Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

The Laser Turns 50

Soulskill posted more than 4 years ago | from the many-happy-returns-of-the-day dept.

Science 74

sonicimpulse writes with news that tomorrow is the 50th anniversary of physicist Theodore Maiman's creation of the first operational laser. "Theodore Maiman made the first laser operate on 16 May 1960 at the Hughes Research Laboratory in California, by shining a high-power flash lamp on a ruby rod with silver-coated surfaces. He promptly submitted a short report of the work to the journal Physical Review Letters, but the editors turned it down. Some have thought this was because the Physical Review had announced that it was receiving too many papers on masers — the longer-wavelength predecessors of the laser — and had announced that any further papers would be turned down. But Simon Pasternack, who was an editor of Physical Review Letters at the time, has said that he turned down this historic paper because Maiman had just published, in June 1960, an article on the excitation of ruby with light, with an examination of the relaxation times between quantum states, and that the new work seemed to be simply more of the same. Pasternack's reaction perhaps reflects the limited understanding at the time of the nature of lasers and their significance."

cancel ×

74 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Happy Birthday Laser! (4, Funny)

Interoperable (1651953) | more than 4 years ago | (#32220810)

You're a good friend and I wish you all the best for the future.

chew chew cheeeew (1)

CHRONOSS2008 (1226498) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221002)

ya know that sound yo make as the cylons came blaring in at you

Re:Happy Birthday Laser! (2, Funny)

davester666 (731373) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221106)

but would you mind not pointing yourself at my eye's... You know you cause permanent damage. Maybe just point yourself at the floor and get the dog to chase after the spot...

Re:Happy Birthday Laser! (1)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221110)

I like my friends like I like my lasers, neither can be stared at directly with the remaining eye.

Re:Happy Birthday Laser! (1)

linzeal (197905) | more than 4 years ago | (#32222098)

What are you your friends like? Gangsters, Medusas and the Sun?

Re:Happy Birthday Laser! (1)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 4 years ago | (#32222276)

girls

Re:Happy Birthday Laser! (2, Funny)

Anne_Nonymous (313852) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221222)

>> You're a good friend and I wish you all the best for the future.

P.S. You're really f-in' old!

Re:Happy Birthday Laser! (1)

Auntie Virus (772950) | more than 4 years ago | (#32223568)

*I'm* turning 50 this year, you insensitive clod! Now get off my lawn!

Re:Happy Birthday Laser! (1)

dov_0 (1438253) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221572)

Happy B'day red dot!

Re:Happy Birthday Laser! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32222188)

Quick overview of the history here [phdcomics.com] and here [phdcomics.com] .

Yet...a string of dissapointments (5, Funny)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#32220826)

Still no succesful integration with friggin' sharks... :(

Re:Yet...a string of dissapointments (1)

pushing-robot (1037830) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221640)

And I don't know who this "Maiman" guy is. Everybody knows the laser was invented by Dr. Parsons [youtube.com] at Cambridge University.

More importantly: (0, Redundant)

zill (1690130) | more than 4 years ago | (#32220838)

How old are the laser sharks again?

Re:More importantly: (2, Insightful)

ciaohound (118419) | more than 4 years ago | (#32220976)

Thirteen freakin' years! [imdb.com] Pretty soon (as in right now?) we'll be bragging about seeing it in the theater in the same breath as saying "Get off my lawn!"

Re:More importantly: (1)

91degrees (207121) | more than 4 years ago | (#32222326)

But why mention that when the inspiration for it had such a love affair with lasers?

Goldfinger is 46 years old. The Bond Cutting Laser was referencing serious cutting-edge tech at the time!

Oh, no, Mr. Bond. I expect you to die!

50 years, and still no portable death ray. (5, Funny)

siphbowl (1220872) | more than 4 years ago | (#32220846)

..but I suppose we do have hi-def films, DVDs, CDs, cutting tools, holograms, spectroscopy, acne cures, hair removal, LIDAR, surgical tools and the barcode scanner. Which almost makes up for it.

Re:50 years, and still no portable death ray. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32220896)

almost.

Re:50 years, and still no portable death ray. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32220948)

toast

Re:50 years, and still no portable death ray. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32221296)

Post

Re:50 years, and still no portable death ray. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32221560)

Roast

Re:50 years, and still no portable death ray. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32223496)

oily coast

Re:50 years, and still no portable death ray. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32224328)

Ghost.

Re:50 years, and still no portable death ray. (4, Funny)

NicknamesAreStupid (1040118) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221266)

Don't forget those nifty light sabers, phasers (where the light comes out so slowly you can watch it move to its target just as Captain Kirk dodges it), and my favorite -- Laser Eyes by Zozobra. It totally rocks!

Re:50 years, and still no portable death ray. (1)

Blakey Rat (99501) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221610)

It would be quite a challenge to make a laser-based death ray that performs as well as our current chemical-based death-dealing devices-- if you could make a battery to effectively supply a laser pistol, and weighs as much or less as the equivalent cordite, I sure as hell want one of those in my cellphone.

Re:50 years, and still no portable death ray. (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#32248242)

Don't presently best batteries have energy densities comparable to many explosives already?

Re:50 years, and still no portable death ray. (2, Funny)

ar1550 (544991) | more than 4 years ago | (#32224650)

Yes, but aside from hi-def films, DVDs, CDs, cutting tools, holograms, spectroscopy, acne cures, hair removal, LIDAR, surgical tools and the barcode scanner, what has the laser ever done for us?

Laser pointer (1)

pepax (748182) | more than 4 years ago | (#32226544)

That's the laser I actually use the most... Even though I run a microscopy lab that uses all kinds of lasers (Ar, He, He-Ne, dye, also two femtosecond titanium:sapphire lasers).

Oblig. Shark Comment (0, Redundant)

bacon volcano (1260566) | more than 4 years ago | (#32220848)

I wonder if the original creators knew how their invention would revolutionize shark-based diabolical traps.

Hey laser (4, Funny)

gooman (709147) | more than 4 years ago | (#32220852)

It's amazing, you don't look a day ove....

Oww, my eye!

Re:Hey laser (3, Funny)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 4 years ago | (#32220888)

It's amazing, you don't look a day ove....

Oww, my eye!

Which no doubt spawned the usual "Do not look into laser beam with remaining eye" warning.

Re:Hey laser (4, Funny)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221024)

I had a laser shot into my eye to reduce a blister on my retina (central serous retinopathy). It was all high tech, except they need to keep your head still while they press this apparatus against your eye. They had a frame to press your face against, but I could not hold myself still while they did that. The doctor supplemented the laser with a gorilla like nurse to pin my head to the frame with his hands.

Not the most dignified procedure, but it worked.

Re:Hey laser! Good fer drilling eyeballs? (1)

aqk (844307) | more than 4 years ago | (#32224432)

One? I had FIFTY.
The idea (LOL!) was to drill holes into my eyeballs to relieve the excessive Intraocular Pressure (IOP) of Glaucoma.
I initially had a IOP of 54 and 55 in each eye. (Ask your Doctor about this)
I asked the ophthalmologist about the laser: "Does this shit really work?" He answered "We're not really sure". Thanx, Doc.

Anyhow, the first few shots were like tiny pinpricks to the eyeballs.
After about ten or fifteen zaps, it REALLY started to be uncomfortable, to put it mildly.

Ten years later, I still take my myriad of eyedrops daily . Presumably the "Laser Witch Doctor" stuff was not successful.
And I suspect my retinas are still deteriorating....

Re:Hey laser! Good fer drilling eyeballs? (1)

Web Goddess (133348) | more than 4 years ago | (#32225194)

You poor poohs! It sounds horrible. Thanks for sharing your stories of doctor trauma. i cannot stand to have my eyeballs touched -- squick!

Re:Hey laser! Good fer drilling eyeballs? (1)

aqk (844307) | more than 4 years ago | (#32225318)

OK, so the comments are boring, smartass.
Go ahead- mod me down some more-
My karma resides elsewhere; I don't waste it on /.

The Future's so bright... (1)

Rollgunner (630808) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221276)

I gotta wear (ANSI Z 136 compliant) shades...

I remember... (5, Insightful)

stonewolf (234392) | more than 4 years ago | (#32220938)

I remember the first article I saw about the laser. I'm not sure if it is was in Popular Science or Scientific American, but I remember that it was described as a solution without a problem. For years after it was invented no one had any idea of what to do with the damn thing.

Now, it seems like they are everywhere there is one in every CD, DVD, and Blue Ray drive. We use them to align everything along that nice straight line. We are testing laser laser weapons. We use them to remove hair and correct eyes. They are critical to many manufacturing processes including precision cutting. Not to mention the whole field of holography and holographic optical elements.

But, It took many years for people to even start imagining what the thing was good for. And, even longer for the technology to get to where they could be used for practical applications. The history of the laser is a perfect study in how a really new idea develops into a useful technology. After 50 years we are only seeing the beginning of the application of the Laser.

Got to love it.

Stonewolf

Re:I remember... (5, Insightful)

jtcampbell (199660) | more than 4 years ago | (#32220994)

I think the key innovation (from a consumer point of view) was the laser diode. Whilst some early laser disc players used gas lasers, it was the laser diode that enabled the CD player and all the other consumer electronics applications you describe.

Recent invention (-1, Troll)

michaelmalak (91262) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221118)

a solution without a problem

When I saw "Laser turns 50" on cnn.com I was shocked that it was that recent of an invention. That's 13 years after the transistor! Then reading the history on Wikipedia, I saw that it was envisioned by Einstein in the 1920's, but I guess no one bothered to invent it. They were too busy nuking Japan, I suppose.

Re:Recent invention (3, Interesting)

deglr6328 (150198) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221676)

I know the above comment is modded flamebait because of the stupid note about nuking Japan, but he's completely right about the lateness of the laser's invention. The laser could have been invented in the 1930's, and very nearly was! [ico-optics.org] Ali Javan himself, the inventor of the ubiquitous (or, at least, once ubiquitous in the 80's and 90's) helium neon gas laser said he would've almost certainly invented it in 1938 [farhangsara.com] had he been around then. It is an accident of history that the laser took another 25 years to invent after most of the underlying science ("negative absorption", coherence, etc) were understood.

Yes.... (1)

stonewolf (234392) | more than 4 years ago | (#32222212)

I once saw a detailed analysis, written a few years after WWII, that showed in great detail that every technology needed to build a V2 missile was in existence by 1910. But, the V2 didn't go into operation until the 1940s and development started more than 10 years earlier.

Now we have the laser as an example of another technology that could have been invented 30 to 40 years earlier. But, in fact, neither of them was invented earlier.

The point is that first you have to imagine that something is possible, and that goes beyond just having a theoretical proof of the possibility. Then you have to believe that it is possible. But, even that is not enough. You have to have someone who was exposed to the knowledge required to invent the thing who has the belief and who has access and understanding of the precursor technologies.

Then, that person, or persons, has to have the will and the resources needed to finally build a working model.

After that comes the hard part. The hard part is convincing people that what you have done is something new and valuable. In the case of the V2 the large holes that appeared in the European landscape were plenty of proof. In the case of the laser the poor guy couldn't even get his paper announcing his invention published because the people doing peer review didn't understand what he said.

The challenge is to go out and identify research that actually points to world changing new technology. If you can do that, then you are a genius and you will be doing a huge service for humanity.

Stonewolf

No, not quite. (1)

Animats (122034) | more than 4 years ago | (#32225096)

The laser could have been invented in the 1930's, and very nearly was!

There are many inventions that could have been made "earlier", but in most cases, either the theory or some other supporting technology wasn't there yet. Somebody actually built and patented a FET-like transistor in the 1920s, but it's not clear that it ever worked. Lacking both ultrapure crystals and underlying theory, the best they could have done back then was to build a flaky device that sometimes worked, like a "crystal radio" with a "cat's whisker" that had to be adjusted manually to find a good spot on a galena crystal.

Scanning tunneling microscopy could easily have been done in the early 1950s. That was closer to a failure of imagination, because an STM isn't that complicated; it's far simpler than an electron microscope.

Steam engines might have happened maybe 2000 years earlier. But steel and precision cannon-boring had to come first. Affordable steel production was a surprisingly late invention. It wasn't until 1876 (!) that the "basic Bessemer process" made steel a high-volume item. Most of the 19th century ran on cast and wrought iron. Even boilers, which was Not A Good Thing.

Re:I remember... (3, Insightful)

chichilalescu (1647065) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221164)

You have to realize that experimental physics needed lasers. for a lot of things (measurements suddenly got more precise).
CDs are just an application of precise measurements.
High speed internet is here because instead of radio waves we can use visible light (but the basic idea is still to send information through a wave).

It is however true that it takes time to bring various pieces of information together, and mankind can probably still progress a lot just by being able to properly connect the dots that are already visible.

Re:I remember... (1)

jdeisenberg (37914) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221538)

Yes, I remember reading an article (I think it was in Time magazine) that described lasers as "a solution in search of a problem."

Re:I remember... (1)

treeves (963993) | more than 4 years ago | (#32243094)

Well I guess it found a few, huh?
Construction levels
Tattoo removal
Drilling through printed circuit boards
LASIK
LIDAR
amusing cats and their owners
LASERIUM
office printers
lithography
showing someone where a celestial object is
particle counters
inertial confinement nuclear fusion

Re:I remember... (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221646)

I'm not sure if it is was in Popular Science or Scientific American, but I remember that it was described as a solution without a problem

To be fair, the LASER was a relatively small modification to the MASER. Both work on the same principle, the LASER just produces a slightly different range of EM. The original paper describing a LASER called it an Optical MASER. The really clever part was inventing the MASER, the LASER was an incremental improvement. The basic premise has been used with a lot of non-microwave, non-visible, EM too. At the time, a MASER that produced optical light was not seen as especially useful, while ones that produce microwaves were (and still are) useful for line-of-sight communication over long distances.

Re:I remember... (1)

whitesea (1811570) | more than 4 years ago | (#32226798)

To be fair, the LASER was a relatively small modification to the MASER. Both work on the same principle, the LASER just produces a slightly different range of EM. The original paper describing a LASER called it an Optical MASER. The really clever part was inventing the MASER, the LASER was an incremental improvement. The basic premise has been used with a lot of non-microwave, non-visible, EM too. At the time, a MASER that produced optical light was not seen as especially useful, while ones that produce microwaves were (and still are) useful for line-of-sight communication over long distances.

Don't forget Einstein, Fabrikant, Prokhorov and Basov http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laser#History [wikipedia.org] . Every invention has many parents, even if the person who took the last step gets all the credit.

Re:I remember... (1)

mangu (126918) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221774)

The first article I read about the laser was in National Geographic, in 1966 or 67.

I don't remember this "solution without a problem" thing, if I remember right, that article was full of the promises of wonderful applications for the laser.

Re:I remember... (1)

shadowbearer (554144) | more than 4 years ago | (#32224664)

  You can buy laser pointers for a buck or two at a lot of 'dollar' stores, now.

  It escapes me how they make money on the things, considering that batteries for them are usually 2-3 bucks retail, but wth, the cats love'em ;-) I have a couple dozen of the danged things in a box on a shelf in the closet, with shapes ranging from bullets to dicks to lipstick containers. Ah, the wonders of modern overseas manufacturing.

SB

I guess that worked out... (1)

mjphil (113320) | more than 4 years ago | (#32220984)

"a solution looking for a problem."

Found some.

On stage... (1)

C A S S I E L (16009) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221008)

Curiously fitting that I'm just back from one leg of a tour of a modern dance piece using Ableton, MaxMSP, Arduino, Python and Lasers.

Pix: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cassiel-com/sets/72157622557842760/ [flickr.com]

Re:On stage... (1)

MRe_nl (306212) | more than 4 years ago | (#32226502)

Any movies of the show available?
Some stuff my friends have been building.
http://www.robob.nl/node/35 [robob.nl]
DMX and/or beat-controlled.
Also: reading email in Ableton; nifty!

Unsurprising (3, Insightful)

Angst Badger (8636) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221010)

A lot of things that seem like interesting but irrelevant phenomena at the outset turn out to be tremendously important later; that's why pure science is so important, yet so hard to justify to short-sighted "results-oriented" people like your average congresscritter. Whether it's the integrated circuit or, for that matter, electricity itself, fundamental discoveries and inventions tend to precede their applications, often by decades. Later, when someone attempts to solve a particular practical problem, some previously unused discovery is picked up and used as part of the solution, and only then does its significance become apparent.

It's a safe bet that fifty years from now, someone with a ten-digit Slashdot user ID will post a story about how clueless we were in 2010 about the earth-shattering importance of something few of us have heard of today except as a scientific curiosity. (And, no doubt, some of us who are still alive then will post thoughtful replies about obsolete technologies that will be immediately tagged "getoffmylawn" by younger folks.)

Re:Unsurprising (2, Insightful)

Garble Snarky (715674) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221286)

Except in 50 years, they'll need a new phrase because the concept of a "lawn" will be as unfamiliar as say, rewinding cassette tapes, is today...

Re:Unsurprising (1)

gyrogeerloose (849181) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221518)

Except in 50 years, they'll need a new phrase because the concept of a "lawn" will be as unfamiliar as say, rewinding cassette tapes, is today...

"You kids get off my minefield and out of my clear-fire zone!"

Re:Unsurprising (3, Insightful)

tool462 (677306) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221712)

We still say "don't touch that dial", "turn down the volume", "dial the phone". Hell, we even say "rewind" when we mean we're seeking backwards in a DVD.

In 50 years I look forward to being a grump saying "get off my lawn" when I really mean "get off that 2x2 slab of concrete I use for my barbeque."

Re:Unsurprising (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32221896)

You rewound yours? I just played the otherside.

Re:Unsurprising (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 4 years ago | (#32223374)

In 50 years, they'll still be bitching about not having flying cars.

And the geezers will be yelling at kids to stay off their 4chan.

Re:Unsurprising (1)

El_Oscuro (1022477) | more than 4 years ago | (#32224374)

I think it will be "get off my LAN"

Re:Unsurprising (1)

squiggleslash (241428) | more than 4 years ago | (#32227702)

It's a safe bet that fifty years from now, someone with a ten-digit Slashdot user ID will post a story about how clueless we were in 2010 about the earth-shattering importance of something few of us have heard of today except as a scientific curiosity.

Meh, I'm still pretty sure the iPad isn't going anywhere...

Sorry, just one more science fiction joke (1)

Waldeinburg (737568) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221202)

We are experiencing some truly important anniversary years for science fiction movies:
  • 2010: 50 year birthday for the laser, without which no cool weapons could be invented!
  • 2012: 50 year birthday for the visible-spectrum LED, without which no advanced machines could be build!

Re:Sorry, just one more science fiction joke (2, Funny)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221332)

2012: 50 year birthday for the visible-spectrum LED, without which no advanced machines could be build!

And without those making the serious computers, with a wall of blinking lights, would be so much harder...

Re:Sorry, just one more science fiction joke (1)

marcansoft (727665) | more than 4 years ago | (#32224732)

Don't forget 2013, the 20 year anniversary of the modern high-brightness blue/white LED, without which no modern electronic gadget could have existed.

That's Hawt!! (0, Offtopic)

Sublmnl (868393) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221336)

Nothing turns me on more than mature technology.

From invention to everywhere... (1)

stokessd (89903) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221430)

The discovery is 50 years old, and my parents laser printer is nearly 20 years old. The CD player is almost 30 years old. That's very fast from discovery to use to trickle down to consumer crap we can all buy. Sadly it took too long to turn the technology into a cat toy...

Sheldon

Re:From invention to everywhere... (1)

delysid-x (18948) | more than 4 years ago | (#32221586)

50 years to bring it down to the $1 laser pointer from the dollar store.

Re:From invention to everywhere... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32222112)

they had those 10+ years ago

Countdown (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32221718)

These are already in the hands of the terrorists. The short window we have to wipe them out before they are able to wipe us out is rapidly closing. If you are not electing someone to protect us at any cost to political correctness, it must be because you have a death wish.

ThinkGeek (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32221950)

C'mon ThinkGeek [thinkgeek.com] give us a special sale on lasers to celebrate this historic event!

Meow! (1)

Whuffo (1043790) | more than 4 years ago | (#32222138)

Cats everywhere wish the laser a happy birthday!

It's really amazing ... (1)

joelsanda (619660) | more than 4 years ago | (#32222518)

... given how many lasers are in my house. The DVD and CD players, game systems - hell, even my toolbox has a laser level to help me hang a row of pictures straight on a wall.

And yet my geared bicycle requires nothing shy of a virgin, a volcano and some extraordinary good luck to get the rear derailleur aligned so it shifts clean and taught. Bicycle gears, in their current form, have been around since the 1950s [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle_gearing#History], and yet the shifting technology hasn't changed much. Until CDs and DVDs came along I'd bet there were thousands upon thousands of bicycles for each laser, and yet the bicycle gets nowhere near the attention the laser does.

And the bicycle won't put your eye out!

Maiman, lasers, and UFO's (1)

smellsofbikes (890263) | more than 4 years ago | (#32224522)

I met Theodore Maiman once, when he gave a lecture at a college, and got to talk to him afterwards since I was working as an assistant to the prof who got him to come. One of the things I thought was interesting about his talk was, as the summary sort of discusses, the basic stuff of a laser was well-known. Indeed, people had nearly made lasers when they started manufacturing Geiger-Muller tubes. So Maiman spent a lot of time talking about the progression of technical concepts, from investigating the mechanics of fluorescence and phosphorescence and why they're different, to high-voltage supplies and flash tubes, to show that the laser is amazing but clearly nothing more than a clever tweak of existing technology. I asked him about this, why he'd spent so much time talking about applicable pre-laser research and only a small amount of time talking about neat stuff like Doppler cooling [wikipedia.org] , and he said he did so because he was tired of people saying lasers were UFO technology and wanted to make it very clear that they were obvious and he was just lucky enough to be the one who managed to put one together.

No posts on Intel LightPeak? (1)

AbRASiON (589899) | more than 4 years ago | (#32224786)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lightpeak [wikipedia.org]

If Intel get this right, and the licensing costs aren't ridiculous we might finally get that 'be all and end all' cable for the PC we wanted for all those years.
I went on a lightpeak google frenzy yesterday, Intel wanted to get it out for the 50'th birthday of the lazer actually.

Obligatory xkcd (0, Redundant)

f3rret (1776822) | more than 4 years ago | (#32227782)

http://xkcd.com/729/ [xkcd.com]

Also happy birthday laser!

consumer lasers (1)

peter303 (12292) | more than 4 years ago | (#32229442)

I wonder if any one anticipated you'd be able get one as tiny a pen for just a few dollars 30-some years later. And anyone could buy it.
Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>