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Copernicus Reburied As Hero

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the late-to-the-party dept.

Science 369

CasualFriday writes "Mikolaj Kopernik, a.k.a. Nicolaus Copernicus, the 16th-century astronomer whose findings were condemned by the Roman Catholic Church as heretical, was reburied by Polish priests as a hero on Saturday, nearly 500 years after he was laid to rest in an unmarked grave. On Saturday, his remains were blessed with holy water by some of Poland's highest-ranking clerics before an honor guard ceremoniously carried his coffin through the imposing red brick cathedral and lowered it back into the same spot where part of his skull and other bones were found in 2005."

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I've seen this before... (5, Funny)

masterwit (1800118) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316174)

Jacek Jezierski, a local bishop who encouraged the search for Copernicus, said that he considers Copernicus' burial as part of the church's broader embrace of science as being compatible with Biblical belief.

In the end it's just one big format war...

Re:I've seen this before... (1)

kylemonger (686302) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316196)

More like embrace and extend. And then extinguish.

Re:I've seen this before... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32316630)

More like embrace and extend. And then extinguish.
RTFA. It's extinguish, embrace, extend.

Re:I've seen this before... (4, Insightful)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316424)

embrace of science as being compatible with Biblical belief.

But not vice versa.

Re:I've seen this before... (0, Redundant)

InfoJunkie777 (1435969) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316478)

embrace of science as being compatible with Biblical belief.

But not vice versa.

What he said.

Re:I've seen this before... (5, Insightful)

blai (1380673) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316732)

You're absolutely right. Not all beliefs are compatible with facts. Facts do not encompass all beliefs. Science is not a religion and religion is not a science. That's like saying a pen is bad because you can't build a house with it. That's not what it's for. It isn't what you think it is, nor is it what you think it isn't even if you are correct.

Re:I've seen this before... (4, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316832)

Trouble is, religions have this nasty habit of attempting to make claims that are, in fact, empirically verifiable (or, typically, falsifiable), and then throwing a fit when science calls them on it.

For sufficiently vacuous definitions of religion, and definitions of science that bend over backwards to be purely descriptive, the two are compatible. However, as an empirical matter, incompatibilities are frequently observed.

Re:I've seen this before... (1)

noidentity (188756) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316452)

Yeah, just watch out for some company with submarine patents on organized religion. Now there's a patent troll I highly approve of!

Re:I've seen this before... (1)

SharpFang (651121) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316838)

I'm afraid there's a plenty of prior art on that.

Re:I've seen this before... (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316484)

It makes one wonder where they'll bury Richard Stallman and Bill Joy (creators of emacs and vi, respectively) when they die.

Re:I've seen this before... (1)

lennier1 (264730) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316888)

Stallman's body will obviously be bent into a C and Joy is buried vertically with his head down.

Re:I've seen this before... (4, Funny)

jeremyp (130771) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316946)

Bill Joy's epitaph will be :wq.

Or possibly :q! if he has failed to write an autobiography.

I don't know how you quit from emacs.

Re:I've seen this before... (1)

DrGamez (1134281) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316976)

:x

Re:I've seen this before... (1)

NicknamesAreStupid (1040118) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316734)

"To know that we know what we know, and to know that we do not know what we do not know, that is true knowledge," MK.

Sure... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32316188)

Whatever makes them feel comfortable at night.

Re:Sure... (1, Insightful)

The Hatchet (1766306) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316542)

Right? its like, well, we may have been completely and totally wrong, if not flat out evil and cruel, but we will rebury you as a hero 500 years from now. And now they do the same thing to modern scientists. Talk about blindness.

Re:Sure... (5, Insightful)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316612)

This is the catholic church we're talking about, they've much more progressive than the American sects that oppose science (hence the acceptance of evolution in Europe, there are no debates about what should be taught in schools here).

I'm aware that the catholic church is extremely conservative but compared to the madness of the American fundamentalists that make the news they're moderates.

Re:Sure... (4, Informative)

VTI9600 (1143169) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316678)

There are lots of Catholic schools in America (Catholics too, obviously) and they all teach that the Church has accepted the notion that man came about by the process of evolution, albeit a process conceived of and initiated by God. Also, I would guess that the vast majority of Christian schools in the country are Catholic, even though Catholics only make up 30 percent [wolframalpha.com] of US Christians.

Re:Sure... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32316944)

Everybody foe this brainwashed Catholic shill. [slashdot.org]

I don't have a problem with you lurking in my beloved Slashdot, but I'd rather you spend the day clicking on ads rather than participating in discussion.

Re:Sure... (1, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316848)

That isn't blindness, it's marketing-caliber evil. Essentially, the corpse is just a pawn in a ghoulish little rebranding exercise. "Catholicism: Not as nutty as our reputation would lead you to expect."

It's just a bunch of bones, so it isn't a huge deal; but they are using, rather than honoring, him here.

Re:Sure... (1)

alx5000 (896642) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316852)

Little children?

(I kid, I kid...)

You know? I think I'm okay with that. (3, Insightful)

Sowelu (713889) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316194)

Say what you will about it being too little, too late, but I'm glad that they're going back and recognizing past mistakes and trying to do what little they can to right them. Especially so that others can see how they've changed in the meantime. Ideally it'll change the behavior of those still alive today...

Re:You know? I think I'm okay with that. (1)

iguan0 (170013) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316266)

Ideally, it will make them understand their mistakes and avoid doing more. Like the p-pill, or condoms, or stop protecting pedophiles and many other current issues.

Ideally, this would mean the end of this money-making, power-driven organisation.

What about today's mistakes? (3, Insightful)

khasim (1285) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316364)

They're doing this as a PR stunt to distract people from the mistakes they're making today.

Copernicus is known in almost every science class today. Who cares what The Church does with whatever-is-left-of-his-body now? 500 years later?

Re:What about today's mistakes? (5, Insightful)

VTI9600 (1143169) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316718)

They're doing this as a PR stunt to distract people from the mistakes they're making today.

If I designed a device to automatically lower fresh tinfoil hats from the ceiling whenever the one you're wearing now got worn out, I would make a mint.

Who cares what The Church does with whatever-is-left-of-his-body now? 500 years later?

Catholics care. They care because they believe in the sacrament of forgiveness. They care because they believe that people have immortal souls that can last more than 500 years after someone's death.

Re:What about today's mistakes? (4, Insightful)

T Murphy (1054674) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316750)

The Catholic church recognizes it has a bad history with reacting to science, so they are trying to make up for that, yet it seems any effort to do so just that brings more complaints. Damned if you do, damned if you don't.

By this point, the Catholic church has mostly improved from malicious to benign on the science front (they may contest doing research in certain areas of science on moral grounds, but they don't really try to contradict science anymore). Most of the anti-science creationism and whatnot isn't from the Catholic church.

Disclaimer: I was raised Catholic and appreciate most of the philosophy but don't care for the religion.

Re:What about today's mistakes? (2, Interesting)

syousef (465911) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316900)

They're doing this as a PR stunt to distract people from the mistakes they're making today.

Copernicus is known in almost every science class today. Who cares what The Church does with whatever-is-left-of-his-body now? 500 years later?

Q: What's the definition of infallible?

A: Get it completely wrong, persecute people who used actual science to get it right - I mean REALLY persecute them - put your political agenda and your authority ahead of truth - threaten them with torcher, put them under house arrest, deny them medical aid, make them fear for their lives, threaten them with eternal damnation - then 400-500 years later admit that your predecessors made a mistake and make use of the very science you tried to bury to shout from the rooftops how good and holy you are to be able to admit the error at all - really put on a show - set up an observatory, rebury people. Turn the whole thing into a 3 ring circus.

Yeah I wonder why I'm not sold. I wonder why your numbers are dwindling.

You know what REALLY pisses me off? When people who wish to excuse the bad behaviour of the church point out that Galileo was politcally unwise to ridicule the pope as if it makes the treatment he received okay just because he spoke out of turn and made an ass of himself. As if it's okay to bury scientific truth and torcher/imprision someone for speaking out of turn.

Re:You know? I think I'm okay with that. (0, Troll)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316422)

That won't change the fact that a significant part of Polish society are still backwards and bigots, much like the corresponding part of the US society. One Copernicus rehabilitated half a millenium late does not a 21th century society make. Support reason! [racjonalista.pl]

Re:You know? I think I'm okay with that. (1)

The Hatchet (1766306) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316560)

If only they actually treated modern scientists well. Its just the same bullshit again 500 years after that crap happened, and yet they still haven't learned. If you refuse to recognize the patterns of reality, how will you recognize the patterns of reality?

Re:You know? I think I'm okay with that. (1)

paxcoder (1222556) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316628)

Excuse me but what are you talking about? Thanks for your answer in advance.

Re:You know? I think I'm okay with that. (1)

glavenoid (636808) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316674)

The only thing I can think of that might jibe with your parent's post is the church's ban on embryonic stem-cell research. Apart from that, then I don't know what s/he is talking about either.

Re:You know? I think I'm okay with that. (0, Redundant)

Mr. Freeman (933986) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316760)

They haven't changed a damn bit. This is done as one big PR stunt to make it look like they aren't completely anti-science. The "debate" about whether to teach science or religion in science classrooms is a huge thing right now. If the church's beliefs have been "comparable with science" for some time now then why did it take so long to rebury this guy? The answer is simple, they still think this guy is a heretic but they're pretending to honor him so it makes the "teach religion instead of science" argument more sensible. "SEE!! We can't possibly be anti-science, we just now honored a scientist we didn't like 500 years ago!!"

Oh Awesome! (2)

csueiras (1461139) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316202)

I guess that makes it up to him! /s

Typical (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32316210)

I'm glad the church recognizes the value of bleeding-edge Renaissance science. Maybe next year they will find out the importance of electricity, birth control, or logic.

Pomp and circumstance (5, Insightful)

spire3661 (1038968) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316214)

Sometimes, i just dont understand people's motivation for this sort of thing. Copernicus was a great man, why on earth do we need to dig up his corpse and rebury him to honor his achievements? The mere fact that we discuss him and his work 500 years later is the greatest honor. There are times were circus and spectacle are needed, this is not one of them.

Re:Pomp and circumstance (5, Insightful)

MyLongNickName (822545) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316308)

Why is it that when I have mod points that I want to use on a thread I always end up commenting instead?

Anyhow, you may not find it important, but others do. This is the equivalent of saying "we fucked up big time and we are reversing ourselves". Large organizations show real remorse differently than individuals. So, this is a very large positive step.

Now, why it took 500 years to figure this out is another story altogether.

Re:Pomp and circumstance (1)

obarthelemy (160321) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316390)

papal infallibility ?

1870 (4, Informative)

mister_playboy (1474163) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316584)

That doctrine is actually much more modern than most people would guess, having been issued in 1870 [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Pomp and circumstance (2, Informative)

SharpFang (651121) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316774)

It would be significantly shorter than 500 years if they knew -where- Copernicus was buried...
Location of his grave was one of bigger historical secrets in Poland. (and the fact that the suspected location was a chamber filled with thousands of bones from many, many corpses, mixed in disarray, didn't make it any easier. It's been a luck that his corpse was found in a casket, and not in 300 pieces mixed with all the rest...

Re:Pomp and circumstance (4, Insightful)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316344)

Copernicus' remains were recovered as part of an archaeological discovery. Would you suggest not reburying them? Or perhaps just tossing them back in the hole and throwing the dirt back in?

Re:Pomp and circumstance (5, Funny)

T Murphy (1054674) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316418)

How about send his remains to an Earth/sun Lagrangian point, so if you look at it the right way, it's like the sun is orbiting around him.

Re:Pomp and circumstance (1)

vlad30 (44644) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316556)

As opposed to shining from where ?

End of thread. (2, Informative)

glavenoid (636808) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316692)

You win!

Re:Pomp and circumstance (4, Interesting)

RevWaldo (1186281) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316790)

I'd think that having his remains orbit the Earth Scotty-style would do as a fitting tribute. But this does raise the issue of "whose remains are they anyway"? The cathedral that the remains were originally buried and now reburied would probably have the final say on the launch, and its doubtful they'd go along. It's a little vexing that the church that condemned him in the first place essentially still control his remains five centuries on.

.

Re:Pomp and circumstance (1)

kurokame (1764228) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316488)

Exactly. They need to be reburied anyway, and putting them back in an unmarked grave seems rather silly. Why not take the opportunity to honor someone whose achievements are still celebrated 500 years later? It's not as if you dug him up just so you could make a fuss over burying him again.

Re:Pomp and circumstance (4, Interesting)

VTI9600 (1143169) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316924)

This was no ordinary discovery. According to TFA, they spent six years searching for the remains. Once they were found, they used DNA markers (!) and facial bone reconstruction to positively identify the man as Copernicus. Everyone joking about how the church is 500 years behind in technology should take note.

Re:Pomp and circumstance (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316958)

Once they were found, they used DNA markers (!) and facial bone reconstruction to positively identify the man as Copernicus. Everyone joking about how the church is 500 years behind in technology should take note.

What, they have archbishops with degrees in molecular genetics now? Oh, wait, they probably used a biotech company to do that...

Re:Pomp and circumstance (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316490)

Weeel, guess who has something to gain from this... regarding the recent... well... scandal..?

Re:Pomp and circumstance (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316530)

Well it's hardly the first time that bodies of e.g. saints have been moved and reburied, often to build a church on top of them. Does it have any real meaning where the bones lie and how they got buried if at all? Well, it's a bit like questioning if offside is real in soccer because within the rites and ceremonies of the Church it certainly matters. For example, even if it doesn't apply to Copernicus, being denied a Christian burial was a grave punishment. Of course an atheist can just shrug at that and go "So?" because it doesn't matter but for someone who believes it does. Likewise, being buried a hero is a great recognition by the Church, which presumably has meaning to Christians. Just because we find it an odd way to honor the dead, doesn't make it wrong in any way.

Re:Pomp and circumstance (4, Funny)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316592)

For example, even if it doesn't apply to Copernicus, being denied a Christian burial was a grave punishment.

You mean that in this case, a naughty grave was punished by not being used to bury a famous scientist?

Re:Pomp and circumstance (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32316536)

It's a religion. You really expect things they do to make sense?

Re:Pomp and circumstance (2, Interesting)

Vadim Makarov (529622) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316544)

Sometimes, i just dont understand people's motivation for this sort of thing. Copernicus was a great man, why on earth do we need to dig up his corpse and rebury him to honor his achievements?

I think in essence this is a church advert. (They couldn't care less of the science he has discovered. Religion needs promotion. Same happened at the death of Newton.)

Re:Pomp and circumstance (1)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316580)

Um, they didn't just dig him up so they could put him back again. He was in an unmarked grave which was dug up by archaeologists. After investigation, they figured out who it was.

What do *you* suggest they should do with the bones? Hmmm?

Throw them in the trash ... or rebury them with dignity and a proper headstone?

Re:Pomp and circumstance (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32316720)

RTFA... archeologist dug up his bones. They are now being re-buried. Also... he was never condemned as a heretic for his scientific ideas.

Re:Pomp and circumstance (1)

mrmeval (662166) | more than 4 years ago | (#32317006)

It wasn't for him or his work. It was to benefit Poland and the church. Poland gets to beat it's chest and say "Look at what we did." The church can point and say "Clean hands, clean hands, we are no longer evil".

It's as if they were saying "Let them eat tripe."

Why was he buried in an anonymous grave? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32316216)

Copernicus' burial in an anonymous grave in the 16th century was not linked to suspicions of heresy. When he died, his ideas were just starting to be discussed by a small group of European astronomers, astrologers and mathematicians, and the church was not yet forcefully condemning the heliocentric world view as heresy, according to Jack Repcheck, author of "Copernicus' Secret: How the Scientific Revolution Began."

"Why was he just buried along with everyone else, like every other canon in Frombork? Because at the time of his death he was just any other canon in Frombork. He was not the iconic hero that he has become."

How comforting this must be for him (1)

rickladd (1705402) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316230)

I'm sure he's resting better now. Sure hope he has some descendants capable of enjoying the irony of it all. This can't be comforting unless you believe in an afterlife and, even then, what would it benefit Copernicus? Surely, by now he'd already know he's been vindicated. I suppose it can be seen as some indication of humanity's progress . . . kinda.

Pearly gates. (3, Funny)

Dyinobal (1427207) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316256)

Does this mean he gets to go to heaven now? or just that his body got violated by a bunch of priests.

Re:Pearly gates. (2, Insightful)

jeffasselin (566598) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316282)

Since heaven is a fantasy, then he obviously isn't going there. I vote for option #2.

Re:Pearly gates. (1)

mwvdlee (775178) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316286)

Well... what do priests usually do?

Re:Pearly gates. (1, Informative)

asdf7890 (1518587) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316458)

what do priests usually do?

Violate the bodies of choir boys, rather than those of the long dead.
Flamebait I know, but I have karma to burn.

Re:Pearly gates. (1)

alfredos (1694270) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316362)

Vote for #2. I also dare say that if he had a conscience, he wouldn't much enjoy the honor.

Re:Pearly gates. (1)

mkiwi (585287) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316448)

Hey, we all know only Mormons go to heaven!

Re:Pearly gates. (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316654)

Yeah, heaven is filled with beer and wine for everyone to enjoy.

Re:Pearly gates. (5, Informative)

adamziegler (1082701) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316666)

You do know that Copernicus was a Catholic priest also right?

So it takes 500 years for the Church to admit (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32316268)

it was wrong. So in 2510 it will apologize to altar boys for abusing them.

Re:So it takes 500 years for the Church to admit (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32316342)

In 2510, the altar boys will beg for more

Re:So it takes 500 years for the Church to admit (4, Funny)

PPH (736903) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316520)

Until then, they'll continue to bury their bones in inappropriate places.

Re:So it takes 500 years for the Church to admit (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316984)

You mean that they use femurs as dildos? Oh my goodness...

Re:So it takes 500 years for the Church to admit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32316574)

Right, because the first incident of a priest buggering an alter boy took place in 2010. We're presumably well past the 500-year horizon on that one.

I'm sure (3, Insightful)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316318)

I'm sure he feels just about the same being buried in the new grave as he did about being buried in the old one. He doesn't care at all.

Re:I'm sure (5, Insightful)

Rakshasa Taisab (244699) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316356)

And stupid people keep thinking burials are for the dead, not the living.

Re:I'm sure (1, Redundant)

poena.dare (306891) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316376)

Symbols have power. I don't see any harm in showing respect for a noted independent thinker. Also, any act that demonstrates that religion and science do not have to be in opposition is a Good Thing.

Furthermore, in deference to his religious beliefs, I'll imagine he is pleased.

Re:I'm sure (3, Insightful)

obarthelemy (160321) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316414)

I'd rather the church put a bit more effort in making life better for the living

Re:I'm sure (1)

Hijacked Public (999535) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316682)

Alternatively you could not rely on symbols to show that religion and science do not have to be in opposition, you could just take the straight forward method and actually take actions now, in real time, that demonstrate, to people alive right now, that religion and science don't have to be in opposition. Not that it matters much because science gained the upper hand long ago and can't effectively be stopped any longer. By locking people up or forcing them to recant on pain of torture, anyway.

As for a Copernicus I don't think he is please. I think he is dead and his corpse long ago rotted mostly away. It isn't possible that he is pleased given that reality.

For those of us still among the living the less validity we lend to voodoo magic symbols the better we will all be. Dig up people you used to persecute or burn incense and chant, it doesn't matter in any practical way to anyone with any sense.

I'm sure Copernicus feels better... (4, Insightful)

SetupWeasel (54062) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316348)

No. Wait. He's dead. He doesn't care at all what you do to his bones.

Re:I'm sure Copernicus feels better... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32316594)

Oh, I see you've played Fallout 3, too!

Amazing how much they have changed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32316388)

Personally I have zero use for the catholic church, the abuse of children would be enough for me to back a ban on the church. I do have to say how shocking the shift has been in the church towards science. Some things are backward still but a startling example was the church embracing the "creation of life", translated shoehorning hand assembled DNA into a cell and getting it to reproduce, the DNA not the cell. As little as a decade or two ago it would have been condemned. Granted they have finally entered the 20th century a 100 years too late but it is progress. Personally I'd like to see the church disbanded for all they had done over the centuries and still do to this day but they have changed their attitudes towards science.

Re:Amazing how much they have changed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32316660)

You are ignorant. The church/children abuse situation is horrible, but if you are going to put a ban on the church, you might as well do that to all religions who have had clerics or leaders who have done things of that nature to the children. And while you are at it, you might as well ban public school, and YMCAs and then even parenthood. The Catholic Church does not have a monopoly on messed up men harming children in that way.... and contrary to popular opinion, they don't even have a percentage majority.

As far as the Catholic Church entering the 20th century 100 years too late... you might thank the Catholic Church for the systems of education and science we have. Without the Catholic Church, our Universities and Scientific methods would not exist.

Not only was Copernicus not condemned... he was also a Catholic Priest.... but maybe we should just ignore everything he said because he was probably a child abuser also!

It's my nick (1)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316396)

I've been an admirer of Canon Kupfernigk since I learned about his work and his book at University. Since the root of his name means "copper" (Kupfer in German) and I spent a number of years working for a company that did interesting things with copper alloys, I adopted his name as my Internet nick. I'm pleased that the Church eventually caught up with the historians of science, but I have only one question for Benedict 16th: What the Hell took you so long?

Re:It's my nick (1)

dwye (1127395) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316500)

> but I have only one question for Benedict 16th: What the Hell took you so long?

He hasn't been Pope for that long, perhaps, and has been busy with problems related to living priests and has only now got to dead ones?

Re:It's my nick (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316670)

Besides, he's in charge of a religion spanning the whole damn world, there's more things he has to care about and I'm not sure a showy ritual for a guy who's been dead for 500 years and hasn't been sainted is something that comes to mind often. Copernicus isn't the only victim of church injustice.

Marketing (1, Troll)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316446)

You can see how little scruple companies like the Catholic church have, when they dig up your remains to bury them again, just to make themselves look (not be, remember, Pope Kiddiefiddler [youtube.com] ) good...

feh. (0, Troll)

Pig Hogger (10379) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316454)

Bunch of hypocrites...

Re:feh. (0)

paxcoder (1222556) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316742)

That's why you never appologize, right? Oh no, wait, that's becaue you're allways right. Sorry.

Condemned?? (1)

adamziegler (1082701) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316528)

Um... since when was Copernicus condemned?

In other news... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32316540)

In other news, ignorant bible thumpers, in the U.S., are taking over school boards to continue to promote a viewpoint that wasn't even considered enlightened during Medieval times.

Too bad religious folks take all the benefit from those whose ideas they suppress... otherwise these folks would still be praying over severed body parts of saints, stored in little boxes in the basements of churches, as the church's "state of the art" major medical care. If not, by now, the gene pool would likely be pretty darn close to rid of these troglodytes.

Re:In other news... (2, Insightful)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316686)

I believe relic worship isn't practiced in any protestant belief, that's a catholic thing. Protestants don't have saints and don't pray to relics, a big part of the reformation was ditching all the "extended universe" canon stuff and going back to what's in the original book.

Was this legal? (1)

Degro (989442) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316546)

How does some religious group have the right to dig somebody up like that?

Future Slashdot Story on 5/23/2510 (4, Funny)

webbiedave (1631473) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316582)

Church Admits Touching Children and Covering it Up Not Such a Good Idea.

Pope John Paul George Ringo the Third officially stated via the openly gay pontiff's Jupiter-hosted website [www.catholic.popestuff2], "We've had a little time to think about it and we finally understand that whole uproar or whatever. Hey like the third testament says in Bieber 10:15 'Whatever you want shawty I'll give it to ya'."

He went on to say, "Here's some water! Hope that makes up for it."

Editor's Note: Catholicism was a dominant religion centuries ago in which old men in funny hats told others what to do.

Editor's Editor's Note: Religion was a wide-held belief that ideas found in stories millenniums old should be used to rule our lives. Not kidding.

(article translated from Chinese via Skybot Vacuum Cleaner with Babel Attachment)

Re:Future Slashdot Story on 5/23/2510 (0)

paxcoder (1222556) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316722)

Funny fail.
Also, Jupiter is made of gas.

Re:Future Slashdot Story on 5/23/2510 (2, Funny)

webbiedave (1631473) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316776)

Indeed. It turns out to be the best place for a data center.

Re:Future Slashdot Story on 5/23/2510 (1)

VTI9600 (1143169) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316788)

Church Admits Touching Children and Covering it Up Not Such a Good Idea.

Thanks. They've already admitted that, Troll.

Re:Future Slashdot Story on 5/23/2510 (2)

webbiedave (1631473) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316982)

Yeah. They were all over that when the story broke. Right on top of it. Handled it great.

That's kinda my point. Get it? Good. Now move on.

Funeral (1)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316598)

You know about funerals, it's for those still living, not for the dead. Would this make Catholic church, particularly Polish Catholics, feel better about themselves? Don't make much difference to me - I know what he accomplished.

umm (2, Interesting)

nomadic (141991) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316610)

Mikolaj Kopernik, AKA Nicolaus Copernicus, the 16th-century astronomer whose findings were condemned by the Roman Catholic Church as heretical,

Do we have a cite for this?

So... (4, Interesting)

rrohbeck (944847) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316626)

How long until Richard Dawkins will be sainted? 2510?

The two books to read (5, Informative)

JoshuaZ (1134087) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316694)

There are a lot of misconceptions about what Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler and all the other important figures during this time period were doing. For example, a lot of people don't realize that the system constructed by Copernicus still had epicycles. It was more aesthetically pleasing and slightly simpler mathematically than the Ptolemaic system but it wasn't actually more accurate. It wasn't until Kepler came around that a system that was genuinely superior in both simplicity and accurate. Also, people seem to forget that a major reason for Copernicus' work was that the Church wanted a more accurate astronomical system because they needed it to calculate the dates for Easter and other issues. And the Roman Catholic Church didn't even take a negative stance to heliocentrism until many years after Copernicus. Martin Luther and some of the other early Protestants reacted negatively far years before the Church did. The actual history is much more complicated than the standard narratives make it out to be. There are two excellent books on this topic. The first is Thomas Kuhn's "The Copernican Revolution" which presents the history pretty well although it gets filtered slightly through Kuhn's philosophy. The second is Alan Hirschfield's "Parallax" which takes a broader outlook over a much longer time period but with less detail on the period directly after Copernicus. Both books are very good reads.

They stopped at six (1)

VTI9600 (1143169) | more than 4 years ago | (#32316814)

From TFA:

The tombstone is decorated with a model of the solar system, a golden sun encircled by six of the planets.

They stopped after Saturn because the next one is...you know...*dirty*

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