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Austria Converts Phone Booths To EV Chargers

samzenpus posted more than 4 years ago | from the calling-electricity dept.

Transportation 161

separsons writes "Telekom Austria, a telecommunications company, aims to convert obsolete public phone booths into electric vehicle recharging stations. The company unveiled its first station yesterday in Vienna and hopes to create 29 more stations by the end of the year. The stations may not be super popular now, but they should be soon; Austria's motor vehicle association says the country will likely have 405,000 electric vehicles on the road by the year 2020."

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Fags, niggers and spics (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32108216)

I love fags, niggers and spics. Chinks and kikes can fuck off.

Re: troll (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32108272)

Obvious troll wins if he wastes your mod point; go mod someone up instead.

Re: troll (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32108406)

Obvious troll wins if he wastes your mod point; go mod someone up instead.

damn right but they cant resist. nigger nigger nigger see, soon this will be modded down nigga

Re: troll (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32108704)

Way too obvious, you look more like an orc than a troll.

Something is wrong here... (5, Interesting)

T Murphy (1054674) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108244)

A company with outdated infrastructure changing it's business model to adapt to changing technology- all in a quick, relatively efficient process? Yeah, you've got to be pulling my leg.

Wait, do you mean Corporate America isn't doing it right?

Re:Something is wrong here... (5, Interesting)

masterwit (1800118) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108306)

But in future, payment, which is expected to cost a single-digit euro sum, will be via mobile phone, Ametsreiter said.

Ah the irony...I personally welcome new healthy ideas into any market. (Free market with healthy regulation, whatever no political arguments needed here)

Some more info:

Telekom Austria's charging stations will leverage the group’s existing infrastructure: the company currently operates 13,500 telephone booths countrywide, of which 700 are multimedia stations. In the first phase, the focus will be on multimedia stations that offer on-street parking opportunities for electric vehicles. By installing additional charging points, each telephone booth will be able to recharge more than one vehicle at a time. By year-end 2010 a total of 30 charging stations will be on stream. According to a survey by Verkehsclub Osterreich, an association promoting environmentally sustainable, socially just and economically efficient mobility, the number of electric vehicles will significantly increase in Austria over the next few years, with e-scooters exceeding 60,000 and e-cars 115,000 by 2015.

http://www.telegeography.com/cu/article.php?article_id=33006&email=html [telegeography.com]

Yes they did not go out on a limb to invest in phone booths, but using existing architecture in an economically and environmentally friendly way to address an emerging market, nice.

Re:Something is wrong here... (3, Funny)

Jurily (900488) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109240)

I loved the part where the submitter felt the need to clarify that Telekom Austria is a telecommunications company. Now if only he could tell us which country it's in...

Re:Something is wrong here... (1)

siloko (1133863) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108506)

405000 electric cars on the roads in ten years time

Yes, and with such accurate soothsayers in their midst what could possibly o wrong!

Re:Something is wrong here... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32108570)

they should invest into broadband internet for austria. large parts of the country are still internet wasteland.

telekom austria isnt the progressive force it looks like with this AD.

Re:Something is wrong here... (1)

am 2k (217885) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108584)

As a customer of Telekom Austria, I can assure you that nothing about that company is quick and efficient. They're the former state-run monopoly.

Re:Something is wrong here... (5, Insightful)

drsmithy (35869) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108844)

As a customer of Telekom Austria, I can assure you that nothing about that company is quick and efficient. They're the former state-run monopoly.

People love to say this scornfully, but they seem not to realise that if "Telekom $SOME_COUNTRY" _wasn't_ a "former state-run monopoly" then if they didn't live within a hundred metres of their nearest neighbour they wouldn't even _have_ a phone service, and the mere idea of a practically free phone standing on the street would be absolutely laughable.

Re:Something is wrong here... (2, Insightful)

am 2k (217885) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108896)

True, but the deduction "formerly state-run" -> "extremely inefficient" shouldn't be as unfailing as it is.

Though it has become better, Telekom Austria no longer sends three technicians to install a cable (two watching, one working).

Re:Something is wrong here... (1)

bhima (46039) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109194)

My experience with Telekom Austria and UPC/iNode has not been substantially different.. and actually not all that different from AT&T/Mindspring in America. So my feeling is that this is entrenched telecoms firms and not formerly state run firms.

I'd love to get 24e (Fiber) but my property management company won't have anything to do with it.

Re:Something is wrong here... (1)

Registered Coward v2 (447531) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109580)

As a customer of Telekom Austria, I can assure you that nothing about that company is quick and efficient. They're the former state-run monopoly.

People love to say this scornfully, but they seem not to realise that if "Telekom $SOME_COUNTRY" _wasn't_ a "former state-run monopoly" then if they didn't live within a hundred metres of their nearest neighbour they wouldn't even _have_ a phone service, and the mere idea of a practically free phone standing on the street would be absolutely laughable.

While I agree that government regulation (which generally means a monopoly) to ensure cost recovery (and profits) drives universal service since companies can provide service to uneconomic areas by subsidizing the costs; that does not mean it must be a state run monopoly. ATT in the US wasn't one; it didn't even start as a regulated monopoly.

As with any regulation, the idea was to limit competition and thereby ensure profitability. Universal service was one by-product.

Re:Something is wrong here... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32109168)

As a customer of Telekom Austria, I can assure you that nothing about that company is quick and efficient. They're the former state-run monopoly.

Takes a while to fix that reception issue in your basement ?

Re:Something is wrong here... (2, Interesting)

MemoryDragon (544441) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108646)

Actually Telecom austria is also the biggest mobile phone provider in austria (and a big one in severeal eastern and southeastern european countries).
Btw. also Austria has more mobile phone contracts than citizense due to the fact that mobile phone services there are dirt cheap and lots of people have more than one contract.

Re:Something is wrong here... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32108700)

It's like a Police Box, but without the time travel...GT Bike Parts [gt-bikes.info]

One question (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32108246)

What's a phone booth?

Re:One question (5, Informative)

SirWinston (54399) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108262)

> What's a phone booth?

It's like a Police Box, but without the time travel...

Re:One question (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32108288)

> What's a phone booth?

It's like a Police Box, but without the time travel...

Whoa! Dude! That's totally bogus.

Re:One question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32108402)

But that's not important right now.

Re:One question (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108586)

Well, stepping into one at least feels like traveling back in time.
Also, it’s bigger on the outside. ^^
And cleaner...

Re:One question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32108264)

its perfect for hotboxing

Re:One question (2, Funny)

tjones (1282) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108284)

A toll booth for the PSTN.

Re:One question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32108292)

That's like this movie ... where this guy walks into a box ... and talks with this weirdo who has this gun and shoots like ... everyone and stuff. There's this babe, who's like ... awesome! Dude! Check it out!

Re:One question (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108304)

>What's a phone booth?

That's where I first met yo mama ($YourAge + 9 months) ago.

Re:One question (4, Funny)

dakameleon (1126377) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108394)

I'm sorry, Yo Mama jokes with $variables just don't work.

Re:One question (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108430)

That's just as well. I should have said (9 * $Months) anyway. I shoulda asked yo mama how the old programming syntax worked before she fell asleep. :D

Re:One question (1)

siloko (1133863) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108582)

Well that's comedy and programming off the list. Fireman? Fighter pilot?

Re:One question (1)

EEPROMS (889169) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108544)

I can see it now in the tourist guides..

Warning!! when using public phones in Austria first make sure you are not earthed, there is a high probability of brain damage.

Re:One question (1)

M8e (1008767) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108960)

It's an wifi hotspot inside an (glass)booth that also have a payphone.

This looks like a job for Superman (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109326)

What's a phone booth?

It's where Clark Kent gets into his real work clothes.

The word will get a new meaning (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32109716)

In Finland long-distance trains have phone booths without phones and maybe the trend will spread. They're booths with amplifiers so that you can get a better signal when the train is in areas with poor coverage, which is the case in some areas on the countryside. Privacy is of course also a benefit but the most important one is that your fellow passengers don't need to listen to "what? can you repeat that?, say again...". The latter is such a benefit that I wouldn't mind if phone use was only permitted in the booths.

why, at that rate... (4, Funny)

Ancient_Hacker (751168) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108256)

Why, at that rate, they'll be able to simultaneously recharge 0.06% of the electric cars in the country!

And with the usual 30 milliamp analog phone line current, it will only take about a dozen years to recharge each car.

Re:why, at that rate... (1)

Pirate_Pettit (1531797) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108316)

Actually, that's a good point - how is using such a low-power infrastructure (even as a starting point) any easier than starting from scratch? Are they just re-purposing the pipes and sheaths from the old landlines?

Re:why, at that rate... (3, Insightful)

carlzum (832868) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108576)

It probably has less to do with reuse than business opportunity. They provide a service that doesn't justify the maintenance of the booths. They could remove them and relinquish control of the locations. But apparently they control the rights over the locations (at least enough to install chargers) and they're probably convenient and accessible for EV owners. That's an advantage over anyone else trying to enter the market.

Re:why, at that rate... (2, Interesting)

clemdoc (624639) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108786)

As far as I know, they're actually not allowed to give up the phone booths. Telekom Austria is the former state monopoly and they're obliged to maintain certain services even though they may not be lucrative anymore.
(Just as the Postal Service has been forbidden to close certain Post Offices lest the density become too low: Some retirements pensions are actually still paid through the Post Offices and you don't want old people to have to travel for hours to get their money.)
So upgrading an existing infrastructure that has to be maintained to offer additional services doesn't seem like too stupid an idea.

Re:why, at that rate... (1)

fractoid (1076465) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108772)

Actually, that's a good point - how is using such a low-power infrastructure (even as a starting point) any easier than starting from scratch? Are they just re-purposing the pipes and sheaths from the old landlines?

For starters, they already have the land reserved. I'd imagine the paperwork required to requisition a half-square-meter of public land on a roadside in the center of a city would be overwhelming, and that's not to mention the added drama of laying new cable routes.

Re:why, at that rate... (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109212)

Local councils have installed some electric car charging points in London. At the moment they're free to use (free electricity, free parking) once you've paid an annual fee.

They're basically a post with a socket on the top: Picture [green-car-guide.com]

I don't especially like them -- I'd like to see less traffic congestion in the city. You can fit stands to secure eight bicycles in the same space as one car, which is a much fairer use of some very useful land. Or, you can have an empty street without all the clutter.

Re:why, at that rate... (2, Funny)

Bob_Who (926234) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108344)

....And with the usual 30 milliamp analog phone line current, it will only take about a dozen years to recharge each car.

Yeah, but think of all the roll over minutes!

Re:why, at that rate... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32108622)

....And with the usual 30 milliamp analog phone line current, it will only take about a dozen years to recharge each car.

Yeah, but think of all the roll over minutes!

Yeah but the long distance charges will eat up any minutes.

Re:why, at that rate... (4, Insightful)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108374)

Why, at that rate, they'll be able to simultaneously recharge 0.06% of the electric cars in the country!

And with the usual 30 milliamp analog phone line current, it will only take about a dozen years to recharge each car.

Phone booths in my country have lights for nighttime use so I suppose they have mains supply as well.

Re:why, at that rate... (1)

dubbreak (623656) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108542)

Phone booths in my country have lights for nighttime ...

Ah yes, much easier to see the hookers when they are illuminated.

Re:why, at that rate... (1)

haruchai (17472) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109208)

The lighting benefits both parties - easier for them to count the cash, and you to count their teeth.

Re:why, at that rate... (2, Insightful)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109120)

Yes, I can do arithmetic too. 15 minutes charging a day * 405,000 vehicles = 101250 hours of charging a day, or 4218 charging stations. Except that number is a complete fantasy: the usage won't be spread neatly over 24 hours. There will be sharp peaks morning, mid-day and afternoon, plus concentrated demand in areas with a lot of rich ecoloons who think electricity is "clean" because the gas, oil and coal plants making it are located out in the sticks.

Even with the best charge rates and distance-per-charge figures, we're looking at needing ten times as many EV charging stations as we currently have fossil fuel stations.

Re:why, at that rate... (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109218)

a lot of rich ecoloons who think electricity is "clean" because the gas, oil and coal plants making it are located out in the sticks.

It is clean, from a local point of view. That's important, since pollution from petrol/diesel engines is a primary cause of respiratory illnesses.

Re:why, at that rate... (1)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109612)

Welcome to 2010. It must be traumatic being unfrozen from that block of ice and all, but things have moved on a bit since 1972. Here in the future, if you're concerned about the local air quality, the best thing you can do is to suck it through a modern internal combustion engine and catalytic converter. It will literally clean the air for you.

Re:why, at that rate... (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109662)

Then why do cars still smell? (Yes, including new ones.)

Re:why, at that rate... (1)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109702)

If you can smell car exhausts, then you do not live in an area with significant air pollution. Next question.

Re:why, at that rate... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32109222)

Why? I mean we will all charge our EV at home during night at off peak prices, right? So the only use we will have for the cityside chargers are if we're away from home, forgot to plug the car at night or doing heavy driving during the day.

I'm assuming that taxis, handymen etc. that do heavy driving during the day will have an alternate fuel source, or dedicated loading stations/battery exchange, so really I don't think we'll need more EV charge stations than fuel stations today, unless you count the ones at home and at office parking places.

Re:why, at that rate... (1)

haruchai (17472) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109298)

Math, incredibly useful as it is, is no substitute for imagination. There are lots of ways to deal with the need for charging stations and I'm cheered to see that there are at least some places in the world that are moving on this, unlike the pathetic efforts of my own country.

As demand rises, I foresee parking lots, whether at work, shopping centers, wherever, installing quick-charge stations. And those gas stations will likely do it as well. I wonder if any of the auto manufacturers have electric car designs where the battery is quick-swappable?
If so, you could have garage stations where you can pull in and swap your depleted battery for a charged one but that'll have lots more headaches than charging stations because of issues such as battery standardization, warranty, disposal, etc.
Initially, those kinds of stations would likely be manufacturer specific but then we could have the auto dealers performing that function.

Yes, there'll be headaches, and lots of them but I don't see it being anywhere near as difficult as starting from practically nothing, including expertise,
and having to build the highway, railways and electricity infrastructure as our forebears were faced with doing, 150 years or so ago.

Re:why, at that rate... (1)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109658)

Yes, I agree that imaginary charging stations are going to be the #1 response in most areas.

Re:why, at that rate... (1)

haruchai (17472) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109732)

Funny! But, you're wrong. At least in the short term,which may be a lot longer than I'd like, the #1 response will be that it can't be done.
Meanwhile, people like Shai Agassi will be busy doing it.

About emissions displacement (3, Insightful)

tepples (727027) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109344)

areas with a lot of rich ecoloons who think electricity is "clean" because the gas, oil and coal plants making it are located out in the sticks.

The advantage of such "emissions displacement" is that it's a lot easier to clean the emissions from one big stationary engine than thousands of mobile engines.

Re:About emissions displacement (1)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109584)

Sure, if you ignore that fossil plants will always lag 30 years behind vehicle technology because of their replacement schedules, we can all breathe unicorn farts and pixie burps.

The internal combustion engines that currently exist are so much cleaner and more efficient than the powerplants that that currently exist that electric vehicles are an environmental nightmare.

We can talk again in 30 years, m'kay?

Re:About emissions displacement (2, Informative)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109698)

The internal combustion engines that currently exist are so much cleaner and more efficient than the powerplants that that currently exist that electric vehicles are an environmental nightmare.

You are completely and totally wrong. Internal combustion engines used in automobiles top out around 25% efficiency. Electric motors used in cars top out around 95% efficient, and they're even over 90% efficient when acting as a generator (during regenerative braking.)

We can talk again in 30 years, m'kay?

In thirty years, you might be right; we might be driving EVs.

Re:About emissions displacement (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32109586)

Also, the one big stationary steam turbine generator is almost certainly far more efficient than a bunch of internal combustion engines.

Location Location Location (4, Interesting)

lordlod (458156) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108300)

I understand their desire to reuse the prime real estate they have for their phone boxes and convert it into a new profitable market.

However in this case I'm not sure it will actually be so useful. Typically you position phone boxes in pedestrian heavy areas where people can see them and use them. Normally you would want recharging stations in car parks, where cars like to hang out for extended periods of time. Do you really want to base your business model over having cars parked beside the road in busy streets for 6.5 hours at a time? Looking at the phone booth in the picture there doesn't even seem space for a single car to stop.

Re:Location Location Location (2, Funny)

j-stroy (640921) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108330)

This could work, so long as they surround the car parks with a high kangaroo fence...

Re:Location Location Location (2, Informative)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108376)

This could work, so long as they surround the car parks with a high kangaroo fence...

Austria not Australia.

Though for all I know they have a few Kangaroos in Austria too.

Re:Location Location Location (1)

Ranma-sensei (800217) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108912)

This could work, so long as they surround the car parks with a high kangaroo fence...

Veeery funny. We Austrians have t-shirts explaining the difference because we're sick of talking ourselves black in the face.

Re:Location Location Location (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32109604)

What does that t-shirt say?
Hitler's birthplace vs. British Concentration camp?
Small insignificant country vs. large insignificant country?

Re:Location Location Location (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32109648)

I don't know that I've read too many posts by the GP, but I think he's funny, and intentionally so.

Back in the day, when I were a little sprout, I spent a summer with an uncle of mine. He has a very offbeat sense of humor, and he had me literally rolling on the floor of his pickup laughing one day through this type of humor.

We had to stop because a train was switching cars, and the siding they were using to do this ran across the highway. We'd been sitting there a few minutes when a brakeman came walking along the railroad tracks. My uncle says, "Watch this". He calls the brakeman over to us and asks, "What's the matter? Your train broke?" That brakeman's jaw literally dropped. He stood there with his mouth hanging open. He couldn't believe what he was hearing. You could just see him thinking: Nobody could be that stupid could they?

He started stammering about switching cars, but he was so shocked that he could barely talk. He never did figure out he was having his leg pulled while he was standing there, and I was laughing so hard I was lying on the floorboards.

I think you guys have been had.

Re:Location Location Location (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32109664)

Yeah, I know, mate. So do your counterparts in Europe.

Re:Location Location Location (1)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108448)

A lot of phone booths are next to the road, so that people can call a cab.

As to charging time, I would have thought they'll be more like battery swapping stations - take out your empty one, insert a charged one.

But who knows, I'm just guessing.

Re:Location Location Location (1)

MemoryDragon (544441) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108658)

Actually the austrian situation is different, the mobile phone usage is more than 100% since literally everyone has one contract and a lot of people have more than one.
The phone boxes over the last decade have been severely reduced, some have been dedicated to internet / telephone stations...
I think the charging is first thought as charging station for electricity powered bikes and other small vehicles.

Re:Location Location Location (1)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108904)

This company does not want to make a usable EV recharger network, they just want to be part of it. They want to transform what they already have into something that can make marginal money instead of costing some money.

That's thinking outside of the (glass) box (1)

Bob_Who (926234) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108326)

Its the only way I can think of getting some value out of zillions of mini 6 x 6 lots with booth enclosure and electrical feeds.

Re:That's thinking outside of the (glass) box (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32108598)

Should do what Hong Kong's PCCW did with theirs - they turned the booths into Wi-fi hotspots. [psfk.com]

Makes much more sense if you ask me.

Not Vehicles, gadgets is more ideal (2, Interesting)

flurdy (301431) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108880)

I would prefer that we convert the phone booths to mobile phone, iPod, etc ie gadget charging stations.

May need to offer some lockable lockers with chargers similar to what they offer at music festivals. But not sure terror / vandal paranoid people would accept that.

I have to admit I still use phone booths, but only as a quiet place to talk on my mobile...

Terrible idea. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32108332)

The kangaroos will hop into the phone boxes and be electrocuted. Just horrible.

Re:Terrible idea. (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108382)

The kangaroos will hop into the phone boxes and be electrocuted. Just horrible.

Better than shooting them. Bzzzzt

Re:Terrible idea. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32108604)

Only if Austria has phone booths in the Zoo enclosures

Re:Terrible idea. (4, Funny)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108668)

Only if Austria has phone booths in the Zoo enclosures

How else would the Kangaroos get news from home?

Re:Terrible idea. (1)

dbIII (701233) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108522)

Crikey! Makes the meat tender mate!
However mein poster, kould be wurst.

Re:Terrible idea. (1)

will_die (586523) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108918)

That or the dingo can now steal you baby and cook it.

bikes, not cars? (5, Interesting)

serps (517783) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108398)

Seems more practical to recharge bikes (either electric-assisted, or motorcycles), rather than cars.

  • You can physically get a bike closer to the telephone box than you can a car.
  • You can fill a bike battery an appreciable amount in an hour, given the system's power generation constraints.
  • You can fit a bunch of charging bikes around a box with bike rack technology
  • There's thousands of bike riders in that country already, unlike the car-heavy US

Re:bikes, not cars? (2, Insightful)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108408)

Well the title does say Electric Vehicle Chargers

But where... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32108488)

is Superman suppose to change if he ever visits Austria?

Hope they warn the older citizens of the change... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32108518)

Else, they might be in for a huge shock when they walk into one of those booths and try to make a call.

I'll be here all morning, folks!

electric device outlets please (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32108536)

Outlets to recharge a laptop or cell phone would be great too. Sometimes phone calls are *long*.
"Yes honey, I'm at the beach. Miss you!"

I imagine near the phone booth you could string out some cable to have outlets near park benches, and some wifi in the area would be nice.
*waves crashing* :)

Department of Redundancy Department (1)

fm6 (162816) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108572)

Telekom Austria is a telecommunications company?

Re:Department of Redundancy Department (2, Funny)

alchemy101 (961551) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108632)

Some of us can't understand an Australian accent you insensitive clod!

Ahnold (2, Insightful)

tepples (727027) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109352)

But is an Austrian accent like the Governator's any easier?

Re:Department of Redundancy Department (2, Insightful)

Ant P. (974313) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108972)

This is Slashdot. Some people would make a serious complaint if that was left out.

Where does the energy for thelectricity come from? (1)

BenJCarter (902199) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108588)

I'm just asking...

Re:Where does the energy for thelectricity come fr (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32108592)

Power Plants may be. Just saying :)

Re:Where does the energy for thelectricity come fr (2, Funny)

clemdoc (624639) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108834)

we have lots of people who carry the electrons for us. they collect them, put them in buckets and dump'em into the phone booth. no problem. most of the time, we just have the kids do that, as they seem to serve no other sensible purpose. how do you do it?

Re:Where does the energy for thelectricity come fr (1)

ctrl-alt-canc (977108) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109186)

From the wireline.

Re:Where does the energy for thelectricity come fr (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32109558)

Call Centres, staffed by the unemployed, criminals and retired folk will be employed to call the phone boxes constantly to maintain a 50-75 volt DC ringing signal down the line.

hi (-1, Offtopic)

katehudson06 (1805440) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108630)

What's a phone booth? Bol Apartments [apartments...roatia.com]

Location Location Location (4, Interesting)

mindbrane (1548037) | more than 4 years ago | (#32108930)

A handful of years ago I gave some thought to some business ideas that could make use of phone booths. I wondered if they could be viably transformed into secure, internet transaction booths, keeping the coin payment system as an option to CC payment. Phone booths have a high profile/key location thing going for them that's just waiting for the right entrepreneurial insight.

There is another possible use they should explore (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32109146)

Suicide booths.

What are you looking at me like that for? They'll have plenty of juice there. That way if someone going to charge their car becomes overwhelmed by the mind-numbing emptiness of their life think how convenient that would be to have a suicide booth right there. They could even leave the phones intact so that in case someone thinking of suicide has second thoughts they can call a suicide hot line and someone can talk to them and make sure that they go through with it.

Think how beneficial it would be. It would help reduce the demands on the environment by reducing the population and the need for electricity, not to mention the positive effects it could have on traffic congestion.

Range of electric vehicles? (1)

neumayr (819083) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109414)

Last I heard, electric vehicles were very limited in their range. Which doesn't seem to suit a country as large as Australia.
Have I missed some huge jump in development?

Re:Range of electric vehicles? (1)

neumayr (819083) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109428)

Oh, Austria. Never mind then..

Re:Range of electric vehicles? (3, Funny)

rtz (221437) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109474)

No, but you missed an important part of the story, I'll let you find the mistake yourself.

Hint: You're about one half of a large rotating thing wrong.

But wait! (1)

gman003 (1693318) | more than 4 years ago | (#32109710)

Where will Superman change his costume?

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