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First Non-Latin TLDs Go Online Today

CmdrTaco posted more than 4 years ago | from the is-klingon-in-there dept.

The Internet 302

eldavojohn writes "ICANN today switched on the country code top level domains for Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates, which are the first non-Latin TLDs available and are also fully readable right to left. Slashdot does not support them but you can find the TLDs in the BBC article. ICANN said it had 21 more requests for TLDs in 11 different languages. A quick note — if you do not have the language packs installed, you may experience unpredictable browser behavior in the URL bar. Right now countries like China and Thailand have implemented workarounds to achieve the same effect."

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302 comments

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Really? (3, Funny)

Tekfactory (937086) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111482)

China and Thailand have implemented workarounds to achieve unpredictable browser behavior in the URL bar?

Re:Really? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32111514)

Yeah, like www.bankofamerica.com.secure.cn

Re:Really? (5, Funny)

AnonymousClown (1788472) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111590)

Yeah, like www.bankofamerica.com.secure.cn

I have a better one: www.bankofamerica.com.secure.ru.

It has an algorithm that predicts what expenses you will have in the near future and withdraws your money and puts it in a safe account that's unknown to you so that you don't spend it. They did that to me - took all my money out - and then all I have to do is send them an email and they'll pay my bills - all for a $19.95 monthly service fee on my CC. I can't loose!

This is my first month on this program, so I'll let you guys know how it works.

Re:Really? (4, Interesting)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111912)

I got a better one. www.bankofamerica.com. See, I used Unicode character 212e instead of the e. Looks the same to most people, and would probably fool quite a bit of people. I wonder how they hope to stop situations like this. (I actaully used an e, because slashdot wouldn't let me put in the HTML entity, but this is good enough to demonstrate the problem)

Re:Really? (4, Funny)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111986)

I actaully used an e, because slashdot wouldn't let me put in the HTML entity, but this is good enough to demonstrate the problem

So, if you only could have done it, you might have done it.

Now I'm really scared.

Re:Really? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32112112)

TFS said Slashdot doesn't support those URLs. That doesn't mean the rest of the internet can't.

Re:Really? (3, Insightful)

phantomcircuit (938963) | more than 4 years ago | (#32112092)

Just for anybody who is interested and lazy... javascript:alert(unescape("http://www.bankofam%u212ercia.com"))

It doesn't look exactly like 'e', but it's certainly close enough to fool some people.

Re:Really? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32111848)

I can't wait to register mohammed.com in arabic and redirect it to goatse!

Re:Really? (2, Insightful)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 4 years ago | (#32112002)

I can't wait to register mohammed.com in arabic and redirect it to goatse!

You realize that now every Anonymous Coward is a target, right?

Thanks a lot.

Re:Really? (2, Funny)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111858)

Yeah, they are a little behind. They just implemented AOL keywords.

Good news everybody! (5, Funny)

sunderland56 (621843) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111492)

Slashdot does not support them

It is now possible to get a domain that cannot be slashdotted!

Re:Good news everybody! (5, Informative)

leuk_he (194174) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111766)

Yes you can slashdot them, but you cannot show a correct text-. [xn----rmck...xn--wgbh1c] Yet...

Thats all good (2, Insightful)

Johnny Fusion (658094) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111494)

But they will still need Latin characters to type "http://"

Re:Thats all good (2, Funny)

AnonymousClown (1788472) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111606)

Wouldn't the Latin URL start off with "HTTPUS" for the URLUS?

Re:Thats all good (2, Funny)

medcalf (68293) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111798)

That depends on if you interpret "hypertext" as motion towards, in which case the answer is no, or not, in which case the answer is yes.

Re:Thats all good (3, Insightful)

HiVizDiver (640486) | more than 4 years ago | (#32112034)

Don't you mean HTTPVS/URLVS?

Re:Thats all good (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32112066)

Only if your browser is a stone tablet...

Re:Thats all good (5, Funny)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 4 years ago | (#32112062)

SPQR://

Re:Thats all good (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32111706)

You no longer need to type http:// in most browsers to visit a web page since what, 1995 or so?

Re:Thats all good (1)

Johnny Fusion (658094) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111752)

Yes but you still need to type it when making a hyperlink in your mark up language of choice.

Non-latin TLDs? (4, Insightful)

kvezach (1199717) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111496)

Well, hooray for a more fragmented Internet. While every keyboard can type A-Za-z, that's not true of Chinese or Arabic, so sites using those TLDs will be effectively off-limits to those that aren't "native". Sure, the sites can also register an ordinary domain name, but then why not just use that domain name to begin with?

Re:Non-latin TLDs? (4, Interesting)

Just Some Guy (3352) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111560)

While every keyboard can type A-Za-z, that's not true of Chinese or Arabic, so sites using those TLDs will be effectively off-limits to those that aren't "native".

For now, I hope so. Imagine a RTL domain name, coupled with a phishing email telling recipients to visit moc.tfosorcim.[NEWGTLD] that renders as [NEWGTLD].microsoft.com. Won't that be fun?

Re:Non-latin TLDs? (4, Insightful)

C0vardeAn0nim0 (232451) | more than 4 years ago | (#32112036)

this a boon for russian scamers.

some letters in russian cyrillic look like latin characters but have different uses. example, the cyrillic character that looks like a "C", is actually aquivalent to "S", their "H" is actually our "N". so a TLD ".som" in cyrillic would be seen on the screen (and understood by westerners) as ".com".

so here's my suggestion to firefox developers: put some easy to see visual clue on the address bar to tell exactly in which language or character set the URL is written in.

Re:Non-latin TLDs? (0, Troll)

drachenstern (160456) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111568)

Not to feed the trolls, but since you're registered: It's called a link. Imagine that.

Re:Non-latin TLDs? (2, Insightful)

QuantumRiff (120817) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111576)

Everyone with a Western Keyboard can type A-Z and a-z. Not so with other countries keyboards. (btw, you can still type the unicode characters in windows, its just much more difficult). But really, if they have a Chinese language URL, and a site that is entirely written in Chinese, are they worried about not having you as a potential customer, when you can't figure out how to connect using their language?

There are more people online in China than live in the US. This is going to be awesome for their local online economies, as people will be able to use their native languages.

Re:Non-latin TLDs? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32111638)

While every keyboard can type A-Za-z, that's not true of Chinese or Arabic

utter bullshit

plenty of keyboards have no Latin characters by default however all keyboards can be used to enter any character set through software

Re:Non-latin TLDs? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32111722)

Or you could just install the input methods for any of those languages, and type the characters with any keyboard.

Re:Non-latin TLDs? (2, Interesting)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111914)

When was the last time you had to type in a relativelly unknown URL? (not things like google, gmail, your bank, etc.)

For that matter, when was the last time you had to type an URL of a site in a language which is off-limits to you anyway?...

This might help greatly in popularization of the internet in large part of so called "developing countries", especially since the biggest changes can be expected when the common folks get hang of it; they are much more likely to be fluent only in their native language and script. Or - imagine the uptake of the internet in the latin world if all URLs were in, say, the Georgian alphabet [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Non-latin TLDs? (1)

Steve Max (1235710) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111946)

If only someone could implement a system that points from one page to another, a "link" between them if you will. Maybe some text or image where the user could click and be redirected to some other page. Would that be even possible?

Now more seriously, how often do you type the URL for a site in a language you can't speak? Even if you do that sometimes, I'd say you would be able to get there by a Google search written in your native charset. I don't see this as a big issue.

Re:Non-latin TLDs? (1)

street_astrologist (1522063) | more than 4 years ago | (#32112042)

This shouldn't be a real problem, because normal users don't type URLs, except into Google/Yahoo/Yandex/Baidu/etc.

If you have doubts, just watch any non-software geek use a web browser for 30 seconds. The search field is the new location bar.

A small step for mankind. (1)

bornroot (795375) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111498)

A evolution of the net, rather than a revolution.

Seriously? (2, Insightful)

elewton (1743958) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111504)

Is it chauvinistic that I find this insane?

I wouldn't mind if they used an escape character sequence and then mapped other alphabets to strings of Latin characters, but actually breaking backwards compatibility...

Re:Seriously? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32111548)

they didn't break backwards compatability,
here's the brilliant standard http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Punycode
it's just awesome.

Re:Seriously? (1)

elewton (1743958) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111680)

Thank you very much.
TFA could have mentioned it.

Re:Seriously? (2, Funny)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111572)

I think unicode is a bag of shit. If ISO 8859-1 was good enough for Homer, Jesus, & Shakespeare it's good enough for everyone.

Re:Seriously? (1)

sourcerror (1718066) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111664)

If ISO 8859-1 was good enough for Homer, Jesus, & Shakespeare ...

It's not good enough for Muhammad and Buddha.

Re:Seriously? (3, Insightful)

Philip K Dickhead (906971) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111666)

Oh C'mon! Jesus used the Aramaic alphabet.

Shakespeare wrote in a "diffyrente waye", with an alphabet that included letters like the "thorne" - a "th" that is frequently mistaken for a "y" - hence our ridiculous "Ye Olde".

As for Homer Simpson? I don't believe he can write very much at all.

Re:Seriously? (2, Insightful)

bradleyjg (68937) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111776)

Jesus spoke Aramaic (AFAWK didn't write at all) and his followers recorded his life in Koine Greek. Neither of which can be represented in ISO 8859-1.

Re:Seriously? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32112126)

Homer also wrote in Greek. Me thinks you were just trolled.

Re:Seriously? (4, Informative)

tlhIngan (30335) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111888)

Is it chauvinistic that I find this insane?
I wouldn't mind if they used an escape character sequence and then mapped other alphabets to strings of Latin characters, but actually breaking backwards compatibility...

Except there *IS* an escape sequence. And the actual representation is in standard latin alphabets.

The reason is that browsers can detect the escape sequence and interpret the rest of the URL as a unicode string.

The escape is "xn--" - domains using it have xn--domain, TLDs as xn--TLD. Use both and they both have to be escaped - xn--blah.xn--blahtld.

The trick for the Rest of Us is to be able to set that as "off" by default to keep these xn-- sequences from looking like normal latin characters. The good news is the encoding is such that Paypal and the like don't get rendered as xn--paypal.com and such, but xn--junk_that_renders_as_paypal.com.

Internationalized domain names have been around a few years. This is just an internationalized TLD using the same DNS-friendly encoding scheme.

To all of you selfish westerners complaining... (-1, Flamebait)

BHearsum (325814) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111524)

Fuck off.

Re:To all of you selfish westerners complaining... (1)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111656)

I'm a Westerner, but I think this is pretty cool. Is it particularly useful for me? No, not really. Besides a semesters worth of Japanese in college, I studied Spanish and Latin, both in high school and in college. Amazingly, both use the Latin alphabet. I've dabbled in some Italian and German as well, but I can type the majority of those characters on my keyboard, too, or with character combinations to get at the unicode. However, if this enables further localization for geo-location specific sites and content for those to whom its relevant, then its a pretty big step forward. Most foreign sites which need to be easily accessible to westerners will still probably maintain a Romanized domain name which points to their English/Spanish/German content, while leaving their native language content accessible via the native language hostname, thus making it so that everyone is comfortable getting at information without having to switch brain modes. American and Europeans doing business with Asian and Middle Eastern customers will probably do the same, providing access via native-language domain names for their major markets. Is it extra work? Yes, but in the long run its going to be worth it, and it may provide an excuse for people to learn an Asian or Semitic language, or even an Indo-Aryan language like Russian or Greek which uses non-Roman letters. People should do that anyway, though.

Re:To all of you selfish westerners complaining... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32111676)

Don't you have any mosques to be bombing, sand nigger?

Social media IDN fail (1)

ketilf (114215) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111550)

...and both twitter and bit.ly fail to handle the IDNs correctly. Twitter doesn't make http://-./ a link, and bit.ly just says "Server Error".

But then again, nobody could have thought this would be easy... I have an email address ending in .name, and 4 character TLDs can even be difficult sometimes.

Slashdot IDN fail (1)

ketilf (114215) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111564)

Haha, way to go Slashdot! So I have to input http://xn--4gbrim.xn----rmckbbajlc6dj7bxne2c.xn--wgbh1c/ instead of http://-./ ?

(Not that anyone will see what I originally meant)

Re:Social media IDN fail (2, Interesting)

cpghost (719344) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111628)

I have an email address ending in .name, and 4 character TLDs can even be difficult sometimes.

I have and use .info and .name domains too, but have not seen any problems with them (yet). Maybe some programs don't check RFC-822 (or whatever it is called nowadays) addresses as they should, but this is not new.

Re:Social media IDN fail (1)

mikael_j (106439) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111904)

I actually built my own url shortening site the other day and the only part I felt was missing as of last night was that it didn't handle international domain names properly (and the language I used to put it together seems sorely lacking in an easy way to convert to punycode, it's got a whole bunch of functions for punycode to utf-8, iso-8859-1 and other charsets but nothing for the opposite).

Why not post example (3, Interesting)

grahamm (8844) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111552)

Why did the BBC article not include a link to a valid non-latin URL so we could see how our browsers cope? Even if the page is not understandable, it would be nice to know that the pages load.

Re:Why not post example (5, Informative)

tot (30740) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111600)

The ICANN blog [icann.org] has a working link.

Re:Why not post example (1)

Verteiron (224042) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111896)

Wow, the default Droid browser totally barfs on that link. It shows up on the page as a bunch of empty-box characters, and trying to follow it throws the browser a "http:/" link that it ignores completely.

Re:Why not post example (1)

Chris Mattern (191822) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111990)

If the link shows as empty-box characters on the ICANN page, then your computer doesn't have Arabic support installed for the operating system. That might be what's causing the trouble, rather than Droid.

Re:Why not post example (1)

Antony-Kyre (807195) | more than 4 years ago | (#32112048)

IE6 doesn't seem to support it, but FF3.5.5 does. How disappointing.

Re:Why not post example (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32111608)

Probably because they couldn't figure out how to type http:/// [http] in non latin and/or they couldn't decide what site to bring down with a 'slashdot effect'.

Re:Why not post example (4, Informative)

chill (34294) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111618)

Re:Why not post example (1)

phantomcircuit (938963) | more than 4 years ago | (#32112132)

Looks like latin characters too me....

Re:Why not post example (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32111704)

Because those millions of BBC readers that just want to know that the pages load would take down that poor arabic website.

Fragmenting and such... (5, Insightful)

Unka Willbur (1771596) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111566)

Ridiculous tribalism, that's all it is. Fragmentation of the Internet to appease some regressive, regional e-peenery is the stupidest idea to date. I speak 8 languages and love some, like Russian immensely, but the internet is a nation with its own language, and that language is Standard English [wikipedia.org] . I call shenanigans on anything else being shoehorned into its basic infrastructure!

you're not thinking the issue through (5, Insightful)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111654)

currently people are not getting on the internet because its all in english: it serves as a barrier and they see no reason to even try

but when the internet supports their native language, they get on the internet, get a taste of it, like it, want to use more it, and inevitably this drives them to the english web, since there's more of whatever they're looking for over there

in other words, the long term effect of supporting other languages on the web is paradoxically further and faster consolidation to english

Re:you're not thinking the issue through (1)

lehphyro (1465921) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111918)

inevitably this drives them to the english web, since there's more of whatever they're looking for over there

I doubt it. I big part of the english internet is USA-centric, they dont give a shit about it.

ever hear of facebook? twitter? (3, Interesting)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 4 years ago | (#32112060)

i'm not at all implying that other people care about USA-centric crap, but i'm saying they most definitely are interested in tech that often starts in the usa

there's also the network effect

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_effect [wikipedia.org]

more people using a given website simply makes it more compelling, because how many people are in a given social website often defines how useful that site actually is. this renders languages other than english at an automatic, and continuing, disadvantage

even internet tech that started outside the usa, if it gained an international following, say the chan message boards from japan (4chan), icq in israel, or chatroulette in russia, they all migrated to the english web as an inevitable aspect of becoming an international success, and even though they of course have multilanguage abilities and continue to be used in multilanguage ways, their english manifestations are their largest elements

then there is the bizarre phenomenon of paleolithic tech that gets born in the usa, and mostly forgotten there, but continues to live on in other areas

google's orkut started in the usa, but faded, but is huge in brazil, and also india. google relocated orkut from california to belo horizonte

remember friendster? its still alive and well in malaysia, philippines, indonesia. a malaysian company in fact recently purchased friendster

all i'm saying is we're talking about technology, not culture, and no one believes that being usa-centric is the point or even an aspect of being rooted in the english language

Re:you're not thinking the issue through (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32112076)

This barrier will disappear when translation tools (ie: google translate) get good enough.
Then anyone can just activate "auto-translate" (chrome has already started going down that road), and browse the whole internet in their native language, and not be restricted to only content that has been translated.

Re:Fragmenting and such... (1)

sourcerror (1718066) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111692)

Part of me says you're right ... the other parts says "Why does it bother you?". (Unless you want to be a sysadmin in China.)

Re:Fragmenting and such... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32111988)

Because the current standard for URLs lack characters which can be easily mistaken for other characters (outside of O/0) and we get domain-based phishing anyway. This has come up more than once that once address bars start treating these characters "correctly" you may realize you've just navigated to what would be punycode encoded as (obviously a garbage string for example's sake) http://xn-2oga-aiaw-va-na-neva-.com instead of http://yourbank.com or you may miss it and be phish food. This has been batted about for a while now and it will cause problems in the future.

Re:Fragmenting and such... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32111702)

English? WTF? LOL!

Re:Fragmenting and such... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32111758)

When the 7 Billion people around the globe will be speaking Standard English, then you may have a point. Until then I think it is everybody's right to use his/her native/preferred language on the Internet, including in TLDs. I speak 5 languages and Arabic is my native language and I think that today is a great day for the Internet.

Re:Fragmenting and such... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32111822)

I speak 5 languages and Arabic is my native language

How do you find time to hop on the internet when 72 virgins are waiting for you?

Re:Fragmenting and such... (4, Insightful)

melikamp (631205) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111792)

but the internet is a nation with its own language

Yeah, but it's not English, it's TCP/IP. And DNS is not even an integral part of the Internet, but rather a layer on top, used mostly for the WWW part. Many peer-to-peer applications would work just fine even if DNS was never created.

Much P2P depends on WWW for discovery (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 4 years ago | (#32112016)

DNS is not even an integral part of the Internet, but rather a layer on top, used mostly for the WWW part. Many peer-to-peer applications would work just fine even if DNS was never created.

Except a lot of peer-to-peer applications depend on WWW for discovery. You still need DNS to download the client or a recent list of well-known hosts.

Re:Fragmenting and such... (1)

MrLogic17 (233498) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111830)

I see some problems cropping up in the future.

Imagine a domain like BankOfAmerica.com - only one of the letters is non latin, yet simmilar looking. Links look OK, address bar looks OK.

Just say'n - there's going to be bad guys exploiting this.

Re:Fragmenting and such... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32112098)

would it not show up as xn--gibberish.com ? The example link in the ICANN blog shows up as http://xn----rmckbbajlc6dj7bxne2c.xn--wgbh1c/

Re:Fragmenting and such... (5, Insightful)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111844)

Ridiculous tribalism, that's all it is.

Well, then as the submitter, I regret tagging it with "culture."

I speak 8 languages and love some, like Russian immensely, but the internet is a nation with its own language, and that language is Standard English [wikipedia.org] . I call shenanigans on anything else being shoehorned into its basic infrastructure!

Huh, as a developer I had always assumed that we wrote software to help people. Not that people changed their behaviors and customs to be able to use our software. I guess I was wrong. I find it disturbing that a polyglot like yourself can so easily dismiss an engineering challenge as "ridiculous" and "shenanigans" because all it takes to get around it is for everyone in the world to learn my language of takes.

I find it humorous that we sit here and rail for interoperability and satisfying the consumer and no DRM and open standards ... only to turn around and call something that opens up the internet to the rest of the world "ridiculous."

If this is the consensus among geeks, what a shame it is to be a geek.

Where do you stand on the effort that went into the Linux language packs? Were those ridiculous tribalism as well when someone took the time to make them?

Re:Fragmenting and such... (1)

tehcyder (746570) | more than 4 years ago | (#32112054)

as a developer I had always assumed that we wrote software to help people

YMBNH

Re:Fragmenting and such... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32111852)

Gonna post this a A.C. because it's so obviously not groupthink and will surely be rated "Troll."

I am fine with the fragmentation. That fragmentation could go far to keeping these backwards thinking religious factions in places like Iran and Pakistan from further infiltrating our everyday life by forcing us to put up with their backwards all-or-nothing morality.

As a matter of fact, I am all for building a great big plastic dome over the middle east so that they can keep to themselves until they grow the fuck up. While we're at it we can put OUR fundamentalists there too in Jerusalem.

Re:Fragmenting and such... (1)

Cyberax (705495) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111938)

No, support for local languages is good.

However, the way it's being added is technically bad.

Re:Fragmenting and such... (1)

lymond01 (314120) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111948)

I'd rather see a character translation method. I should be able to type CNN in my native language and, once put into a URL bar, it will translate it to cnn.com and move forward. There are plenty of URLs in different languages, but as far as I know they're all the latin characters (abcdef, etc).

Re:Fragmenting and such... (1)

pilgrim23 (716938) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111998)

stultorum calami carbones moenia chartae

Re:Fragmenting and such... (1)

tehcyder (746570) | more than 4 years ago | (#32112032)

the internet is a nation with its own language, and that language is Standard English

So by your logic, no-one should be allowed to write emails, or post to forums, or compose web pages in anything other than English?

Summary (1)

fulldecent (598482) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111632)

So now we have mention of a new website. Slashdot cites its shortcomings as unable to display a link to the site and the article has no link.

You can find a link by following here:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&source=hp&q=http://xn--4gbrim.xn----rmckbbajlc6dj7bxne2c.xn--wgbh1c/ar/default.aspx [google.com]

This is just like .xxx (5, Insightful)

drumcat (1659893) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111644)

Guess what -- this will all get blocked. More fragmentation = less free internet. Here comes Sharia law that says all internet usage must be in Farsi, and all websites with latin endings will be blocked. Weak.

Re:This is just like .xxx (2, Insightful)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111826)

Guess what -- this will all get blocked. More fragmentation = less free internet. Here comes Sharia law that says all internet usage must be in Farsi, and all websites with latin endings will be blocked. Weak.

No, the sharia will be that all internet usage must be in Arabic since that is the only language the Koran can be in (if it isn't in Arabic, it isn't the Koran according to Muslims).

Re:This is just like .xxx (1)

eldepeche (854916) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111962)

I'm pretty sure that if Sharia specified a language to be used, I'm pretty sure it would be Arabic, smart guy.

Re:This is just like .xxx (1)

tehcyder (746570) | more than 4 years ago | (#32112080)

GP was probably proud of himself for having heard of a language other than caveman grunting.

A great victory (5, Funny)

MoellerPlesset2 (1419023) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111650)

For the inhabitants of Mönsterås [monsteras.se] , Sweden.
The town name means 'patterned ridge', but to date they've have had to put up with the domain "Monsteras" - which means "monster-carcass".
(å, ä, ö/ø in the Scandinavian languages are considered to be their own unique characters, not accented 'a's and 'o's.)

Re:A great victory (2, Informative)

Fenris Ulf (208159) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111846)

That's a hostname (which is already supported via IDN, such as http://xn--malmpeeps-37a.se/ [xn--malmpeeps-37a.se] ), this story is talking about TLDs.

There's no technical reason Mönsterås can't have mönsterås.se

Re:A great victory (1)

mikael_j (106439) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111940)

Å, ä and ö have been usable in .se domain names for quite some time actually, it's just that support for it in various development tools is absolutely pathetic (unless you want to change your language and library choice solely based on which one has support for that specific feature).

Re:A great victory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32112108)

"The town name means 'patterned ridge', but to date they've have had to put up with the domain "Monsteras" - which means "monster-carcass"."

Soooooo, let me get this straight. They want to go from a cool name like Monsteras (Really? They have monster carcasses? Cool!) to a boring one like Mönsterås ("Patterned ridge"? Boring to anyone not a geomorphologist).

Don't blame me if their tourism rates drop. Well, ok, except for an influx of geomorphologists.

Language packs? (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111682)

My browser has had support for Mojibake [wikipedia.org] encoding for years.

Good first step! (2, Insightful)

fortapocalypse (1231686) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111686)

Now to axe the latin protocol prefix, colon, slashes and dots. Also, what about those with disabilities- it is visual after all. We need "thought domains"- but wait, what about those with impaired mental capacities? Domains by intuitition would work. But what about parallel universes! Argh.

Re:Good first step! (2, Insightful)

Fenris Ulf (208159) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111860)

Since when does a user have to type the http:/// [http] in a browser bar?

Re:Good first step! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32111922)

There are more protocols than http.

Ummm... (1)

Pteraspidomorphi (1651293) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111750)

The introduction of the first web names using so-called country code top-level domains (CCTLDs) is the culmination of several years of work by the organisation.

Could have sworn they've been available for quite a while...

security implications (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32111850)

What are the security implications. I understand that certan characters appear more than once in differeing character sets. As in 'A' could be represented by 65, 72 etc. That means that Asite.com could be registered multiple times.

So what's the RFC for similar characters (1)

Colin Smith (2679) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111934)

Preventing similar characters from being used to make one domain look like another.

 

Unpredictable browser behavior? (1)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 4 years ago | (#32111944)

Isn't that a possible hacking vector?

Where can you register? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32112010)

So where can I register a domain name in Arabic? What Arabic TLDs are available? I'm Canadian, can I register?

Shukran! (1)

Itninja (937614) | more than 4 years ago | (#32112030)

So when is /. going to allow none Latin characters? I cannot even say ! What gives?

Safari and Firefox work (2, Informative)

ral (93840) | more than 4 years ago | (#32112130)

The site in the ICANN blog [icann.org] worked for me in both Safari and Firefox, in the Windows XP and OSX versions of both. Both Safari and Firefox showed Arabic in the text on the tab, but only Safari showed Arabic in the address bar.
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