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187 comments

Linux (5, Funny)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435770)

...but is there a Linux driver?

Re:Linux (1)

DarkKnightRadick (268025) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435890)

There better be :-p

Re:Linux (4, Insightful)

alannon (54117) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435940)

Since OSX uses CUPS as its core printer driver system, I suspect it wouldn't be terribly difficult to make it run on Linux.

Re:Linux (4, Funny)

liquidpele (663430) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436236)

I tried to build one, but I'm missing a few pieces.

What I want to know is (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32437154)

How much is the ink?

WTF (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32435798)

Stop linking to websites that link to the actual fucking article: http://www.b3ta.com/links/Lego_printer [b3ta.com]

Also, this is just a more advanced variation of a project included with the original Lego Mindstorms kit.

P.S.: fucking Flash used for video again. Lame.

Re:WTF (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32435822)

so by your definition, some shitty forum post is the "actual fucking article" as opposed to say an actual article?

Re:WTF (3, Informative)

Endo13 (1000782) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435870)

And sometimes there's some pretty good reasons for it. Like in this particular instance the article is a great read and perfectly fine to do so anywhere you please. The forums with the original post, on the other hand, not so much.

Lego Printer? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32435806)

When I saw this headline, I thought it printed on to lego blocks forming words using lego blocks

Re:Lego Printer? (4, Interesting)

clone53421 (1310749) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435906)

I thought it printed LEGO creations from LEGO blocks.

Y’know, your average 3D printer... but with LEGO bricks.

That would be cool.

Re:Lego Printer? (2, Insightful)

omnichad (1198475) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436010)

I thought it was a 3D printer that printed LEGO bricks themselves.

Re:Lego Printer? (1)

clone53421 (1310749) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436100)

Well, my second guess was it might print onto LEGO bricks themselves... e.g. design-your-own minifig faces. I know for a fact that felt tip pens will smear and smudge on LEGO bricks, though, so that was pretty obviously not what they meant.

Re:Lego Printer? (2, Insightful)

Zapotek (1032314) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436044)

I thought it printed LEGO creations from LEGO blocks.

Y’know, your average 3D printer... but with LEGO bricks.

That would be cool.

I love how a 3D printer is now referred to as "an average 3D printer [no big deal]".
I'm stilled quite fascinated by that technology...

Re:Lego Printer? (1)

sexconker (1179573) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436366)

Same.
I am filled with disappointment.

I want a 3D printer (3, Insightful)

jgagnon (1663075) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435826)

That will take a CAD drawing and build me a Lego model from it. :p

Re:I want a 3D printer (2, Interesting)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435864)

Search "Lego factory" on YouTube. I've seen one that builds Lego cars.

Re:I want a 3D printer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32436018)

How about a 3D printer that will take a CAD drawing of a 3D printer and build you a 3d printer that will take a CAD drawing of a 3d printer and build you a 3D printer that will take a CAD drawing of a 3D printer and build you a 3d printer from it from it from it.

[anonymouse as my geek ego couldn't take it if I got that wrong]

Re:I want a 3D printer (4, Informative)

g0bshiTe (596213) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436094)

They have one, it's called RepRap [scientificblogging.com] .

I want a lego tattoo printer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32436638)

I want a lego tattoo printer

Disappointment (1)

OpenSourced (323149) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435840)

I somehow thought that a "Lego printer" was a device to create an image of what you print using Lego cubes. So, as amazing as the thing is, I felt a bit disappointed.

Re:Disappointment (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32435912)

I came here to say this. But then you already had, so I felt a bit disappointed.

Re:Disappointment (4, Funny)

halivar (535827) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436296)

My only disappointment is that he used "special pieces." At least, I think a felt-tip and a rubber-band count as those.

Re:Disappointment (2, Informative)

langelgjm (860756) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436524)

Well, didn't some of the Technics kits come with different kinds of bands and wheels for them? So that's not too much of a stretch...

Re:Disappointment (1)

KlaymenDK (713149) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436656)

Badum-tish. Hah.

But yes, I have a number of sets with rubber bands in them (although there might be a different term for them in legolese?).

Re:Disappointment (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32436550)

Is a circuit board standard set these days? They keep adding so much...

Re:Disappointment (1)

SydShamino (547793) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436948)

There are plenty of hard-core LEGO enthusiasts who only use official LEGO-brand rubber bands. There are enough sets that have come with a rubber band, various pieces of string, etc., to make that possible. Back when I bought sets and resold them as parts in the late 90s, the rubber bands and string and such were hot sellers.

The pen, though.... I can't think of any set that has come with a pen. Maybe use one from LEGOLAND?

Re:Disappointment (1)

JonJ (907502) | more than 4 years ago | (#32437020)

The pen, though.... I can't think of any set that has come with a pen. Maybe use one from LEGOLAND?

Maybe my memory is playing tricks on me here, but there was this set that my older brother got a long time ago, which was a husge truck, that had extra instructions for making it into either a sorting machine(I don't know the technical name) or a drawing machine. I believe that one came with a pen, so if I remember correctly some sets have been known to come with pens.

Re:Disappointment (1)

mcvos (645701) | more than 4 years ago | (#32437080)

My only disappointment is that he used "special pieces." At least, I think a felt-tip and a rubber-band count as those.

Rubber bands are legal as far as I'm concerned, and I don't think there an official Lego pen yet, so you can't get out of the felt-tip either. But the home-made electronics made me wonder how essential the Lego really is in this printer.

It's still awesome, though. I especially like the little touches with the minifigs (though they may have been added to make it look like there's more Lego in it).

I may be the only one (1)

Bicx (1042846) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435844)

I clicked on the article, excited to see a 3D printer that printed out complete Lego models. Talk about a let-down.

Re:I may be the only one (1)

MozeeToby (1163751) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435968)

You're not alone. I was expecting software that allowed you to place lego bricks in 3d space and then hit print and have the object you designed built for you. Not that this isn't neat, just not nearly as neat as what I first imagined.

Re:I may be the only one (3, Funny)

g0bshiTe (596213) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436118)

Wow, talk about Epic Fail. The summary even says "with felt tip print head".

Re:I may be the only one (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32436968)

No one reads TFS, that's what titles are for you insensitive clod!

Re:I may be the only one (1)

cool_arrow (881921) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436352)

you can download software from the lego website that will allow you to do the design in 3D. Throw down the cash and they will ship your design but you have to build it. http://ldd.lego.com/ [lego.com]

Ouch (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435848)

I'm guessing it takes one new felt tip pen per page, seeing how often it hits the page.

It's always freakin' Windows or Linux for these crazy projects, so bonus points for making the whole thing run on a Mac, as an OS-level printer driver too.

Re:Ouch (4, Insightful)

obarel (670863) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435894)

You mean "it's 1,000 times cheaper than inkjet".

Re:Ouch (1)

jslater25 (1005503) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436456)

Actually, if you've seen the prices for Lego pieces these days, I don't know if this printer would be much cheaper than a normal inkjet.

Re:Ouch (1)

KlaymenDK (713149) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436682)

That depends on the lifespan, no? Most inkjets you can buy for almost free, but the refills will bleed you dry (so to speak). Lasers, on the other hand, are rather expensive up front but can run for miles on one tank of, um, wrong analogy. What I'm saying is, I think Lego printers might be classified as laser printers.

Re:Ouch (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32437040)

No, I think you missed the part about it running on a Mac.

Re:Ouch (3, Interesting)

0100010001010011 (652467) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435922)

Although he loses some street cred for not using Dogcow [wikipedia.org] Especially since it was used for print dialogs.

The image of the dogcow was used to show the orientation and color of the paper in Mac OS page setup dialog boxes. HCI engineer Annette Wagner made the decision to use the dog from the Cairo font as a starting point for the page graphic. Annette edited the original font and created a larger version with spots more suitable for demonstrating various printing options. The new dog graphic had a more bovine look, making it arguably less clear as to what animal it was intended to be, and after the print dialog was released the name "dogcow" came into use.

Re:Ouch (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32436502)

Moof!

Sharpie would give more detail (3, Interesting)

sxedog (824351) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435854)

Let's improve on this by adding a fine point marker! :)

No (4, Funny)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435932)

If it ain't broke, DON'T fix it.

Re:No (5, Funny)

tattood (855883) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436032)

I don't get it.

Re:No (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32436164)

I tried to find your sig so I could reply to it, but it appears that you don’t have one.

Re:Sharpie would give more detail (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436978)

Pshh. Nah. Use a 0.4 mm mechanical pencil, and get 63.5 DPI!

Better than Anything HP Puts Out (2, Insightful)

hardburn (141468) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435878)

I bet this is more reliable than any printer HP ever put out. I'm certain the cost of ink is cheaper.

Love all the little minifigs scattered around the machine.

Re:Better than Anything HP Puts Out (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32435958)

Somewhere, there are LaserJet IIs still printing.

Not all HP printers are consumer grade junk.

Re:Better than Anything HP Puts Out (2, Informative)

kalpol (714519) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436148)

I'm still using my 20-year-old LaserJet IIIsi.

Re:Better than Anything HP Puts Out (1)

SydShamino (547793) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436872)

4M Plus for the win! Awesome printer. With a JetDirect card all these printers integrate easily into a modern network. (Just put the printer near the wireless router and use one of the hard wire ports.)

Re:Better than Anything HP Puts Out (1)

Pharmboy (216950) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436194)

We have a LJIII and a consumer grade Epson dot matrix printer (circa 1990) that we used for address labels for most of two decades. The only reason we don't use them is that our newer printers are much cheaper to operate. Both still work just fine.

Re:Better than Anything HP Puts Out (1)

skids (119237) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436298)

To me "consumer grade junk" == "spare parts found in trash."

More Epsons than HPs found there, from experience. Unfortunate, because I don't know how to break into those yet,

Re:Better than Anything HP Puts Out (1)

element-o.p. (939033) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436360)

I've got a '98ish consumer-grade HP-660C that still works. Not all consumer-grade HP printers are junk.

Re:Better than Anything HP Puts Out (1)

Nikker (749551) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436480)

Can't argue with that. Bought a laserjet 6l last year for $50CDN with a full toner still haven't put a dime into it. Best printer purchase I've ever made.

Re:Better than Anything HP Puts Out (1)

dgatwood (11270) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436532)

The reason the LaserJet II is still working is that the guts were built by Canon. There are plenty of LaserWriter printers that still work, too. It was a good engine.

To be fair, HP's bigger laser printers are pretty solid (e.g. the 81xx series) unless you actually need them to conform to their specs. Then they fail miserably.

For example, we have two 81xx series printers where I work. I tried to use them to print 11x17 pages double-sided. Shouldn't be a problem, right? Wrong. The printers are so brain damaged that they feed the pages too close together. Thus, if you send multiple pages at once, you never get a single page out of the printer before it is jammed (at a total loss of all pages in flight). You have to send every 11x17 double-sided page individually (e.g. print pages 1-2, wait, print pages 3-4, wait, etc.). If you do that, it works and never jams, but that's pretty painful when you have to print... say a hundred pages in this fashion. I mean seriously, how hard is it to not start one page until the previous page is clear? Both our 8100 and our 8150 do exactly the same thing (with up-to-date firmware in both). Apparently testing is optional at HP.

Oh, and did I mention that it takes three minutes for the d**n things to warm up from powersave mode? Sure, it's great that they can crank out 32 pages per minute, but until you hit 32 pages, my 8ppm low-end Brother consumer printer is faster (startup time measured in low double-digit seconds). The vast majority of the time, I wish I had my personal printer from home instead of these beasts.

And don't get me started on their dithering/halftoning algorithm. I've never once seen any HP printer reproduce any photographic content (even in black-and-white) without objectionable banding problems. That includes both laser and inkjet printers. The print quality on gradients is absolutely awful from what I've seen. It's even noticeable in the sample printouts that you get from their printers in stores. To say that I'm unimpressed would be generous. Don't get me wrong, they're by no means the worst out there---I still swear more at Epson, Lexmark, and a couple of others---but HP is way up on my list.

Re:Better than Anything HP Puts Out (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32436742)

No, but nearly everything they've made since the Carly era has been absolute crap. I've replaced so many failed printers that were just outside of the warranty period including some that were purchased because they were supposed to handle high volume printing. Old HPs were great. I have clients still using LaserJet 2s and 3s. Recent printers are terrible.

Re:Better than Anything HP Puts Out (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32435960)

Clearly someone who never had an LJ II series of any stripe.

Re:Better than Anything HP Puts Out (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435986)

Cheaper, Better, Faster. Pick two!

This is so beautiful (1)

walmass (67905) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435898)

... I wanted to cry

OMG! (0)

ahem (174666) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435904)

P0N!3s!!!

Creativity at its finest (2, Interesting)

adeft (1805910) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435916)

The little guys riding on it just top it off perfectly. I'm reminded of the rickety dumb erector set models I made as a kid with an instruction manual. :(

Re:Creativity at its finest (4, Funny)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436026)

The little guys riding on it just top it off perfectly.

Wonderful. Like angels on an illustrated manuscript.

Next steps (4, Interesting)

wickerprints (1094741) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435930)

1. Multiple colors via a pen carousel and switching mechanism.
2. Support for plotting in addition to line-by-line output.
3. Halftone dithering.

Re:Next steps (1)

stms (1132653) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436500)

Commercial adoption should be the next step think of all the money they could save on printer ink.

Technically... (1, Informative)

NonUniqueNickname (1459477) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435936)

It's a plotter not a printer.

Re:Technically... (5, Insightful)

mea37 (1201159) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436024)

Plotters draw vectors. Based on the demo this is pretty clearly raster-based. Don't let the way it holds the ink fool you; it's a printer.

Re:Technically... (1)

NonUniqueNickname (1459477) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436390)

Plotters draw vectors.

Which definition of "vectors" excludes straight lines? The gadget converts a raster image to drawing instructions; then executes the instructions with a pen. It's a plotter.

Re:Technically... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32436444)

Then every printer is a plotter. By plotting arbitrary short lines, i.e. dots.

edit: and of course the capcha was 'childish' :-)

Re:Technically... (2, Informative)

clone53421 (1310749) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436454)

It’s a raster-based printer, which plots (yes) dots. Devices which print by plotting dots are simply called “printers”.

Vs. a line plotter, which is what you are typically referring to when you say “plotter”: some of which are designed exactly like this, with carriages to move the paper and pen. Rather than plotting dots, though, they draw solid lines by moving the pen and/or the paper in solid, continuous movements (only lifting the pen when necessary to break the line and begin a new line somewhere else).

Re:Technically... (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436912)

Actually the gadget doesn't draw dots, but horizontal lines. Basically it only rasterizes in one dimension (although I guess it actually "unrasterizes" a 2D raster).

Re:Technically... (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 4 years ago | (#32437120)

This takes me back; in the early eighties I had a Radio Shack MC-10 computer, and poking around (and buying a repair manual) I discovered that it had a far higher resolution video driver than was sopperted by its OS. I also had a small plotter for it.

So I wrote a graphics program that would show the pic on the TV, and wrote a printer program for the plotter that would print out the pictures. I thought it was pretty cool, since IBM didn't even have a PC capable of that.

I was a lot smarter back then...

It's not a printer (2, Informative)

Dynedain (141758) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435944)

Actually, it is a pen plotter [wikipedia.org] , not a printer. It's a technology that was very common in architectural and engineering offices until it rapidly died off 10 years ago for inkjets.

I love the Lego figures going along for a ride.

Re:It's not a printer (5, Informative)

poopdeville (841677) | more than 4 years ago | (#32435994)

No, it's not a plotter. Plotters are able to move the substrate back and forth underneath the pen. Combined with the left and right motion, a plotter can make a line in any direction on the substrate. "Plotters are restricted to line art," as your wikipedia link says. This can't even do line art. It must rasterize ("pixelize") an image before it can be printed.

Re:It's not a printer (2, Insightful)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436168)

Yup. More like a 1-pin dot matrix printer. But oh-so-wonderful!

Re:It's not a printer (1)

clone53421 (1310749) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436196)

It’s designed in such a way, yeah, but it seems to me that it could have just as easily been designed to lower the pen and draw line art.

However your average software probably expects you to rasterize the output when you print...

Re:It's not a printer (1)

Kemanorel (127835) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436230)

Some plotters are able to move the substrate... Others merely had a stationary flatbed and had a dual-axis armature to generate lines in any direction. The flatbeds worked great for smaller sheets while the moving substrate models were more suited to larger sheets.

Not all plotters move the paper... (2, Informative)

Ellis D. Tripp (755736) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436282)

Analog plotters were at one time common items in engineering labs, as well as chemistry labs where they served as output devices for chromatographs, spectrometers, etc. HP pretty much owned the market, and they moved an overhead pen over a stationary sheet of paper, which was held down to the bed by an electrostatic charge. A typical unit shown here:

http://www.teknetelectronics.com/Search.asp?p_ID=12956&pDo=DETAIL [teknetelectronics.com]

Re:Not all plotters move the paper... (3, Interesting)

clone53421 (1310749) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436400)

Whether it moved the paper or the pen is relatively irrelevant. I think his main point was, plotters universally draw line art (moving the paper, or pen, in a fluid continuous movement along the path you are tracing)... vs. printers which rasterize their image (print dots of colour which merge together to form a complete image).

Although this project rasterized the page (printing dots), it could have just as easily been designed to set the pen down and then do continuous line art... but you have much less software that’s capable of printing to a line art plotter as opposed to a regular raster image printer. That is most likely the reason for the dot-matrix print style that it used.

This really isn’t that impressive. The main point that impresses me is that LEGO products are precision-built with such a quality as to be able to feed paper and move a pen to accurately position the dots and produce what looks like essentially a flawless page of print (albeit slightly low-res because of the relatively large size of the dots). We always knew that LEGO used top-quality materials with very, very small tolerances on the parts... this takes advantage of that and shows just how high their standards are.

Nothing mind blowing here (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32435970)

I have built a similar device from a kit called "Merkur" more than 20 years ago.
A video of merkur alfi [youtube.com] in action.

Re:Nothing mind blowing here (1)

methano (519830) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436268)

Egads! that's annoying

Cool but hardly genius. (1)

Whatsisname (891214) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436030)

I give it more credit for artistic value with the figures placed around than for the technical difficulties.

I built a plotter capable of those drawings for my 2nd year engineering class using a few stepper motors, a bunch of paint stirrer sticks, epoxy and an AVR microcontroller.

Re:Cool but hardly genius. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32436256)

I give it more credit for artistic value with the figures placed around than for the technical difficulties.

I built a plotter capable of those drawings for my 2nd year engineering class using a few stepper motors, a bunch of paint stirrer sticks, epoxy and an AVR microcontroller.

How many Lego blocks did you use?

Re:Cool but hardly genius. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32436280)

As many as he needed.

Re:Cool but hardly genius. (1)

fiannaFailMan (702447) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436790)

I give it more credit for artistic value with the figures placed around than for the technical difficulties.

I built a plotter capable of those drawings for my 2nd year engineering class using a few stepper motors, a bunch of paint stirrer sticks, epoxy and an AVR microcontroller.

Well bully for you!

Lego car factory (1)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436048)

I much prefer the Lego Car factory [youtube.com] way cooler IMHO than some paper and a coloured pen.

I just have to say (1)

AlgorithMan (937244) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436064)

f*cking awesome!

Finally! (1)

N0Man74 (1620447) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436078)

We finally get some *real* "News for Nerds"!

That's really awesome.

Lego Lab (2, Funny)

Mindcontrolled (1388007) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436108)

During my PhD work, we built some lab gear, for example an overhead shaker, from Lego Mindstorm gear. Pure nerd fun. Had to hide the stuff when the prof showed the lab to guests, though...

Cool, but... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32436162)

If you've ever struggled to build anything more complex than a cube of Lego, this will blow your mind. It's a fully functioning Lego printer, complete with felt tip print head.

On one hand, that's very cool.

On the other hand, though (and on second thought), I just don't see the big deal - I don't see why I should get excited about this.

Back when I was young, I had lots of LEGO, and I played with it every day. I used to build things I liked; space ships, space stations (yes, I was mostly into the Space sets - I basically grew up on Classic Space at first and Futuron later on, and I made it all the way to Blacktron I and II, Space Police and M-Tron), but also houses, cities, castles, and so on.

I created worlds, I played with tme - in them, really -, and I had fun, tons of fun, a kind of fun that I've never really been able to recreate anymore since I've turned an adult.

I don't want to diss LEGO printers, or the people who build them. But at the same time, I just can't get excited about them; they're a perfect example "adult toys". It's a neat application of LEGO, and it shows again what you can do with the stuff, but the magic that was (is) inherent in any child's creations, even my own, isn't there. Fact is, it's not even intended to be there.

I'm sorry, I just can't get excited over this. When somebody creates a cool LEGO space ship or space station or so, though, be sure to post a Slashdot story about it. ;)

Re:Cool, but... (1)

Kemanorel (127835) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436294)

Completely offtopic, but the M-Tron sets completely rocked. As for the ability to just "play" and use your imagination, I suspect that if you gave yourself time and leave to go back to it, you'd be able to find the fun again and your life would be somewhat better for it. Just because you're an adult doesn't mean you have to stop playing. Imagination is always useful.

trolling as usual, BUT (-1, Troll)

zugedneb (601299) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436396)

what the hell is this?

Knowledge in electronics and some mechanics makes on a GENIOUS?

Hey, I wiped my ass this mornign, then at least I am moderatly ingenious? Please?

hahaha

Make & program your own robots, William Clark (2, Informative)

Mike McTernan (260224) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436442)

There's a similar lego plotter in this book: http://www.clarkonline.org/william/mapyor/index.html [clarkonline.org]

The book describes using some large lego wheels to form a drum around which the paper was attached, and how to form a small electro magnet around a bolt through a technic lego plate to pull the pen towards the drum. The pen itself was suspended between two lego axles on a butterfly pin. The whole magnet head assembly could pinion left and right using an improvised lego rotary counter to measure progress with a similar block to rotate the drum.

I had the Sinclair Spectrum version of the book as a child and an IO box of relays. I never made the printer, but made lots of other devices.

There's some inside pictures of the book here: http://www.hexapodrobot.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=35&t=318 [hexapodrobot.com]

A PDF of the book is here: http://www.worldofspectrum.org/infoseekid.cgi?id=2000479 [worldofspectrum.org]

That's cute, and what would be even cooler... (1)

AthleteMusicianNerd (1633805) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436508)

is if someone figures out a way to literally print out a lego(like my idealistic mindset first thought when reading the article) which could then of course lead to people printing out all of their manufactured goods.

The LEGO work isn't the impressive part. (1)

Urza9814 (883915) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436598)

The actual LEGO construction is _not_ the impressive part here. I built something quite similar 5+ years ago. Many people did. They gave instructions for how to build it in the LEGO Mindstorms Ultimate Builders Set. And there were a huge number of alternatives built as well, to be more accurate or to print on different paper or just built differently. The impressive part of this is all in software. Never seen anything like that before.

Perpetual Motion with Legos (1)

Pawnn (1708484) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436604)

One time I made a perpetual motion machine car with Legos. Unfortunately, it rolled off a table and broke. :-(

I never could get it right again, but I swear it happened!

Google's own Larry Page Did It First... (2, Interesting)

lobiusmoop (305328) | more than 4 years ago | (#32436834)

I remember being awestruck seeing a picture of a Lego plotter machine many years ago. It turns out that it was build by Larry Page [wikipedia.org] of Google fame.

Here's a picture of it [luberth.com]

This is Slashdot no? (1)

matthiasvegh (1800634) | more than 4 years ago | (#32437056)

Considering this is slashdot, who the hell struggles with Lego? Hell, I'm pretty sure a substantial ammount of users here use (or have used) Mindstorms extensively..
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