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Databases In Caves? A Unique Google Fiber Bid

Soulskill posted more than 4 years ago | from the sysadmins-plus-bats-equals-fun dept.

Google 124

An anonymous reader writes "Plenty of cities have submitted bids for the Google Fiber project, with most of their bids being centered around the attributes that could describe many communities. Yet one small midwestern town, with much less fanfare than the metropolitan bids, provided an unusual proposition for Google in their likely quixotic nomination. Quincy, IL, has an extensive series of underground caverns that could provide year-round temperature control, dedicated hydroelectric power, and security in the case of a terrorist attack."

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Makes sense (4, Funny)

sys.stdout.write (1551563) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875368)

Sys admins pretty much live in caves already, right?

Re:Makes sense (4, Funny)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875950)

Hey!

It's called a LAIR.

Re:Makes sense (3, Funny)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876332)

No. Dragons live in lairs. And they guard treasures.

Batman lives in a cave.

If you're a system administrator in Quincy, Illinois and you have a black car, you're already on the path of becoming a super-hero!

Re:Makes sense (2, Funny)

Dekker3D (989692) | more than 4 years ago | (#31877190)

and a sysadmin's servers aren't his own little treasure? i could swear i've heard one call his "his precioussss..."

Carthage, MO has that as well (3, Informative)

Nimey (114278) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875400)

Big former limestone quarry with a bunch of underground storage. Town has its own electric utility too.

Re:Carthage, MO has that as well (4, Funny)

sconeu (64226) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876254)

Yeah, but it's not worth it, because everyone knows it'll all be plowed under and salted when the Romans [city-data.com] invade.

Re:Carthage, MO has that as well (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31876590)

Springfield, MO also has caves.. .. with a data center/ISP already (SpringNET), we already have metro fiber (I can get 100mbs to the cave, and 20 mbs out of the city from my desk).

We have 3 collages, 5 "religious" collages, and like 6 junior collages/nursing schools..

Google would only have to work with one entity, City Utilities, who already have right of way to run more fibre.

We threw our name in for the Google fibre too..

Re:Carthage, MO has that as well (0, Offtopic)

quantumplacet (1195335) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876914)

that's a lot of collages, though I'd rather not receive medical treatment from a nurse who's education came from a small collage...

Re:Carthage, MO has that as well (2, Funny)

Mr Z (6791) | more than 4 years ago | (#31877030)

Yeah, full size picture books are much better than small collages, that way you get to see the detail in addition to the big picture.

My Town Put A Bid In.... (4, Funny)

BJ_Covert_Action (1499847) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875458)

We may not have extensive, cool underground caves, but we do have a nearly unlimited resource of young college-aged girls in warm sunny California weather right on the beach with an advanced technical university that can turn out underpaid interns by the droves. So suck it Quincy. =P

Re:My Town Put A Bid In.... (3, Funny)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875768)

Your newsletter, I WANTS!

Re:My Town Put A Bid In.... (1)

bananaquackmoo (1204116) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875964)

You forgot to mention SLO's numerous bars and awesome food! Wine country nearby, hiking and beaches, halfway between LA and SF...

Re:My Town Put A Bid In.... (1)

gawaino (1191849) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876694)

... and near a major earthquake fault, high taxation

Re:My Town Put A Bid In.... (2, Funny)

BJ_Covert_Action (1499847) | more than 4 years ago | (#31877110)

And to top it all off one of California's only nuclear power plants operating right in that high earthquake zone! I can't think of a better paradise frankly. Plenty of circus and wine for the locals, and if something fundamental gets fubarred we have a nice messy nuclear explosion to cover it all up*. Ah the promised land. =)

*: So as to not lose geek cred, I do realize that Diablo Canyon will not be exploding anytime soon and that, in the event of an actual reactor issue, an explosion will not be the resultant phenomenon. For humor purposes, however, I enjoy pointing out the delicious absurdity of building a nuclear power plant near a fault line.

Re:My Town Put A Bid In.... (1)

no1home (1271260) | more than 4 years ago | (#31877856)

Damn! I KNEW I should've gone to SLO-Poly instead of Pomona!

What about the mole people? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31875472)

Or are you going to hire them as network engineers? They seem to have a lot in common... fear of sunlight, refusal to shave, grumpiness...

Re:What about the mole people? (1)

Cheerio Boy (82178) | more than 4 years ago | (#31878848)

Or are you going to hire them as network engineers? They seem to have a lot in common... fear of sunlight, refusal to shave, grumpiness...

Dude. I live in Northwestern Illinois and I would gladly move to Quincy, IL to do admin stuff in a giant cave. :-)

Besides the obviousness of not having to seriously travel for support Quincy has fairly inexpensive real estate with actual space around it.

Now to figure out how to deal with being upside-down on that pesky mortgage....

Fantasic Idea! (3, Interesting)

Kagato (116051) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875480)

I don't know if they will be google fiber finalist, but they make a very compelling argument for being a data center. Kudos for using the competition as a backdoor into media spotlight.

Re:Fantasic Idea! (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31876800)

Proponents of underground houses cite the thermal properties of their structures as a benefit. NOT because it provides infinite cooling, but because the earth acts as a capacitor. The cave will be packed from floor to ceiling with servers, and the heat will go into the surrounding earth and stay there. After two months the limestone surrounding the data center will approach the heat capacity - they'll have to shutdown, and the surrounding rock will be radiating heat for a month.

and... (1)

qoncept (599709) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875492)

..and my down may not have extensive, cool, secure areas for servers, but we need it as badly as anyone I've ever heard of. I'm paying $110 a month for 1mbps SDSL.

no, caves suck (4, Interesting)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875494)

1. they are hard to get to

2. they are hard to get supplies to and build in

3. they flood

4. they have air quality issues

5. and they ARE cool... until you put a bunch of servers in them, and then they heat up, and STAY hot, and are harder to cool than on the surface

the idea of servers in caves sucks

Re:no, caves suck (4, Interesting)

FooAtWFU (699187) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875550)

I was reading somewhere about the London Underground - how, when it opened, it was really nice and cool in the tunnels and everyone enjoyed a break from the summer heat... but a century of operations has heated the very bedrock, and now it's sweltering down there, and they're trying to figure out ways to effectively do air-conditioning in stations and on trains ... which can be tricky, since some of the tubes are so tight that there's not really anywhere for the waste heat to go. (They were talking about having the trains make blocks of ice while in other segments, and letting those melt while they're in the narrow under-the-river tubes).

Re:no, caves suck (1)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875800)

Sounds like a major geothermal heat pump project in the making, cooling the bedroom with the surrounding ocean/river water.

Re:no, caves suck (1)

MaskedSlacker (911878) | more than 4 years ago | (#31878116)

Cooling the bedroom is usually the last thing most couples want.

Re:no, caves suck (1)

treeves (963993) | more than 4 years ago | (#31878802)

I want it cooler, she wants it warmer. Of course, I'm talking about *temperature*, not speaking euphemistically.

Re:no, caves suck (1)

OzRoy (602691) | more than 4 years ago | (#31878724)

That is really interesting.

I think it would be a different situation here though. In London the City itself is probably acting as insulation preventing the heat from the tunnels escaping; no one likes being cold, so all the building have heating.

In this situation the mountain would lose heat to the surrounding atmosphere much more readily.

Re:no, caves suck (1)

BoRegardless (721219) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875612)

1. they are hard to get to: no, they drive trucks into those types of caves, if I am not mistaken (or have HUGE elevators)

2. they are hard to get supplies to and build in: Not with a roadway, and you don't have to build "buildings" as such.

3. they flood: If they did, Quincy wouldn't put up the choice to Google.

4. they have air quality issues: Dust control is needed on the surface for data centers, too, if you haven't noticed.

5. and they ARE cool... until you put a bunch of servers in them: Heat exchanger systems are used in every data center and a specific system would be designed for the caves. My guess is they would dump heat to pipes drilled in the limestone to take heat to distant distributed parts of the limestone bed.

Re:no, caves suck (1)

qoncept (599709) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875652)

5. and they ARE cool... until you put a bunch of servers in them, and then they heat up, and STAY hot, and are harder to cool than on the surface

How do you figure? Unless you're talking about the logistical complications (your point #2), I don't see any reason.

Re:no, caves suck (2, Informative)

Swervin (836962) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875692)

1. they are hard to get to

2. they are hard to get supplies to and build in

3. they flood

4. they have air quality issues

5. and they ARE cool... until you put a bunch of servers in them, and then they heat up, and STAY hot, and are harder to cool than on the surface

the idea of servers in caves sucks

1. Having seen these caves first hand, I know for a fact that a good many of them can be driven into directly, doesn't get much easier to get to than that.

2. (See 1)

3. Haven't seen or heard of much flooding in these.

4. The ones I've driven past have massive ventilation fans outside, and can handle removing vehicle exhaust. What are you doing to the air quality in there that's worse than exhaust? Burrito day?

5. Not sure on 5, but they do manage to store refrigerated goods in them, as another poster points out. I'd handle this by drilling wells into the floor of the cave and circulating water if the cooling wasn't sufficient.

Re:no, caves suck (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31875726)

1) Believe it or not, roads are allowed to lead to caves.

2) Believe it or not, roads are allowed to lead INTO caves.

3) Really? Every cave in the world floods?

4) What air quality issues?

5) Anything more then conjecture?

This list sounds like the typical I'm-13-years-old-and-know-how-to-use-a-computer-so-I-think-I-know-everything bullshit that normally fills /.

Re:no, caves suck (0)

toastar (573882) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876654)

3) Really? Every cave in the world floods?

Do you know how caves like this form? The dirt usually doesn't just magically disappear something has to take it away.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karst_topography [wikipedia.org]

Re:no, caves suck (2, Informative)

anotherone (132088) | more than 4 years ago | (#31877632)

They're manmade caves made from limestone mining.

Re:no, caves suck (2, Funny)

MaskedSlacker (911878) | more than 4 years ago | (#31878186)

The dirt usually doesn't just magically disappear something has to take it away.

Shovels in this case.

Re:no, caves suck (1)

Tmack (593755) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875732)

1. they are hard to get to

2. they are hard to get supplies to and build in

3. they flood

4. they have air quality issues

5. and they ARE cool... until you put a bunch of servers in them, and then they heat up, and STAY hot, and are harder to cool than on the surface

the idea of servers in caves sucks

4 is questionable, most caves have good air flow (depends on your local though). Thermal and pressure differences between entrances create it (thermometric or barometric flows)

Other reasons not to put this type of things in caves:

* Caves are protected environments in most states
* Caves are commonly roosts for bats, which are having a hard enough time with WNS [caves.org] right now, let alone people intent on killing them
* Caves typically do not follow city planning, they go where they want to, following seams and faults in the rock
* Along with the flooding, they tend to have very high humidity (though there are dry caves too)

Im thinking these are more like mine tunnels or something..

-T

Re:no, caves suck (2, Informative)

lena_10326 (1100441) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875900)

Obviously these are man made caves. Not naturally formed ones carved by water. Man made caves tend to follow grid patterns because they are planned with the thought in mind to rent the space out. They will leave massive walls and pillars spaced out every 50 feet or so.

Also, caves with heavy usage are not going to be friendly to bats, which don't like being disturbed by 18 wheelers driving past every 20 minutes.

Re:no, caves suck (1, Redundant)

Tmack (593755) | more than 4 years ago | (#31877310)

Obviously these are man made caves. Not naturally formed ones carved by water.

Then it should be called such, rather than just cave [wikipedia.org] , as I stated. The word Cave by itself is defined as a NATURAL space formed by natural processes.

Pedantic, yes, but if you told a bunch of geologists you are going to run a datacenter in a cave you would get a bunch of strange looks from them if you didnt say "man made" first.

-Tm
nss#45759

Re:no, caves suck (1)

MaskedSlacker (911878) | more than 4 years ago | (#31878212)

The word Cave by itself is defined as a NATURAL space formed by natural processes.

I can assure that there is nothing natural about CmdrTaco's bedroom.

Re:no, caves suck (3, Informative)

Andy Dodd (701) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875778)

Hmm... Then why are companies like Iron Mountain building out LARGE datacenters in caves?

(In most cases, former mines/quarries.)

1) Not caves large enough to drive vehicles in - many mines meet this criteria
2) Same answer as 1 for supplies, for 2 - in many cases they were already "built" for previous purposes (usually, getting valuable materials out of the ground)
3) Not if they're above the water table - many are. Iron Mountain's is, and apparently they're planning on using a nearby underground lake for cooling soon.
4) Not if built/designed correctly.
5) Iron Mountain and the like would prefer to disagree with you on that.

Re:no, caves suck (1)

toastar (573882) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876772)

Hmm... Then why are companies like Iron Mountain building out LARGE datacenters in caves?

(In most cases, former mines/quarries.)

1) Not caves large enough to drive vehicles in - many mines meet this criteria
2) Same answer as 1 for supplies, for 2 - in many cases they were already "built" for previous purposes (usually, getting valuable materials out of the ground)
3) Not if they're above the water table - many are. Iron Mountain's is, and apparently they're planning on using a nearby underground lake for cooling soon.
4) Not if built/designed correctly.
5) Iron Mountain and the like would prefer to disagree with you on that.

LAWL! I had to do the recovery on several tapes that were stored with iron mountain after katrina.

Re:no, caves suck (1)

Tmack (593755) | more than 4 years ago | (#31877442)

Hmm... Then why are companies like Iron Mountain building out LARGE datacenters in caves?

(In most cases, former mines/quarries.)

1) Not caves large enough to drive vehicles in - many mines meet this criteria

Those are mines or tunnels, not caves [wikipedia.org] . If they insist on calling it a cave, they should specify "man made" cave or risk getting the NSS, ACC, USGS, USFWS and a few other organizations on their ass

... 3) Not if they're above the water table - many are. Iron Mountain's is, and apparently they're planning on using a nearby underground lake for cooling soon.

Natural caves are typically formed by running water, they are nature's storm drains. You dont have to be below a water table for rainwater to fill a cave, mine or other hole in the ground. Water follows gravity, which typically goes down, and since holes in the ground generally go down to stay underground, water tends to follow. If the exit isnt large enough, it will fill the hole. How do you think the underground lake formed? I hope they are going through the EPA and USGS and other orgs to get approval on using that lake, as its probably the source for well water for miles around, and could have consequences if not done correctly. Karst Pollution [springerlink.com] is serious business, and Illinois a notable karst region [wikipedia.org] .

4) Not if built/designed correctly. 5) Iron Mountain and the like would prefer to disagree with you on that.

Again, see response to item 1.

-Tm
nss#45759

Re:no, caves suck (1)

Brianwa (692565) | more than 4 years ago | (#31877708)

I once knew a guy who worked for a real estate company that sold similar caves. IIRC they were also mines that were no longer being used. A common use for these caves is to store cheese while it ages -- they're the perfect temperature and cheese companies can save lots of money in electricity costs.

I didn't believe him at first when he told me with a straight face that he used to evaluate and sell cheese caves.

Re:no, caves suck (1)

Angst Badger (8636) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876040)

3. they flood

Depends on the cave. Of course, if you're going to build a dam a scant three miles away and vastly raise the water table, well, it's probably going to be a concern with this cave.

Re:no, caves suck (3, Interesting)

Swervin (836962) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876192)

3. they flood

Depends on the cave. Of course, if you're going to build a dam a scant three miles away and vastly raise the water table, well, it's probably going to be a concern with this cave.

Dam is already there, they're just adding a hydro electric plant to it. Lock and Dam 21 [wikipedia.org]

Re:no, caves suck (3, Interesting)

ErikLalande (1791774) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876348)

These caves don't flood. Monster food companies use them to store food in, and they are a mile from the river.

Re:no, caves suck (3, Funny)

T Murphy (1054674) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876142)

You must be missing something. The bad guys in spy movies often put their secret bases in caves, complete with big computers with lots of unnecessary buttons and screens. Super villains know what they are doing, so I'm sure caves are an excellent choice.

no, no, no (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876356)

all supervillain cave headquarters have a rocket launchpad room

all evil supervillains in b grade hollywood movies want to launch rockets at somebody from hidden rocket launch sites. whether syndrome in the incredibles, blofeld in you only live twice, rogue russians in vin diesel's xxx, whomever

to cool down their ridiculously huge server complex then is a simple matter of opening the dome over the launch pad

duh!

Re:no, caves suck (1)

evilviper (135110) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876300)

5. and they ARE cool... until you put a bunch of servers in them, and then they heat up, and STAY hot, and are harder to cool than on the surface

Indeed. The term is "thermal mass". It was being trumpeted for a good long time as "green" since it helps to average-out the temperatures in homes, offices, etc. Problem is, with extended hot or cold weather, you need active heating/cooling, and a huge amount at that, because of all the thermal mass you now need to heat/cool.

This was solved a long time ago, however, by having the thermal mass attached by pipes, instead of as directly part of the building. Previously, that was in the form of "solar ponds" which you can choose to leave "outside" if they will not provide a benefit. More recently, the superior option is water or ground-source heat-pumps, which can benefit from the thermal mass of the ground even if the ground is hotter/colder than you would prefer to be, and can be shut off at any time should the air temperature be more comfortable than ground...

Re:no, caves suck. No, you do. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31876708)

How nice to show the world your complete ignorance regarding caves, keep it up champ.

Re:no, caves suck (1)

arem-aref (158417) | more than 4 years ago | (#31879528)

might wanna do a little more research, i'm from quincy, these caves are used for lotsa things, and they're easy to get to, i've never known them to flood, they're ventilated to above ground, they're really large(+5 miles horizontal), and there is beer and other food stored there!

Re:no, caves suck (1)

reidrhollander (1467541) | more than 4 years ago | (#31879582)

No, none of these are relevant. i grew up in Quincy and the "caves' are old limestone quarries. They have a network of roads like an underground city and are in fact used for storage by many regional food and bevarage companies because of the climate as well as long erm document storage because of the safety factor. Herr is more info. http://www.uwi.org/default.htm [uwi.org]

Re:no, caves suck (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31879866)

1. they are hard to get to

2. they are hard to get supplies to and build in

3. they flood

4. they have air quality issues

5. and they ARE cool... until you put a bunch of servers in them, and then they heat up, and STAY hot, and are harder to cool than on the surface

the idea of servers in caves sucks

That's what I keep telling those idiots in Cheyenne Mountain, but they don't listen to me! Maybe you can talk some sense into them. Don't forget to mention the grues.

They're Used by Industries too (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31875514)

Awesome... Quincy, IL is where I attended college at and I lived there for a good 5 years. The caves mentioned are even partially used for warehousing refrigerated goods and even has some industrial temperature control.

brilliant idea! (1)

unix_geek_512 (810627) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875544)

This is a great idea provided the area is geologically stable and there is little risk of flooding.

Dispersing data centers over wide geographical areas is also advisable.

Springfield Underground @ Springfield, MO (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31875548)

The entire city of Springfield, MO is already above a gigantic cave bigger than the whole above-ground city, and is ALREADY WIRED WITH FIBER. =)

Be safe! (1)

Seraphim_72 (622457) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875560)

Because when I think Quincy IL, I think TERRORIST ATTACK.

Re:Be safe! (1)

Al Dimond (792444) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876076)

Some other little town in rural Illinois nearly took down a big statue of Abraham Lincoln (probably in the early 'aughties) because they thought it was a terrorist risk. Fortunately cooler heads prevailed.

Re:Be safe! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31878138)

Some other little town in rural Illinois nearly took down a big statue of Abraham Lincoln (probably in the early 'aughties) because they thought it was a terrorist risk. Fortunately cooler heads prevailed.

Perhaps we could harness the power of their thermal-cranial cooling to keep the datacenter cooled.

Re:Be safe! (3, Insightful)

ErikLalande (1791774) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876434)

Thats not the point. The point is that Quincy's underground data center would be a backup for Chicago, KC, or St Louis's if they ever got hit with a dirty bomb. The fact that its a cave just means that Google wouldn't have to invest millions of dollars to create a hardened data center, because it does that naturally.

Re:Be safe! (1)

Seraphim_72 (622457) | more than 4 years ago | (#31878298)

If any of those get hit hard enough with a dirty bomb to knock out their data centers, the last thing anyone is going to care about is their data being online.

Re:Be safe! (1)

Anpheus (908711) | more than 4 years ago | (#31878728)

I will. My emails are important, I make sure each of them has the red exclamation mark and flag.

Re:Be safe! (1)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876864)

Terrorists, OK, but what are their plans for the Deep Crows [penny-arcade.com] ?

Great white north... (1)

grumpyman (849537) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875574)

I wonder if some of the northern cities/towns in Canada which has the infrastructure/connectivity may give them edge on cooling cost? There are technologies out there that can utilize external temperature.

Re:Great white north... (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875746)

Actually almost anyplace with a dam would probably be a good spot for a data center. Frankly putting them in the day it's self may be brilliant.
1. Lots of reliable power and no transmission loss.
2. Easy cooling. Tap the cold water going into the turbine for cooling and release it down stream.
3. Security. The dam probably is already a high security area so no extra would be needed.

Re:Great white north... (1)

nemasu (1766860) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875934)

The northernmost city in North America with a metro population of over one million is Edmonton. June through August has an average temperature of about 22 Celsius (72 F), unless they wanted to go more north (there's not much up there), they're still going to need to have cooling in place for a few months at least. Granted, in the winter, all they would need to do is suck air from the outside.

Re:Great white north... (1)

Nulifier (1227312) | more than 4 years ago | (#31879294)

I live in Edmonton, not only would you be able to pull the cold air in from the outside in the winter, you would probably have to heat it too (it got below -40c this year).

Wrong year (1)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875576)

How quake proof are those caves? Because that is the most visible concern about anything this year in particular (even if is within average, it got a lot of visibility)..

The internet isn't like a big truck (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31875578)

It's a series of caves.

They also promise superfast indexing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31875602)

They feature an exclusive cloud of spiders that is as fast as it is creepy.

So easy (1)

odin84gk (1162545) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875664)

A caveAdmin could do it!

Hope this goes through (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31875686)

I live pretty close to Quincy, IL, it's in the same Congressional district as me at least. So maybe I'll be able to get me a fiber connection soon after.

Cryptonomicon anyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31875702)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptonomicon

Re:Cryptonomicon anyone? (1)

reverseengineer (580922) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875904)

Or much eariler, Kurt Vonnegut's Player Piano (1952), where the giant computer EPICAC XIV resided in Carlsbad Caverns. I guess Google's servers won't require an army of workers to swap out vacuum tubes though.

Re:Cryptonomicon anyone? (1)

bmearns (1691628) | more than 4 years ago | (#31879106)

First thing I thought of, too.

I forgot about Player Piano, though I think there was a super-computer-in-a-cave in Breakfast of Champions, too.

Whats next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31875728)

Whats next? Wormholes in mountains? .......

Quicy, IL? (2, Informative)

Theaetetus (590071) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875748)

Actually, it's not a bad idea... Quincy, IL has three decent colleges nearby and a huge local technical population: two of the largest radio, television, and satellite transmitter manufacturers, Harris and Broadcast Electronics, are based in Quincy.

Good idea but... (1)

ae1294 (1547521) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875810)

This would probably work out well if it wasn't for the hordes of man eating rats and re-animated skeletons that inhabit these caves.

But I guess it would be pretty good security as long as the terrorists didn't happen to bring +1 war hammers and town portal scrolls along...

Cave as a work environment (2, Interesting)

lena_10326 (1100441) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875816)

I've worked in the Kansas City caves and sat behind a desk on a computer for a while. It's fascinating for the first day but that ends quickly. The lack of sunlight and outdoor exposure really gets to drain on you week after week. Imagine getting up and going outside for some fresh air but when you go outside it's very dark, humid, claustrophobic, and the air is stale. It drives you nuts. Especially when you hear creaks and cracks all day in the dead of silence. I would not want to be an IT admin working in a cave.

Re:Cave as a work environment (1)

topcoder (1662257) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876104)

Imagine getting up and going outside for some fresh air but when you go outside it's very dark, humid, claustrophobic, and the air is stale.

Can you get me a job there?

Re:Cave as a work environment (1)

tsstahl (812393) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876122)

Spelunking around the office is cool until you have to go to the bathroom real bad--take everything you bring...

Re:Cave as a work environment (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31876208)

I fail to see how this is different from your mom's basement.

Re:Cave as a work environment (1)

lymond01 (314120) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876594)

Gosh, it's Google. You don't think they'd have swimming pools, ping pong tables, oxygen bars...

Re:Cave as a work environment (1)

cynyr (703126) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876946)

so put the racks in the cave and the office outside at the entrance. best of both worlds.

Re:Cave as a work environment (2, Funny)

eshbums (1557147) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876950)

I've worked in the Kansas City caves and sat behind a desk on a computer for a while. It's fascinating for the first day but that ends quickly. The lack of sunlight and outdoor exposure really gets to drain on you week after week. Imagine getting up and going outside for some fresh air but when you go outside it's very dark, humid, claustrophobic, and the air is stale. It drives you nuts. Especially when you hear creaks and cracks all day in the dead of silence. I would not want to be an IT admin working in a cave.

Did you type 4 8 15 16 23 42 over and over again during the course of your day?

Re:Cave as a work environment (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31876956)

Just so you know, only one out of the following two statements are true:

1. They're going to lay the cables in the caves
2. They're going to move the entire working population of Quincy down into the caves for the rest of their careers.

Re:Cave as a work environment (1)

lena_10326 (1100441) | more than 4 years ago | (#31878210)

Of course you will not read this because you posted anonymouse.. but.. for the record.. you are an idiot. Hint: support systems; support engineers.

Damn those Quincy Fools!!!! (0, Redundant)

jameskojiro (705701) | more than 4 years ago | (#31875912)

Dear Captain-Commander,

It was bad enough that they were breaking the balance between the soul re-incarnation cycle, but now they are wanting to build a datacenter in their secret underground cave. How is the Research and Development division supposed to keep up with that? It isn't like there is unlimited space to place to place a giant data center in the middle of the Seireitei. I should have killed that little punk Ishida when I had the chance. I guess now I am going to have to build the thing Heuco Mundo, which is fine, but running a data link from there to the World of the Living is such an enourmous pain the in neck. I guess I will have to pay those Quincys a little "research" visit.

Signed,
Mayuri Kurotsuchi

?science?.scriptdead./,.org?/great balls of fire (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31875914)

lemming sea, attaching the word 'science' usually includes some sort of investigatory process.

not so here, robbIE's brief, away from the topic storIE (scripted by us.gov), does not include ANY facts relating to what really happened.

http://www.aos.wisc.edu/fireball/2010_04_14_fireball_loop_640x480_long.gif

can any of you hyper-geniuses (or a genuine individual with experience in such matters) describe the activity in this clip in ANY detail? if not, calling it (the storIE) science only starts the inaccuracy. flame on. thank you.

Utah's Granite Caves (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31875960)

Utah has used its extensive granite caves for storage - both hard copy and digital - for a very long time. It's a constant temperature year round, has low humidity, no water issues, and hasn't seen a big earthquake in a very long time. I've been told the caves are so deep they could even survive a nuclear attack.

databases in caves (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31875962)

so are we gonna call this "caveSQL"?

or was this supposed to be titled "Datacenters in caves"?

What a dark, unpleasant place (1)

jmitchel!jmitchel.co (254506) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876102)

What a dark, unpleasant place. Getting into the caves isn't so hard, because Quincy is situated on high bluffs overlooking the Mississippi. So access is probably pretty much straight in from the highway or something like it. Keeping the Mississippi out the next time it floods in a major way may be a bigger problem. Being in Quincy though... that's the biggest problem. The darkest two years of my life were my time there, trying to find something to do, trying to stay warm in my cavernous old house. Quincy is 100 miles from anywhere, and once you get anywhere you still have a couple hundred miles to get to anywhere you'd actually want to be.

Uh, I think they missed something... (1)

greenguy (162630) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876238)

Google Fiber is about connecting homes and businesses to the Internet.

Not databases.

WEhere else (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31876532)

did you think they put their servers during the stone age?

They are good at hiding stuff like bin laden (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 4 years ago | (#31876720)

They are good at hiding stuff like bin laden

The Republic (2, Funny)

ravenscar (1662985) | more than 4 years ago | (#31877228)

This sounds like Plato's version of a server farm.

"Underground Caverns"? (1)

mad.frog (525085) | more than 4 years ago | (#31878502)

As opposed to those sorts of caverns that are above-ground?

Has to be said... (1)

Chris Mattern (191822) | more than 4 years ago | (#31879068)

Tony Stark built a database in a CAVE! [youtube.com] With a BOX OF SCRAPS! [youtube.com]

Has to be said... (1)

Chris Mattern (191822) | more than 4 years ago | (#31879096)

Tony Stark built a database in a CAVE! [youtube.com] With a BOX OF SCRAPS! [youtube.com]

Batdatacentre (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31879142)

"To the Batdatacentre!" doesn't quite have the same oomph...

The three most important things (1)

cowbud (200323) | more than 4 years ago | (#31879422)

provide year-round temperature control, dedicated hydroelectric power, and security in the case of a terrorist attack."

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