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Next Ubuntu Linux To Be a Maverick

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the a-lock-for-the-primaries dept.

Operating Systems 319

VincenzoRomano writes "While the latest version of Ubuntu is still smoking hot, the Ubuntu development community is already working on the next step. Both the wiki and the bug tracking system at Launchpad have already been set up for Maverick Meerkat, which will be version number 10.10. This confirms the usual naming and numbering schema and the fact that the final release should be due in October. This next version, which obviously won't be Long Term Support (LTS), should sport a lighter and faster environment with GNOME 3.0, a.k.a. GNOME Shell, among the main advances. Everything has been explained by Mr. Shuttleworth in his own blog since the beginning of April. The first alpha release is not due earlier than the end of June, so maybe it'd be better to take advantage of the Lucid Lynx while the technical overview of the Meerkat starts getting more details."

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319 comments

Insert... (-1, Offtopic)

schon (31600) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075036)

Insert John McCain joke [verydemotivational.com] here.

Re:Insert... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075180)

Insert John McCain joke [verydemotivational.com] here.

Maverick Meerkat can see Windows 7 from its windowing system.

Re:Insert... (1)

cheatch (1713998) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075222)

Q. Why was John McCain running for President? A. It was at the top of his bucket list.

Re:Insert... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075538)

Except he already ran in 2000. Joke fail.

Re:Insert... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075446)

The real joke here is that you're using Ubuntu in the first place.

And no one cared... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075042)

It's peaked, time to work on something with a real shot at making this year of the Unix Desk Top.

Should have aimed for 10/10/10 (5, Funny)

Kelson (129150) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075056)

I see that they're aiming for October 28. You'd think someone would have tried to aim the "Perfect 10" for a 10/10/10 release date.

Re:Should have aimed for 10/10/10 (3, Interesting)

ElectricTurtle (1171201) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075288)

Yeah, too bad that date is politicized because it is the national day of Taiwan/ROC. It could be interpreted as attempting to honor Taiwan and by extension provoke the PRC. You might think it's silly, but believe me, the PRC tracks every little thing that happens in connection with Taiwan, even things that might only be coincidentally symbolic.

Re:Should have aimed for 10/10/10 (5, Funny)

Kjella (173770) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075496)

A "Perfect 10" is 36-24-36, if 10-10-10 is your idea of it seek professional help ;)

Re:Should have aimed for 10/10/10 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075588)

A "Perfect 10" is 36-24-36, if 10-10-10 is your idea of it seek professional help ;)

If that's immediately where you go when someone says "Perfect 10", maybe YOU should seek professional help...

Re:Should have aimed for 10/10/10 (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075728)

no no ... a perfect 10 is a 6 that swallows

Re:Should have aimed for 10/10/10 (5, Informative)

thePsychologist (1062886) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075676)

28 is a perfect number. It is the sum of all of its proper divisors. 1 + 2 + 4 + 7 + 14 = 28.

Insider story: (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075058)

The release name was changed to Maverick Meerkat in the last minute under the direct intervention of Mark Shuttleworth. "Masturbating Monkey", the well-thought release name which had already gained general consensus among the Linux community, was canceled for fear of retribution from Theo.

Maverick Meerkat? Meh... (5, Funny)

Em Emalb (452530) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075066)

I'm waiting for Naughty Nautilus myself.

Re:Maverick Meerkat? Meh... (4, Funny)

gzipped_tar (1151931) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075082)

Forget those underwater invertebrates. Naughty Nymph FTW.

Re:Maverick Meerkat? Meh... (1)

aftermarketgirl (1399563) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075400)

Oh, I remember this joke! Very clever. Can I order some new joke format please? Something about how Shuttleworth is an astronaut and therefore wears diapers, somehow connecting that to how he's being a baby about button placement. Thx.

Re:Maverick Meerkat? Meh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32076080)

Obstreperous Orgasm?

Sounds good! (3, Interesting)

Scholasticus (567646) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075104)

I know, I know, "'Ubuntu' is an African word meaning 'I'm too stupid for Slackware'" ... I don't use it myself (I use another distribution, not going to plug it here), but I've installed it for a number of friends and family members, and just installed Lynx for my brother, because: 1) Ease of install/configuration 2) Pretty easy transition from Windows 3) Lots of software in the repos And some other reasons. LL is pretty sweet, so I think Shuttleworth & Co. are on the right track in many, if not all, ways. So I think the announcement is pretty exciting. Gnome 3 looks very promising ... so next June' Maverick Meerkat could be pretty interesting.

Re:Sounds good! (1)

Elektroschock (659467) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075236)

And then there is Lubuntu. The "just works. no complexity" flavour of Ubuntu.

Re:Sounds good! (3, Insightful)

MonsterTrimble (1205334) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075924)

I use Lubuntu 10.04 & PPA repos (testing) on my 5 year old laptop. I like it in general - responsive, clean, simple. However, it does not 'Just Work'. To wit:

1) Lack of meaningful network tools - Pyneighborhood is the worst solution I've ever seen to this. WiCD & network manager like to fight it out over who starts which day. I STILL can't browse my LAN.
2) Plymouth - this one has settled down but it was a pure nightmare when I first installed it. I ended up removing GDM entirely to stop the hanging on startup.

I applaud the Lubuntu team and the complaints above are only my observations - I am looking forward to future releases and the maturing of Lubuntu as a distribution. As a probable future refugee from Kubuntu, I beg to not become part of the system and stay close to LXDE. Gnome is the king, the rest are pawns.

Re:Sounds good! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075868)

Whoever mooded the above post "flamebait" didn't even read the whole thing.

... I've installed it for a number of friends and family members, and just installed Lynx for my brother, because: 1) Ease of install/configuration 2) Pretty easy transition from Windows 3) Lots of software in the repos And some other reasons. LL is pretty sweet, so I think Shuttleworth & Co. are on the right track in many, if not all, ways. So I think the announcement is pretty exciting. Gnome 3 looks very promising ... so next June' Maverick Meerkat could be pretty interesting.

Re:Sounds good! (2, Interesting)

Tubal-Cain (1289912) | more than 3 years ago | (#32076050)

...just installed Lynx for my brother, because:

  1. Ease of install/configuration
  2. Pretty easy transition from Windows
  3. Lots of software in the repos

I agree with your first two points, but since does a web browser need repos?

Ubuntu 6 month cycle (3, Funny)

mxh83 (1607017) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075112)

The 6 month iterations are plain stupidity, IMO. Hardly anyone wants to "upgrade" that often, and when it's out, we all realize that it's the same old crap in a different color.. No real usability improvements.

Re:Ubuntu 6 month cycle (4, Insightful)

FictionPimp (712802) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075154)

I go from LTS to LTS. But those incrmental upgrades are great. It gives the bleeding edge people something to do, and it let's me keep tabs on what will show up in the next LTS.

Re:Ubuntu 6 month cycle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075416)

Bleeding edge people (not "cutting edge", really "bleeding edge") don't do releases; we keep on a rolling distro. Releases offer nothing if you want "bleeding edge", they only delay the software you want to use. It's bleeding edge because it actually bleeds; things break, and we like it.

Release early, release often. (5, Informative)

khasim (1285) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075156)

The 6 month iterations are plain stupidity, IMO.

But it gets current code out there and in use.

Hardly anyone wants to "upgrade" that often, and when it's out, we all realize that it's the same old crap in a different color.

That's where the LTS releases come in. If you don't want to upgrade, you don't have to. For years.

In the meantime, the other people are hammering on the short-release cycle code.

Re:Release early, release often. (4, Insightful)

IANAAC (692242) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075854)

That's where the LTS releases come in. If you don't want to upgrade, you don't have to. For years.

The problem with this is that many good applications won't support the release for the same amount of time.

Boxee is an excellent example, at least for the last Ubuntu LTS release. They dropped support for it as soon as the next Ubuntu release came out - not an LTS release.

Re:Ubuntu 6 month cycle (5, Funny)

Minwee (522556) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075220)

The 6 month iterations are plain stupidity, IMO. Hardly anyone wants to "upgrade" that often

If you don't want to upgrade every six months then don't do it.

Just let me know if you have any other really tough problems that you need my help with.

Re:Ubuntu 6 month cycle (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075264)

Hardly anyone wants to "upgrade" that often

Why then does reality disagree with you? Or is there someone holding a gun to their head forcing them to use Ubuntu or to use the six month releases over the LTS ones?

Re:Ubuntu 6 month cycle (3, Interesting)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075454)

From release to release? Yeah, the improvements tend to be incremental so you're not going to see anything Earth-shattering. That's just the "frog boiling in the pot" effect though. Compare Ubuntu today with Ubuntu from 3 years ago, and you'll notice HUGE usability improvements. Despite having been a Linux user in a "dual boot and learn it but still spend most of your time in Windows" fashion since 1997, Ubuntu is the first distribution that fully converted me. I'm still on Windows at work, but at home? It's been 3 or 4 months since I've touched Windows. And for the first time, I really haven't felt much of a need to.

Re:Ubuntu 6 month cycle (3, Insightful)

Seth Kriticos (1227934) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075462)

The 6 month iterations are plain stupidity, IMO. Hardly anyone wants to "upgrade" that often, and when it's out, we all realize that it's the same old crap in a different color.. No real usability improvements.

You aren't into OSS development much, are you?

See, as some others pointed out, the long term support releases are there for the more conservative / more stable environments. You can upgrade every 2 or 3 years and have your peace.

Some of us are actually curious and like to see new stuff at times. We like new releases. We play with them and see how they do or break, then we post bug reports and stuff. We check out the regular releases and are happy with that.

One important thing the Linux community realized was, that building something for two years in your basement and then trying to release something perfect will most probably end in havoc.

On the other hand, releasing often, getting feedback, keeping in touch with users is much more effective.

Another good example for this is the Linux kernel: an new version is released every 3 months. Works great, is stable and everyone can calculate on when to integrate. Also developers don't have to wait ages for the merge window when they can add their own code.

ps. And there are nice changes in a lot of places, though the focus of this long time release was obviously more on the stability part and a lot of people on the previous LTS release were awaiting this one eagerly.

Re:Ubuntu 6 month cycle (1)

John Whitley (6067) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075546)

Nonsense; "user visible" changes are very different for different people when it's a distro consisting of thousands of packages. Ubuntu's system is also far better than "release never", which was the seeming mantra of Debian stable for many years, and apparently RHEL's entire business model.

For my part, I like having reasonably vetted releases which bring incremental improvements. It's a happy medium between (e.g.) surfing Debian unstable just to get some new feature in one oft-used package and "stable" versions which are so stale that paleontology grad students write their dissertations on them.

Re:Ubuntu 6 month cycle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075550)

I agree that a timed 6-month schedule is stupid, but mainly because it doesn't seem to be enough time to get a release in pristine condition for release. I like openSUSE's timeframe of 8 months better. It gives the developers more time to fix bugs and add new features. And with some of the experimental crap Ubuntu shoves into seemingly every release, two extra months could only benefit both the developers and the users. Not to mention, you get a full two extra months before upgrade time, assuming you upgrade soon after release.

On the plus side, no one says you *have* to upgrade to every new release. You can easily wait until a couple months after a version is released to be sure all the bugs are fixed, or you could skip every other release. In extreme cases, you can go straight for the LTS releases.

But the problem is, certain software (especially web browsers) starts rapidly showing its age, so an update is often highly desired by the time a new release is out (at least for me). I kind of agree that "not everyone wants to upgrade every 6 months", but I also believe that most everyone wants to stay up to date. Problem is, with a typical locked release, you're forced either upgrading or suffering with old software. Why can't there be both? Can't certain major software be updated, leaving the kernel, GNU toolchain, X.Org Server, GCC, desktop environment(s), etc. (you know... system-defining stuff) locked while allowing updates of "additional" software?

Ironically, one of Windows' strong points is that you can do just this--just download a new version of the program and install. Sure, it may not work for proprietary, commercial software in all cases, but the ironic part is that it's often easier to upgrade free software programs to the latest version in Windows than it even is in Linux, since you're not restricted to the "official" repositories.

Re:Ubuntu 6 month cycle (1)

migla (1099771) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075582)

But it's not just "the same old crap with a different color". Even if we'd agree that whatever ubuntu develops itself is not much every half year, all the upstream packages will have newer versions.

Re:Ubuntu 6 month cycle (1)

capo_dei_capi (1794030) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075992)

No, an upgrade is very straight-forward, if you don't use the GUI stuff, and only takes maybe an hour of actual work. Just replace the name of the release in apt/sources.list do an aptitude update; aptitude upgrade then get rid of the bloat that comes with it, and your good to go. Unless there's a major change in DE version, after which you may have to look around for a new theme that you like.
The Ubuntu people usually warn you against this way of upgrading, but in 3 years of using Ubuntu I have yet to experience an install breaking on me after an upgrade.

Awww... (4, Funny)

Kirin Fenrir (1001780) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075122)

They didn't accept my name, "Menstruating Mongoose". :(

Re:Awww... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075170)

Nor did they accept Mating Monkies :(

Re:Awww... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075348)

masturbating macaw?

Re:Awww... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075544)

Morbidly obese aMerican

Re:Awww... (2, Interesting)

Crayon Kid (700279) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075602)

It's because of "mongoose". Shuttleworth was bitten by one as a child and has it in for them. Now, had you proposed "Menstruating Meerkat" on the other hand...

sorry, but Ubuntu failed hard this release (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075130)

I've used Ubuntu as my primary desktop OS since 8.10, and I can say without reservation that 10.04 is the worst of the bunch. Why? They broke everything! And I'm not just talking about button placement. I fixed that in the first 10 minutes. The reason why I'm abandoning Ubuntu are simple: they dropped the quality ball on this release.

First I noticed that VirtualBox doesn't let you use bridged network unless you manually install some kernel drivers. Googling found that people had this problem for at least 3 months, and they still didn't fix it in the release. Second, upgrading uninstalled my Java plugin for Firefox, so I had to manually add the symlink. Third (and by far the worst), my 6GB machine became non-responsive in the first 24 hours of uptime -- on the same machine that typically had months of uptime on 8.10 through 9.10 (I only rebooted for security patches that required a reboot).

In conclusion: if they don't fix these problems in the next two weeks, I'll abandon Ubuntu for another distribution, and I'll never consider using Ubuntu again.

Re:sorry, but Ubuntu failed hard this release (1)

TheDarkener (198348) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075624)

+1 (if I had the modpoints)! It seems that Canonical is definitely favoruing eye candy and new features in spite of under-the-hood brokenness. It's really sad to see *any* distribution of Linux become like Windows. Really sad. :( Of course, there is always Debian to fall back on :)

Re:sorry, but Ubuntu failed hard this release (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075642)

Third (and by far the worst), my 6GB machine became non-responsive in the first 24 hours of uptime

$ cat /etc/lsb-release
DISTRIB_ID=Ubuntu
DISTRIB_RELEASE=10.04
DISTRIB_CODENAME=lucid
DISTRIB_DESCRIPTION="Ubuntu 10.04 LTS"

$ uptime
19:06:59 up 30 days, 19:20, 1 user, load average: 0.04, 0.02, 0.00

I've been running Lucid on a test server since beta 1. No crashy. Works fine on my Asus 1005PE netbook too. Uptime there is a few days and counting.

Re:sorry, but Ubuntu failed hard this release (4, Informative)

tom17 (659054) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075648)

I'm in a similar boat. I did the upgrade over the weekend from 9.10. When I went from 9.04 to 9.10 I was mostly pleased, except a few irritating bugs and the fast user switch applet was removed - this previously made wife-friendly usage in the living room a breeze. I was all excited to get to 10.04 as it was returning. This would be Ubuntu's last chance to keep me.

Yes it returned (in a less intuitive place, the menu with your name is now all 'communication' based. The fast switching is located under the *power* icon... huh?)
I have already had a system freeze while switching user.

Sun Java was booted and now isn't even in the repositories. "OpenJDK is good enough for most people". I will try it for a while but I hope it is up to scratch for Java EE 6 development (doubt that). Now I have to jump through the proverbial hoops.

The whole Indicator applet/Indicator applet session/Notification Area/Volume control/Battery meter/Network icon mess is a joke. - The combinations of icons that you are allowed ends up with far less efficient usage of space in some circumstances. The reason they made the changes? To increase efficiency of space used.

I know some of these are minor irritations in reality, but it's mucking about with stuff like this, causing frustration with the users, that pisses me off. I know, I will get used to it.. *sigh*.

So it's time for a switch. Is Fedora Core wife-friendly? She is begging for Win7 so I may just partition it with FC/Win7 & Hackintosh - Maybe this is the OS that will lure me, cos linux (Well, Ubuntu) only seems to be going backwards.

Tom...

Just leave now, and save yourself the trouble (3, Informative)

Vectormatic (1759674) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075656)

Ever since ubuntu became usable without command line hacking (somewhere in 2007 by my account), they started fucking up other parts. They started adding in new flashy shit that no-one really needs, and forgetting about actually getting a STABLE distro out there. In 9.10 everything pretty much works on my desktop (wish i could say the same for my laptops, which fuck up on every release), except for the piece of misconfigured shit that is pulseaudio. If i try to play certain DVDs in vlc, all sound will play, except for the fricking voice tracks.. it takes endless fucking about to get this to work. And every single release the last few years has had these type of issues on nearly all of my systems. nearly everything works, but they never forget to royally screw at least one thing up, preventing themselves from becoming a true user friendly distro.

10.04 will NOT make it onto my main systems for day to day use, if i ever find the need to upgrade from my current ubuntu settups, then fedora is first on my list.

Re:Just leave now, and save yourself the trouble (1)

blincoln (592401) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075894)

They started adding in new flashy shit that no-one really needs, and forgetting about actually getting a STABLE distro out there.

Kubuntu 10.04 is much more responsive on my laptop than the last release. Unfortunately, whereas the last release was rock-solid stable on that laptop (once I manually edited xorg.conf to disable some arcane feature whose use was causing the bottom half of the display to be garbage), this new release is pretty sketchy. So far I've discovered that when recording audio in Audacity, there is a ~90% probability that all of X will crash (with an error along the lines of "Unable to write bytes: broken pipe") when I hit the stop button, or after it's been recording for awhile.
That specific error seems to have cropped up frequently (but in regards to different components) in the various 10.04 releases (Ubuntu/Kubuntu/Xubuntu). :\
Maybe I should look into another KDE-based distribution.

Re:sorry, but Ubuntu failed hard this release (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075660)

I'll never consider using Ubuntu again

That's a bit harsh considering the amount of work that went into this release. But there are too many regressions, that I agree with. Every regression is one too many IMHO but being an LTS I would've seconded a 2-month delay like during the Dapper Drake days. But that would come with a substantial cost for Canonical, so the release date was set in stone.

VirtualBox didn't work well for me on 9.10, but I'll add it to my list of things (or current gripes) for Maverick (though the Ubuntu WayTM would be to install virt-manager and run your VMs with qemu-kvm). Also, icedtea6-plugin is in main, but the Sun Java packages are not part of Ubuntu. If you're using the former, please file a bug report with the tag "karmic2lucid" on Launchpad (or mark an existing bug as affecting you). As for the non-responsive issue, that's very interesting and I'd be glad if you filed a support question for it so it can be investigated further.

And hey, if all else fails, you can always get your money back!

Re:sorry, but Ubuntu failed hard this release (2, Funny)

flabordec (984984) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075684)

No!! Please!! Don't!!! Continue using their free software, please!!

Re:sorry, but Ubuntu failed hard this release (1, Insightful)

moosesocks (264553) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075792)

I've used Ubuntu as my primary desktop OS since 8.10, and I can say without reservation that [MOST RECENT VERSION] is the worst of the bunch. Why? They broke everything!

Seems like we hear this with every Ubuntu release... especially in the immediate days following the release. Ubuntu seems to jump the gun with releases.

I don't necessarily take the view that quality's slipped -- the OS as a whole has markedly improved. However, they might want to do a bit more QA before pushing out releases.

Also, isn't the "I'll never consider X again" reaction a bit impulsive?

(PS. Did you install VirtualBox from repositories? The packages should have a DKMS trigger that fires whenever the kernel is updated. The kernel module requirement has always been there, and DKMS usually automagically takes care of any compatibility issues.)

On the other hand... (2, Interesting)

IANAAC (692242) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075928)

They fixed some things too.

Most notably in my case, was the use of an external monitor at a different resolution than my netbook.

That was horribly broken in 9.04.

As for uptime, I've only had mine running a couple days on and old Eee 701 (albeit with 2G memory), but it's been solid, so far.

Re:sorry, but Ubuntu failed hard this release (1)

timeOday (582209) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075940)

Dang, have your high expectations come from using any distro other than previous versions of Ubuntu itself? The ONLY distro I've ever used that didn't get wadded up in dependency problems now and then was probably Debian Stable, and that always ends badly when I lose the discipline to stick with the ancient packages and start mixing in new packages that inevitably poison the system. Same for RHEL.

I can't even run emacs on my gentoo system anymore ("emacs: error while loading shared libraries: libXm.so.3")

I really think the linux tradition of zillions of interdependent packages is misguided. What is it we think we are optimizing for? Disk space? It's not worth it. The most reliable packages, such as mplayer, are that way because they just bundle all their dependencies, and don't try to use any versions of the libraries you might already have lying around.

Majestik Moose (3, Informative)

mikemsd (225775) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075164)

I was really hoping for Majestik Moose. Seemed like the obvious choice to me.

10.04 - Best Ubuntu Yet! (2, Informative)

David W. White (1241890) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075316)

I went against my earlier decision to wait a few weeks after the official release, and upgraded the night 10.04 came out. For the first time since I'm using Ubuntu from 7.04, nothing broke! I mean - network, virtual box, mail everything still worked. My only problem was getting use to the placement of the control box on the left instead of on the right. In terms of speed, I haven't seen any visible improvement in startup, but shutdown occurs in way less time than 9.10. This is the best Ubuntu yet!

Re:Majestik Moose (0)

ElectricTurtle (1171201) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075426)

A moose once bit my sister...

No realli! She was Karving her initals on the moose
with the sharpened end of an interspace toothbrush given
by Svenge - her brother-in-law - an Oslo dentist and
star of many Norwegian movies: "The Hot Hands of an Oslo
Dentist", "Fillings of Passion", "The Huge Molars of Horst Nordfink".

Get 64 bit working properly (1, Insightful)

Threni (635302) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075202)

Seriously. I shouldn't have to dick around googling for out of date articles explaining which repository, script etc etc I need to download and arse around with to get Flash and Java working in the browser.

Re:Get 64 bit working properly (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075238)

Took me 3 clicks and no terminal.

Posted from my 64Bit Ubuntu 10.04 workstation

Re:Get 64 bit working properly (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075354)

Try sudo apt-get install ubuntu-restricted-extras

Impatient? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075214)

I didn't know upgrading from one mediocre desktop experience to virtually the same mediocre desktop experience could keep someone on edge.

Maverick Meerkat?!? (4, Funny)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075252)

I thought for sure they were going to name it "Masturbating Monkey"!

Re:Maverick Meerkat?!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075448)

I hoped for milquetoast multiculturalist.

Re:Maverick Meerkat?!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075474)

Pee-wee threatened to sue.

danger zone (1)

zerodl (817292) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075292)

next release will be Goofy Goose. though half-way into development it'll get a bad spin and will crash on startup.

No Gnome Shell (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075344)

I'm pretty sure Ubuntu is not planning on switching to Gnome Shell, they are highly customizing the old setup instead.

they missed the boat (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075382)

they shoulda called this release the Lusty Llama!

-db

Maverick? (1)

CosaNostra Pizza Inc (1299163) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075394)

This begs to be a Sarah Palin joke.

Re:Maverick? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075796)

The Maverick family would appreciate it if you could never again mention the Maverick family name at the same time as that former beauty queen from Alaska.

What's next? (3, Funny)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075396)

In defiance of spelling nazis everywhere, I propose the next release be named "kneeling gnu".

Gnome 3? Don't bother (1, Interesting)

Trufagus (1803250) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075486)

Steve Jobs is preparing a patent attack. Apparently it is impossible to create a GUI without violating their patents.

Re:Gnome 3? Don't bother (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075832)

Adobe is going to sue Apple for not using Flash and Apple will, in turn, sue Adobe for filing suit. Both will subsequently be sued by the RIAA and MPAA, after which they'll attempt to amend the new Health Care bill in order to force the purchase of cassette tapes and refurbished BETA machines on the American people. After the impending collapse Joe Biden will boycott all Arizona laws (for good measure) then patriotically bail out all oil companies that geographically reside near the American coast-line, and do not have proper protections in place in case of rig explosions. This all will be a big F#$%ING DEAL, unless Wall Street stands to make any money, in which case the current administration will be forced to threaten Iran with sanctions unless they un-train their Uranium filled, ICBM's from American bases within the next 5 years, or face the ominous consequence of being threatened with sanctions again.

I'm submitting Oily Ox for the next iteration.

Mod me down, you know you wanna. (1, Troll)

TheDarkener (198348) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075540)

Sorry, I'm just an ex-Ubuntu fanboi. 10.04 changes, again, Ubuntu's focus on the desktop. I need more stability than whiz-bang features that aren't-so-mature-yet. I use Ubuntu for LTSP networks for many people, and cleaning up all of this "Ubuntu One / Social Networking / ever-changing-logout-shutdown dialog / notification panel / network-damager / blah blah blah" type of newly pushed feature stuff each and every release is tiring. I 3 Debian stable+backports for mission-critical LTSP desktops! They don't change but the upstream code. They don't try to re-brand and cuztomize every aspect. Don't get me wrong, I still think Ubuntu is great for a single-user desktop. Just not servers of any kind. It just seems to me that the more a distro changes from upstream (in most cases), the more has the potential to break. I applaud the Ubuntu community (which I am still a part of) for pushing for such change and making it such an attractive alternative to Windows, but to me, personally, I think Debian is probably my best fit.

Gnome shell (1)

Tubal-Cain (1289912) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075612)

Playing with it in Debian, I find gnome-shell to have extremely poor performance. The dependencies (mesa) suggest to me that it may require compositing. What about the computers that aren't capable of compositing?

Ubuntu 10.10: Maverick McCain? (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075672)

No, thanks, I'd rather wait for 11.04.

Re:Ubuntu 10.10: Maverick McCain? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075784)

At least the Maverick is smokin' hot.

Just out of curiosity what happens in 7 years ? (1)

aepervius (535155) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075686)

What happens after Zealous Zebra ?

Re:Just out of curiosity what happens in 7 years ? (1)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075864)

What happens after Zealous Zebra ?

That was my thought as well. At "M" they are half way through the alphabet.

Re:Just out of curiosity what happens in 7 years ? (2, Funny)

pmontra (738736) | more than 3 years ago | (#32076056)

You start with AA AA, as in Adventurous Amazing Awesome Apes.

I don't get it. (1)

jvillain (546827) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075758)

How is it that every single thing that happens at Ubuntu becomes a story on /. ? A new name is prime for a press release or an announcement on their site. It is a waste of bandwidth on /. . Some of the stuff that gets posted here goes beyond minutia and straight to trivial.

The Slashdot Trolls all agree (5, Insightful)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075788)

The Slashdot Trolls all agree; Ubuntu is the worst OS ever made, and only caters to retards!

Which means it actually may be getting close to the year of the Linux Desktop. After all, it's actually becoming usable by "morons", a.k.a. people that have a life.

I don't care what they name it. (1)

drunkennewfiemidget (712572) | more than 3 years ago | (#32075820)

I just wish they'd spend less time with eye candy, and more time making it stable. It seems every release of Ubuntu becomes less and less usable than the last. My parents computers started crashing randomly, my wife's laptop crashed and took the filesystem with it, etc. Sure debian's older, but at least I can put a computer on it and expect it not to lock hard.

My parents and wife are on debian now, and I continue to play around with different distributions for posterity, but often find myself running back to debian or gentoo.

If you think that's awesome... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32075942)

Check out the adult only version "Mischievous Mink".

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