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Wisconsin Designates State Microbe

samzenpus posted more than 4 years ago | from the the-fighting-parameciums dept.

Biotech 102

Hugh Pickens writes "The NY Times reports that state legislators in Wisconsin raced against the clock to pass a bill designating Lactococcus lactis as Wisconsin's official state microbe. 'The first time I heard the idea, I thought, I've got more important things to do than spending my time honoring a microbe,' says Gary Hebl, a Democratic state representative who proposed the bill which, he says, would make Wisconsin the first state in the nation to grant such a designation, 'but this microbe is really a very hard worker,' added Hebl, referring to the bacterium supported by the Department of Bacteriology at UW — Madison used to make cheddar, Colby, and Monterey Jack cheese. The proposal faced only one detractor in committee ('the opponent was clearly lactose-intolerant,' says Hebl), and there was no sign of a last-minute campaign from other bacteria, so by evening, the Assembly had approved the measure, 56 to 41. In case there were any doubts about Wisconsin's priorities, a separate bill also awaits consideration in Madison, declaring cheese Wisconsin's state snack."

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State microbe ... (3, Funny)

Stooshie (993666) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895008)

... now that's just cheesy!

Re:State microbe ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31895052)

What happens when you end up eating the state microbe while eating the state snack? Won't there be laws against that?

Re:State microbe ... (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895622)

Fromage neral point of view, I wonder whey they decided to do this.

Re:State microbe ... (2)

Moryath (553296) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895778)

This will go well with the official state parasite: politicians.

Re:State microbe ... (1)

MoeDumb (1108389) | more than 4 years ago | (#31907268)

Mmmmm, Lactococcus lactis!

What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31895018)

Seriously? Official state microbe and an official state snack? Apparently these boobs have nothing better to do (such as paying attention to more serious matters in their state (whatever those might be)). Vote 'em out, Wisconsin voters!

What boobs.

Re:What? (3, Insightful)

_merlin (160982) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895044)

Well at least they're just engaging in harmless silliness - they could be screwing things up like most politicians seem to be good at.

Re:What? (1)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895080)

Well at least they're just engaging in harmless silliness - they could be screwing things up like most politicians seem to be good at.

Like everything else that ends up going horrible awry, this is starting "small" and "innocent". Just give them enough time and encouragement.

Re:What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31895090)

Well at least I'm just browsing Slashdot - I could be adding spaghetti code and buffer overflows to this critical software project like most developers seem to be good at.

It's cool, my next employee review is years away.

Re:What? (1)

Nimey (114278) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895750)

It costs money to print up stuff to tell people about this nonsense. They'll have little fliers or somesuch detailing all the official state things, and now a new run will have to be made up for this addition.

Re:What? (1)

rhsanborn (773855) | more than 4 years ago | (#31896386)

It serves two purposes. The state is the first to designate a state microbe, and as such will get publicity on news channels for it. Most states have large scale ad campaigns to encourage business and tourism. This is no different. The state is honoring, and making the public aware of one of the important players in one of Wisconsin's most well known industries. Whether it's wholly effective or not, they are, in fact, serving their constituents.

Re:What? (1)

Trepidity (597) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895772)

Texas attempts (seriously) to solve that problem by only allowing its legislature to meet every other year. Unfortunately, the governor works overtime in the off-years to make up for the stupid-government shortfall (and he can call the legislature into special 30-day sessions even in the off-year, if he needs their approval for something.)

Re:What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31896948)

So what you're really saying is that Texas is ruled every other year by a Dictator? How very roman of you.

Re:What? (1)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | more than 4 years ago | (#31897124)

What is this "tator" addendum you speak of? BYT, I live in Houston.

Re:What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31896244)

Oh they have plenty of overreaching overtaxing corrupting cheating crap bills that they are also trying to rush through before they get voted out in the fall.

Re:What? (1)

jayme0227 (1558821) | more than 4 years ago | (#31897018)

Being from Wisconsin, I can tell you that they definitely find the time to screw things up. This is just a diversion. But really it is a diversion that gets attention for one of our state's largest industries. You're reading about Wisconsin cheese right now, and that's kind of the point. Free publicity.

We actually take a lot of pride in the state in our dairy industry, and many of artisan cheesemakers in the state win awards and prizes at a national and even international level every year. We still proclaim ourselves "The Dairy State" on our license plates, even though California* has surpassed us in total production. Milk is very much a part of our culture.

Re:What? (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 4 years ago | (#31897510)

Somehow I would have thought that Saccharomyces cerevisiae would have been a better choice for Wisconsin's state microbe. I'm only 2 states away from WI and I don't see much Wisconsin cheese on the shelves. Plenty of Wisconsin beer however.

Re:What? (1)

lorenlal (164133) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895490)

I think the most serious issue they have is high cholesterol.

Re:What? (2, Interesting)

HaZardman27 (1521119) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895568)

As a Wisconsin native, I can assure you that things run very smoothly compared to most states I've lived in, and if you read the article you can see that it took almost no time in all to put this through. We're generally very pleased with our politicians (as much as that's possible with politicians). We even have one of the few congressmen to vote against the Patriot Act.

Re:What? (1)

Bakkster (1529253) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895686)

At least, unlike most state's official state birds, this microbe has a direct effect on the state's economy.

Legislatures do a hell of a lot of purely laudatory actions, we only hear about them when they're strange or funny. For example, Michigan's no-meat Saturday [livingstondaily.com] , responded to by a US Representative from MI proposing National Meat Appreciation Day [mlive.com] . Sure, it's also a bit of political wrangling, but it's still equally a waste of elected official's time.

Kansas: (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31895032)

Salmonella

Re:Kansas: (1)

NatasRevol (731260) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895710)

No. The hospital super-bugs - staph or strep. Because they show evolution in action.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_bug_(bacteria) [wikipedia.org]

Re:Kansas: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31896758)

It's not a bug, it's a super feature!

Re:Kansas: (1)

causality (777677) | more than 4 years ago | (#31901318)

No. The hospital super-bugs - staph or strep. Because they show evolution in action.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_bug_(bacteria) [wikipedia.org]

Actually that'd be natural selection unless a new, never-before-seen species is created. That's not how superbugs originate. Instead, antibiotics kill less than 100% of an existing species of bacteria. Let's say antibiotics can kill 99.5% of them. The 0.5% that survive the antibiotic continue to metabolize and reproduce until they replace the numbers that were lost to the antibiotic (and bacteria can often reproduce very quickly). Now you have a resistant population that originated with those individual bacteria that were able to survive that antibiotic. That is natural selection of the fittest in response to a change in the environment (the introduction of an antibiotic) but is not the evolution of a new species.

In fact, it reduces the genetic diversity of the original population by causing only members with certain traits to survive and reproduce. All members which had different genetic traits are now dead, killed by the antibiotic. As bacteria typically reproduce asexually through mitosis, restoring that original diversity would be challenging. None of this is the "amoeba to human" (to use a figure of speech) evolution that explains the appearance of highly complex organisms on Earth. In fact I've never seen a scientific, proven example of a mutation that added new genetic information that did not previously exist. It would be sort of like expecting entropy to lead to a more highly ordered state. None of this proves or disproves the concept of evolution, but it does make it a much more mysterious process than we are usually led to believe. It's the kind of thing I hope science one day has a better understanding of.

Re:Kansas: (1)

drsmithy (35869) | more than 4 years ago | (#31906038)

None of this is the "amoeba to human" (to use a figure of speech) evolution that explains the appearance of highly complex organisms on Earth.

No-one makes claims about "amoeba to human" (to use a figure of speech) evolution, except Creationists.

In fact I've never seen a scientific, proven example of a mutation that added new genetic information that did not previously exist.

This [talkorigins.org] should get you started.

None of this proves or disproves the concept of evolution, but it does make it a much more mysterious process than we are usually led to believe. It's the kind of thing I hope science one day has a better understanding of.

There are few theories that are understood better than Evolution.

Boy Am I glad (2, Funny)

rockclimber (660746) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895036)

that the really important problems are tackled, without fear or failure....


What's next, Michigan delcaring Fe(OH) their state mascott?

Re:Boy Am I glad (1)

Lord Pillage (815466) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895072)

Well Fe(OH) legislation would be a strong base for future laws...

Re:Boy Am I glad (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895884)

If you can change he value of pi by legislation, altering the oxidation state of an element should be trivial.

And in every other State (1)

Wolvenhaven (1521217) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895040)

Proposed legislation will attempt to make Saccharomyces cerevisiae their State Bacteria.

Re:And in every other State (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31895092)

State fungus perhaps, but there are better qualified candidates for the position of state bacteria.

i declare this travesty of waste of taxpayers time (3, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895048)

delicious

Re:i declare this travesty of waste of taxpayers t (1)

pclminion (145572) | more than 4 years ago | (#31900038)

Yes, we shouldn't ever focus on anything like "local culture" or find things to be proud of as residents of a certain place, or promote anything that isn't monotonous, requisite, fiscally appropriate. We ought to be freaking out and struggling to keep our heads above water at all times. There's no time to be human beings, we have drudgery to deal with!

For Our Non-United States Friends (3, Informative)

RobotRunAmok (595286) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895076)

Wisconsin is the state synonomous with cheese. Nothing else, really. Just cheese. Everything they do, seemingly, is cheese-related. Oh, yeah, they have a pretty good football team from their city Green Bay. The team's fans are called "cheese-heads," and attend games wearing giant wedges of cheese as hats.

Seriously. [blogspot.com]

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (2, Informative)

DickieRay (469521) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895116)

We have beer, too.

A former legislator used to love this sort of thing. As the State Legislature was considering making the tuba the State Instrument, which came to pass, she said this type of silliness takes time away from passing more bad laws.

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (1)

quixote9 (999874) | more than 4 years ago | (#31897200)

Ooh, beer! That means they could have a state yeast too! Saccharomyces cerevisiae, here we come!

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (4, Informative)

hardburn (141468) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895118)

That's not true. We're also really good at beer and fireworks.

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (1)

IANAAC (692242) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895262)

Sorry, but our non-US friends would say that our beer is swill.

Really.

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (1)

chthon (580889) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895368)

I went this weekend to the Struise Brouwers in Vleteren. What I tasted there has not been made or tasted by many. A variety of Black Albert, a stout ripened in oaken whiskey caskets, and Pannepot Wild, a beer variety enhanced with gueuze yeasts.

Yeah, I know, off-topic, but worth mentioning I think.

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (1)

Stele (9443) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895640)

Thanks for mentioning. I'll add it to my itinerary.

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (3, Insightful)

phishtrader (741975) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895530)

It's as if you've missed the whole craft beer movement in the US that's been going on since the early '80s. There is a lot of really good beer being produced in the US these days. Sure, the domestic standbys are still mass produced crap, but other countries have their own mass produced crap as well. I don't know where you're from, but try visiting the liquor store sometime and try something that doesn't have Miller or Bud written on the label.

Not really true anymore (2, Insightful)

sean.peters (568334) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895566)

It's sort of unfair to refer to "American beer" when what you're really thinking of is Bud-Mil-Coors. Not so long ago, it was certainly true that you had a choice of crappy mass-produced beer and nothing else. But nowadays, decent beer is available in every podunk town. Of course, there's still an ocean of the swill produced, but good domestic beer is easy to find.

Re:Not really true anymore (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31895662)

So what would you recommend to visitors?

Re:Not really true anymore (2, Informative)

Velorium (1068080) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895708)

Depends where in the U.S. you're visiting. The "non-swill" beers are usually the ones that are locally brewed.

There are both national and local brands... (1)

sean.peters (568334) | more than 4 years ago | (#31896316)

available nationwide:

  • Sierra Nevada Pale Ale. Very hoppy in the west coast style. Brewed in Chico, CA, but available just about everywhere.
  • various Sam Adams products. Boston Lager is pretty good, and some of their specialty brews are really excellent.
  • Blue Moon - local take on a Belgian style ale. Actually produced by a subsidiary of one of the big breweries, and not as good (in my opinion) as the real thing... but far from swill.

Local choices will vary by location, but most mid-sized and larger towns have at least some kind of a local-ish beer choice as well.

The renaissance in homebrewing in the US really forced the beer industry here to get its act together. Having tasted the real thing, people became much less willing to drink the swill.

True... (1)

IANAAC (692242) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895818)

but I was replying to the oh-so-common "Milwaukee beer rules" mentality.

When I was a kid, I grew up hearing my dad and all his friends refer to Leinenkugel (Chippewa Falls) as "squaw piss". And it really was back then. Since then, they've made huge strides in making the brand an upscale brand now.

I know that there are many craft breweries around Wisconsin. I visit many of them. But Wisconsin has never particularly been known for them.

I spend my springs/summers in NW Wisconsin and enjoy this part of the country very much.

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (4, Insightful)

Stele (9443) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895590)

Sorry, but our non-US friends would say that our beer is swill.

They would be wrong.

Seriously, with the possible exception of Belgium, the shear variety and quality of beers produced by the hundreds of micro-breweries and brew-pubs in Wisconsin tops anything I've experienced in the last 10 years in Europe. Anyone who has had the privilege of coming to the "Great Taste of the Midwest" knows what I am talking about.

That said, volcano permitting, I'm traveling to Belgium next month to work on a book about monasteries and "exotic" beers.

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#31899904)

How about Pilsen in the Czech Republic? You know. The city that Pilsener beer is named after. They certainly one of the best, if not the best beer in the world.
Or Germany, with its insane amount of breweries. We got two dozen different types of beer of one type brewed in my city alone.

But of course I don’t want to make Belgium or small American breweries look bad. They are a bit more open to new things or experiments. It depends on you, if you consider this a good or a bad thing.

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (1)

Stele (9443) | more than 4 years ago | (#31901632)

I'm a HUGE fan of German beers of all kinds, Bavarian beers especially. I've spent many many hours sitting in beer gardens there. I personally consider German beers to be among the best in the world. I don't think I would ever get tired of German styles if that was all I could drink. And you get the wonderful bonus of being next to Belgium!

But I can drive 15 minutes and find wonderful examples of pretty much every German style. I happen to have a keg of fantastic Hefeweizen from a local brew-pub that is a near dead ringer for Weihenstephaner on tap in my home bar.

Wisconsin was built from generations of German immigrants. Thankfully they brought their love of beer with them!

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31897110)

There are quite a few good micro breweries in Wisconsin. Capital Brewery in Middleton, Ale Asylum in Madison, New Glarus brewing, and Sprecher in Glendale (Milwaukee).

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31898328)

Lakefront Brewery in Milwaukee is nice too, and they have a great beer hall. With fish fries, of course.

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31895532)

Wisconsin is only known for fireworks because they are illegal in some of the adjacent states. The fireworks sold in Wisconsin are all made in China.

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (1)

gaelfx (1111115) | more than 4 years ago | (#31896600)

Let's not forget summerfest! It combines all of the best parts of Wisconsin and occasionally adds good looking boobies. Check it out: www.summerfest.com

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (1)

chthon (580889) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895190)

Does that make Wisconsin the Holland of the USA ?

Might be missing the windmills and the tulips.

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (1)

hansamurai (907719) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895288)

Wind farms are growing in popularity around the state. Seems like a couple hundred went up around my parent's house over the last few years.

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31895434)

What about the hookers and the shrooms ?

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31895552)

Does that make Wisconsin the Holland of the USA ?

Might be missing the windmills and the tulips.

Actually, there's a significant number of douchebags in Little Chute, WI who are of Dutch descent -- though I don't blame their disposition on their descent. The village ponied up way too much money to build a little windmill solely as a tourist attraction (why??) and then put it where nobody will visit. They have no brewery, but they've got cheese shops. You can't throw a stone without hitting a Vandehey, VanZeeland, Van[whatever]. I went to school there. Glad to be gone. Posting as anon for obvious reasons.

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (1)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | more than 4 years ago | (#31896044)

Well, Holland is actually in Michigan on the east coast of Lake Michigan. They make some pretty good beer there too. Plus wooden shoes, tulips, and everything else Dutch.

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31895192)

And beer?

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (1)

chthon (580889) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895296)

B.t.w. I see that Wisconsin produces about 600 varieties of cheese, but what varieties ? Do they have the same amount of variety that exists across Europe ? Fresh cheeses, soft cheeses, half-hard cheeses, hard cheeses, runny cheeses, chewy cheeses (like halloumi), big wheels of cheese, small pungent cheeses (I am from Belgium b.t.w.)?

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (1)

IBBoard (1128019) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895620)

Do they have the same amount of variety that exists across Europe ? Fresh cheeses, soft cheeses, half-hard cheeses, hard cheeses, runny cheeses, chewy cheeses (like halloumi), big wheels of cheese, small pungent cheeses (I am from Belgium b.t.w.)?

More importantly, is it actually cheese or is it that strange American rubber? I may be British and not keen on soft cheeses (like Brie) but the Americans seem to find it hard to do a decent cheddar.

I think Wisconsin might be good, but I can't remember. I do remember that Stephen Fry visited a cheese place and commented on how horrid the rest of the world found American cheese (especially the spray stuff) but I can't remember what he thought in the end.

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (1)

rhsanborn (773855) | more than 4 years ago | (#31896582)

I hope by rubber cheese you aren't referring to the crimes against humanity that are Velveta and Kraft American "Cheese" as they are mostly cheese flavored vegetable oil. I'm pretty sure they even claim on the packaging that they are "Processed Cheese Food", not really cheese. If you are looking for delicious cheddar, they are indeed available, Wisconsin being one state with many varieties, and Vermont being another.

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31896856)

Even setting American "cheese" aside, take Kraft's cheddar: I have in my fridge 4 blocks of their extra sharp cheddar. I expect one to be good and hard and actually taste sharp, two bars to be mediocre, and one to be crap. Their "aged Wisconsin cheddar" is just as inconsistent.

The store brand cheddar is uniformly mediocre.

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 4 years ago | (#31897796)

I hope by rubber cheese you aren't referring to the crimes against humanity that are Velveta and Kraft American "Cheese" as they are mostly cheese flavored vegetable oil. I'm pretty sure they even claim on the packaging that they are "Processed Cheese Food", not really cheese.

In Britain that's normally what we understand to be "American Cheese" (blame McDonald's), although we tend to call it "processed 'cheese'" or "plastic cheese". I don't think I've ever seen anyone use it except on a burger; if you're really lazy you buy pre-sliced/grated actual cheese rather than the plastic stuff. (Going by what's available, most people buy blocks of cheese.)

Example [mysupermarket.co.uk] -- clearly they aren't allowed to call it "cheese". (Here's the rest of the packaged cheese "shelf" [mysupermarket.co.uk] .)

The only American cheese I know is Monterey Jack, which I've seen in a couple of expensive burger places.

If you are looking for delicious cheddar, they are indeed available, Wisconsin being one state with many varieties, and Vermont being another.

I think they'd be difficult to find in the UK, you'd need to go to a speciality store. A quick search suggests this might be because dairy farming is subsidised in the EU, making imported stuff comparatively expensive.

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (1)

rhsanborn (773855) | more than 4 years ago | (#31899294)

An amusing aside, many grocery stores put the "American Cheese" in the refrigerated section because people aren't comfortable buying cheese that isn't refrigerated. It turns out that stuff is perfectly shelf stable on the shelf next to the dried beans.

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31901334)

Do they have the same amount of variety that exists across Europe ? Fresh cheeses, soft cheeses, half-hard cheeses, hard cheeses, runny cheeses, chewy cheeses (like halloumi), big wheels of cheese, small pungent cheeses (I am from Belgium b.t.w.)?

More importantly, is it actually cheese or is it that strange American rubber? I may be British and not keen on soft cheeses (like Brie) but the Americans seem to find it hard to do a decent cheddar.

I think Wisconsin might be good, but I can't remember. I do remember that Stephen Fry visited a cheese place and commented on how horrid the rest of the world found American cheese (especially the spray stuff) but I can't remember what he thought in the end.

At least for Cheddar, I think the city actually tried suing US cheese manufacturers, because technically the cheese made in the US is NOT Cheddar, probably more properly 'cheddar' or Cheddar-like...

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (2, Interesting)

Stele (9443) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895696)

Yes, we do. Our cheeses are as diverse as our beers. I recently attended a cheese and beer pairing where there were a dozen wonderfully "stinky" cheeses paired with some fine Belgian-style strong beers - all made in Wisconsin.

It's one of the reasons I've stayed here for almost 20 years, despite hating the long winters.

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (1)

Bakkster (1529253) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895360)

Oh, yeah, they have a pretty good football team from their city Green Bay. The team's fans are called "cheese-heads," and attend games wearing giant wedges of cheese as hats.

Seriously. [blogspot.com]

Only on /. does a reference to the Packer's 'Cheese-heads' require a link to photographic proof that you aren't joking...

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 4 years ago | (#31897886)

Seriously. [blogspot.com]

Only on /. does a reference to the Packer's 'Cheese-heads' require a link to photographic proof that you aren't joking...

Some of us aren't aware of every aspect of American culture, and appreciated the link ;-).

Maybe you don't know about cheese rolling [google.co.uk] .

and badgers (2, Informative)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895426)

i'm not really sure why, but in my mind, wisconsin means cheese and badgers

i'm not sure if that association is normal or random

PANIC! A SNAKE! SNAKE, AUGH SNAKE.... Aaargh, it's a Snake!!!

Mushroom Mushroom!

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | more than 4 years ago | (#31898094)

Is that real cheese? With those holes, is it Emmentaler?

--

Mac and Lac

Re:For Our Non-United States Friends (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31899588)

Wisconsin = cheese, beer, and cranberries.

Wisconsin accounts for over half of the US cranberry crop. IIRC, Wisconsin alone grows more cranberries than any other country.

Cheese to be the official State snack? (1)

macraig (621737) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895094)

Something tells me that Wisconsin will be Jamie Oliver's next destination.

lactose (3, Insightful)

maxume (22995) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895126)

Actually, lactose intolerant people often appreciate it when bacteria break down the lactose before they eat the food.

In Alabama... (2, Funny)

dgun (1056422) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895186)

...we're fighting over bingo. So, you know, legislating official microbes actually sounds productive.

Re:In Alabama... (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895744)

if you get illinois, kentucky and tennessee to legislate over something silly, that's a time zone time wasting bingo you know

is kentucky the free space?

Re:In Alabama... (1)

HaZardman27 (1521119) | more than 4 years ago | (#31896072)

Yeah at least in Wisconsin they didn't have the crazy mud-slinging ads about microbes.

Haha (4, Funny)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895206)

The Onion always cracks me u... wait, what?

Re:Haha (1)

prichardson (603676) | more than 4 years ago | (#31907454)

The Onion was started in Wisconsin. We commemorate that by creating real events to emulate Onion parodies.

I know this is off topic, but... (1)

mswhippingboy (754599) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895216)

Actually, lactose intolerant people often appreciate it when bacteria break down the lactose before they eat the food.

brought memories of an old SNL skit - Pre-Chew Charlie's - http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xas2fz_saturady-night-live-pre-chew-charli_fun [dailymotion.com]

Funny how associative memory works....

WI should have motto "Eat Cheese or Die" (5, Funny)

elwinc (663074) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895232)

In about 1985, the then governor of Wisconsin wanted to change the license plate motto (America's Dairyland) to something more exciting. A popular suggestion was

Eat Cheese or Die

Unfortunately this suggestion did not survive. I believe the time is ripe to try again to implement this new motto.

If you think I invented phony "facts," see http://www.nytimes.com/1985/12/08/us/wisconsin-s-license-plates-won-t-say-eat-cheese-or-die.html [nytimes.com]

Re:WI should have motto "Eat Cheese or Die" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31896574)

How I wish that was our motto..

Re:WI should have motto "Eat Cheese or Die" (1)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | more than 4 years ago | (#31897162)

Logic error. The "OR" should have been an "AND"

Re:WI should have motto "Eat Cheese or Die" (1)

amliebsch (724858) | more than 4 years ago | (#31898404)

The more popular slogan was, "Come and smell our dairy air!"

If you know any French at all, you'll get the joke.

Re:WI should have motto "Eat Cheese or Die" (1)

adolf (21054) | more than 4 years ago | (#31907226)

Very punny.

(I had mod points a small number of minutes ago, and I would surely have modded this up [despite knowing almost no French], but they're all gone now. So rather than getting +1, you instead shall be the recipient of this useless acknowledgment.)

this is stupid (1)

ILuvRamen (1026668) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895502)

In case you think this is stupid, I just want to say that I'm from Wisconsin and I also think this is stupid.

Re:this is stupid (1)

Yosho (135835) | more than 4 years ago | (#31896322)

For what it's worth, I'm from Texas and I think this is cool. I would much rather politicians spend their time honoring microbes than telling me who I have to give my money to or who I'm allowed to marry or what I'm allowed to do with my electronic devices.

And maybe if politicians start spending enough of their time honoring microbes, people will start to realize that maybe we don't need so many politicians in the first place...

Re:this is stupid (1)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | more than 4 years ago | (#31897184)

I'm also from Texas and I'll have you know that I honor microbes daily!

Re:this is stupid (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31899652)

I think its great. I am from portage wi, and I say the more useless the better

Thanks for looking at the important bills! (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31895548)

Angry Wisconsin Resident here.

So they're willing to look at a bill for a microbe, but won't even touch an important bill such at the medical marijuana one.

http://www.immly.org/index.html

Absolutely.... (2, Insightful)

howlatthemoon (718490) | more than 4 years ago | (#31895902)

They should have named Saccharomyces pastorianus the state microbe.

Perhaps UW should change its mascot? (2, Funny)

Zot Quixote (548930) | more than 4 years ago | (#31896210)

We don need no stinking Badgers, not when we have the fighting Lactococcus Lacti!

Re:Perhaps UW should change its mascot? (1)

Vexor (947598) | more than 4 years ago | (#31898662)

Q: So why don't Wisconsin men date Minnesota women?

A: Have you ever seen what a Badger does to a Gopher hole?

I just love to see our taxes hard at work.

While I think that's good, what about the RTA? (1)

haaz (3346) | more than 4 years ago | (#31896580)

While I smiled when I heard this on the radio, and thought it was very cool, we here in southeast Wisconsin also need to get the regional transit authority (RTA) bill passed. Bus service in Milwaukee County has been reduced by 20% over the past several years, and we're about to lose a full third more if this doesn't go through. With our incumbent county executive who's got a penchant for starving government, we won't see any progress without the RTA. As I doubt my state legislators are reading /., I'll be calling them instead of just posting on here and hoping it gets done.

Not a waste of time (2, Insightful)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | more than 4 years ago | (#31896826)

While the bill is campy and fun, it does promote science and learning in an interesting way. You can bet that hundreds of science teachers will do a quick lesson on this microbe and why it's so valuable to their state economy.

Other states to follow (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 4 years ago | (#31898128)

Here in California we just voted to make the collective intellect of the state government and employees the official state microbe. :-)

Where's the T-Shirt ? (1)

dreb (1748444) | more than 4 years ago | (#31898422)

Where can a buy the T-shirt so I can show my pride in the state's microbe ?

Tax Dollars at Work (1)

rdmiller3 (29465) | more than 4 years ago | (#31899682)

So this is what one of the nation's highest tax rates goes to pay for.
:(

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