re:Huh? (3, Funny)

fiddley (834032) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775214)

Wait 'til the teachers get told to start teaching this gibi crap at school. Suddenly all the recent graduates are talking exbi this and zebi that and you're still talking exa and zetta, and all of a sudden you're looking like a dibinosaur.

Re:Huh? (1)

Stewie241 (1035724) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775248)

That's odd... I always though a gigabyte was 10^9. 10^5 seems like a really odd number for that sort of thing.

Re:Huh? (1)

TwiztidK (1723954) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775336)

Unfortunately, I fail at math today. I realized it was wrong as soon as I clicked submit...but it was already too late.

Re:Huh? (4, Insightful)

Kentari (1265084) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774748)

Even without reverting to scientific notation or a new SI-prefix they can go down to 0.001 yN before anyone starts to complain. That's 3 orders of magnitude beyond what they claim to be able to measure "soon" and 5 beyond what they did.

And besides that, popular press doesn't seem to have problems with reverting to "100 million billions of bytes or kilometers", so why not "millionths of yN". It's not as if anyone still has a feel for these numbers beyond "peta" or "femto"... except for the scientists that run into them.

Re:Huh? (3, Funny)

cc1984_ (1096355) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775236)

+1x10^0 insightful :)

Re:Huh? (3, Funny)

Fnkmaster (89084) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775618)

As long as they can measure it in Libraries of Congresses, I'm okay with it.

Re:Huh? (1)

Stewie241 (1035724) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775218)

Yeah... because YoctoNewton is a unit that appears in general press all the time.

Re:Huh? (1, Interesting)

cc1984_ (1096355) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775398)

How many people knew what a terabyte was 10 years ago?

How many people know what a petabyte is now?

In any case, your reply shouldn't be directed at me. I have no intention of using YoctoNewton more than three times in a sentence. What I was getting at is that scientific notation is not mainstream.

I was addressing this point:

Who hasn't hearsd of Scientific Notation?

Re:Huh? (1)

profplump (309017) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775652)

You wouldn't, you'd buy a 12th generation drive. Or maybe a "Double 12G" drive if you went for the 2x10^12 model. Or some other name that can be incremented but is not strictly tied to the drive size.

It's not like marketing names are strictly tied to SI unit names, and they already print "1 TB = 1,000,000,000,000" in the fine print on the box to declare the actual size, so printing 1X10^12 would actually be simpler than the status quo.

Re:Huh? (2, Informative)

wisnoskij (1206448) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774804)

And a quick look at SI prefix history (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SI_prefix#List_of_SI_prefixes) will show you that they have been slowly expanding that table anyways (as it was needed most likely).

SI Issue (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31774530)

This sudden leap in sensitivity could cause a problem for the system of SI prefixes which don't yet come any smaller than yocto."

Simple. Call them deciyoctos, centiyoctos, miliyoctos, microyoctos, etc. The problem will be solved forever. It's not like we will find anything smaller.

Re:SI Issue (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31774630)

Simple. Call them deciyoctos, centiyoctos, miliyoctos, microyoctos, etc. The problem will be solved forever. It's not like we will find anything smaller.

On Slashdot you never can be sure if you are reading a joke from a genius or a line from an idiot.

Re:SI Issue (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31774694)

On Slashdot you never can be sure if you are reading a joke from a genius or a line from an idiot.

It's Slashdot, it's ALWAYS the latter.

Re:SI Issue (2, Funny)

Stooshie (993666) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774720)

LOL. We could have yoctoyoctos or even yoctoyoctoyoctos.

Re:SI Issue (1)

TrumpetPower! (190615) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775478)

Yoyoctomomma?

Cheers,

b&

Re:SI Issue (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31774668)

It's not like we will find anything smaller.

not until we start looking for your penis.

Re:SI Issue (1)

NemosomeN (670035) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774764)

It only starts getting cumbersome at 1,000th of a yoctonewton, so until we reach that point, use fractions. Oh nooooooooo!

Re:SI Issue (1)

linzeal (197905) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774726)

How about using scientific notation like a sane person who has a B.S. Prefixes are for manufacturing and consumers not r and d.

Computer science is, as always, superior. (2, Funny)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774546)

I, hereby, propose the diminewtons.

They should've started from the tiniest entity, like we CSs did with the bits.

They won't hear us complain of not having a name for portions of a yotabit.

Re:Computer science is, as always, superior. (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774768)

so in an analog world, what is the smallest unit then?

Re:Computer science is, as always, superior. (2, Funny)

thijsh (910751) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774828)

Zero

Re:Computer science is, as always, superior. (1)

tsalmark (1265778) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774904)

Assuming Thanshin is not a complete idiot, I think you just got Whooooooooshed.

Re:Computer science is, as always, superior. (2, Informative)

ciroknight (601098) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775112)

Depends on what we're talking about. Probably Planck units [wikipedia.org] is about the best we can do, so starting with ~10^-100-ish would be a good first guess.

Re:Computer science is, as always, superior. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31775668)

Depends on what we're talking about. Probably Planck units [wikipedia.org] is about the best we can do, so starting with ~10^-100-ish would be a good first guess.

Hmm.. I first read that as "~10^-whoosh-ish"

Uncertianty Principle (1, Interesting)

Psychotic_Wrath (693928) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774574)

At that small of values the uncertianty principle probably plays a big role in error. I wonder if they considered that.

Re:Uncertianty Principle (4, Funny)

Tar-Alcarin (1325441) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774598)

They may or may not have. It's impossible to tell.

Re:Uncertianty Principle (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775156)

But the question scientists are asking is, "Is there any beer in the fridge? [angryflower.com]

Re:Uncertianty Principle (1)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774626)

At that small of values the uncertianty principle probably plays a big role in error. I wonder if they considered that.

Probably not. After all, physicists aren't requiered to know about physics.

Wait a second...

Re:Uncertianty Principle (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774682)

If we had sociology majors doing this stuff, we wouldn't have to consider these sorts of questions.

Re:Uncertianty Principle (1)

benjamindees (441808) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774740)

If we had sociology majors doing this stuff, we wouldn't have to consider these sorts of questions.

Because it would already have been answered by a committee of government technocrats?

Re:Uncertianty Principle (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775012)

I was thinking more that there wouldn't uncertainty in the answer.

Re:Uncertianty Principle (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774744)

Yeah, these guys definitely should've consulted with you first for basic physics concepts.

Re:Uncertianty Principle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31774838)

Ah yes, I'm sure they didn't take into consideration that basic piece of physics knowledge you picked up on high school.

Re:Uncertianty Principle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31774882)

They're measuring the velocity of the atoms but not their positions. However, their positions are constrained.

h/4pi is only about 10^-34 Nms. If the containment is O(1um) then delta p can be about 10^-28 Ns. A force applied over a long time like a second *could* therefore be measured to 10^-24 N. If the force is applied for longer, even finer measurements would be possible. What they can't do is see a force of that magnitude applied for a very small time. If you could arrange a force of that order which only lasted for 1us, they wouldn't be able to detect it.

Look at last fiew SI prefixes (1, Informative)

ATestR (1060586) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774606)

zepto
yocto

Seems like the logical next steps would be prefixes starting with x, then w, etc. So:

xocto
wupto
vecto
etc.

I doubt that the measurement of forces will go that many more orders of magnitude beyond where they're already measuring things.

Re:Look at last fiew SI prefixes (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774714)

No, but we'll need for them for other things. What will we do after Apple makes the iPod Yocto?

Re:Look at last fiew SI prefixes (4, Insightful)

imakemusic (1164993) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774972)

What will we do after Apple makes the iPod Yocto?

Isn't it obvious? We'll bitch about how useless and locked-down it is whilst simultaneously posting at least two stories a day that say how it is changing the world.

Re:Look at last fiew SI prefixes (1)

Smallpond (221300) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774998)

Lose it while trying to pick it up with the included iTweezer?

Re:iPod Yocto (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31775048)

Just enough to hold the mandatory 30 second anti-piracy advertisement, followed by the RIAA approved 5 second clip of the song, followed by a 30 second commercial outro.

All DRM protected and only usable with "trusted" hardware (digitally encrypted at receiver and then decrypted by the new mandatory $500 digital speaker, or $200 earbuds) to keep those evil pirates from infringing.

Re:Look at last fiew SI prefixes (1)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774736)

zepto
yocto

Seems like the logical next steps would be prefixes starting with x, then w, etc. So:

xocto
wupto
vecto
etc.

I doubt that the measurement of forces will go that many more orders of magnitude beyond where they're already measuring things.

Yeah, but what are the base2 derived prefixes? zebti, yobti, xobti, wubti, vebti, etc?

Re:Look at last fiew SI prefixes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31775068)

Do you even need prefixes for small fractions (1/1024th, 1/(1024^2), etc.) of a single bit?

Re:Look at last fiew SI prefixes (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774924)

Hold my hat, I'm off to the trademark office to register those names and variations, as well as buy the .com .net and .org!

Re:Look at last fiew SI prefixes (1)

operagost (62405) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775038)

Then harpo, then groucho. Either this force is tiny, or my newton meter has stopped.

Re:Look at last fiew SI prefixes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31775154)

How about taco, as in taconewtons. Yum!

Doppler effect? I don't know... (1)

vsage3 (718267) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774618)

The doppler effect to me is a very specific phenomenon whereby there is a shift in perceived wavelength when there is relative motion between a source emitting waves and the observer. The article talks about lattice vibrations being the source of the shift (these vibrations are referred to as "phonons" by physicists), which has nothing to do with relative motion.

Re:Doppler effect? I don't know... (1)

vsage3 (718267) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774636)

Silly me! These are a few ions, and hence there are no phonons since there is no crystal structure. Still, I would like to know exactly what they mean by "vibrations"

Re:Doppler effect? I don't know... (1)

niklask (1073774) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775360)

From the article itself:

Their kit consists of a few dozen beryllium ions trapped in magnetic and electric fields using a device called a Penning trap. These ions vibrate at between a few mega and kilohertz, frequencies that can be accurately measured by bouncing laser light off the ions and measuring any Doppler shift they cause.

Me thinks you forgot to read the part about bouncing photons off the ions. The ions will be moving relative to the photons due to the vibrations.

It's 10E-24 (4, Insightful)

ugen (93902) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774646)

There is an accepted mathematical (and computer) notation for it. Please use that - there is no need to resort to the equivalent of emoticons.

As an aside, why does every possible potential fraction of a unit need it's own prefix? Unless it is widely used to warrant a prefix, using a numeric power is just fine. Somehow I doubt these units will be common enough for anyone to even remember. SI is really going overboard on this, taking an idea to absurdity.

say, that's a good idea (2, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774910)

the emoticonewton

or perhaps the :)newton, 8-(newton, :-Pnewton, ;\newton, etc

this is a great idea you've had! pat yourself on the back

Re:It's 10E-24 (1)

lurgyman (587233) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775438)

Or even 1e-24 if you wanna get super technical ;)

Re:It's 10E-24 (1)

vegiVamp (518171) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775470)

You don't do a lot of actual sound-based talking to people, I guess. "One zlotnikNewton" rolls off the tongue quite a lot smoother than "one to the power of minus 24 Newton".

Re:It's 10E-24 (1)

MoonBuggy (611105) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775672)

That does, however, break down when you say "One Yoctonewton" and then have to immediately add "that's ten to the minus 24". Words are only efficient if people actually know what they mean!

Even regularly dealing with extreme orders of magnitude, pretty much everyone I work with knows from 'nano' to 'tera' and then just automatically switches to powers of ten.

Low mass gravity measurements (5, Interesting)

forand (530402) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774660)

Haven't had time to read the article but it would amazing if force measurements at these levels could be conducted between well characterized masses to validate general relativity at low mass short distance scales.

Dark Matter? (1)

pavon (30274) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775610)

Could something like this be useful for experiments like the CDMS, which are searching for non-baryonic particles?

Work on it (2, Funny)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774738)

...And yet still not sensitive enough to measure how fast I jumped when my niece recently asked me if I wanted a Miley Cyrus ticket too.

Faptometer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31774794)

I formally propose the fapto as the prefix for the next smallest increment. Acceptance of the faptometer won't fulfill me as a person, but it should make me happy for a couple of minutes.

this thread of course will devolve (2, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774812)

into a bunch of humorous suggestions for the name of units smaller than yocto

allow me to start the noble proceedings:

mosquito-newtons

eensyteensy-newtowns

feelingsofinadequacy-newtons

napoleoncomplex-newtowns

wheredididropit-newtons

2009GNP-newtons

loco-newtons

gonzo-newtons

artdeco-newtons

your turn

Re:this thread of course will devolve (1)

ChunderDownunder (709234) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775006)

Moonfaces [wikipedia.org]

Re:this thread of course will devolve (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775702)

Liebnizes.

Advertisement Opportunity (2, Funny)

RealErmine (621439) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774822)

This sudden leap in sensitivity could cause a problem for the system of SI prefixes which don't yet come any smaller than yocto.

I say that the SI authority open the floor for commercial advertisers to sponsor smaller prefixes.

Future announcements might include: "Physicists break force measurement record with device sensitive to 10 Applenewtons."

Ob. Star Wars reference (0)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774850)

"I sense a disturbance in the forc .. another distur ... another dist... anothe ... MAKE IT STOP!"

So what does this mean? (1)

CRC'99 (96526) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774868)

In laymans terms, what does this actually mean?

From how many hundreds of miles away can we detect a sparrow fart? Or more slashdot related, how many miles away can someone detect my unencrypted wireless AP?

no (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774966)

in proper slashdot parlance, you must:

1. translate yoctonewtons into libraries of congress units
2. contemplate a beowulf cluster of them
3. explain their significance with a car analogy

Re:no (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775540)

You must be new here. In any vertical list of sequential positive integers, one entry must always be 'coyboyneal', and one must be'...', which is always followed by the last entry, 'profit'.

Great Scott! (0)

IMarvinTPA (104941) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774878)

Dr Brown didn't know what a Gigawatt was when Marty got to 1955!

IMarv

I'm displeased (1)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774884)

Not one Obi-wan Kenobi quote in the whole thread yet. None of you are geeks. You're just nerds. NERDS!

Re:I'm displeased (1)

ChunderDownunder (709234) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774944)

At the risk of starting a vi-vs-emacs style flamewar, I think they prefer the term "trekkers". :)

Re:I'm displeased (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775224)

Yes there was. [slashdot.org] And I, for one, am PROUD to be a nerd. Maybe you should join the underaged trolls at geek.com?

beyond yocto (5, Informative)

migloo (671559) | more than 4 years ago | (#31774918)

Logically, 10^-27 would be called xennea
The recurrence is:
zepta (Z + hepta=7)
yocto (Y + okto=8)
xennea(X + ennea=9)

SI prefixes are lame (1)

fortapocalypse (1231686) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775078)

Why are we using non-mathematical language to describe numbers? Just use powers of ten, etc. and be done with it! I like base 2 better, though. Base 10 is a flight-of-fancy. ;)

Turtles all the way down. (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775100)

"zeppo", duh!

creators' newclear power senses everything... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31775116)

&, is even able to create new 'things' at will. additional 'features' include the ability to re-arrange anything/everything in the wink of an eye. what a 'device', no?

manufactured 'weather' still sucking badly. seismic activity remains 'normal' (usgs).

never a better time to consult with/trust in your creators, who understand/sense us on a sub-atomic level, & by every other conceivable measure. you become a member of the creators' wwwildly popular planet/population rescue initiative/mandate simply by wanting to. see you there?

mod usp (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31775384)

FreeBSD at about 80 1t jus7 0wnz.', have the energy

Not that kind of force-sensing (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31775448)

Still can't detect individual midi-chlorians, can it?

I have a solution! (1)

Dialecticus (1433989) | more than 4 years ago | (#31775650)

I propose fig as the new SI prefix for 10^-27.

...Then again, maybe I'm just hungry.
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