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Chinese Users Get Nokia Music Service Sans DRM

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the market-paradox dept.

Cellphones 67

angry tapir writes "Nokia has launched a version of its Comes With Music download service without digital rights management (DRM) for the Chinese market. Currently, the service is available in about 30 countries, but in those countries the music, unlike in China, is copy-protected."

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It doesn't make any sense (1)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799128)

Why would Nokia waste time implementing a non-DRM scheme just for China? It seems like a problem that would have worked itself out on its own.

Re:It doesn't make any sense (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31799134)

DRM is pure retardation, where ever it is.

While the Chinese get to enjoy it ... (1)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799138)

... we /. users still getting the 503 errors !

Re:While the Chinese get to enjoy it ... (1)

gzipped_tar (1151931) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799160)

Those 503 errors are not restricted to areas outside China ;)

Re:While the Chinese get to enjoy it ... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31799170)

... we /. users still getting the 503 errors !

yeah...me (thomasdz) too. I like the Guru meditation thing (isn't that from old Amiga days)
But at least I'm looking into "Varnish" now..

503 errors due to Cloud hosting? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31799190)

Reddit switched to using Cloud hosting a few months ago, and now about 60% of the requests to their servers results in a 503 error for me. That's why I've come back to Slashdot; the Cloud rendered Reddit unusable!

Any site that switches to using the Cloud ends up seeing their reliability fall through the floor. Cloud computing is just marketing speak for reducing your server capacity to an unreasonably low level, for no good reason at all (Cloud hosting often costs more than normal dedicated hosting).

Re:It doesn't make any sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31799188)

Because DRM is a pain in the ass for the user. Pirates are offering much more convenient non-DRM files, and they are winning in the Chinese market. In order to compete, legit download services have to offer a better product - and they can do that by offering non-DRM downloads from fast, responsive servers.

Re:It doesn't make any sense (2, Interesting)

magarity (164372) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799538)

Pirates are offering much more convenient non-DRM files, and they are winning in the Chinese market. In order to compete
 
They are winning so well that Chinese consumers now expect it. I was in Beijing last year and at the major electronics mall it wasn't possible to find a something that DIDN'T already have a bunch of copied games and movies loaded onto it, even at the brand name booths.

Re:It doesn't make any sense (4, Interesting)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799246)

>>>Why would Nokia waste time implementing a non-DRM scheme just for China?

I would think it would be quite simple to dump songs online without DRM. Adding the DRM is the major PITA. So - Why doesn't China have copyright laws? Sounds like the US in the 1800s - copyrights didn't apply to foreign nationals like Charles Dickens. His works were widely distributed by US printers without giving a dime to Mr. Dickens for his labor. (Perhaps that's why 1800s US literacy was 99% - lots of free, cheap books available for reading.)

Re:It doesn't make any sense (2, Funny)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799362)

(Perhaps that's why 1800s US literacy was 99% - lots of free, cheap books available for reading.)

Also, TV was a lot less popular then.

Re:It doesn't make any sense (3, Interesting)

FatdogHaiku (978357) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799984)

Also, TV was a lot less popular then.

Funny. But the "TV" of the day was the cheap thrill stories that could be bought or traded, and that meant reading.
Also kids got their ass whipped for fucking off or behaving like morons. Even in the depression era, my Dad went to a one room school for the first 6 grades. If you messed around they punished you then and there in front of the whole class... that meant every kid in town, basically. And then when you got home the real punishment began... because the whole town knew you had embarrassed your family.

The end result was you payed attention and studied. If you really didn't want to be schooled then there was work waiting for you, not pay (the parents get the pay), just work, until you run away, become an adult and move out, or finish school. My Dad ran away at 15.

Re:It doesn't make any sense (1)

gomiam (587421) | more than 4 years ago | (#31800106)

The end result was you payed attention and studied

It would seem you didn't get the same punishments ;)

Re:It doesn't make any sense (1)

FatdogHaiku (978357) | more than 4 years ago | (#31800158)

Nope. Also a bit dyslexic and way too trusting of my spell check.

payed != paid
but Firefox likes 'em both because of the "payed out a line" usage I guess.

Re:It doesn't make any sense (2, Insightful)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799390)

[citation needed]

On the other hand, there are lots of "free, cheap books" today, too. Many, many more than there were in the 1800s. Why has literacy gone done, if all that was needed was free books?

Re:It doesn't make any sense (2, Informative)

gzipped_tar (1151931) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799492)

> Why doesn't China have copyright laws?

We do, and I've met ppl punished for copyright violations. Heck, "severe" copyright violation is even a criminal offence in China (I believe this has something to do with WIPO treaties, but IANAL anyway).

Re:It doesn't make any sense (1)

stonewallred (1465497) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799586)

The other side of the coin is that US copyrights might as well not apply to Chinese. They ignore them with impunity. I'd bet my last dollar that the ones (few at that) who are busted for copyright violations in communist china are busted because they did not pay off the right people or because someone else did pay off the right people. Nokia knows that DRM music is not going to sell, and that DRM free music is not going to sell that well, but any piece of a pie that you get when you were not going to get any is better than none.

Re:It doesn't make any sense (2, Informative)

gzipped_tar (1151931) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799720)

There are WIPO treaties with the goal of recognizing copyright across jurisdictions, but they're more about diplomacy & political bargains than about judicial cooperation between member counties. My feeling is that the USA is perfectly fine with trading IP loss in China for other things such as Chinese credit/investment/whatever.

Re:It doesn't make any sense (2, Interesting)

SpelledBackwards (587772) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799618)

Where's your 99% statistic coming from? I doubt many slaves and former slaves had much access to education.

Re:It doesn't make any sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31806104)

Where's your 99% statistic coming from? I doubt many slaves and former slaves had much access to education.

Ummmm at that point in time there really wasn't much "access to education" for anybody who wasn't a member of the elite caste. Well, if by "education" you mean formal education... you have just as much ability to learn from other people as anybody else does. Most "schooling" at that point in time was done at home by the parents.

I'm not sure where your bias about slaves is coming from (well, ok, it comes from the "history" they teach in school these days), but despite the popular assumption many slaves didn't work in the fields at all, and most slave owners didn't spend their free time beating, raping, and killing their slaves. Slaves were expensive, and just as you don't waste a good horse you didn't waste a good slave. Many of the ones who worked in the houses or the house proper were literate, and it's not like they said "fuck you I'm not gonna teach you to read". In addition, many of the children spent time with the owner's own children, and were commonly used as study partners and the like.

Oh, and I made a specific point of using the terms 'slave' and 'owner' because if you think that all slaves, or even the majority of slaves, had black skin then you're an idiot.

Re:It doesn't make any sense (1)

pitchaxistheory (844824) | more than 4 years ago | (#31800860)

+1 Insightful.

bescause the Chinese (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31799270)

ruoe the worl apparently. They are allowed to just pirate music around willy nilly, attack the internet etc.
I for one DON'T welcome our new Chinese overmasters, Die Nokia!

Re:It doesn't make any sense (1)

cntThnkofAname (1572875) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799312)

perhaps because china accounts for more than a fifth of the world population...

They don't have DRM, but what is there instead? (1)

sethstorm (512897) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799176)

While they might have no DRM, China is willing to go the extra mile (e.g. far beyond the US) in monitoring / enforcing their policies against their own citizens. Think of what they already have to fulfill the RM part of DRM.

They don't need DRM, when the Rights Management has a suitable real-world equivalent in their government. All they have to do is wait for the right moment to use it on their target.

Re:They don't have DRM, but what is there instead? (1)

klingens (147173) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799196)

So you say China has a harder copyright laws and enforces them more stringently that western nations? Is that really what you want to say?

Re:They don't have DRM, but what is there instead? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31799848)

What he is saying is that the harshness and invasiveness of American copyright law is a political tool for the government.

Using "police investigation of copyright infringement" they get to spy where they previously didn't, and using "copyright infringement" as an excuse, they can throw dissidents in the can when it is convenient.

What he is saying is that, with dissent itself being a felony in China, the government doesn't have an incentive to impose a harsh copyright policy.

Re:They don't have DRM, but what is there instead? (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 4 years ago | (#31800304)

...copyright law is a political tool for the government.

And you are among the very few to understand its real intent. Its original intent may or may not have been more honorable, but now it is simply a sledgehammer. Very sad that we tolerate it.

Re:They don't have DRM, but what is there instead? (4, Insightful)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799334)

China is willing to go the extra mile (e.g. far beyond the US) in monitoring / enforcing their policies against their own citizens.

Excuse me, but do you realize that copyright violation is a nationalized industry in China?

Re:They don't have DRM, but what is there instead? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31799448)

China is willing to go the extra mile (e.g. far beyond the US) in monitoring / enforcing their policies against their own citizens.

Excuse me, but do you realize that copyright violation is a nationalized industry in China?

Only if you apply US/EU copyright law to China.

Oh wait, China gets to make their own rules. It's not (yet) part of the New World Order.

Your copyright does not exist in China, hence it cannot be violated.

Re:They don't have DRM, but what is there instead? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31800002)

Bullshit, China has signed the Berne Convention in '92 [wipo.int] , so the copyrights *are* valid.

Posting as anon because /. won't let me login.

corepirate nazis raking it in @somke&mirrors.c (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31799180)

The Dow's up but trades are scarce, worrying bulls
AP
Traders and Specialists work on the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange Friday, April 9, 2010, in New York. (AP Photo/David Karp) AP – Traders and Specialists work on the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange Friday, April 9, 2010,
Related Quotes Symbol Price Change
^DJI 10,997.35 +70.28
^GSPC 1,194.37 +7.94
^IXIC 2,454.05 +17.24
By BERNARD CONDON, AP Business Writer Bernard Condon, Ap Business Writer – Fri Apr 9, 6:18 pm ET

NEW YORK – Think Dow 11,000 is a big deal? Think again.

The Dow Jones industrial average briefly hit the milestone Friday for the first time in 18 months before closing at 10,997.

But Wall Street analysts who study key stock index levels say all the attention paid to 11,000 is more like a big distraction. They worry that investors are ignoring another number at their peril: The surprisingly low volume of trading. As stocks have risen over the past year, the volume reflects the vulnerability of a rally riding on the shoulders of relatively few participants.

And that's given pause even to the bulls.

"It worries a lot of us," says Wellington Shields' Frank Gretz, a technical analyst who specializes in pinpointing market levels at which stocks might suddenly rise or fall. He wonders whether the volume signals that the rally could soon peter out, like the big surges that preceded steep declines in the 1930s in the U.S. and in Japan more recently.

Louise Yamada, a 29-year veteran of technical analysis who heads an eponymous firm in New York, says she's not just concerned but confused.

"Why is the market going up?" she asks. "You usually don't see advances without volume."

The widely cited Dow index, which tracks stocks of 30 companies, is up 70 percent from its lows of more than a year ago. The climb has been one of the strongest in history, and it may herald a strong recovery. But it's been propelled by relatively few trades.

The 200-day moving average volume on the New York Stock Exchange is now at 1.2 billion shares, down from 1.6 billion, or nearly 25 percent, a year ago.

makes sense (0, Flamebait)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799322)

The Chinese can get the music without DRM because they have a lot more respect for copyright.

The problem in the West is that we just don't know how to behave.

Just wait 'til the really nasty transnational corporations start playing countries against one another. It's going to be a new Golden Age for defense contractors and arms manufacturers. Not that their first Golden Age ever ended.

Re:makes sense (0, Redundant)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799440)

The Chinese can get the music without DRM because they have a lot more respect for copyright.

Hahahahahhahahahaahahahaa!


Snirk, hee
Hahahahahahahahahaha!

Re:makes sense (1)

Luckyo (1726890) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799472)

Whoever modded this "flamebait" needs a sarcasm meter check. P.S. Awesome post.

It's like drugs ... (2, Insightful)

Skapare (16644) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799336)

The US pharmaceutical companies overcharge the US market for their drugs because they know they can get away with it, with all their lobbying power with the government (both in the Whitehouse and in Congress). You think the music industry and movie industry is any different? They pay more than we can, so they get a government more to their liking. Then they can gouge us for the money to buy even more of our government.

Re:It's like drugs ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31806308)

The US pharmaceutical companies overcharge the US market for their drugs because they know they can get away with it

Saying that the US companies are "overcharging" the US market is highly misleading. The fact is that most countries have price controls on prescription drugs (especially the ones from the US) and the drug companies have to make a deal with those governments before they are even allowed to sell the meds there. Most of the time there is no "negotiation", the country says "We will allow you to charge no more than $X for that drug. If you don't like it too bad". And guess who ends up picking up the tab.... the US consumers. Not only do we foot the bill for the R&D, but we subsidize the countries who rely on socialized medicine, which is part of the reason why they can jump up & down and say "See see socialized medicine is So Great, why just look at how cheap our drugs are!!!"

I suggest you do a little research on the subject before you continue making yourself look like a fool. I know what they tell you on the TV news but here's a hint- they make money based on ratings, not accuracy.

./ != researchers! (2, Informative)

anarche (1525323) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799378)

wtf are you all on about

nokia are doing this because they realise that China pirates as much as possible and it is difficult to make money Western-ways in China: "an acknowledgment of the difficulty in monetizing music sales in a region overwhelingly (sic) dominated by piracy." http://www.digitaleastasia.com/2010/04/10/nokias-comes-with-music-service-hits-china-drm-free/ [digitaleastasia.com]

this is an attempt by nokia to make some money in china in the face of overwhelming piratanical odds.

Re:./ != researchers! (3, Insightful)

Skapare (16644) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799450)

So what you are saying is, if we were to increase our level of music piracy in "Western" countries, then we, too, could end up without having to deal with all that DRM.

Re:./ != researchers! (1)

gzipped_tar (1151931) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799512)

"Monetizing (I hate that word -- me) music sales" may well be a red herring here. Nokia is yet to saturate the *device* market in China, I guess.

Re:./ != researchers! (1)

anarche (1525323) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799528)

yep, thats pretty much what nokia are getting at here.

their lack of market saturation ties their hands. lure the pirates in to buying the handset, or not penetrate the handset market at all

Re:./ != researchers! (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#31800516)

Are you sure "nor penetrating the handset market" (of which Nokia has 40% wordwide...and that's all mobile phones, not only "smartphone") goes together with China lack of saturation?...

Hypocrisy and showing their true colors... (5, Insightful)

Bert64 (520050) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799432)

If DRM is supposed to combat piracy, then why no DRM in the country with one of the highest piracy rates in the world?

Perhaps because DRM has nothing to do with piracy, and everything to do with screwing every last cent out of law abiding customers. Seems the chinese are smarter than that and simply won't stand for being screwed like that, so they are forced to actually offer a better product at a competitive price.
So what the west needs to do, is follow china's example, pirate more and eventually the record labels will be forced to stop treating us with such utter contempt.

Re:Hypocrisy and showing their true colors... (2, Interesting)

gzipped_tar (1151931) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799532)

For the corporations it really doesn't really matter if piracy is fought or not. They exist for profit, and if there's profit in fighting piracy (or screwing customers, if you say so), they'll do it. As you've pointed out, given the high piracy rate in China it is probably too costly to fight piracy right now, and going drm-free is likely to yield richer profit margins.

Corporations are not naturally the enemy of our rights. They don't screw us for some ideological stuff like "rights". They screw us (or lick our asses) because there's a profit motivation in it, and for them everything else is just manifestly non-existent.

Re:Hypocrisy and showing their true colors... (1)

sjames (1099) | more than 4 years ago | (#31800250)

Unfortunately, there's profit in bribing U.S. legislators into having the government fight piracy on the taxpayer's dime (talk about a massive subsidy!).

In China, the government is too busy pushing it's own ideology to be willing to push some western corporation's interests.

That's why their economy is so busy expanding. Such expansion is against the interests of large corporations (they prefer that they expand and aren't about to willingly make room for competition).

Really, large corporations ARE the natural enemy of some of our rights, the ones that prevent them from doing whatever they like and the ones that make us free to tell them NO without returning to cave dwelling.

Re:Hypocrisy and showing their true colors... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31800122)

If DRM is supposed to combat piracy, then why no DRM in the country with one of the highest piracy rates in the world?

You just answered your own question.

It's because piracy is so high that they need to remove DRM.
If you can get the same product from any street vendor but without DRM, why would you put up with the restrictions of DRM and pay more for the privilege?

Re:Hypocrisy and showing their true colors... (1)

the_womble (580291) | more than 4 years ago | (#31805644)

Maybe this is why my friend emigrated to China.

For the slow witted, yes, a couple I know did emigrate from the UK to China, but I doubt its anything to do with piracy.

Re:Hypocrisy and showing their true colors... (1)

kimvette (919543) | more than 4 years ago | (#31800500)

If DRM is supposed to combat piracy, then why no DRM in the country with one of the highest piracy rates in the world?

Professional courtesy?

Re:Hypocrisy and showing their true colors... (1)

mordejai (702496) | more than 4 years ago | (#31801472)

Actually it doesn't have anything to do with the music itself, but with the PLAYERS.

I know ipods and other brand-name, DRM-happy players are popular in the US and parts of Europe, but in China and pretty much everywhere else, 90%* of the market correspond to chinese-made players that DON'T support any form of DRM.

So, selling music without DRM is the only way to get into those markets.

*: I made the number up, but just have a look at the local stores in non-central countries and compare the amount of chinese players with the brand-name ones.

Ah, China... (3, Insightful)

Erikderzweite (1146485) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799452)

Land of the free and home of the brave!..

Copy-protected? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31799490)

Copy-prevented.

China represents the DRM-free future (4, Insightful)

dcavanaugh (248349) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799578)

Piracy is readily accepted as a fact of life in China. Just about anything that is sold on CD or DVD media is available in pirate form. Small pirate vendors outnumber legitimate stores by a wide margin. It's actually harder to buy legitimate media than the pirated stuff.

Knowing this, Nokia anticipates total rejection of DRM by Chinese consumers. Using DRM to compete with pirates is business suicide. So they don't do it.

For whatever reason, Nokia thinks they can get away with DRM in other countries. Because consumers are stupid. If they don't need DRM in the world capital of piracy, why do they need it anywhere else?

How dumb are western consumers? Spam exists because a tiny percentage of morons are still opening the messages and buying herbal Viagra. DRM exists because a tiny percentage of morons is willing to by crippled products.

The copyright industry has made it clear: Only by adopting piracy on the scale of China will DRM will go away.

Re:China represents the DRM-free future (1)

gzipped_tar (1151931) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799680)

> For whatever reason, Nokia thinks they can get away with DRM
> in other countries. Because consumers are stupid. If they
> don't need DRM in the world capital of piracy, why do they need
> it anywhere else?

As I said in another post above, Nokia isn't trying to sell more music by this move. It is all about selling more devices in a market that has not yet reached its saturation. In other countries such as the USA they face dominating opponents such as Apple, and there's not that much that could be reaped from the device sales.

As a result, they're touting the DRM-freedom as a feature of their devices in China. This is not effective in other countries where device sales no longer likely to outweigh music sales.

In China, Nokia has quite good market share as well as mindshare, but they're probably doing this just to fortify their grounds before Apple makes their cut.

Apple is already late to the game in China. Unlocked iPhones has been circulating here but Apple is still working on its slow way of penetrating the "above-ground" market. Before Apple peoples the land with its own ecosystem Nokia wants every inch of it occupied by Nokia breeds, locking Apple out (pun not intended).

DISCLAIMER: the above post contains speculations and opinions. Read or mod it accordingly.

Re:China represents the DRM-free future (1)

dcavanaugh (248349) | more than 4 years ago | (#31800034)

If the goal is to sell more devices, then a non-DRM strategy should work even better in a market where they face a dominating opponent. Apple not only has a dominant position with the devices, they are selling music DRM-free through iTunes.

How did Nokia expect to sell more devices or more music by offering an inferior product? What MBA genius thought DRM would help them compete in the US vs. a non-DRM competitor who already has commanding market share?

Re:China represents the DRM-free future (1)

Krneki (1192201) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799690)

It's the same story why PC games costs less then Console games. In order to compete with high piracy they need to lower the price.

The message is pretty clear to me. Don't like the price? Pirate more.

Re:China represents the DRM-free future (1)

ShadowRangerRIT (1301549) | more than 4 years ago | (#31799858)

Or because the console manufacturers take a cut of every game sold on the console, but not for the PC. It's not a piracy competition.

Re:China represents the DRM-free future (2, Interesting)

Krneki (1192201) | more than 4 years ago | (#31801396)

PS3 is so far warez free, yet I don't see any promised price drop.

Re:China represents the DRM-free future (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31800188)

DRM exists because a tiny percentage of morons is willing to by crippled products.

No, DRM exists because, as a result of all the bullshit lawsuits filed by the record industry, people are afraid NOT to buy products that use it. They hear about people losing these suits and being charged around $20,000 per song, and it scares the hell out of them.

Re:China represents the DRM-free future (1)

dcavanaugh (248349) | more than 4 years ago | (#31800284)

Like spam, the solution to DRM is to eliminate the demand. All the laws in the world can't sell a product that people are determined not to buy (except health insurance).

If you respond to spam, you are motivating the spam industry to keep up the good work. If you buy DRM, you are accepting a substandard product and encouraging the copyright industry to offer you even more restrictions in the future. Only by eliminating the demand for crap can we eliminate the supply. The Chinese have this figured out.

Westerners idiots? uhhh no... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31800352)

So what does that say about the creative factor and media being produced by the Chinese, oh thats right it all but doesn't exist and is completely lame at best.

Face it, you guys suck off the tit of Hollywood when you come home from work and than whine about how you are getting stiffed.
Indy music/movies suck so there is no hope there, lets face it that the only way to make these big productions to work is that big corporate environment.
Things must be so great in China without DRM, it is more like the Chinese authorities ignore piracy because it keeps the people contained and complacent.

Westerners stupid? haha yeah coming from Chinese people that is hilarious where all the only advantage is they have more than enough monkeys to throw at the problem to be solved. Chinese people are stupid for tolerating their abusive government and being complacent while they suck on the tit of westerners for all the things they enjoy in life. See thats easy and it is good to be a westerner as many bitter Slashdotters there are that hate America.
When are the Chinese going to adopt a policy of making good media that is worth watching, I see nothing but a leeching nation who produces little to no creativity.

Oh nooo Disneys 'Stanley the steamer' is still under copyright and cannot progress as a species, get off your high horse and stop acting like a selfish entitled bitch who thinks they are owed everything to them on the internet. This is almost as funny as the people who tried to claim piracy actually helps out sales, it is laughable at best.
Not everything is copyrighted to shit, things the government deems necessary to human progression or that would hinder progress is locked down by copyright. Example: I think it was a harvesting machine that would seperate grain at a great process that would help the nation out, the government decided they cannot hold the right/copyright to that work and said "no, it is too valuable to be locked down with one company".

Move along and find bigger priorities in life than worry about getting your Hollywood movie/tv show to survive

Re:Westerners idiots? uhhh no... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31801350)

The Chinese are smarter than you think. Their concept of communism is looking more like capitalism than the US. For all the freedoms the Chinese lack, they will not be required to buy heath insurance and there is no DMCA. Granted, the phone company monitors your calls and reports to the government. But that happens in the US as well. AT&T shares a building with NSA in San Francisco for exactly that purpose.

The Chinese economy is growing fast, as is their trade surplus. Unlike the US, they are not running trillion-dollar deficits. The biggest mistake I see the Chinese making is their willingness to finance US debt.

As for the Chinese having "enough monkeys to throw at the problem to be solved", the reason why that matters is that the US would be forced to use unionized monkeys at 5x the cost to do the same job. The Chinese know how to keep the lower class productive without spending much on them. In the US, we give people $100k in student loans just so they can end up selling cars.

Re:China represents the DRM-free future (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31800382)

Actually Nokia has Decleared that it plans to drop DRM in every country. Nokia is just implementing its new "no DRM" strategy to all new markets it is now entering. Nokia will probably drop DRM away from other countries soon enough:

more on this:
http://www.channelnewsasia.com/cna/cgi-bin/search/search_7days.pl?status=&search=Nokia&id=411983

Re:China represents the DRM-free future (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31801122)

For whatever reason, Nokia thinks they can get away with DRM in other countries. Because consumers are stupid.

How about, because in other countries there is enough enforced rule of law to give copyright protection some teeth?

How dumb are western consumers? Spam exists because a tiny percentage of morons are still opening the messages and buying herbal Viagra.

Gosh, yeah, too bad we don't have Internet Licences with intelligence tests eh? How idiotic of the "West" to allow everyone to use the internet, even if they're naive, senile, or suffer head injuries. How foolish to accept the inconvenience of spam when we could just shut down freedom.

(I really don't mind you having a rip with a foaming tirade, but it's a little much when the mods give it '5 Insightful'. That had to be addressed.)

Re:China represents the DRM-free future (1)

dcavanaugh (248349) | more than 4 years ago | (#31809348)

Your sarcasm is especially off-target when you face the fact that nobody in this thread has suggested that eliminating foolish users would improve the Internet. Although spam and DRM could be curtailed with smarter users, I attribute these scourges to the price of freedom.

On the other hand, an "ignore this user even when posting as AC" feature would be handy indeed.

Although I had not given it much thought until now, thanks for taking the time to point out the upside of an idiot-free internet.

Planned for India too (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31800208)

i'm a Nokia Music India user, and just before end of february, they sent out a email, the first part of which i have pasted below

"Nokia Music is becoming part of Ovi

Nokia Music will soon become Ovi Music. This means all the tracks you download will be DRM-free, MP3 files that you can now play on a PC, Mac or any personal music player! Plus, as part of the change to Ovi, we’ve enhanced our search capability so it’s easier than ever to find the music you want."

Well maybe it's for the better... (1)

Sepiraph (1162995) | more than 4 years ago | (#31800252)

Chinese citizens may have less human rights but they have more digital rights. And leave piracy for real pirates! GRRRRRRRRRRR

you can't own bits (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 4 years ago | (#31800288)

a book, a movie, a recorded tune: impossible to control in the internet age

of course, artists will still make money off of media, via ancillary means (live concerts, cinema houses, paperbacks), its just that the traditional media companies aren't necessary any more as distributors. there job now is to simply die, though they obviously aren't doing it quietly

there is a tendency in the west to extend corporatism as much as possible. when the truth is, owning a monopoly on an intellectual product stifles true capitalism, like any monopoly. a society truly wedded to the ideals of a free market is one which understand monopolies and oligopolies are artificial construct which stifle free trade. as such, the monopolies granted by the idea of intellectual property are anti-capitalistic, and those who champion a world without intellectual property are not "socialists" or "communists", but are actually hewing to free market principles to the fullest. creeping corporate power is a threat to the free market, no matter how many in the west confuse corporate bloat with the ideal of a free and fair market place

intellectual property also impoverishes our cultural space. all for the sake of overextending a philosophical idea that has no place in the modern world

death to the concept of intellectual property

of course, it makes no matter how many legislators media companies buy off to extend this failed philosophical idea: the internet merely renders all those laws unenforceable and moot

Re:you can't own bits (1)

binkzz (779594) | more than 4 years ago | (#31801254)

a book, a movie, a recorded tune: impossible to control in the internet age>

Unfortunately, that won't stop companies from trying their utmost and give it all they have to try anyway.

If you can't beat them, join them. (1)

lsatenstein (949458) | more than 4 years ago | (#31809092)

As I read in the press and the 'net, China does not respect copyrights. So, using DRM would only mean that the Chinese will employ ways to defeat DRM. And since the market is so large (double that of the USA), it makes more enconomical sense to dispense with DRM.
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