×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Asus Budget Ultraportable Notebook Sold Sans OS

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the utterly-completely-impossible dept.

Portables 263

EconolineCrush writes "Tired of paying the Windows tax on notebooks? Asus's Eee PC 1201T budget ultraportable comes without a traditional operating system and sells for only $380. The 12-inch system has promising specifications, sporting an Athlon Neo processor, Radeon HD 3200 graphics, Bluetooth, and 802.11n Wi-Fi. It weighs just 3.2lbs with a 6-cell battery and can even handle light gaming duties. However, battery life in Ubuntu is considerably shorter than it is under Windows. Are there any better options for would-be laptop Linux users?"

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

263 comments

$380? (4, Insightful)

Reason58 (775044) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269732)

Didn't they sell for less than that WITH an OS a year ago? Does "netbook" not mean what I think it means (cheap, low power, long battery life, not a desktop replacement)?

Re:$380? (4, Insightful)

Pojut (1027544) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269746)

I dunno, man...a 12" screen is really pushing the definition of "netbook". Then again, it is refered to as an ultraportable notebook, not a netbook, so...

Re:$380? (4, Interesting)

dward90 (1813520) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269750)

"Netbook" probably means exactly what you think. "Notebook," however, which is what TFA is about, is a different term.

Re:$380? (1)

lemur3 (997863) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270146)

isnt a netbook an ultraportable notebook? if not....where is the line and how can I be sure which is which without the marketing speak applied to a products name?

Re:$380? (5, Funny)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269754)

Ultraportable notebook=/=netbook. Netbooks are passe now that we have iPads. PCs are passe now that we have iPads. Thinking for oneself is passe now that we have iPads.

-1 Offtopic (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32269798)

Fuck you for even bringing up the fucking iPad.

Re:-1 Offtopic (5, Funny)

_Sprocket_ (42527) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270318)

Didn't you hear? Fucking is passe now that we have iPads and freedom from porn.

Re:-1 Offtopic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32270658)

Fuck that!

Oh, wait, I'm a Slashdotter. It doesn't matter than fucking is passe.

Creating something is passe (4, Insightful)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269808)

Netbooks are passe now that we have iPads. PCs are passe now that we have iPads.

Actually creating something is passe now that we have iPad. Go and consume, consume, consume.

Just pa (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32269826)

Is there anything that Linux with a GUI does well besides suck?

Re:Just pa (5, Funny)

404 Clue Not Found (763556) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269958)

Is there anything that Linux with a GUI does well besides suck?

Yes, if you can track down the ACPI drivers for the fans.

Re:Just pa (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32270736)

Ahh, I see what you did...think of something funny then post as AC and answer yourself to get some funny points. Bravo. Well played.

Re:$380? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32269842)

Heterosexual intercourse is now passe now we have iPads.

Re:$380? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32270460)

Heterosexual intercourse is now passe now we have iPads.

Homosexual intercourse is still okay though.

Re:$380? (3, Insightful)

smbarbour (893880) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270486)

You can quote me on this: "The iPad will never reach full market potential as long as people cannot play FarmVille on it."

Re:$380? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32270488)

LOL .. esp "Thinking for oneself" - great humor.

Some just seem to miss it, so subtle.

Re:$380? (1)

therealobsideus (1610557) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269766)

TFA describes it as a notebook for the most part, aside from it's Eee branding. The Slashdot post says notebook. Where in the hell did you get netbook? :P

Re:$380? (3, Interesting)

lemur3 (997863) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269858)

I thought the same thing. $380? Too much!

I remember when the eeePc's and other netbooks started coming out for sub $300 prices that it wouldnt be long before we would see $150 netbooks... But I guess that isnt what happened because netbooks seemingly get more and more expensive.

Where are the cheap netbooks that I thought were the intent of the product?!

Re:$380? (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269938)

http://www.cherrypal.com/secure/index.php [cherrypal.com]

Right there. Yeah, might be crap, but sure is cheap

Re:$380? (2, Interesting)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269984)

It's also a scam [google.com].

Re:$380? (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270076)

Hm, odd most of the major tech blogs have said something about Cherry Pal's products, but yeah, seems scam-like enough. Plus they have a crap site. If they really did ship those things on time they wouldn't be too bad for small robotic projects.

Re:$380? (3, Insightful)

hansamurai (907719) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269954)

Microsoft convinced the manufacturers that they needed to run Windows, so any kind of ARM support was dropped with that, along with the likelihood of a cheap netbook.

Re:$380? (1)

BigFootApe (264256) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270098)

I believe what we're seeing a coalescing of different pressures keeping prices high, including customer wanting Windows, substantial market requirements for CPU power (higher resolution media playback, etc), some key applications not currently available on ARM, marketing channels not setting appropriate expectations vis-a-vis product capabilities. I also believe existing hardware suppliers are somewhat reluctant to race each other to the bottom in pricing and margin.

Re:$380? (2, Insightful)

Moblaster (521614) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269910)

It sold for less last year because of Microsoft contractually restricting the CPU power and specs of WinXP netbooks. Cause Microsoft does not like netbooks. Because they are supposed to be cheap. And Microsoft don't do cheap.

Now as for power issues in Linux: please RTFUPMDFAOTWAKSAM ("Read the f-ing Ubuntu power management documentation found all over the web and kindly stop annoying me")

Re:$380? (3, Funny)

BobMcD (601576) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270208)

Now as for power issues in Linux: please RTFUPMDFAOTWAKSAM ("Read the f-ing Ubuntu power management documentation found all over the web and kindly stop annoying me")

PUSABYATLAATCOORISATFO/.

("Please use shorter acronyms because yours are too long and annoy the crap out of reasonable individuals such as those found on slashdot")

Re:$380? (1)

theaveng (1243528) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269952)

I was thinking the same thing.

Also why would I pay $380 for an OS-free netbook when hhgregg has one for sale at just $275, and Windows Seven is included free.

Re:$380? (3, Informative)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270024)

Probably because the $380 NOTEBOOK in question here isn't a netbook. It's got a 12" screen. It's got a full keyboard. It's got much better integrated graphics. It's light.

We're talking more in the range of a 12" MacBook here rather than a netbook.

Re:$380? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32270008)

A 12" screen is probably more expansive than a 8.9" one.
The Athlon Neo CPU is probably more expansive than an Atom, but also more powerful. Same for the graphic chip.

Re:$380? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32270388)

A 12" screen is probably more expansive than a 8.9" one.

Yeah, being "more expansive" is the definition of a 12" screen compared to a 8.9" one.

Re:$380? (3, Interesting)

Professor_UNIX (867045) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270066)

Just buy the Eee PC 1005PE. I don't regret my purchase for a second and a 10+ hour real-world battery life is absolutely beautiful on a netbook. I wouldn't even consider a laptop or netbook with a pitiful 5 hour or less battery life these days. The whole point of a netbook is portability and that means not being shackled to an AC power outlet to power or recharge your laptop all the time so why wouldn't you pick the netbook with the most battery life?

Re:$380? (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270632)

If only there was such long-lasting netbook with a clit... ;/

Portability when it comes to battery life, and in a cheap package, is here already. But I have this dream of being able to play Diablo2 in a cathedral during organ concert, on a cemetery during the night of 1st-2nd November [wikipedia.org], or in a train compartment (especially with some nouns present). Only clit or mouse would be sufficient; and mouse is mostly just luggable, not fully portable... ;/

Re:$380? (1)

codepunk (167897) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270174)

I am not sure about the asus netbook but I bought a aspire one last month for $280 with windows 7 installed. The asus has more ram but I am perfectly happy with my purchase.

Re:$380? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32270242)

Agreed.

I purchased a similar machine around christmas for about $300: Gateway LT3103u - Athlon 64 Ultra low Voltage L110 processor, Radeon x1200 graphics, 11.6" 1366x768 display, 2 GB RAM, 160 GB HD, 6 cell battery, WiFi, Bluetooth, and it came with Windows 7 Pro...

So how is paying more $ to not have the OS included a benefit for me?

Re:$380? (1)

gambino21 (809810) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270604)

From what I understand a lot of PCs with Windows can sell for cheaper than the base cost of the system. The reason is that they are effectively subsidized by the pre-installed thirdparty spam-ware. The thirdparty software vendors pay to have their applications pre-installed which covers the cost of the windows license plus a little bit extra. So the only way a linux or no-OS computer could be cheaper is if they also had a similar deal.

"Traditional Operating System" (0)

Knara (9377) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269744)

What does that even mean?

Re:"Traditional Operating System" (5, Informative)

amRadioHed (463061) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269824)

Hi, you must be new. Welcome to the interweb! When you see underlined text on a "web site" you can "click" on the words to get more information. In this case if you clicked on "comes without a traditional operating system [techreport.com]" you would have learned that "Asus ships the Eee PC 1201T with only its ExpressGate instant-on OS". Isn't that neat? Have fun!

Re:"Traditional Operating System" (0, Redundant)

Knara (9377) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269886)

How is that OS different than a "traditional" operating system?

Re:"Traditional Operating System" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32269982)

How is that OS different than a "traditional" operating system?

You're kidding right?

Re:"Traditional Operating System" (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32270034)

Wow, you must be a fucking moron. Find out more [google.com].

Re:"Traditional Operating System" (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32270096)

Expressgate is to traditional OS as Knara is to traditional human being. Expressgate can do simple things, like browse the web, but is incapable of more advanced tasks, similar to how Knara can (apparently) browse the web, but fails at more complex tasks like thinking.

Excellent analogy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32270796)

I LOL'd... thanks. XD

Re:"Traditional Operating System" (2, Insightful)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270170)

On a traditional operating system, you can run a compiler.

Re:"Traditional Operating System" (1)

BobMcD (601576) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270284)

How is that OS different than a "traditional" operating system?

I'd challenge you to make your point, and be direct about it. You're leaving the reader to guess, but even on this site you're wrong to assume that we'll all jump to the same conclusion that you did.

Re:"Traditional Operating System" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32270496)

Instant on... It's on a chip, not the drive. It's paired down and loads quick but would be a pain to use all day for all your computing needs.

Re:"Traditional Operating System" (1)

gbjbaanb (229885) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270278)

When you consider my old computers came with a OS on bios that booteed instatly and dropped you ito a prompt, ExpressGate is quite the definition of the "traditional" OS.

Re:"Traditional Operating System" (1)

joeflies (529536) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269828)

Traditionally, laptops and netbooks come with an operating system of some sort.

Re:"Traditional Operating System" (1)

Knara (9377) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269854)

Sure. However, "traditional" implies there is some category of "non-traditional" that carries with it some quality that sets it apart.

Re:"Traditional Operating System" (1)

AK Marc (707885) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270790)

I understand that you are being purposefully obtuse to make a point. There is a quality that separates Windows from non-traditional operating systems. Market share. People "traditionally" bought PCs with Windows on them. This doesn't follow that tradition, and thus either has no OS or a non-traditional one.

It looks like you are fishing for some deeper meaning, and it isn't there. The statement is 100% correct, and your feigned confusion could have been mistaken for real the first post, but when you continue to work very hard to be purposefully obtuse when people clarify indicates you are asking questions for rhetorical reasons, and not because you want an answer.

It means the operating systems your ancestors used (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32269852)

nt

Re:It means the operating systems your ancestors u (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32269988)

My ancestors didn't use NT, you insensitive clod!

Re:"Traditional Operating System" (3, Funny)

Jorl17 (1716772) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269900)

One that's old, stupid, popular and yet used by millions of people.

Re:"Traditional Operating System" (2, Insightful)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269994)

It means Windows. That's the main headline without saying it outright: this notebook is being sold without Windows.

Any other questions?

Battery life issues will be fixed in upcoming rel (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32269784)

I'm told, under NDA, that Ubuntu's upcoming Nigerian Narwhal release has solved the battery life issue

Re:Battery life issues will be fixed in upcoming r (0, Troll)

Jorl17 (1716772) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269912)

Darn, my last mod point just went away! Someone up him with informative, please!

Re:Battery life issues will be fixed in upcoming r (1)

rickb928 (945187) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270608)

This is actually better than your usual juvenile AC drivel. Oh, for a mod point...

Not bad. You have promise.

Is that any of your business? (1, Interesting)

Saeed al-Sahaf (665390) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269788)

Yes, I have a large budget for my anus. But is that any of your business? I think not.

Re:Is that any of your business? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32270246)

Yes, I have a large budget for my anus. But is that any of your business? I think not.

http://www.thescambaiter.com/forum/showthread.php?t=109

is this a pun on the above? If so, well done.

ExpressGate/Splashtop (4, Insightful)

zogger (617870) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269796)

How well does that built in micro OS really work? Seems like for a lot of folks that might be all the "OS" they really need.

When will netbooks... (1)

Dishwasha (125561) | more than 3 years ago | (#32269932)

support more than 2GB of RAM? Add any OS and the memory hungry Firefox and I'm already out of available RAM and the netbook is performing like crap.

Re:When will netbooks... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32270050)

Dude, $10 4GB SD card from NewEgg. ReadyBoost. LEARN.

ReadyBoost has been around since Vista and makes my 2GB Netbook fly.
IDE, Firefox/Thunderbird, Notepad++, Pandora, etc at the same time? No problem.

For Linux I think there's a way to use a card as a RamDisk, which is the same idea.

Re:When will netbooks... (4, Interesting)

Narishma (822073) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270114)

It's a limit imposed by Microsoft. Or at least that was the case when netbooks came with Windows XP, now that they use Windows 7 I don't know if it's still the same. Basically there was a list of specifications the netbook should not exceed if the manufacturer wanted to get Windows at a reduced price. The ones I remember are 1 GB of RAM max and no more than a single CPU core. I think the hard disk capacity and the screen size were limited too.

This will definitely kill the iPad (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32270020)

Consumers will finally be able to install what every Linux distro desired in order to write code, inexpensively.

Yes, I'm being sarcastic.

Yes there are more Linux alternatives for these... (3, Informative)

g0bshiTe (596213) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270038)

Debian Eee [debian.org]
Gentoo Eee [eeeuser.com]
EasyPeasy [geteasypeasy.com]
Ubuntu Of course Ubuntu has a Eee flavor of the kernel, I chose to go a full blown Hardy Heron install on my netbook. I was given mine by a friend who was gonna throw it away. I removed the Xandros that was on it and installed Ubuntu and other than a bit of fun hacking around with it, it's quite useless other than using the terminal. Firefox on the web with it is crap, no memory whatsoever so if you have more than 1 tab open it takes forever to do anything. Forget about compiling something while websurfing cause that won't happen. My advice to people thinking about getting these, for the price if you double it, you get a pretty kick ass laptop these days. Go for the laptop, more power, more space, more ram, more CPU, more functional!

Re:Yes there are more Linux alternatives for these (1)

Carrot007 (37198) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270144)

> My advice to people thinking about getting these, for the price if you double it, you get a pretty kick ass laptop these days. Go for the laptop, more power, more space, more ram, more CPU, more functional!

More missing the point?

Re:Yes there are more Linux alternatives for these (4, Informative)

Walter White (1573805) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270154)

If lack of RAM is the problem, then install more RAM. I upgraded my Eee 901 to 2GB of RAM and that brought total cost up to $300. It allows me to use RAM for /tmp which makes it not nearly so sluggish. Firefox is still problematic. I think it does a lot of disk writes and that causes unacceptably long freezes on the Eee so I use Chromium (on Ubuntu.)

I don't do compiles and I certainly would not recommend it for a desktop or laptop replacement, but when I travel it meets my needs for browsing, email, loading podasts on my Sansa and occasional word processing and presentations.

Re:Yes there are more Linux alternatives for these (1)

initdeep (1073290) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270294)

some netbooks had soldered in ram which prohibited simply upgrading it.
The original Dell mini 10 for example.

Re:Yes there are more Linux alternatives for these (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270390)

You know, other solution would be to install software which makes more efficient use of available resources...

Re:Yes there are more Linux alternatives for these (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32270574)

I use the Atom 270/1GB version of HP's Netbooks on both UNR and standard Ubuntu desktop - sure not seeing your speed problem.

On it runs full engineering software (full cad system) in a Windows Virtual Machine in VirtualBox running in Ubuntu UNR. AND have firefox open in Ubuntu with several tabs. With a terminal open running ssh back to a home server.
 
  If I need a bigger screen I just hook it up to a monitor and plug in a mouse/keyboard. Or the projector for presentations.
 
.

Re:Yes there are more Linux alternatives for these (2, Interesting)

DrCode (95839) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270682)

I may have something similar, an eee 900a with 1Mb RAM and 4Gb ssd. The problem is that not only is 4Gb too small, but it's a very slow ssd, worse than any hard drive. I spend about $50 to replace it with a much faster 16Gb, and installed Ubuntu NBR. It's now quite reasonable for web surfing. Flash movies are slow, but watching video with mplayer or vlc, even full-screen, is fine. It's great for traveling, as it fits in a small shoe bag and gets 3-4 hours battery life.

I want a small power supply, not a good battery. (4, Interesting)

leuk_he (194174) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270052)

I don't understand why there are no laptops with a small power supply and (barely..) no battery.
95% of my laptop work is close to a socket and to a wifi internet connection. The trouble is that most laptops i used until now do not have a small power adapter. You still have to lug a considerabele power supply.

Battery is useful, but i could live without, and it would shave a small amount of the price and weight. And with a modularised design it could just be an other option.

Re:I want a small power supply, not a good battery (1)

BenFenner (981342) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270116)

While I don't share your desire for an integrated power supply I can relate to someone who doesn't find current products that fit their needs (I'm the same way with cell phones and other items). I imagine the heat created is a big factor. You know how blisteringly hot those power bricks get? Stick that into the laptop case and all of a sudden you've doubled or tripled your cooling needs.

Re:I want a small power supply, not a good battery (1)

BobMcD (601576) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270546)

I imagine the heat created is a big factor. You know how blisteringly hot those power bricks get? Stick that into the laptop case and all of a sudden you've doubled or tripled your cooling needs.

As someone who frequently gets them so hot that the fail-safes kick in - well:

This.

Re:I want a small power supply, not a good battery (2, Interesting)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270212)

95% of my laptop work is close to a socket and to a wifi internet connection.

A lot of restaurants provide free Wi-Fi but don't have any customer-accessible power outlets. And not everybody requires the Internet all the time; some laptop users (such as myself) can get work done while commuting on a bus, train, or carpool.

Re:I want a small power supply, not a good battery (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270536)

Nowadays, with cheap cellular access, you can have plenty good enough internet "while commuting on a bus, train, or carpool"...

Re:I want a small power supply, not a good battery (2, Interesting)

bendodge (998616) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270276)

My Eee PC 1005HA has a very small brick. It's a little wider and taller bigger than a Zone candy bar and about as long. It also has very long battery life. The only problem (as mentioned below) is that it gets really hot (~7 Amps), probably because of the small surface area.

Re:I want a small power supply, not a good battery (1)

natehoy (1608657) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270414)

Exactly.

Converting a certain number of watts from AC to DC generates a certain amount of heat, and you can only improve the thermal efficiency of the inverter to a certain degree, then it starts getting more expensive very fast.

The smaller they make the power supply that provides a given wattage, the more problems you're going to have cooling it due to a smaller surface from which to radiate the heat.

Making it internal would be a nightmare, because then all that heat would be contained inside the case when you are trying to use it on AC power.

Re:I want a small power supply, not a good battery (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270560)

Laptops with (barely...) no battery were the norm for many years. Still are, actually.

And the size of that power supply is so because you want "speed", "big screen", etc.

But what about linux? (1, Insightful)

w0mprat (1317953) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270082)

Seriously. Why didn't they just dump something like vanilla ubuntu on the laptop? At least it would have something on it. If it's being sold without an OS, presumably it's being sold to someone who knows how to install. Even Asus' Splashtop would have been good.

It has Splashtop (2, Informative)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270258)

Even Asus' Splashtop would have been good.

From the article:

Asus ships the Eee PC 1201T with only its ExpressGate instant-on OS, which provides Internet access, web browsing, and other basic functionality.

The impression that I get from this Wikipedia article [wikipedia.org] is that Splashtop and ExpressGate are one and the same.

Re:But what about linux? (1)

natehoy (1608657) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270358)

One possibility comes to mind.

Ubuntu is supposed to have a shorter battery life on these specific units than Windows. The attached article on the subject claims just under 2.9 hours for Ubuntu and 4.2 hours for Windows 7.

So, if they put Ubuntu on it, they'd have to quote the Ubuntu battery life (they could probably call it a generous 3 hours and get away with a bit of market fluffery).

By not putting an Operating System at all on it, they can validly quote the Windows battery life numbers, and say the battery lasts "well over four hours!(*)"
(*) When using Windows 7.

Note: I have an Asus eeePC (one of the ten-inch models) that came with Windows 7 Starter. It's currently running Linux Mint 8 and the battery life is pretty close to the claims they made with Windows. I had to use the Lucid backports to do it, but oddly enough the version of Ubuntu they used *is* Lucid for this review. It could be that Ubuntu is not properly identifying these units yet and isn't doing as good a job as it could be with the battery.

Re:But what about linux? (1)

jgardia (985157) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270570)

After some tests I found that my battery in Kubuntu lasts about 15% more in my Thinkpad X61t (vs Ubuntu).
I'm not sure why, but that was also visible under powertop (10-15% less power consumption).

Freedos in Thailand (4, Interesting)

Santzes (756183) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270178)

Here in Thailand, or at least in Chiang Mai, most of the computers and laptops I've seen come with FreeDOS preinstalled. If you don't want to install an OS yourself (and don''t prefer Freedos ;) you can just leave the new computer to the shop and pick it up with a OS of your choice a few hours later for a dollar or two extra install fee + price of the OS.

Re:Freedos in Thailand (0, Troll)

sznupi (719324) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270404)

That's also quite common throughout large areas of ex-Soviet Block. From bigname manufacturers, too.

And don't tell /. fairytales about "a dollar or two extra install fee + price of the OS"; typically those OS installs are not licensed.

Used laptop (1, Insightful)

InlawBiker (1124825) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270322)

I just bought a used Thinkpad T42 for $150 and put Ubuntu on it. It has an actual screen, keyboard, wifi and 40gb hard drive. It even has a supported 3d card so I can do the whizzy 3d desktop thing.

There are lots of offloaded business class laptops out there that run Linux great. They're usually very well built and full of Intel parts, which have solid Linux drivers.

Computers should be designed for an OS (3, Interesting)

Burz (138833) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270408)

But the fact that this is rarely the case for any Linux-based desktop system tells me why power-saving and other (usually audio) features don't work well.

Its interesting that most of the (few) brands that work well with a distro like Ubuntu off the shelf also tend to be companies that offer certain models with Linux pre-installed. They're not like Dell, who will design a prototype from available components, then go to the component OEMs and say "We're making 2 million of this new system, but some of your chips come with standard features we'd rather leave out or fudge in software... chop that stuff off your chips and drop your price if you want our business".

Of course, the Linux drivers tend to be written for the OEM originals with their standard features intact, not the funky special-request variations made by Dell, Acer, etc. for their budget models.

What this translates into is that Johnny is perplexed as to why Linux has poor "PC compatibility".

Someone (that means us) needs to start insisting on systems that were designed with Linux or preferably a popular landmark distro like Ubuntu in mind. And we need to stop setting our friends and colleagues up for failed experiments when handing them discs expecting they can just run it on their PCs; It reflects badly on our judgment as individuals and on free open source software in general.

Which Ubuntu? (1, Informative)

loudmax (243935) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270424)

The article says they used Ubuntu, but doesn't say whether they're using regular desktop Ubuntu or the Netbook remix [ubuntu.com]. They admit that they haven't optimized the kernel: it's entirely possible that battery life could be improved by recompiling the kernel with different flags or some equally esoteric maneuver. Of course normal users shouldn't have to optimize their kernels, but installing the netbook edition shouldn't be that esoteric. The article doesn't say if they did that or not, but if they had, I suspect that they would say so.

I haven't installed plain Ubuntu in a while, so I don't know if it offers to optimize for netbooks at install time. It would be nice if it did that.

xf86 ATI Video Driver is the culprit (4, Informative)

Nethemas the Great (909900) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270548)

It unfortunately tries (unsuccessfully) to perform throttling based upon load rather than having discrete under/overclocking modes as the proprietary Catalyst driver does. The result of which is that the GPU always draws excessive amounts of power even when running off the battery. The only real solution at this point is to swap out the open source driver for the ATI proprietary one and then use the "aticonfig" utility to set the power state according to your need at the time. Other non-GPU optimizations can be done as well, however, the power wasting the GPU is doing with the xf86 drivers is an order of magnitude greater.

What's with Ubuntu? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32270776)

What's the fetish with Ubuntu?

Gnome has to be the most annoying interface in the world, worse than McOS or even windoz.

The $380 64 Bit Windows Laptop At Walmart (1)

westlake (615356) | more than 3 years ago | (#32270816)

The E-Machine:

64 Bit Windows Home Premium
15" 1366x768 Screen
Dual core 2.2 GHz Intel CPU
3 GB DDR 2 RAM
250 GB HDD
DVD Burner
Intel 4500M graphics
5-in-1 media card reader

eMachines Black 15.6" eME725-4520 Laptop PC with Intel Pentium Dual Core Processor & Windows 7 Home Premium [walmart.com]

The Asus 12 inch Intel-Ion netbook with Win 7 Home Premium is $470 with a one year warranty. ASUS Silver 12.1" Eee PC 1201N-PU17-SL Netbook PC with Intel Atom N330 Processor & Windows 7 Home Premium [walmart.com]

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...