Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Win7 Can Delete All System Restore Points On Reboot

kdawson posted more than 4 years ago | from the yes-we-have-no-recovery dept.

Bug 449

An anonymous reader writes "Astonishingly, the so-called system restore feature in Windows 7 deletes restore points without warning when the system is rebooted. This forum thread on answers.microsoft.com shows some of the users who have experienced the problem. Today I did a clean install of Windows 7 Ultimate 32-bit (no dual boot), and noticed that whenever the machine rebooted after installing an application or driver, the disk churned for several minutes on the 'starting Windows' screen. Turns out that churning was the sound of my diligently created system restore points being deleted. Unfortunately I only found this out when Windows barfed at a USB dongle and I wanted to restore the system to an earlier state. This is an extraordinarily bad bug, which I suspect most Windows 7 users won't realise is affecting them until it's too late."

cancel ×

449 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

In Soviet Microsoft (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32060968)

system reboots you!

How prevalent? (1, Interesting)

valros (1741778) | more than 4 years ago | (#32060972)

So wait, how prevalent is this?

Re:How prevalent? (5, Informative)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061068)

I thought I had this, but then I double checked and realized I had my system restore max space set to 700mb. My single restore point was taking up 555mb of this. I upped the space. Maybe some people are being too over zealous with cranking down the space? (I forgot how much it took up when I set it I guess.)

[Edit: Looks like the accepted solution on that thread simply increases the space allocated to System Restore! I could be right, maybe?]

Re:How prevalent? (5, Informative)

camperdave (969942) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061108)

It is impolite, if not rude, not to throw up a warning message or error message, though. You never delete data without giving the user a chance to say no.

Re:How prevalent? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061184)

Tell that to Gentoo Linux and their default WIPE /tmp ON BOOT option!

Perhaps my own fault for keeping stuff i need in /tmp, but still no excuse.

Re:How prevalent? (4, Informative)

slimjim8094 (941042) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061222)

Are you kidding me? /tmp is TEMPORARY! It's transient - that's the whole point!

Programs that store data of ANY permanence in /tmp are broken. People who store data of ANY permanence in /tmp are foolish.

Re:How prevalent? (5, Funny)

Shadow of Eternity (795165) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061474)

Foolish? I think that's an understatement. Using temp for storage is like getting angry when people flush your shit down a toilet.

Re:How prevalent? (2, Interesting)

wdsci (1204512) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061234)

I would temper the grandparent's statement by saying it depends on which data you're talking about. I mean, /tmp is supposed to be a temporary storage location - even the name tells you so. The whole point of it existing is so that you (well, the OS) can cache things there and trust that they're not going to sit around forever hogging disk space without having to remember to delete them explicitly. So I would expect that to be wiped on boot. (Same applies to temporary folders in Windows or any other system) Other data, though, I would generally expect to be kept. Especially System Restore points, which are pretty much useless if your last one is going to get deleted automatically.

Re:How prevalent? (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061384)

my own fault for keeping stuff i need in /tmp

Yeah....

Re:How prevalent? (5, Insightful)

Spy Hunter (317220) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061476)

On the contrary. It is *extremely* rude to throw up a confirmation dialog before every trivial system maintenance task.

As has been pointed out below, System Restore is basically only useful for resolving problems so severe they prevent your system from booting. Once your system has booted you don't really need older restore points, and they take up a *lot* of space. Deleting them is absolutely the right decision for the average user. The *real* problem here is probably the UI for creating system restore points not mentioning the deletion policies and generally misleading people into believing that creating restore points manually is a useful thing to do.

These people creating restore points all the time remind me of the people who get obsessed with defragmenting their disks every night...

Re:How prevalent? (2, Insightful)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061378)

In any case - whenever I have encountered problems with Windows I have never been able to get any useful recovery by using the "Last known good configuration..." It has always been a reinstall if I weren't able to boot normally.

So I would say that the system recovery feature is erratic as it is at best.

Re:How prevalent? (1)

Illogical Spock (1058270) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061450)

You are right about the times when the system is crippled and can't even boot. But when the system is OK but something starts to behave not that well just after you install a driver, a software or something like that, the System Restore can help you most of the time, specially when some computer illiterate friend calls you asking for help. 9 out of 10 times someone called me JUST AFTER the problem appeared (again, problems caused by the installation of something, not viruses of things like that) the System Restore solved the case. Some examples are the USB ports don't recognizing anything after a driver install (and no, uninstalling the driver and reinstalling the original one didn't help) or a very, very old version of something installed on top of a newer system that have affected some DLLs.

 

Re:How prevalent? (2, Insightful)

Illogical Spock (1058270) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061466)

It can be the problem. But is this the default for Win7? If so, it's Microsoft's fault anyway, as if a single restore point eats up 550Mb the default total limit could never be set to 700Mb.

Another question is why the restore point uses half a gig, when XPs restore points are a lot smaller than that...

Re:How prevalent? (1, Interesting)

jhoegl (638955) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061304)

Well just this week we had someone with a corrupted explorer.exe, it kept crashing.
After checking everything we figured it was an unseen virus or something and went to look at restore points
The restores were set to 0KB (seriously, they had KB as an option for a restore point on a Win7 install), so that was our evidence.
However, Im wondering if this is not somehow part of the bug. Ill wait and see what MS finds

Not That It Matters Much... (5, Informative)

Nemyst (1383049) | more than 4 years ago | (#32060974)

I don't know if anyone's been in the same situation as I have, but the only times I've had to use system restore were a disaster. For virus infections, the restore data tends to be infected too, so that's useless. For restoring from bad drivers, applications, etc. the only time I had to do that I went from no network connection to BSoD on boot which took me two days to fix.

I have disabled System Restore now, and I never ever suggest using it to anyone I know.

Re:Not That It Matters Much... (1, Interesting)

ls671 (1122017) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061018)

The only time I used system restore is when I couldn't reboot with new installed components or service packs so maybe MS decided that if you rebooted successfully, then you do not need the restore data anymore, hehe... ;-))

Not a bug (0)

Dunderflute (1001355) | more than 4 years ago | (#32060982)

It's not a bug. It's a feature!

Re:Not a bug (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061044)

And a borked feature at that. It should be deleting the virus-known-as-Windows in its entirety.

Don't expect a fix anytime soon.

System restore stinks. Image your disk (4, Insightful)

syousef (465911) | more than 4 years ago | (#32060996)

System restore has always been awful. It doesn't play well with anti-virus, it's slow, it's always been buggy. Worst part is I've only had it work to fix a problem for me ONCE in the couple of years I bothered with it. These days if I want to save the state of a computer that is working well I simply image the disk. More expensive and potentially time consuming but a hell of a lot more reliable.

Oh and don't image it with Windows 7 Microsoft tools. I had an issue with Vista's system restore tool once that had me scrambling for a copy of Virtual PC to read the images. (Vista system restore would just wipe the existing partitions then fail with an error before restoring a thing).

Re:System restore stinks. Image your disk (0, Troll)

GNUALMAFUERTE (697061) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061120)

tar zcvf `date '+%Y%m%d'`_configs.tgz /etc

m ... strange that your config backup isn't working. Mine is working beautifully!

Off course, I don't need to use it, ever, because my operating system works.

Come on guys! it's 2010! Computers are awesome, and we are exploring space more than ever. We discovered the whole human genome, and everyone has a touchscreen in their pocket! But ... many are still using windows and praying to their $invisible_man_in_the_sky. The future is here, but half of you didn't get the memo.

Stop preaching Linux (3, Insightful)

syousef (465911) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061154)

But ... many are still using windows and praying to their $invisible_man_in_the_sky. The future is here, but half of you didn't get the memo.

Please stop preaching Linux like a religion.

The fact is I can get a lot of software on Windows that is unmatched on Linux. When I want to run Linux software, I can usually get a version that works on Windows, but if I can't I run Linux (either on a VM or on physical hardware).

Oh and by the way I have a degree in Astronomy. In this area there's a lot very good Windows only software, and a lot of very good Linux only software. I'm not about to shut myself out of using any of it.

Re:Stop preaching Linux (4, Interesting)

scrib (1277042) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061298)

Yeah, it's great, which is why I run Windows in a VM on Linux. I keep a snapshot of a working XP virtual disk handy.

Why? I'm the go-to geek in the family and I've had to call Microsoft registration many times to reactivate XP after an upgrade or salvaging a drive from a dead MB. They're always polite and friendly, and reading the seven sets of six digits over the phone and typing in the response only takes about 10-15 minutes. But...
What about when that 800 number goes dead? Or they stop giving out activations for older XP systems? Or they finally say "sir, that's an OEM license and only valid for the broken machine, not the new MB."

Ironically, what I need the Windows VM for the most is iTunes. Thanks, Apple!

Linux issues can be fixed.
Windows can be reinstalled. Probably. Or you can buy a new version and migrate your data. Perhaps.

Re:Stop preaching Linux (1)

kainosnous (1753770) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061438)

That begs the question: Is the value of an operating system the programs that are built for it? Certainly that is the reason why a lot of people use Windows, but does that make it a better OS, or a better marketed OS?

If it were the case that the software could not have be easily written to work on another OS, then the answer would be easy. Anybody who has tried to do socket programming in Windows knows what a pain that can be. However, is that the case with these Windows only programs? I'm skeptical because I've personally never seen a FOSS project that couldn't be ported outside of Windows. I would appreciate insight from somebody who works on Windows only software.

Re:Stop preaching Linux (3, Funny)

Illogical Spock (1058270) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061482)

Please stop preaching Linux like a religion.

You sinner!!! I hope that when you are done in Earth you get a Job(s) as the doorman in hell's Gates!

(All right, all right, this one was awful!)

Re:System restore stinks. Image your disk (3, Interesting)

gandhi_2 (1108023) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061212)

My man,

the beauty of windows isn't windows.

it's active directory and all the other systems that ms puts together for fleet management.

i'll slap the shit out of the next person who says openldap. it is pretty easy to do stuff like point an entire OU to a WSUS server and specify how updates are done.

they've built an impressive system for enterprise setups that would take a shitload of work in linux. pushing down group policies to a fleet of macs?

Re:System restore stinks. Image your disk (5, Informative)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061258)

It is easier to push updates to Linux boxes, except those updates aren't just a small smattering of MS updates, but rather for every application installed on the box.

There are some nice virtues to Microsoft's myriad of enterprise tools. But suggesting that Windows boxes are easier to manage for software updates is not one of them.

Then again, one can also argue that instead of fucking with group policy and MS exploit patches, you could just run Linux and run secure boxes that are far easier to secure in the first place.

Re:System restore stinks. Image your disk (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061290)

i'll freely admit that AD beats anything Linux has to offer in a number of ways, but for patch/package management, RHEL's tools blow WSUS out of the water. WSUS is misery to administer, and offers no way to legitimately push updates, only to make them available the next time the server tries to update. It also forces you to do everything by group, no one off specific updates to a particular server, which is a minor thing, except for when you need it.

Re:System restore stinks. Image your disk (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061334)

Start slapping then, because AD _IS_ LDAP. No if's and's or but's. You can configure LDAP on linux just as much as you can with Microsoft's shitty MMC. Think mysql vs postgresql... It's still SQL.

Re:System restore stinks. Image your disk (3, Informative)

gandhi_2 (1108023) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061386)

you are a pussy, AC.

AD is ldap + bind + all the ldap client software + stuff linux doesn't have like gpos + ability to integrate with wsus, exchange, forefront, etc.

AD is BASED ON ldap, sure enough. it's way more than that.

Re:System restore stinks. Image your disk (1)

qupada (1174895) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061420)

I keep my /etc in a git repository now. Commit changes after each round of system updates and if I change anything major, keep a couple of copies of the repository on different machines. It has saved me from myself at least once when I kept the wrong copy of a config file after an upgrade.

You have to put up with a few apps (cups and wicd are good examples) that needlessly change files in response to hardware events, but in general the strategy has served me well.

Don't rely only on system restore (2, Informative)

cosm (1072588) | more than 4 years ago | (#32060998)

Yea...uh...system restore...yea. Better off using a full disk imaging utility, or using a 3rd party backup manager like Acronis or whatnot.

Re:Don't rely only on system restore (1)

drolli (522659) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061046)

Yes. if a system is important to you, then backup with a bare-metal restore is the only way to be sure.

Any professional who tells different is directly responsible for loss of data.

Re:Don't rely only on system restore (0)

biryokumaru (822262) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061206)

...a bare-metal restore is the only way to be sure.

That, or nuking it from orbit.

Wait, what was the question?

Re:Don't rely only on system restore (2, Insightful)

ls671 (1122017) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061310)

> Yes. if a system is important to you,

I try not to keep anything important on windows boxes or laptops so I never have to bother to back them up. So far, the only thing I found out the hard way I had to backup is my configuration file for game controls that the Logitech Profiler uses. It took me quite a while to reconfigure my games when Windows failed.

In some way, I could pretend that I do not have to trust Windows for the integrity of my data. I use shares on my file server to save things and repositories when versioning is needed.

I would feel very handicapped with only a Windows box at my disposition. Yet, I realize that this is exactly what most people have. Most of the people I know lose data when their Windows computer crash. I just can't afford it so of course I also implemented a proper backup procedure on my Unix hosts but I swear I have none for Windows boxes.

Re:Don't rely only on system restore (2, Informative)

TechForensics (944258) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061126)

I'm not sure even tools like Acronis are really safe since they run under, and are subject to restrictions imposed by Windows. For example using Easeus Partition Manager to clone the boot partition of your main drive to another clean drive will not produce a bootable disk, even if you copy the hidden boot partition (whose raison d'etre M$ claims is bitlocker). I don't believe anything that runs under Windows will make a perfect duplicate of your boot disk-- if you want to have a spare drive in your desk that can be swapped in for your failed C:\ drive without a hiccup, do what I do and boot your system from, say, a FreeBSD Live DVD (I use PC-BSD) and use dd. That is as good as you can get, and I've proven it works (just don't boot the system with your clone installed alongside your boot drive). (Of course, be sure both drives are the same kind, i.e. PATA, SATA or SCSI.) (Note: Most Live Linux and Unix discs will not complete booting from a SATA optical drive-- not sure why. You must use PATA.)

dd if=/dev/ad0 of=/dev/ad1 bs=4096 conv=noerror (with Unix it's as easy as that, though the disk names in your system may be different). If you are going to do this, be sure your destination drive is the same size, or larger than, the source drive, even if you're only interested in copying the first couple of partitions (the partition table will be wrong, and that will cause an error, unless all partitions are present). What I haven't confirmed yet is whether you can shrink all partitions on your source drive so their combined size is smaller than a destination drive that's smaller than the source so that the partition table on the destination drive won't refer to areas beyond its physical boundaries, but logically, that should work. (How about cloning your C:\ drive to a nice (but smaller) solid-state replacement drive?)

It's too bad M$ doesn't make a more capable OS, but we know why they don't.

Re:Don't rely only on system restore (2, Informative)

paulwye (1465203) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061232)

I don't believe anything that runs under Windows will make a perfect duplicate of your boot disk-- if you want to have a spare drive in your desk that can be swapped in for your failed C:\ drive without a hiccup,

Nope, Acronis (and I assume others as well--I specify Acronis because it was mentioned, and I use it) disk images can be used to do a bare-metal restore in the event of software or disk failure. You'd need either (a) previously-created rescue media, or (b) another machine with Acronis and (i) a spare SATA/IDE port or (ii) a USB disk enclosure. Works like a charm. In fact, IIRC, the replacement disk doesn't even need to be of the same size, except under certain circumstances.

Re:Don't rely only on system restore (2, Informative)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061264)

I've used Ghost and Clonezilla to make replacement bootable hard drives just fine. I can't imagine Acronis really fails in this regard, or it wouldn't be taken seriously.

Re:Don't rely only on system restore (1)

HeronBlademaster (1079477) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061286)

Note: Most Live Linux and Unix discs will not complete booting from a SATA optical drive-- not sure why. You must use PATA

Depends on the distro and your hardware. For example, Gentoo's minimal CD won't boot on my desktop (or wouldn't as of a few months ago), because it is missing drivers for my motherboard; Ubuntu's LiveCD works fine. (I only have SATA drives.)

Re:Don't rely only on system restore (1)

Machtyn (759119) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061372)

See Partimage Is Not Ghost [windowsdream.com]

Can't be affecting all users (4, Informative)

Zouden (232738) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061006)

I just checked and I have 9 restore points going back two weeks. I would have restarted several times in that period. The summary makes it sound as if this is a bug that affects all users. I don't think that is the case.

This is an extraordinarily bad bug, which I suspect most Windows 7 users won't realise is affecting them until it's too late.

Yeah or maybe it's not affecting most Windows 7 users.

Re:Can't be affecting all users (5, Funny)

buchner.johannes (1139593) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061034)

Warning: Your style of discussion hinders M$ bashing on slashdot and might get you banned.

Re:Can't be affecting all users (3, Informative)

vistapwns (1103935) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061038)

I also have old restore points, and in multiple systems I've installed Win 7, I've looked in system restore on several of them on multiple occasions and have always seen old restore points going back passed recent reboots. I guess we need something in the wake of all those ubuntu 10.04 bugs to make windows look like the monster.

Re:Can't be affecting all users (2, Insightful)

Nimey (114278) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061056)

It's kdawson. You can't expect fact-checking.

Re:Can't be affecting all users (5, Insightful)

kjart (941720) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061194)

It's kdawson. You can't expect fact-checking.

I kind of think this guy takes a bit of undeserved heat sometimes, but the 'story' here is a link to a forum thread with fewer than 10 posts (at the time of this reply). That doesn't seem front page worthy, well, anywhere.

Re:Can't be affecting all users (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061436)

Perhaps on a forum it's front page worthy?

Re:Can't be affecting all users (1)

Megaweapon (25185) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061058)

Posted by kdawson

'nuff said.

Re:Can't be affecting all users (3, Informative)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061224)

Agreed, I've restarted over a dozen times due to me mucking around and changing stuff via the registry. I've got 9 restore points going back to the 5th of april.

Re:Can't be affecting all users (1)

jabbathewocket (1601791) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061406)

its not affecting users who are not "too smart for their own good" and turned down the system restore size to the bare minimum that windows will require to do a windows update (without disabling it) IE user error blamed on software that is performing the way it should be.. same old same old.

Don't jump the gun blaming Win7 (2, Interesting)

MSTCrow5429 (642744) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061016)

I've used System Restore on my Win7 64-bit systems. If Win7 really had a habit of deleting System Restore points, it would have been detected and harped upon within hours of its release, 32-bit or 64-bit. Whatever the problem is, it's hard to believe it's Windows' fault.

Re:Don't jump the gun blaming Win7 (0)

TechForensics (944258) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061140)

I've used System Restore on my Win7 64-bit systems. If Win7 really had a habit of deleting System Restore points, it would have been detected and harped upon within hours of its release, 32-bit or 64-bit. Whatever the problem is, it's hard to believe it's Windows' fault.

Are you kidding?

System restore! So we meet again, my nemesis! (4, Funny)

assemblerex (1275164) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061020)

Last resort of the desperate! Failed restore ahoy!! Batten down the ram hatches, load the cache cannon and pray lads, pray!
It's going to be a rough one! A working restore is like catching the white whale. Sure you can do it but it might kill you
in the process.

Re:System restore! So we meet again, my nemesis! (1)

slimjim8094 (941042) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061226)

Does anyone actually know someone whose problem was fixed by System Restore? I sure don't...

Re:System restore! So we meet again, my nemesis! (1)

nextekcarl (1402899) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061262)

I know of problems caused by trying to use it, does that count?

Re:System restore! So we meet again, my nemesis! (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061284)

It helped me once. Windows update suggested a driver update for my mouse. (Yes, I know, it was silly to bother with a mouse driver update in the first place, but I figured, what could go wrong with a WHQL-certified driver for a USB mouse?) The new mouse driver caused bluescreens during boot. A system restore got rid of it.

Re:System restore! So we meet again, my nemesis! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061396)

I've had three separate instances where it fixed the problem. Each was on a different system. Two of those problems were from services preventing normal login at boot, and the third case was caused by a trojan infection on a parent's PC. Shadow Copy Services in 7 have also been mighty helpful when working with systems people have brought to me.

I do have to say, System Restore has improved a lot since the XP days. Back then the first thing I'd do on a fresh install would be shut it off. Now I'd be keen on leaving it on. That's just my opinion, though.

It's just one more reason... (0, Redundant)

jex.pwn (1776062) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061024)

...to go and download linux.

Re:It's just one more reason... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061094)

...where if your system barfs, you're just screwed. There's no buggy restore feature for you to try and save it...and less to complain about as people don't really do real work on linux boxes anyway...unless you consider developing software that's 5 years out of date and cool php websites. What a bunch of fags.

Re:It's just one more reason... (1)

jex.pwn (1776062) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061150)

Well, the one thing that I have to say I like about Windows 7 ( 1 thing isn't enough for me to use it) is the fact that they finally decided to do a livecd. Great recovery option. Which I believe Linux did first, and if the recovery options for windows are anything like what they used to be ( boot into safe mode ) then Linux has it beat there too.

Re:It's just one more reason... (1)

Shikaku (1129753) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061204)

There's no buggy restore feature for you to try and save it

chroot. And yes it can be buggy just like AC suggests.

Re:It's just one more reason... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061248)

chroot isn't a backup and it's not a restore.

Re:It's just one more reason... (1)

gandhi_2 (1108023) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061322)

My last 2 upgrades of ubuntu were pretty crappy.

I once did an upgrade of suse that lost everything. Every. Last. File.

You can do disk imaging in any OS pretty much.

But nice karma whoring.

Jews for Nerds! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061028)

Jews, also known as kikes, hebes, hymies, yids, gold niggers, oven magnets, hook noses, sheenies, swindlers, criminals, "firewood", and Arabs in denial are a subhuman species of reptilian extra-terrestrials and adherents to one of the world's oldest major religions, called "Judaism", otherwise known as "The Worship of Money" or "Eating Arab Babies".

Judaism was the world's first master race theory. The Jew religion teaches that Jews are the Chosen People of God and that there is a sacred mystical quality to Jew DNA. In olden times, Jew prophets would, under the command of YHWH, frequently lead the Jews on genocidal rampages against neighboring populations, and even today Jew leaders often cite Jewish religious ideals to justify their ongoing genocide of sandniggers. Judaism ironically found its mirror-image inversion in the anti-Jew Aryan racialism of the Nazis.

Despite only being 0.22% of the world's population, Jews control 99% of the world's money. Not only do the Jews control the world, but also the media, the banks, the space program, and LiveJournal's porn communities and Gay communities. All Jews possess the following features: an extremely large nose, fake boobs, curly hair that reeks of faggotry, one of those gay hats, a love of coke, a law practice, a roll of money, a small cock, or shitty taste in dental hygiene.

Jews invented both Communism and Capitalism. Karl Marx, of course, was a Jew, which was why he understood money so well, and in fact he was converted to Communism by another Jew, Moses Hess, the actual founder of Zionism, who ghost-wrote Marx's The German Ideology. Capitalism was created when Christian Europeans threw away their morals and decided to embrace Jewish practices like usury (see: John Calvin). Jews were the first group to create a sophisticated banking system, which they used to fund the Crusades in order to pit Christians and Muslims (both adhering to religions derived from and controlled by Jews) against each other to kill as many people as possible in a macabre human sacrifice to YHWH.

The Jew banking system was based on fraud and lies, so when it inevitably collapsed, the Jews just pwned as many people as possible by unleashing the Black Plague on them. Later, Jews economically controlled medieval Venice (the first modern maritime trade empire), and then crypto-Jewish merchants economically controlled the Spanish Empire, including the slave trade. Openly Jewish bankers orchestrated the Dutch Empire and founded Jew Amsterdam (later Jew York). Later the Dutch Jews moved to London because they thought it would be a better base for a global empire, and actually brought a Dutch nobleman, William III, with them, who they installed in a coup d'état (more like Jew d'état, amirite?) as new King of the British Empire. For hundreds of years, Jewish bankers controlled global trade through their bases in Jew York City and London. European colonialism was, through its history, essentially a plot whereby Jews could gain control of gold and diamond mines in poor countries and increase their stranglehold over the global economy.

Jews also enjoy slicing up baby penises for fun, some even enjoy sucking them. See below.

Jews also created Jew search engine Google, so now they can find all Jew information on Internets.

Some suggest that we should use Jews instead of dogs to sniff out large amounts of concealed cash or anything else worth smuggling at airports due to their sensitive Jew noses. Obviously, this is a horrible idea, because the pay is bad, and the dirty Kikes would probably form a union and demand moar money, thus increasing the burden on taxpayers everywhere.

Gotta love M$... (0, Troll)

correnos (1727834) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061040)

7: Slick like windows, shiny like windows, shatters like windows. I would like to advise ubuntu.com as the most surefire bugfix.

Re:Gotta love M$... (1)

indi0144 (1264518) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061252)

I'd advice Madriva as a real alternative (the Ubuntu option may backfire), well, if that person does not NEED things like desktop publishing or audio/video production they should be fine, right?

On the other hand, who cares about system restore anyway, the favorite pub for your average malware, I use snapshot on a live CD to make my backups, no bloat, good compression and have never barfed on me.

http://www.drivesnapshot.de/en/intro.htm

(not affiliated in anyway)

I don't use this feature. (1)

tpstigers (1075021) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061050)

I've never actually used this feature on my own computer (running Win7 or earlier Windows incarnations). I keep everything important backed up, so I'm never in a place where I can't just wipe everything with a clean install. Am I unusual in this?

Re:I don't use this feature. (1)

spikeb (966663) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061072)

yes

Re:I don't use this feature. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061174)

i do it too...it's easier to do a clean install when there's a problem

Re:I don't use this feature. (1)

chebucto (992517) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061332)

With Windows, it's nice to do a clean install every year or so anyway, to handle bitrot [drdobbs.com] .

Win7 Can Dlete All System Restore Points On Reboot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061064)

and yet it can't see why kids LOVE cinnamon toast crunch.

Re:Win7 Can Dlete All System Restore Points On Reb (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061276)

omfg cooo0ck nigga donkey ballz

ITS CINNAMON TOAST CRUNCH!!!!1

this shit is so delicious that you'd pack your ass with bowls of this and you could still get the flavor on your mouth!!! don't tell me you would not smear your face in the empty bag where this shit is packaged, the focking shit can make your pimples taste like virgin's vagina omfgroflomaololololercopter!!!1111!i

Re:Win7 Can Dlete All System Restore Points On Reb (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061440)

sent from my iPad

Q/A and the Left hand? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061070)

In avoiding the obvious chance to bash Microsoft here, and from a simple implemented feature and coding perspective, is this a seriously bad case of the left hand not knowing what the right hand is doing?

I'd like to think that the code organization and Q/A within Microsoft is respectable and better than most, but in an organization whose primary product is fairly recycled after 20+ years, how does something like this make it through to the shelves? I'm honestly wondering where the breakdown is here.

Just because it's evil windows (3, Insightful)

Superdarion (1286310) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061076)

So a few people have a problem with windows? It's not even widespread!

This wouldn't have made it to slashdot if it weren't for the oh-so-common hatred for windows around these lands.

Restore points??? (0, Offtopic)

mkozusnik (1319801) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061078)

Whatever happened to rsync and mysqldump??? Oh it's windows, nevermind, I don't use it. :)

I'm confused? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061080)

How can I complain about how I love Flash and hate Steve Jobs? This article is about Microsoft!!!!

Re:I'm confused? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061344)

...How can I complain about how I love Flash and hate Steve Jobs?

Just take off your clothes (aka Open Source Flash) and when you see Jobs, stuff an apple in his mouth, and roast him in a preheated oven until his rib is done. Then poop on his head and barf on your penis. That Job will blow the Apple out of Eden and the fig leaf off of Jobs.

Re:I'm confused? (1)

indi0144 (1264518) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061404)

It's easy, look:

So this win 7 OMG21122012ENDOFTIMESBUG just affect (I'd say its a feature) a handful of people at random, well at least I get FLASH hardware acceleration on my W7 box, and if I feel I don't like FLASH anymore I can block or delete it, unlike Apple.. oh wait! You can't choose on Apple land, Steve already decided whats good for you^h^h^h^his-H.264-portfolio, the same W7 decided you don't need your lame ass malware ridden back ups.

See? it's not that hard, COMPUTERS/CORPORATIONS/EGOS SUCK!

Linux = Does not run my software
Mac = I would not put up with their shit ever
Windows = you have to fight your way to gain control of the OS

We need another option! we need a 4th option, IBM wtf are you doing? oh righ, you're too busy with the green fad and milking corporations to care about developing a real OS.

Why move to 7 ? (0, Offtopic)

unity100 (970058) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061086)

xp works quite fine and does everything. did you ever hear the motto 'if it aint broke, dont fix it' ?

Re:Why move to 7 ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061186)

Better support for SSD.
Better support for 64bit.
Better support for running under a non-administrator account.

etc...

Re:Why move to 7 ? (1)

upuv (1201447) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061228)

Yes XP works. However it carries a monster sized piece of baggage. It is the most infected attacked security problem ridden OS on the planet.

Because of XP we still see a stunningly large number of IE 6 users. People who are basically handing over the keys to the house and the wallet each time they go on the net.

XP needs to die. Vista needs to go along with it. Win 7 needs to super cede. For simple privacy and security reasons.

XP is broke. You just can't see the monster sized crack. Others have seen it. A lot of others.

Re:Why move to 7 ? (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061342)

had 7 had the same level of widespread usage, it would be in the same position.

Probably a good thing (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061092)

Antivrus is always finding stuff in there.

Re:Probably a good thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061254)

I've never had that problem with XP, Vista or 7.. maybe *gasp* it's because you have a virus?

Fifty gay cocks spitroasting kdawson, serially (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061164)

while he screams girlishly in pain and delight, not sure whether to beg for mercy, or to beg for more.

Windows won't go away by mocking it (3, Informative)

h00manist (800926) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061170)

Got to be smarter than that. I dislike monopolies and MS as much as anyone, but finding problems and publicizing them will only help test it and reduce QA labor costs for Microsoft. It won't make people not use it, or wonder if Linux or anything else is better. Testing some programs for Linux will be better, talking to people managing various projects, writing user manuals for a few programs. Wine HQ has lots of programs that need testing and installation instructions. Questioning copyrights and patents could get some results, campaigning for legislation change. But just bashing Microsoft and saying "in Linux it is better" won't do much.

Probably not a Win 7 bug... (4, Interesting)

ghostis (165022) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061188)

Given the recent similar issue with supposedly buggy Windows updates, I say this is an undetected root kit cleaning up after itself.

Re:Probably not a Win 7 bug... (1)

indi0144 (1264518) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061410)

mod up!

It's a feature... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061192)

In the next service pack it will prune the whole c:\windows\ directory...

A New Microsoft Sales Strategy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061196)

System restore promises (in theory) that you should be able to roll back to an earlier state, perhaps before installing an app or upgrade that messed your system up.

Now, we know Microsoft has had problems getting people to adopt upgrades -- users are still happy to run XP or IE6 or whatever. Could this "bug" be another method to force upgrades?

You see the "system update" in your system tray... so you just install upgrades without thinking. Suddenly, you have a new browser -- or even a newer version of the OS. You never worried about this before and don't keep backups before installing upgrades because you believe in System Restore. Except now all of those restore points are missing.

And then it gets worse -- you accidentally upgraded to a "trial version" of the new OS, but you can't roll it back. So, you either pay Microsoft $100 for the full version of the new OS, or you go through the pain in the ass of reinstalling from scratch.

Of course, I don't think MS would actually do this. But I bet such a scheme would ensnare a few million casual users. Watch out for a similar "bug" appearing in older versions of Windows during some sort of "security update"....

wtf (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32061230)

So I single thread with a total of 8 posts spread over nearly 4 months classifies as an 'extrodinary bug' and makes it to the frount page.

Welcome to slashdot, credability going rapidly out the window.

Restore points never worked for me anyway... (1)

TavisJohn (961472) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061272)

I tried to use restore points to fix things like were described at the top of the page... And not only did the restore point not fix the problem, often times the problem was the same, or worse.

So I never relied on it anyway.

WIndows 7 is still overall stable, but... (1)

antdude (79039) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061274)

... it has weird quirky bugs. I have this desktop refresh problem on my new office machine with 64-bit Windows 7 HP. Hopefully, SP1 fixes these things!

Bugs on your Windows 7 system restore? (1)

Bob_Who (926234) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061282)

Seems like they (Microsoft) have managed to continue flawed restore data loss in each new release. Ironically, it restores (through social engineering) our familiar role as beta testers that also get to (once again) pay for the privilege of a windows operating system loaded security concerns, flabby feature creepiness, and a corporate eula that is guaranteed to serve their interest and cost you time and money. We are subjected to this, repeatedly, in order to ease the headache of unnecessary risk, expense, and effort. All of this transparency is like living in a glass house, and we seem to have lost our stones. Gee, each new release its getting to be a ritual like a national or religious holiday. The tithe is more a mobster protection racket for your system and the life of the Motherboard and Godfather. Perhaps the Gates fund will one day heal malaria, but in the mean time they're hopelessly infected with "bugginess by design". The day they "cure" windows, it the day we stop buying it again and again like neurotic addicts chasing that elusive sense of clarity.

I destest windoze (0, Flamebait)

Ralph Spoilsport (673134) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061316)

I think it is an abomination against man and nature. I would like to see Microsoft erased from the planet.

That said, I have a Windowze piece of shite at work and I've done what the article describes and I've only lost 3 pointers, and they were off the tail end. furthermoer, I back it up enough that it doesn't matter.

So - does MS deserve to be hit an asteroid? Yes.

Does this problem exist? Not for me.

Why Baby Why? (0, Flamebait)

b4upoo (166390) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061354)

The latest Ubuntu 10.X is so good it is scary. Why anyone wants to run a Windows machine is really beyond my understanding. Do yourself a huge favor and climb off the Microsoft teat.

Re: Why Baby Why? (1)

DragonTHC (208439) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061382)

PC games.

When I can play every single PC game on Linux, I will.

I'm not against Linux, I'm actually an LPI and Novell certified Linux admin. I just play games.

Re: Why Baby Why? (4, Insightful)

Mr. Flibble (12943) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061418)

The latest Ubuntu 10.X is so good it is scary. Why anyone wants to run a Windows machine is really beyond my understanding. Do yourself a huge favor and climb off the Microsoft teat.

Maybe because some people have work to do? Maybe because they get paid to use windows applications? Or maybe because they want to run some specific applications such as games that won't run well on the latest Ubuntu?

Not everyone WANTS to fiddle with their computer, some just want to do stuff with it then go away and do something else. This is why the Mac is popular too. Narrowing yourself down to a single choice of OS and outright saying "Ubuntu is better!" is just foolish. It is like saying that Perl is better than C - but you don't even know what the problem is that is trying to be solved yet! It might be that a totally different language is better than perl or C, but without knowing what the goal is, you can't pick the best solution.

For the record, I am typing this on an iMac, with a XP Pro system next to me, and a Mythbuntu system off to the side as well as 2 other machines that I often change out OS'es on for different purposes. (Currently Redhat is on them at the moment).

Outright saying "Why anyone Wants to run Windows" ignores that different people want different things from their computers. Your solution is not theirs.

Re: Why Baby Why? (1)

LynnwoodRooster (966895) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061446)

Because some of us do technical work with software tools (schematic capture, PCB layout, FEA, 3D CAD) that are not available on Linux. So it's either work with a pretty good OS (Windows 7) or hit the unemployment line with the OS choice of geeks.

This is a surprise? (1)

NicknamesAreStupid (1040118) | more than 4 years ago | (#32061392)

Perhaps, many never even ran Vista.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>