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Japanese Spacecraft Bringing Back Space Rock

CmdrTaco posted more than 4 years ago | from the contaminating-the-planet dept.

Space 116

phaic tan writes "Bridie Smith from the Sydney Morning Herald reports on the Hayabusa spacecraft returning to earth in June with samples from the Itokawa Asteroid: 'A Japanese spacecraft will land in Australia in June, bringing with it samples from an asteroid found 300 million kilometres from Earth. The unmanned Hayabusa spacecraft, launched in May 2003, will become the first spacecraft to bring asteroid material to Earth when it lands in Woomera, South Australia, later this year.'"

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Now that.... (3, Funny)

vikingpower (768921) | more than 4 years ago | (#31938816)

...rocks !

What rocks even more (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31938896)

Is that Meatloaf has significant input into some of the software that went into that space craft. Say what you want about his music (its shit) but the guy has made many important contributions to both the Linux kernel and also more academic code as this. The guy deserves more credit!

Re:What rocks even more (2, Funny)

lxs (131946) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939384)

First Brian May, now Meatloaf?
Is astrophysics mandatory for classic rock legends? What's next? Will Robert Plant drop his Aleister Crowley obsession in favor of studying the Pioneer anomaly?

Re:What rocks even more (1)

ushering05401 (1086795) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939784)

Will Robert Plant drop his Aleister Crowley obsession in favor of studying the Pioneer anomaly?

That would be quite the unexplained deviation of trajectory for Mr. Plant. Whether he is unmanned or not is up for debate. Has he been doing any ED ads yet?

Re:What rocks even more (1)

lxs (131946) | more than 4 years ago | (#31940104)

Crowley did write:
We place no reliance
on Virgin or pigeon,
our method is science
our aim is religion

Is Meat Loaf really a kernel hacker?

Right band, wrong person (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31945434)

Will Robert Plant drop his Aleister Crowley obsession

I doubt it since it was Jimmy Page, not Robert Plant, who was obsessed with Crowley.

Plant was obsessed with "oooh yeah, oooohhhh, yeah! Lemme get back lemme get back..." (And no, the Motörhead bass player and lead screacher was not lunging at him).

Re:What rocks even more (3, Interesting)

hcpxvi (773888) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939694)

Would someone care to explain this Meatloaf/Linux Kernel slashmeme for the benefit of an old codger who is entirely missing the cultural reference? Oh, and yes, I did google it before posting this.

Re:What rocks even more (1)

insnprsn (1202137) | more than 4 years ago | (#31940218)

+1 for this, explanation please?

Re:What rocks even more (1)

ShadowRangerRIT (1301549) | more than 4 years ago | (#31940258)

It's a meme? That's the first I've heard of it. Maybe because this is the first time someone modded it interesting (I bump up Interesting and Informative by a point for the filter). I suppose people do it for the same reason the like inserting false facts into Wikipedia, trolling for giggles, but I'll admit this is an unusually odd manifestation. Choosing Meatloaf (over any other public figure) has the advantage of getting Google really confused; it doesn't know the difference between the person and the food, since Linux has nothing to do with either. I'd be curious to know the origin myself.

Re:What rocks even more (1)

dotancohen (1015143) | more than 4 years ago | (#31944452)

Would someone care to explain this Meatloaf/Linux Kernel slashmeme for the benefit of an old codger who is entirely missing the cultural reference? Oh, and yes, I did google it before posting this.

Meatloaf has contributed some driver code, I think it was the winmodems, under at least two different pseudonyms. Of course, "Meatloaf" is itself a pseudonym!

Re:Now that.... (1)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 4 years ago | (#31938956)

...rocks !

No doubt! I mean I though those Hayabusa Smart cars were cool, but this is Awesome!

Re:Now that.... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31939226)

No, it locks.

Re:Now that.... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31945148)

lacist

Re:Now that.... (4, Interesting)

couchslug (175151) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939242)

The more we can do without sending humans to do it in person, the faster exploration will progress.

Re:Now that.... (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31939480)

The more we can do without sending humans to do it in person, the longer it will take before we colonize other planets.

In my opinion eploration by itself has very little value unless we use the knowledge we gain. If we don't intend to put more humans in space I don't really see any big reason to put more robots in space.

Re:Now that.... (2, Insightful)

blair1q (305137) | more than 4 years ago | (#31941936)

We need to know more before sending humans because if a colony of humans dies determining the hundred reasons that colonizing that spot is impossible then it's as though you were simply gambling lives for your own amusement.

Really, unless the exploring humans luck into somewhere they can take off their helmets and gloves and physically interact with the environment, they might as well be here watching it on TV.

Re:Now that.... (3, Insightful)

element-o.p. (939033) | more than 4 years ago | (#31942738)

Really, unless the exploring humans luck into somewhere they can take off their helmets and gloves and physically interact with the environment, they might as well be here watching it on TV.

Gotta disagree with you there. Given the choice of walking on the moon in helmet and gloves or watching a robot crawl across the moon on T.V., I'd much rather be in the helmet and gloves actually on the moon. Even HD and 5.1 surround sound can't capture all the experience of actually being there.

Re:Now that.... (2, Insightful)

couchslug (175151) | more than 4 years ago | (#31943306)

People tend to confuse "using the knowledge we gain" with "sending humans quickly".

That was fine in terrestrial exploration when men and ships were throwaways. There is a silly emotional need to lead with flesh when the technology we (absolutely) require (anyway) for humans to exploit their environment is not mature. Remote-manned tech, be it distant-manned on Earth or closely-manned onsite, is still remote-manned.

We are sending humans for their own amusement, not because they are useful to the process. At the moment they are a waste of resources. We have eons to send tourists, but actual exploration no longer has anything to do with putting meat on the spot.

Those who want adventure should pay a commercial outfit to give it to them. Knowledge and power are more useful.

Re:Now that.... (1)

lwsimon (724555) | more than 4 years ago | (#31945646)

With the exception of colonization, which is (in my estimation) 50 years of dedicated research away, you're right.

Re:Now that.... (1)

rwa2 (4391) | more than 4 years ago | (#31941408)

Sounds cool... how long before we can start mining the stuff?

It would be neat to be able to start hijacking mineral and ice asteroids into LEO and start figuring out how to process the material from them so we don't have to spend so much resources launching mass up from the Earth. I'd say this is probably a pretty important first step in commercializing the space industry, beyond simply ferrying satellites or creating space hotels. Plus it's compartively low risk (other than getting attacked by astrologers)... just build some thrusters to harvest small asteroids and park them in Earth orbit; once they're there you can do some science and analysis on them and start auctioning off material for projects.

Yeah, been playing EVE and Vendetta Online a bit too much.

Re:Now that.... (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 4 years ago | (#31942154)

...just build some thrusters to harvest small asteroids and park them in Earth orbit;

Right idea, wrong implementation. You send the harvesters to the asteroids, and then ship the water/ice to the various fuel depots. Why move the entire asteroid around when all you need is the ice?

Re:Now that.... (1)

mbone (558574) | more than 4 years ago | (#31942504)

History is against you. The 10 years (1962-1972) of manned space exploration has never been matched by unmanned probes. Partly this is capabilities, partly this is politics, but the experiment has been tried and the results are against you.

Re:Now that.... (2, Insightful)

vtcodger (957785) | more than 4 years ago | (#31943680)

***History is against you. The 10 years (1962-1972) of manned space exploration has never been matched by unmanned probes.***

With the notable exception of the return of lunar material during the Apollo program, most important research has been done with unmanned devices -- Viking, Spirit, Hubble etc. In a sane environment, what Skylab 1973-1974 would have established was that there was very little need or use for humans in space -- at least in the 20th Century and probably well into the 21st as well. Instead we ended up with the monster, money sucking black hole of the space shuttle/ISS whose very high cost, and inability to meet schedule objectives probably set space science overall back at least a decade.

Re:Now that.... (1)

izomiac (815208) | more than 4 years ago | (#31944832)

It depends on what you view as exploration. If you care about mapping the universe, finding out relative concentrations of various elements, and building better probes, then unmanned exploration is the best choice. If you care more about more literally "traveling somewhere in search of discovery", developing human-oriented technology, or learning more about biology then manned exploration is better. Plus, of things that are intrinsically useless, which stimulates the human mind more, knowing the mineral composition of Neptune's moons, or being able to scale Olympus Mons?

Re:Now that.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31939576)

All we found out there was a bunch of smeggin rocks.

Re:Now that.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31942736)

In other news, the Space Music Industry Association of Aliens has announced they are suing the Japanese astronauts for piracy, claiming theft of copyrighted materials. "We have the rights to all Space Rock" claimed SMIAA spokesalien Marvin Martian, "and we intend to enforce our claims".

This rocks! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31938822)

This rocks!

Smart enough not to land it on their own soil. (4, Funny)

Orga (1720130) | more than 4 years ago | (#31938836)

Picked another big island at least.. you know, in case the blob needs to be isolated. Al though I'd think if they landed in Japan at least Godzilla could melt it if it got too large. Oh well.

Re:Smart enough not to land it on their own soil. (5, Insightful)

DamageLabs (980310) | more than 4 years ago | (#31938992)

Australia IS a bigger target. Probably easier to hit.

Re:Smart enough not to land it on their own soil. (2, Funny)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939348)

They also have extensive experience with rocks. [about.com]

Re:Smart enough not to land it on their own soil. (3, Informative)

blair1q (305137) | more than 4 years ago | (#31942010)

and ducking re-entering spacecraft [nytimes.com]

Re:Smart enough not to land it on their own soil. (1)

Ruvim (889012) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939794)

There are much more deserted areas in Australia [wikipedia.org] than in Japan

Re:Smart enough not to land it on their own soil. (1)

snarfies (115214) | more than 4 years ago | (#31940178)

Indeed. The Zeon forces in the One Year War managed to drop an entire space colony on Sydney during Operation British [wikipedia.org] . It wasn't their actual target, but as you say, it was so much easier to hit...

Re:Smart enough not to land it on their own soil. (1)

networkconsultant (1224452) | more than 4 years ago | (#31940300)

It's all part of the plan to overtake Australia, they've wanted it ever since WWII, now they can let their alien minions do the dirty work and come in like heroes after the years of devastation. I for one welcome our new rocky asteroid based alien overlords.

Re:Smart enough not to land it on their own soil. (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#31942004)

Yeah, but most of it you wouldn't want to hit.

Andromeda Strain (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31939136)

Do they have a 'Wildfire' installation in Australia to study any space microbes that might be on the rock?

Re:Smart enough not to land it on their own soil. (1)

SnarfQuest (469614) | more than 4 years ago | (#31940590)

Does this mean no Taco Bell target? I want a chance at free food!

yay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31938886)

space cooties, joy

Re:yay (1)

singingjim1 (1070652) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939046)

Not that I really believe something catastrophic will come of it, but I was thinking the same thing. :)

Re:yay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31939396)

Wormwood... look at the shape of the asteroid.

Best story title ever. (1, Troll)

verbalcontract (909922) | more than 4 years ago | (#31938900)

They used the fly-fly machine to bring sky hard-things to the big blue room's floor!

Meh (0)

0racle (667029) | more than 4 years ago | (#31938902)

It's been done.

This can only end,... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31938904)

with the destruction of Tokyo by a giant lizard or mecha.

Re:This can only end,... (1)

vikingpower (768921) | more than 4 years ago | (#31938970)

...by a giant lizard or mecha.

Nope. By the Shrike.

Re:This can only end,... (1)

Mindcontrolled (1388007) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939196)

Since when does the Shrike need means of transport to get to where it wants to be?

Re:This can only end,... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31940150)

Or the worst case scenario: a giant moth.

Maybe? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31939050)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_rock [wikipedia.org] Maybe this will put an end to the pop music craze.

Earth on crash course? (2, Interesting)

adosch (1397357) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939086)

Anyone catch the doomsday paragraph at the end FTFA:

''If we're on a collision course with an asteroid we need to know if they are rock-solid or if they are piles of rubble,'' he said. ''That will help us predict how best to deal with them.''

...how many sinister space asteroid scares have we had in the past decade claiming utter calamity on the earth? I''m not claiming conspiracy theory on this one (so stay in your caves, trolls!) but it'll be cool to see what kind of composition and materials are uncovered on that thing; because it would be good to know. It's nice to get good, "rock" solid evidence to back up a lot of theories and guessed accuracies of our solar system that are mostly data interpreted facts and not visual or tangible.

Re:Earth on crash course? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31939360)

This is /., you expected people to actually RTFA?

Re:Earth on crash course? (2, Insightful)

MoeDrippins (769977) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939406)

Was that quote in reference to THIS asteroid? If you'll pardon the paraphrasing, i.e., "If we're on a collision course with this asteroid...", vs. "This experiment is a valuable technology and skillset to have, so if we find some as-yet unfound asteroid in the future with which we are on a collision course, we may repeat this process to find out its composition..." ? I read it as the latter, but I'm hardly a yardstick for understanding.

Re:Earth on crash course? (2, Funny)

durrr (1316311) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939536)

The quote doesn't say anything about calamity.
If you read between the lines you'd also realize we are on collision course with an asteroid fragment thanks to this mission, it will hit Woomera, South Australia, later this year if nothing is done to prevent it. I suggest we hit it with all our nukes after touchdown, that saves us the trouble of hitting a moving target.

Space rock? (4, Interesting)

Delusion_ (56114) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939128)

Oh, physical rocks. I thought at first this was about Acid Mothers Temple, the other Japanese Space Rock.

Re:Space rock? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31941836)

Oh, physical rocks. I thought at first this was about Acid Mothers Temple, the other Japanese Space Rock.

Bartkid sez,
That was my first thought, too, but I had Hawkwind in mind rather than the just-as-fine AMT.

Re:Space rock? (1)

BJ_Covert_Action (1499847) | more than 4 years ago | (#31942550)

Japanese Space Rock? That genre exists? Great, there goes another day of productivity in the name of researching something totally badass sounding. This better not disappoint.

What could go wrong? (1)

motorhead (82353) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939240)

Slip a zombie on the barbie!

Australia, not Ueda! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31939424)

Here's hoping that it actually lands in Australia, and not Ueda. [wikipedia.org]

Though hot springs are cool, too. ^_^

Dangerous (2, Funny)

vvaduva (859950) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939428)

What if the asteroid contains a dangerous life form? Don't these people watch any sci-fi movies?

Re:Dangerous (1)

2obvious4u (871996) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939466)

Beware the bugs! [imdb.com]

Re:Dangerous (1)

rickb928 (945187) | more than 4 years ago | (#31940540)

People say WE are a dangerous life form. So far, so good. We could be doing a LOT worse.

Re:Dangerous (1)

jpmorgan (517966) | more than 4 years ago | (#31943110)

That's fine, it's welcome to have a go on a planet covered by dangerous life forms.

Re:Dangerous (1)

rah1420 (234198) | more than 4 years ago | (#31944992)

First thing I thought of was Scoop. [imdb.com] And not that icky new version [imdb.com] either. Saw that and cringed. Give me my frickin' lasers in the central core.

Thank You, Japan (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31939452)

for infecting [arxiv.org] Earth.

Yours In Akademgorodok,
N. Haflinger

WooHoo AUSTRALIA! (1)

notommy (1793412) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939454)

You have just doubled your achievements! Your list now read:
1. Rotary Washing Line
2. First spacecraft to bring asteroid material to Earth

Wait.. It was Japanese. Sorry. I guess it's still the rotary washing line for now :(

Re:WooHoo AUSTRALIA! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31939984)

Don't they also hold the record of most different horrible ways to die by nature?

Re:WooHoo AUSTRALIA! (1)

M-RES (653754) | more than 4 years ago | (#31940922)

You forgot the Ute (pronounced 'yoot')... aka pickup. ;)

Andromeda Strain (1)

soupforare (542403) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939460)

Will massive beer consumption save the Aussie populace!?

Re:Andromeda Strain (1)

snspdaarf (1314399) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939770)

Well, it got me through college...

Re:Andromeda Strain (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#31942054)

Unless there beer is sterno, then no.

Re:Andromeda Strain (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 4 years ago | (#31944448)

Bah, no alien virus is a match for Russell Crowe, mate!

Space is the future. (0, Troll)

bobs666 (146801) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939462)

Being able to acquire materials from space will be required. You can't explore space in a vacuum. LoL. Obama... to little to late.

Lovecraft. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31939484)

Soon we will know if H.P. Lovecraft was right.

Woomera is the perfect place. (1)

atheistmonk (1268392) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939486)

Any illegal aliens that come along with the spacerocks will be placed in Woomera Detention Centre for at least six months and then blasted back into outer space while the whales cry for them.

Re:Woomera is the perfect place. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31941320)

Surely you jest. It's Australia, they'll get put in Woomera for 30 days then granted Permanent Residency like every other illegal alien.

Watch out for Aviads! (1)

Mantrid (250133) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939520)

They've been wandering around there lately.

Am I missing something? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31939522)

Last time I heard, the japanese had lost contact with the spacecraft when it was near the asteroid after MAYBE taking samples. They had given up and declared the mission a failure. I must've missed something here.

Re:Am I missing something? (2, Interesting)

mbone (558574) | more than 4 years ago | (#31940746)

Yes, you missed a lot. They recovered it and are getting back, after a real "Perils of Pauline" type adventure.

Andromeda Strain II (1)

Wormfoud (1749176) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939538)

Let's hope some farmer doesn't find the spacecraft and crack it open...

Re:Andromeda Strain II (1)

Farmer Tim (530755) | more than 4 years ago | (#31939862)

Not likely [theage.com.au] .

Re:Andromeda Strain II (1)

M-RES (653754) | more than 4 years ago | (#31940968)

Yes, with the average Aussie farmer in the interior having about 10 million acres of land ;)

Re:Andromeda Strain II (1)

Farmer Tim (530755) | more than 4 years ago | (#31941470)

The pair pictured aren't farmers, they're erosion enthusiasts.

A plucky little space probe (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31939876)

There have been *so* many technical problems with this mission, such as failure of reaction wheels, loss of the rover during deployment, damage to the solar cells by a flare, loss of attitude and communications due to a fuel leak, and so on. The mission timeline [wikipedia.org] reads like "And then this broke, and we managed to fix it. And then this, and we fixed that. And ..." Yet they are getting close to pulling off the main goals of the mission (sample return). A failure of the sampling procedure probably means they've got a bit of dust rather than the larger pieces they were hoping for, but it's better than nothing! And the pictures and other data the probe has returned are very cool [isas.jaxa.jp] . The asteroid is a "rubble pile", which had been speculated for many asteroids, but not directly seen before.

The engineers and scientists that are running the mission deserve a lot of credit for keeping this thing going despite the problems (the contractors that built it, not as much :-)).

Might have Asteroid Samples on It (5, Interesting)

BJ_Covert_Action (1499847) | more than 4 years ago | (#31940134)

If I recall correctly, the Hayabusa spacecraft MIGHT have samples on it from the asteroid. Then again, it might not. The Hayabusa was originally designed to hover above the surface of the asteroid and fire a pellet into the surface, causing an ejection of material that the probe would then collect in a sample box. However, the probe has been having propulsion issues, amongst other things, and was required to land on the surface of the asteroid rather than hover above it. This, of course, was an achievement in itself. However, upon landing, the probe's pellet ejection system failed and no surface material was displaced forcibly. As I understand it, researchers are hoping that some dust or something settled into the sample collection bin. However, at this time, there is no certainty that it will contain anything.

The most fascinating part about this mission, however, was the fact that it was using four plasma thrusters to steadily propel it to its destination. To my knowledge, this is the first time such technology has been used as the primary propulsion source for a mission. Even more fascinating is that three of the four thrusters failed and, as of now, one functioning thruster is a jury rigged hack job that they got working by using the control systems from one failed thruster and the thruster and propellant from a second. That said, Hayabusa has been an absolute testament to the tenacity and creativity in problem solving of JAXA. It has been an exciting mission, and I am very much looking forward to finding out just how lucky the unlucky probe has been in collecting dust bits from the asteroid.

Re:Might have Asteroid Samples on It (2, Informative)

mbone (558574) | more than 4 years ago | (#31940784)

You are correct. No one knows if there is anything to be returned. I myself would bet for at least a few micrograms, which would be enough to do some real science.

Re:Might have Asteroid Samples on It (3, Funny)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 4 years ago | (#31940850)

Tenacity is right. Space probe engineers are the sort of individuals who could coax a car into starting with no gasoline. Or engine.

You're all missing the point (1)

smooth wombat (796938) | more than 4 years ago | (#31940166)

The point of this endeavor was to determine if this a true asteroid or a planet-bomb sent by the Gamilons in their attempt to kill us.

If it's just an asteroid, no harm, no foul. But if it's a planet bomb, then we need to get the Argo ready to take off and begin its long journey to Iscandar even though Queen Starsha sent us plans for the wave motion engine but couldn't send us plans for the Cosmo DNA device.

Of course, maybe the LHC is really the first stage in the production of the wave motion gun and all of this is merely a ruse to keep the people from panicking.

Re:You're all missing the point (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31946202)

Whoa... heavy!

Let me get this straight.... (1)

zerospeaks (1467571) | more than 4 years ago | (#31940612)

So the Japanese sent a motorcycle in space to bring back an asteroid?

Re:Let me get this straight.... (1)

element-o.p. (939033) | more than 4 years ago | (#31942864)

YES!!! And it's another Suzuki (albeit a *lot* faster than mine).

Crap (1)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | more than 4 years ago | (#31940620)

I thought this was going to be an article about J-Pop. I guess "Space Rock" isn't really coming back in Japan.

Maybe (2, Interesting)

mbone (558574) | more than 4 years ago | (#31940708)

There is no actual guarantee that there is a sample in the chamber (as the pellets misfired).

It's a remarkable achievement to get it back; let's hope that there is something inside.

Re:Maybe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31943272)

And would it be called asteroid rock or meteorite rock when it gets here? It would have survived the descent through the earths atmosphere and landed

Everybody is going ... (1)

Rambo Tribble (1273454) | more than 4 years ago | (#31941316)

... to look pretty stupid when the sample's mother shows up to claim revenge. Didn't these people watch the original "Star Trek" series?

Re:Everybody is going ... (1)

element-o.p. (939033) | more than 4 years ago | (#31942878)

"No kill I"?

Didn't they already try this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31941996)

I don't think the resulting havoc was worth it:

The Green Slime (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0064393/)

Creepshow? (1)

sharkey (16670) | more than 4 years ago | (#31942708)

Jordy Verill, you lunkhead!

And then a town dies (1)

one2wonder (1328797) | more than 4 years ago | (#31942764)

I have this feeling I can't shake that everyone near where this thing lands is going to die from some unknown infection except for the babies and drunks.

Re:And then a town dies (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 4 years ago | (#31944504)

Hot damn, that means I'm safe! Take *that* you self-righteous AA sponsor!

fuc4. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31942944)

Yoshimi? (1)

untorqued (957628) | more than 4 years ago | (#31943452)

Drat! From the headline, I thought this mission was kicking off a new wave of music in the spirit of the Flaming Lips [amazon.com] .

And to think I scrape space rock off my roof. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31945356)

This stuff falls to earth all the time. I scraped a bunch of it off my roof and pulled it out with a magnet.

Procedure.

1. IF you have gutters put bucket under gutter
2. If you do not have gutters find a place where the water channels and place a bucket under it
3. Hose off your roof
4. Collect dirty water and strain it through a very fine strainer (water only should get through)
5. Stir debris with magnet

The magnet should pick up iron debris from space. Rusty roof nails don't count.

Cost .0008 cents of water and a few dollars worth of time , 5 dollar bucket, and 1 dollar magnet.

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