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BYO Linux Router To Australia's Fibre Network

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the please-live-near-the-coast dept.

Networking 123

An anonymous reader writes "Run a Linux router to connect your ADSL service but worried about what will happen when the Australian Government rolls out fibre broadband to your house or business? Worry no more. It turns out that customers on Australia's new National Broadband Network will be able to run their own homebrew Linux router to connect to the network and route traffic any way they please."

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What's the story? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32320750)

So, when someone brings a new network connection to your house, via a standard ethernet cable, you'll be allowed to connect a device of your choosing to the end? Socking. This makes the frontpage of slashdot now?

Re:What's the story? (3, Informative)

Techman83 (949264) | more than 4 years ago | (#32320820)

I know a few the tech support guys at my Provider, they're used to me sending logs from my BSD based firewall. A fair percentage of Modem/Routers are linux based anyway. The only real difference here is the termination is no longer a modem provided by the customer. You'll still need something that talks PPPoE to authenticate to the network, be it a hardware based router or a plethora of software based distro [wikipedia.org]

Re:What's the story? (1, Informative)

WarJolt (990309) | more than 4 years ago | (#32320854)

my dd-wrt router does pppoe. Who wants a power hungry diy router when cheap and cheerful works well too?

Coz this is a power hungry AUSSIE diy router. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32320870)

First rule of Slashdot: "Australian submissions always accepted".

Re:Coz this is a power hungry AUSSIE diy router. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32320958)

First rule of Slashdot trolling: niggers.

Re:Coz this is a power hungry AUSSIE diy router. (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321110)

Unfortunately not but I thought this one was funny [slashdot.org] .

Re:What's the story? (2, Insightful)

Techman83 (949264) | more than 4 years ago | (#32320896)

Well if you use an atom it's not _that_ power hungry and those little routers just don't have the memory/performance.

Re:What's the story? (3, Interesting)

TheThiefMaster (992038) | more than 4 years ago | (#32320972)

If anyone wants to build their own router and is concerned about power usage, size, heat or noise (i.e. doesn't want to use an old desktop) I would recommend them to look into mini-itx systems. The power supplies for an entire typical mini-itx are rated lower than the cpu alone requires in a desktop. They can be made not only fanless, but completely moving-parts-free. And best of all, they're not much larger than the router you'd be replacing!

It's not cheap though, unfortunately.

Re:What's the story? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32321522)

They could also look into those Plug Computers. Low power Linux computer size of a power brick at around $99. They have upped the specs to 1.2GHz ARM recently.

http://www.plugcomputer.org/ [plugcomputer.org]

Re:What's the story? (1)

TheThiefMaster (992038) | more than 4 years ago | (#32322318)

They only have one network socket, you'd need to add one, or use a usb adsl/cable modem, and then get it to work with linux.

I loved this bit from the website:

What are typical applications for a plug computer ?

The application range is bounded only by the imagination of the developer community. Here are some typical use cases:
Compact, high performance home file server for home computers.
Multimedia server for DLNA-enabled players, such as the Sony PS3.
Web proxy, enabling fast, cached access to your favorite web sites.
Storage of home video surveillance streams.
Automate downloads and uploads to your favorite photo sharing web site.

Only if you add external storage...
Apparently without external storage, the plug's only use is "and more!"

Re:What's the story? (1)

drsmithy (35869) | more than 4 years ago | (#32323030)

They only have one network socket, you'd need to add one, or use a usb adsl/cable modem, and then get it to work with linux.

Or you can used tagged vlans and a switch supporting same (pretty cheap these days).

Re:What's the story? (1)

Bert64 (520050) | more than 4 years ago | (#32322668)

Try a guruplug, 2 gigabit ethernet ports, 512mb ram, 1.2ghz arm cpu, boots from flash... perfect for a small router and they're quite cheap.

Re:What's the story? (1)

yakumo.unr (833476) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321398)

Don't have the memory/performance to do what exactly?

The Buffalo routers that come with ddwrt pre-installed now, like the WZR-HP-G300NH, are great, USB for NAS, the works.

Re:What's the story? (1)

profplump (309017) | more than 4 years ago | (#32322078)

Doesn't have the memory/performance to handle a large number of TCP connections, IPSec, gigabit, more than a couple of isolated Ethernet interfaces, etc. There are lots of reasons that a 200 MHz CPU with 8 MB of RAM might not be enough router. They don't necessarily apply to every network or user, but it's absurd to suggest that no such situation exists on home networks.

Re:What's the story? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32322456)

BitTorrent mainly.

When you have about 500 incoming/outgoing connections, those cheapass off the shelf routers run out of RAM for the NAT tables, your web browser then becomes unable to load new websites, the DNS server on the modem crashes and you have to go reboot it.

Oh, and they also don't have IPv6 though that's a software problem rather than hardware.

Re:What's the story? (2, Informative)

jrumney (197329) | more than 4 years ago | (#32320966)

If you're running any servers, you have the power hungry box anyway.

Re:What's the story? (1)

ickleberry (864871) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321586)

My Pico ITX server uses only 15w, the router uses a similar amount. I was thinking if I could get a cheap USB-powered ADSL modem and Wifi dongle for it I could get rid of the router and maybe save about 30e worth of electricity a year. Nobody wants USB DSL modems and you'd almost get a wifi dongle for free on a box of matches these days so it would pay for itself within about 3 months. The only problem is I'd still need a switch and if I got one of those it wouldn't save me anything.

Re:What's the story? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32321334)

You won't be so smug when your puny SOC has been subjected to a couple dozen megabits per second. You won't even need to use a VPN to make your router the bottleneck.

Re:What's the story? (0)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 4 years ago | (#32320826)

you'll be allowed to connect a device of your choosing to the end? Socking.

I am socked, I tell you. Socked!

Tonight at 11, "Connecting your fridge to australian intertubes. What will be the minimum legal size for chicken breasts?".

Re:What's the story? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32320860)

I don't get it... is this a pun on proxies?

Re:What's the story? (4, Funny)

mjwx (966435) | more than 4 years ago | (#32320874)

Tonight at 11, "Connecting your fridge to australian intertubes. What will be the minimum legal size for chicken breasts?".

Dont laugh, I've already soldered an RJ45 connection to the iron. The cat is next.

Re:What's the story? (5, Funny)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 4 years ago | (#32320894)

Dont laugh, I've already soldered an RJ45 connection to the iron. The cat is next.

I think soldering an RJ45 to your cat will probably kill it.

I case I misunderstood you, ironing your cat will also kill it.

Re:What's the story? (4, Funny)

rjch (544288) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321012)

Dont laugh, I've already soldered an RJ45 connection to the iron. The cat is next.

I think soldering an RJ45 to your cat will probably kill it.

Yeah, RJ45 connectors are plastic and will melt easily. Much better just to crimp it to the cat. Just make sure you get out of the way very quickly afterwards.

Use the right cat (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32323118)

Use at least a 6 lb cat, them older 5 lb kitties just don't cut it in the modern networking arena.

Re:What's the story? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32323286)

I guess now I know why it called Catx cable; where x = 5/5e/6...but what do the numbers mean? The number of lives left in the cat after you are done?

Re:What's the story? (4, Funny)

jimicus (737525) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321032)

I think soldering anything to a cat puts the solderer at greater risk than the solderee.

Re:What's the story? (5, Funny)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321128)

We had this pot belly stove in the corner of the living room and during the summer the cat loved to use it to survey the room at eye level but when we used it for the first time in the autumn there was this horrible screech and the cat rocketed across the living room, into the kitchen and stopped, buffing, under the kitchen table.

The treatment for burns is immediate immersion in cold water and fortunately the bath was half full so I picked up the cat and started to "immerse" the patient in the water. I tell you, the resulting scratches lasted months.

Re:What's the story? (1, Offtopic)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321208)

Well, since we are all way off topic anyway - my brother in law always bragged about his welding skills. He SAID he could weld a cat's ass to a pine board. The man never demonstrated that ability, but I pictured the scene in my mind every time I heard him bragging. I never got beyond the part where he might choose to attach his leads to a semi-conductive cat or a non-conductive pine board. Either he's just another dumb redneck, or he's a HELL OF A LOT smarter than I am! ;^)

browns gas aka 2hydrogen+1Oxygen (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32321544)

If you use the gas from electrolysis for welding you can do some pretty amazing things. i the improved welding ability is related to the fact that hydrogen ions or protons are smaller and so faster moving at a particular energy, even at a low density.

what does this mean in practical terms? in the few opportunities ive had to use a browns gas welder, i was able to move my hand through the flame, and without adjusting could
weld a nail to a brick, or turn road gravel into a molten glassy obsidian that cools to a glossy black that you could sell as jewelry. im fairly sure that you dont want to move your hand through an oxy torch. (correct me if anyone has more experience than me).

Re:What's the story? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32321580)

this thread reminds me of the "hamster-duct-tape" news group.
I was young back then, thanks!

Re:What's the story? (4, Funny)

dangitman (862676) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321078)

Dont laugh, I've already soldered an RJ45 connection to the iron. The cat is next.

Are you using CAT-5e or CAT-6?

Re:What's the story? (1)

spec8472 (241410) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321068)

All chicken breasts will need to be appropriately covered before being allowed on the intertubes.
Naked chicken breasts will be blocked unless an appropriate 'Proof of Age' mechanism is in place.

Anyone having pictures of naked chicken breasts from a chicken under the age of 18 will be reported to the AFP.

Re:What's the story? (1)

AK Marc (707885) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321222)

Many FTTH terminate in a proprietary router. DSL connections require a router capable of that protocol. This connection is regular Ethernet that you can plug any capable router or computer into. No need for a FTTH router provided by the telco, no need for an ADSL router. I expect he was comparing it to the ADSL it's replacing. No more need for the specialized routers. Not important news, but interesting nonetheless.

Re:What's the story? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32321594)

I call BS.

Please, link to any reference for a FTTH that has a proprietary premises interface. Sure, the PHY is probably tuned for the telco, but nobody is going to carry anything but Ethernet frames for IP service. They would be losing out on the entire industry's economies of scale.

Take it somewhere else.

Huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32320762)

Um, what are you guys smoking? We can already do that now on our existing ADSL infrastructure.

Re:Huh? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32320774)

But how about on Australian Filtered fiber?

Re:Huh? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32321172)

How is changing your router going to get around filters? It's ISP based, the outgoing routes are going to be filtered anyway.

Kewl (1)

petejk2 (1679232) | more than 4 years ago | (#32320768)

Awesome bunnies!

derr (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32320792)

derr.

That's all I've got to say because you've already wasted enough characters on the fucking obvious.
 

As one would expect nowadays, but ... (4, Informative)

wilfie (622159) | more than 4 years ago | (#32320804)

Virgin in the UK used to refuse support until you connected a Mac or Windows box directly. Routers were 'not supported'.

Re:As one would expect nowadays, but ... (3, Informative)

Zontar The Mindless (9002) | more than 4 years ago | (#32320884)

Telstra used to have the same requirement. IIRC, you couldn't get online at all except by using their crappy connect-ware on a Windows box (and cloning the MAC address to your router didn't work).

I was sooo glad when I moved into an area where I could get service from Internode -- "If it speaks TCP/IP and it works for you, it works for us, too." Heaven.

So, yes, this is news.

Re:As one would expect nowadays, but ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32321026)

I have a Motorola Cable modem as provided by Optus, and I can plug an router of my choice into the RJ45 jack on the back.

The technican even said I could ring up and give them the MAC address to be able to use my own Cable router, but I haven't needed to do that yet.

Re:As one would expect nowadays, but ... (2, Insightful)

mikael_j (106439) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321184)

I was sooo glad when I moved into an area where I could get service from Internode -- "If it speaks TCP/IP and it works for you, it works for us, too." Heaven.

The downside to policies like that is of course obvious if you've ever worked tech support for an ISP, you get some pretty scary setups that people are trying to bring online. I really didn't mind the truly insane stuff like the guys with 15 year old Amiga towers running some binary hacked version of AmigaOS and various hacked together pieces of hardware, at least those guys knew what they were doing (even if their hardware and software did strange things), it was the guy running Mac OS 9 with IE5 or Win95 OSR2 with Netscape 4.x that hurt, because while the former guys were well aware of just how crazy they were the latter group tended to fly into rants about how their 30 year old car still ran like a charm so why wouldn't a ten year old computer work as well as a new one (to those about to tell me that getting OS 9 or Win95 online really isn't that hard, well no, it isn't, not if you're at the machine, it's got all the necessary drivers and a somewhat fresh operating system install, if you're trying to guide someone who hates computers with a vengeance over the phone and he's using a computer that's been mismanaged since the first day he owned it, yeah, good luck with that).

Re:As one would expect nowadays, but ... (3, Insightful)

dropadrop (1057046) | more than 4 years ago | (#32322764)

Allowing using any devices and supporting them is not the same thing.

Re:As one would expect nowadays, but ... (2, Interesting)

XMode (252740) | more than 4 years ago | (#32322848)

Bah.. That's nothing.. Our 'any router will do' policy once got me in to an argument with a customer that lasted a good 20 mins. When I advised him for the 5th time that while he had a router, he would ALSO need some form of computer to get internet pages, he demanded to speak to my supervisor.

Re:As one would expect nowadays, but ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32321266)

When telstra first started adsl only windows 95 and windows 98 were supported. The installers would refuse to install if presented with anything less. Even windows nt would cause them to run resulting in no installed Internet.

Re:As one would expect nowadays, but ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32322914)

You could do a firmware upgrade on those, making it like any other ADSL modem.

Re:As one would expect nowadays, but ... (1)

andr00oo (915001) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321040)

Virgin in the UK used to refuse support until you connected a Mac or Windows box directly. Routers were 'not supported'.

UK Virgin doesn't support routers (pron: rooters) Got it.

Re:As one would expect nowadays, but ... (1)

Gonoff (88518) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321518)

They don't care what I plug into it as long as there is only 1 mac address. In fact, I know people who have recently set up with them. They got nice new Netgear wireless routers in the bundle.

It would be sensible sometimes when fixing problems to connect the PC directly. This would help rule out some causes.

Re:As one would expect nowadays, but ... (1)

AK Marc (707885) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321178)

AT&T (known as SBC or Southwestern Bell at the time) required Windows back in 1998 or so for their DSL. Or, more accurately, they required PPPoE before it was built into commodity routers and only supplied Windows disks with their crappy PPPoE software. At least for the area I was being served. The constant PPPoE drops and about 12 months of complaints and a complaint to the FCC later, they managed to give me a DHCP address so I didn't have to do PPPoE anymore.

Re:As one would expect nowadays, but ... (1)

networkBoy (774728) | more than 4 years ago | (#32322758)

They still only officially support Windows or OSX.
When I moved back under their coverage from a vastly better provider I had to get a tier 3 support person to set it up (previously had remote call forwarding on the line now to be used with DSL) because the old service on the line was incompatible with regular home service and you couldn't set it up on the internet.

When she asked what operating system I was using I responded: "let's go with Windows XP". She laughed and said returning linux customer eh?
So XP was entered into the service notes and all was well.

Re:As one would expect nowadays, but ... (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321496)

Virgin in the UK used to refuse support until you connected a Mac or Windows box directly. Routers were 'not supported'.

From which I understood: the only virgin in the UK is soooo kinky

Re:As one would expect nowadays, but ... (1)

Skapare (16644) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321528)

Comcast tried to pull that on me when I was getting it installed. I just told them "all I have is wireless so there is no way I can connect direct". Then they said "then you'll need to get a wireless router". I said "done". I didn't tell them the router ran Linux.

Re:As one would expect nowadays, but ... (1)

jo_ham (604554) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321634)

I'm using Virgin in the UK right now, and that is no longer the case. They will troubleshoot and support a router-based connection - the cable box outputs bog standard ethernet, and they don't care what you have it hooked up to.

Re:As one would expect nowadays, but ... (1)

Nevynxxx (932175) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321858)

They *did*, but as it was MAC address based, you just faked the MAC. I had a Linux server/router pluggin years before it was even Virgin.

As others have said, now a days they provide WiFi routers if you ask nicely, and support any number fo machines accessing.

Re:As one would expect nowadays, but ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32323014)

Not supported does not mean it doesn't work. If you rely on ISP 1st line support to get your internet working you shouldn't be using anything other than Mac or Windows anyway.

Jews for Nerds! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32320830)

Jews, also known as kikes, hebes, hymies, yids, gold niggers, oven magnets, hook noses, sheenies, swindlers, criminals, "firewood", and Arabs in denial are a subhuman species of reptilian extra-terrestrials and adherents to one of the world's oldest major religions, called "Judaism", otherwise known as "The Worship of Money" or "Eating Arab Babies".

Judaism was the world's first master race theory. The Jew religion teaches that Jews are the Chosen People of God and that there is a sacred mystical quality to Jew DNA. In olden times, Jew prophets would, under the command of YHWH, frequently lead the Jews on genocidal rampages against neighboring populations, and even today Jew leaders often cite Jewish religious ideals to justify their ongoing genocide of sandniggers. Judaism ironically found its mirror-image inversion in the anti-Jew Aryan racialism of the Nazis.

Despite only being 0.22% of the world's population, Jews control 99% of the world's money. Not only do the Jews control the world, but also the media, the banks, the space program, and LiveJournal's porn communities and Gay communities. All Jews possess the following features: an extremely large nose, fake boobs, curly hair that reeks of faggotry, one of those gay hats, a love of coke, a law practice, a roll of money, a small cock, or shitty taste in dental hygiene.

Jews invented both Communism and Capitalism. Karl Marx, of course, was a Jew, which was why he understood money so well, and in fact he was converted to Communism by another Jew, Moses Hess, the actual founder of Zionism, who ghost-wrote Marx's The German Ideology. Capitalism was created when Christian Europeans threw away their morals and decided to embrace Jewish practices like usury (see: John Calvin). Jews were the first group to create a sophisticated banking system, which they used to fund the Crusades in order to pit Christians and Muslims (both adhering to religions derived from and controlled by Jews) against each other to kill as many people as possible in a macabre human sacrifice to YHWH.

The Jew banking system was based on fraud and lies, so when it inevitably collapsed, the Jews just pwned as many people as possible by unleashing the Black Plague on them. Later, Jews economically controlled medieval Venice (the first modern maritime trade empire), and then crypto-Jewish merchants economically controlled the Spanish Empire, including the slave trade. Openly Jewish bankers orchestrated the Dutch Empire and founded Jew Amsterdam (later Jew York). Later the Dutch Jews moved to London because they thought it would be a better base for a global empire, and actually brought a Dutch nobleman, William III, with them, who they installed in a coup d'état (more like Jew d'état, amirite?) as new King of the British Empire. For hundreds of years, Jewish bankers controlled global trade through their bases in Jew York City and London. European colonialism was, through its history, essentially a plot whereby Jews could gain control of gold and diamond mines in poor countries and increase their stranglehold over the global economy.

Jews also enjoy slicing up baby penises for fun, some even enjoy sucking them. See below.

Jews also created Jew search engine Google, so now they can find all Jew information on Internets.

Some suggest that we should use Jews instead of dogs to sniff out large amounts of concealed cash or anything else worth smuggling at airports due to their sensitive Jew noses. Obviously, this is a horrible idea, because the pay is bad, and the dirty Kikes would probably form a union and demand moar money, thus increasing the burden on taxpayers everywhere.

Re:Jews for Nerds! (1, Informative)

Zontar The Mindless (9002) | more than 4 years ago | (#32320932)

All Jews possess the following features: ... shitty taste in dental hygiene.

(Shouldn't rise to the bait, but...)

Right, this *totally* explains my Jewish dentist redoing all my upper teeth last year so that I could actually start smiling instead of cringing -- at a 40% discount off his listed fees -- because I'd obviously needed the work done quite badly for years.

Oh, did I mention that he's an *Iraqi* Jew?

Thanks for sorting that out for me, AC!

Re:Jews for Nerds! (1)

rdebath (884132) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321028)

You should'a turned right at Digg, not left. Go start back at Google, 4chan is that'a'way.

This is news? (4, Informative)

Osty (16825) | more than 4 years ago | (#32320914)

Doesn't every ISP allow you to do this? Your ISP provides with a modem of the correct type (DSL or cable) and you provide your own router. If they give you a modem that is also a router, you can turn that off or ask them for a plain old modem. With many ISPs, at least in the US, you can even provide your own modem.

I've been running my own Linux router for the past 12 years across multiple ISPs, from T1 providers back in college to DSL providers to Comcast, and have never had a problem doing so. The tech support may be clueless if you call ("Did you reboot your router?" "Let me do that ...

Re:This is news? (1)

Osty (16825) | more than 4 years ago | (#32320978)

Doh! Stupid Slashdot. That should continue:

"... [wait 30 seconds while you pretend to reboot your router] ... Rebooted. Problem still exists"). But then you shouldn't need router-side tech support if you're going to run your own Linux router.

Re:This is news? (2, Informative)

kestasjk (933987) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321014)

I'm in Australia (Perth), I have my own modem and use a FreeBSD gateway (so that I can use PF for firewalling and traffic queuing; for Skype and gaming at the same time), which I've been using for ~6 years and over two ISPs.

So to answer your question; no, this isn't news. If the new proposed national broadband network didn't allow a router of choice that would be news, because that would be absolutely ridiculous.

Re:This is news? (2, Informative)

cheater512 (783349) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321016)

This skips the router.

Ethernet cable out of the wall goes straight to your Linux box. Nothing inbetween.

Re:This is news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32321096)

That is because there is a router (battery-backed) outside your house interfacing with the fiber. They surely won't be letting you touch those fibre boxes.

Re:This is news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32321608)

How is this anything new? sounds like Verizon FIOS here in the states. fiberoptic from the curb runs to the ONT on the outside of your house and then ethernet and or coax runs out the ONT and into one of Verizon's actiontek routers, or you can use your own.

VZ's actiontek has the benefit of having a coax connector on it and supporting MOCA. using your existing coax infrastructure in the house MOCA can push over 100mbit between the ONT and the actiontek router. you can also get MOCA bridges that allow the PC to directly connect to the MOCA network via its ethernet connection. as far as i remember MOCA allows for upto 7 devices bridges/routers per coax segment.

Ive heard though that VZ is phasing out MOCA?

Re:This is news? (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321174)

Depends on the network in Australia. In the past as noted, some used unique Surfboard cable units or set up adsl units.
To play unmetered games you had to have applications running to tell the network about your connection and ip.
Mac and Linux support was a joke.
The idea that you have device freedom is nice considering the lock down we hand on many networks in the past.
P2p users can get the best rated/value units and max out their shares and memory ect.
This is much better then getting some "safe" "listed" 1 usb/ethernet box or a 4 port wireless box that gets clogged after you turn on your p2p app for a short time due to low end cost cutting hardware limits.
So yes this is good news, end users can get real value or a 'pro' unit rather than an 'approved' $x00 rebadged consumer grade device.

breaking news (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32320976)

linux users will also still be able to use the national electricity network to power their devices.

Re:breaking news (3, Funny)

GigaplexNZ (1233886) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321162)

Darn, so buying that generator was a waste of time.

Re:breaking news (1)

Nerdfest (867930) | more than 4 years ago | (#32322580)

If you got the kind that runs on water running through a turbine, you probably spent way too much as well.

Does this skip the filter? (1)

WarwickRyan (780794) | more than 4 years ago | (#32320984)

The summary says that you can 'route your data in way you want', does this mean that you can avoid the internet filter? Or have they implemented the filter properly (i.e. centrally)? Which would make this a non-story.

For the record, it wouldn't surprise me if they had implemented the internet filter at consumer-router/modem level. They're bright enough to do it that way.

Re:Does this skip the filter? (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321146)

I believe the filter they want to implement will be at ISP level. I don't actually know how they plan to implement it. They seem to want to block URLs so blocking hosts would block more than intended. I am willing to bet that a non-encrypted link to an http proxy outside the country would fix the problem for you. SSL being reserved for a future time when Stephen Conroy actually listens to his advisers.

Re:Does this skip the filter? (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321210)

SSL would be opened by Australian defence and intel spooks as a default as part of their choke point NSA like grip on the few outside optical links.
Just as SWIFT is in parts of the world and all Australian banking details are in realtime.
The only fun part is they cannot really use much in court as everybody would then know and stop using that aspect of the net ;)
Does Stephen Conroy want to make SSL famous and upset passive long term intel gathering?

Re:Does this skip the filter? (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321234)

On holiday recently I was confined to Malaysian internet cafés for my /. access and looking over the shoulders of my fellow internet consumers I noticed that a lot of porn is delivered by webmail so I wonder what the filterers plan to do about that? Ban specific webmail URLs?

Re:Does this skip the filter? (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321418)

Webmail would be a pic attachment? - unless Australia goes for skin tone filters too, I am not sure what could be done.
If the http link was to a listed site, the email app would be like a web browser and get the image blocked.

Re:Does this skip the filter? (1)

totally bogus dude (1040246) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321156)

Firstly the filter isn't implemented yet; the current proposed plan will do the filtering at the ISP-level, i.e. you won't be able to bypass it from your home connection (aside from by using a VPN or getting your kiddie porn through anything other than unencrypted HTTP on port 80).

I'm still hopeful the filter will be dropped. It doesn't seem to have much support, especially if the audience at least week's Q&A is anything to go by.

Not sure exactly why this qualifies as "news", although I suppose it's quite plausible that a government-backed national broadband network would require a particular device and/or OS in order to access. So I suppose the news here is that a government hasn't made a mind-boggingly poor technical decision.

Re:Does this skip the filter? (1)

deniable (76198) | more than 4 years ago | (#32323486)

The NBN isn't implemented yet either and we're betting that it won't get much further. A few roll-outs in the South-East corner and not much more. Hopefully the filter is as successful. Oh joy, Lateline is showing Conroy attacking Google. The man makes Alston look like a genius.

Re:Does this skip the filter? (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321192)

The filter works on every ISP in Australia and would 'pop' every packet.
A url type request moving from your 'home' to the exchange would hit a a low end "Narus" like unit and would inspect every packet request vs a very long ever expanding list of adult and political sites.
If you request the wrong site, your page is blocked and your IP would be noted.
Not much news on what too many requests to a banned site would do?
Hit it 3 times does the ISP go into log mode??, 50 and a state task force gets some paperwork to sneak and peek??
A few more and you have a few vans parked outside one morning??

Re:Does this skip the filter? (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321206)

I wonder how hard the system would be to DDOS? Once we identify the blocked URLs deploy scripts which will query them at a great rate from a number of different systems. Also if you can identify the node in the ISP system which does the filtering try to get its attention from outside the ISPs network. That would make the DDOS bit easier.

Maybe we can fill up a few RAID arrays with trace data.

Re:Does this skip the filter? (1)

jibjibjib (889679) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321772)

We don't actually have an internet filter here in Australia, so asking "have they implemented the filter properly" isn't meaningful. But in the unlikely event that the government's plan doesn't fall in a heap and we do end up with a filter in a year or two, it'll definitely be implemented at the ISP level.

People in Australia are free to own their own modems and computers and run their own operating systems on them. There's a huge variety of hardware in use. It'd be logistically impossible, as well as very unpopular, for the government to forcibly replace everyone's modem.

Free internet filtering! (0, Troll)

TheIonix (780003) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321008)

Too bad it's Australia, the internet you get is crippled and filtered.

Re:Free internet filtering! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32321104)

Not yet it isn't.

Re:Free internet filtering! (3, Funny)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321152)

Not. Yet.

Though I do check /s/ every night after the wife has gone to bed purely to make sure it is still there.

Re:Free internet filtering! (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321224)

Just as Australia enters the late 20th C with optical, Stephen Conroy takes us back to the digital dark ages again.

Re:Free internet filtering! (1)

Skapare (16644) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321550)

From the sounds of it, Conroy is aiming for the Victorian era, somewhere around the latter 1800's.

Thats nice but... (2, Insightful)

Eth1csGrad1ent (1175557) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321134)

..once the filter kicks in the Internet will stop at your ISP... a bit like owning a ferrari in Antarctica

Re:Thats nice but... (1)

Skapare (16644) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321566)

But not at the other end point of your overseas encrypted tunnel.

Re:Thats nice but... (1)

Eth1csGrad1ent (1175557) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321960)

its a fair point... but wait for the scope creep. The black list will become the grey list, anonymous proxies and encrypted packets are next. The only reason they're not on Conroy's list is because none of his aides have explained them to him. NBN here we come... anyone know what the data charges are like via a sat. phone ?

Re:Thats nice but... (1)

networkBoy (774728) | more than 4 years ago | (#32322890)

high.
Very very high.

Posted by timothy (1)

Swampash (1131503) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321160)

Nuf said.

That's great except... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32321164)

That's great except there won't be an internet to connect to in Australia. When you filter the internet you can't call it the internet anymore. It's an inter-networked series of government approved servers.

Nobody was worried (1)

Quick Reply (688867) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321216)

Why would I be worried? I thought that it was obvious that you can use existing networking equipment otherwise the NBN would be pointless if you can't use it. That's even if NBN makes it to mainland Australia.

But you can only route one way! (2, Informative)

asifyoucare (302582) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321272)

How does this help? You next hop must be the ISP. Anywhere else will not be on the same subnet as your internet interface and thus cannot be a valid next hop.

I assume the ISP will not honour source routing.

you F4il It!? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32321368)

3 4simple steps!

Wow (1)

ledow (319597) | more than 4 years ago | (#32321530)

Amazing. You can use an Ethernet-based device to connect to a domestic broadband network. Wonderful modern technology, isn't it?

Hint: If posting a story where the *opposite* actually sounds more shocking, you're not posting news. You're posting things people already know. News needs to be "new", true and (usually) unexpected, unusual, shocking, controversial etc.

What difference would it make anyway? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32321686)

Whatever tech they use 'outside the house', as long as whatever bo they provide Internet service with ends in a standard Ethernet port, which assigns an IP address by DHCP or uses some other industry standard such as PPPoE, then what "brand" software runs on whatever you connect to that is irrelevant.

If it doesn't end in an ethernet port, I'd never subscribe to it anyway.

No Rush (1)

bloodhawk (813939) | more than 4 years ago | (#32322044)

Even if for some bizarre reason your linux router wasn't supported (slow news day at slashdot maybe?), I doubt anyone would be at any real risk. Current deployment rate of the NBN should have most of Australia up to ADSL 1 levels by around 2030. Then watch as the government realises "Oh shit Australia has poor backbone connections to the US and Singapore and what we have done don't mean shit as we are all sharing the same tiny piece of pipe".

Re:No Rush (1)

deniable (76198) | more than 4 years ago | (#32323538)

Current deployment rate of the NBN should have most of Australia up to ADSL 1 levels by around 2030.

You're a starry-eyed optimist.

I love the sound of that (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 4 years ago | (#32322364)

Australia's new National Broadband Network

"National" Broadband Network.

Music to my ears.

Re:I love the sound of that (1)

XMode (252740) | more than 4 years ago | (#32322996)

Its not what you think.. Trust me.

Hooray (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32323382)

You can now wire your linux kernel right up to the national nanny filter!

Australia and china should go make their own 'internet'.

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