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Windows 7: The Missing Manual

samzenpus posted more than 4 years ago | from the read-all-about-it dept.

Windows 222

r3lody writes "It took me a little while after Windows 7 became available before I gave up my Windows XP desktop and purchased a new laptop with Windows 7 Home Premium pre-loaded. Like those who endured the change to Windows Vista, I found myself floundering around a little trying to figure out all of the new bells and whistles Microsoft had added to its operating system. Windows 7: The Missing Manual by David Pogue is meant to address the needs of people like me. The book, while readable by beginners, is written for users with some acquaintance with Windows. Advanced users will find the book too simplistic, but users up to the intermediate level will find it a handy reference to the new features in all of the flavors of Windows 7." Keep reading for the rest of r3lody's review.Writing for the multiple levels of Windows 7 is handled by including a little sub-heading "cheat sheet" after each major heading. Most will have "All Versions", but you may see a subset like "Home Premium ? Professional ? Enterprise ? Ultimate". Handling multiple levels of users is a little more difficult. The book is written for advanced beginners to intermediate users, but beginners to Windows have "Up to Speed" sidebars added to help them understand concepts regular Windows users already know. More advanced users have "Power User's Clinic" sidebars to provide additional information.

Windows 7: the missing manual is organized into 8 parts, comprising 27 chapters and 4 appendices.

After an introductory section describing the book's layout, Part One deals with the Windows 7 desktop. Comprised of 5 chapters, Part One gives the basics of manipulating windows, programs, and files. Chapter 1 describes the Start menu, jump lists (frequently used documents) and the Run command. Next comes Explorer, the Taskbar, and general window controls. Most of chapter 2 is devoted to the eye candy provided by Aero. The third chapter discussing searching and organizing files follows that, with a good discussion of the much-improved Windows Search. Chapter 4 covers personalization (wallpaper, color and sound themes, screensavers and desktop icons), and the last chapter of part 1 explains the ways you can get help (Microsoft's Help system, Remote Assistance, and getting help from Microsoft).

Part Two uses 3 chapters to cover Windows 7 Software. After talking about opening and closing programs, opening and closing documents, and dialog boxes, David Pogue explains how to install and uninstall software, as well as handling compatibility issues. Speech recognition and gadgets got thrown into this chapter, but seem a little out of place. The next chapter discusses various freebie applications supplied with Windows 7, and those available as part of Windows Live Essentials. Most of those are explained in sufficient detail to use, but a few are deferred to later chapters. This part is closed out with rather brief coverage of Control Panel.

The next 5 chapters comprise Part Three, which is devoted to Windows 7 Online. After chapter 9 explains how to get hooked up to the Internet, chapter 10 is dedicated to Internet security. Microsoft Security Essentials, the Action Center, as well as Windows Firewall and Windows Defender are all covered, along with methods of protecting your privacy while you surf. This all leads into the grand tour of Internet Explorer 8, which is talked about in detail in chapter 11. The last two chapters go over Windows Live Mail and Windows Live Services.

Part Four is the media-centric portion of the book. David broke the discussion into three broad chapters: Windows Live Photo Gallery, Windows Media Player, and Windows Media Center. Windows Live Photo Gallery is Microsoft's challenger to Google's Picasa. While Picasa is more mature, Photo Gallery is not shabby by any means, and chapter 14 gives excellent explanations on how to get the most from the program. The next chapter goes over Windows Media Player, which has been around for a long time. There have been some minor changes to it, including streaming media to other computers and handling of more types of audio and video files. Windows Media Center was originally designed for the Media Center Edition PC, but is now available for any version of Windows 7 from Home Premium on up. You get a lot of information on how to set it up and use it for all sorts of media. You'll also find out how to use your PC as a DVR (assuming you have a TV tuner card or USB tuner).

The next part is all about hardware and peripherals. First printing, then Windows Fax and Scan, and finally general device handling are each given their due. The third and final chapter of Part Five covers laptops, tablets, and touchscreen computers, and their special capabilities and limitations.

One thing all computer users need to handle are the inevitable problems. Part Six covers various maintenance and trouble-shooting topics across three chapters. First, general maintenance and speed tweaks, followed by an in-depth discussion of disks, compression and encryption, and finally a chapter on backup, restore and trouble-shooting. All have just enough information to be useful, and not too much to absorb.

The last main part covers networking and homegroups. Windows is the most useful when it's part of a network, and Part Seven explains how to connect it and use it. After discussing setting up accounts, workgroups and domains have their own chapters, so home and office users can focus on what they need. This part ends with chapters on sharing files and remote control (including VPNs and Remote Desktop).

There is a set of 4 appendices that comprise Part Eight. Included are how to install and upgrade to Windows 7, how to use Regedit, and my favorite two chapters – Where'd It Go?, and the Master Keyboard Shortcut List.

Overall, the book does assume you've at least seen a previous version of Windows, as a lot of text explains how Windows 7 is different. I personally would have preferred the author keep the focus on Windows 7 and less on the differences from prior versions. There are a lot of attempts at humor. On the plus side, it keeps the tone of this fairly large book accessible to the novice to intermediate user. On the minus side, the occasional joke usually seems out of place.

I found Windows 7: the missing manual a valuable reference to the many offerings in Microsoft's latest incarnation of Windows. While the writing style varies from simple reference to the occasional attempt at light-hearted guidance, it is a comprehensive, informative and (most importantly) useful manual of the ins and outs of using Windows 7 in all its flavors.

You can purchase Windows 7: The Missing Manual from amazon.com. Slashdot welcomes readers' book reviews -- to see your own review here, read the book review guidelines, then visit the submission page.

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GNAA 4 LIFE! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32461754)

Oops I farted. *chortle* I'm going to go off to jizz all over my face again.

-Gary Niger

This is just what I need. (5, Funny)

soybean (1120) | more than 4 years ago | (#32461758)

It will accompany my copy of "Windows 7, the missing operating system" nicely.

Re:This is just what I need. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32462096)

Does it tell you how to solve the "700MB per 6 hours" speed limit win7 suffers when trying to copy files across a wireless network? Identical hardware running FreeBSD and OpenSuse on the same, exact network can do this normally in just a few minutes, but not windows 7. Oh well, it doesn't matter now -- I convinced her to ditch windows for Linux.

No more windows on my home network == "peaceful, easy feeling"... :D

Re:This is just what I need. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32462156)

Does it tell you how to solve the "700MB per 6 hours" speed limit win7 suffers when trying to copy files across a wireless network?

You're either making this up or you're an idiot who can't configure their wireless card right.

Re:This is just what I need. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32462732)

That's odd, because
(1) I am not making it up
(2) It was Dell's install/config, and
(3) It "just works" fine with every other OS I've tried.

Atheros wireless, Dell Inspiron 1545 bought new a few months ago.

I guess this is typical though, MS fanbois can't stand it when we point out the problems with windows... And since they have no solution, we get treated to ad hominem attacks.

Re:This is just what I need. (-1, Troll)

Ex-MislTech (557759) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463726)

It may not be M$ fanbois, corps and the government has hired ppl
to monitor and counter and down mod posts that paint them
in a bad light.

http://iaindale.blogspot.com/2007/08/government-to-monitor-blogs.html [blogspot.com]

http://forums.digitalpoint.com/showthread.php?t=337848 [digitalpoint.com]

So when you see ppl mod you down they actually may be getting "paid" to do it.

Even if they ACTUALLY agree with you.

Brave new world indeed, "groupthink" via an ink and paper leash.

Re:This is just what I need. (2, Informative)

0123456 (636235) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462336)

Does it tell you how to solve the "700MB per 6 hours" speed limit win7 suffers when trying to copy files across a wireless network?

Probably because there isn't one. While the first thing I did after buying a Windows-7 laptop was to configure it to dual-boot into Linux for anything other than games, I've had no problems with wireless performance, including downloading tens of gigabytes of games from Steam.

That's not to say that you couldn't have a crappy driver or some misconfiguration, but there's no such fundamental limit in the OS.

Re:This is just what I need. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32462576)

I convinced her to ditch windows for Linux

Now her wireless card doesn't work at all. Problem solved!


Strangely enough, I transfer large amounts of files wirelessly all the time at work on several Windows 7 machines. never seen the problem you are referring to. maybe it is your setup, and not Windows.

Re:This is just what I need. (3, Informative)

oakgrove (845019) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462936)

Now her wireless card doesn't work at all. Problem solved!

I've seen plenty of hardware stop working after upgrading from one version of Windows to another. In the recent past, I've had a scanner and a graphics card that didn't have Windows 7 drivers and the lady just had me put XP back on the box.

Linux may not work with everything but, when it does, it tends to work very well and continue to work. The only real problems are with hardware that just flat has to be reverse engineered to even work at all. If the manufacturer won't make a driver and won't release the specs, what are you going to do? Imagine the reverse, what if hardware just wasn't released with a Windows driver? Is that Windows' or Microsoft's fault?

I'll sum this up with a couple of anecdotes. I have some hardware on my desktop that work much better under Linux. The USB720 wireless data card that I got from Verizon, for example, was a mess under Windows. 30 or more seconds to connect, shutting itself down after 2 hours or so requiring me to pull it out and reinsert it. Hideous and clunky software that came with it. On Ubuntu 10.04, it works flawlessly. Connects in less than 5 seconds, integrated perfectly with the network manager, never randomly shuts itself off. Also, my PVR350 USB TV tuner. Runs like crap in Windows, in Linux, it works perfectly. Very little CPU usage, no tearing, easy to record, etc. So, there really are 2 sides to the hardware Windows/Linux coin. than Windows.

Re:This is just what I need. (4, Insightful)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462152)

Or my netbook's copy of "Windows 7 starter edition, most of which is missing" operating system.

It's a damned shame that books like this are needed. Too bad "help" is so fuXXored.

Re:This is just what I need. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32462962)

Because Linux help is so much better! I know!

Re:This is just what I need. (1)

jollyreaper (513215) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463084)

It's a damned shame that books like this are needed. Too bad "help" is so fuXXored.

Video games build the tutorial into the game with speech, motion, graphics, the works. I never understood why this sort of thing isn't baked into productivity software or operating systems. I'm guessing it's not worth the effort when that sort of thing would just be another cost for the developers and customers who want that sort of thing are already paying money for someone else to write dead tree manuals.

Re:This is just what I need. (3, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463138)

Clippy. We're still traumatized by it. No one will try anything remotely like that until the current generation of computer users dies off.

Re:This is just what I need. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32462516)

It will accompany my copy of "Windows 7, the missing operating system" nicely.

Yes, in my waste basket

It's not... (1, Funny)

Das Auge (597142) | more than 4 years ago | (#32461760)

Windows 7's slogan: It's not Vista!

Jokes aside, I'm pleased with Windows 7. Granted, I only use it for games (I dual-boot Ubuntu and Windows 7).

not to be an asshole... (1, Insightful)

Skarecrow77 (1714214) | more than 4 years ago | (#32461770)

but windows just isn't that hard to use.

Maybe if you're from a 3rd world country and this is your first exposure to a microsoft product, I'd understand... or maybe if it was 1996 and you're finally purchasing your first PC, but I don't think there are too many people left in developed countries who've reached adulthood who have escaped using some version of windows at least occasionally.

And if there is anybody who has somehow managed to do the task of never having worked with windows... I doubt it going looking for a book to learn it.

Re:not to be an asshole... (2, Insightful)

Em Emalb (452530) | more than 4 years ago | (#32461914)

Agreed, it isn't hard to use at all for anyone with any real exposure to the OS.

But...if you really want to UNDERSTAND why things are the way they are, then manuals like these are very good for the noob to intermediate level person.

Re:not to be an asshole... (1)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462118)

Not only that, but books like this are good for pointing out useful things that otherwise would be hard to find out about just from using it. The Windows-key shortcuts are a good example, I don't know how many years I was using XP before I found out about various shortcuts that could save me several seconds of using the mouse.

Re:not to be an asshole... (3, Insightful)

dingen (958134) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462230)

But you don't need a book to learn the keyboard shortcuts of your operating system. Not only are they probably explained in the user interface, they're also listed in the manual that came with the OS and placed in the support section on the developer's website. Who doesn't check out these sort of sources before they go out and purchase a book?

Re:not to be an asshole... (1)

Skarecrow77 (1714214) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462332)

That's not even to mention that there are a thousand and one "windows tips and tricks!" websites out there to tell you things.

Now, I had a "dos for dummies" book, and I found certain things highly helpful... but that was also 1992. Things were a bit different then.

Re:not to be an asshole... (2, Insightful)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462654)

But you don't need a book to learn the keyboard shortcuts of your operating system.

Like I pointed out, it was just an example. I'm sure that Windows 7 includes several new tools and utilities that one wouldn't run across with normal usage, but would still be helpful to know about.

Not only are they probably explained in the user interface

Not that I'm aware of, I don't know where I would see a tooltip to indicate that I can press Windows-E to open Explorer, or Windows-R to open the Run dialog, or Windows-M to minimize/restore all applications.

they're also listed in the manual that came with the OS and placed in the support section on the developer's website

Like most other users, I assume, I only check the manual or support website when I'm having a problem. I don't normally peruse those to look for useful tips I don't already know about if I'm not having any other problems using the software.

Re:not to be an asshole... (1)

dingen (958134) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462786)

I totally understand you don't look in manuals or support documents when you're not having problems. I guess that's true for most people. But what I don't understand, is that you would spend your money on a book such as this, instead of just looking for exactly the same information available from botht the supplier or your software, or various other sources on the web.

Re:not to be an asshole... (1)

Medieval (41719) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462810)

People who have shit to do.

Re:not to be an asshole... (1)

dingen (958134) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462968)

In what sort of world do you live if buying a book from a store is less of a hassle than finding out about this stuff online?

Re:not to be an asshole... (-1, Troll)

stewbacca (1033764) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463320)

Wait, what? I didn't get a manual with Win7 (came bundled with my computer). Windows keyboard shortcuts are an abomination, mostly because they are not defined anywhere, or they aren't very logical. Alt+F4? Huh? What's wrong with something like Alt+Q for quit? At least that way a user can GUESS what a shortcut might be. But then you run into the problem of which modifier key? How do I know? How do I get to the underlined O under the File menu to "Open" something. How is CTRL+F + CTRL+O better than a simple and consistent modifier key + O to open a file?

I still don't know how to invoke some keyboard shortcuts in Windows (15 years on).

At least with OSX it tells you exactly which keys are used for the shortcut right in the menu, and you don't have to do four keystrokes to get to one nested option.

Also, the new Microsoft Office software doesn't even have menus, so looking in the menu for the shortcut key doesn't work anymore either. I have NO idea how to find the shortcuts now.

Re:not to be an asshole... (3, Informative)

rueger (210566) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463462)

At least with OSX it tells you exactly which keys are used for the shortcut right in the menu

Hate to break it to you, but MS products have done the same thing for ages. Except the menuless "ribbon" in Office, which uses tooltips instead.

Re:not to be an asshole... (5, Informative)

amliebsch (724858) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463734)

Your complaints are invalid and stem entirely from your unwillingness to make the slightest effort to understand how the system works.

In most Windows programs with a menu bar, there are two ways to use keyboard commands. One way uses CTRL as a modifier and does not involve the menus at all, though they are discoverable through the menu by using the tooltips. E.g., CTRL+S to save, CTRL+O to open. If you don't know or can't be bothered to remember these keyboard commands, you can alternately navigate the menu system by pressing the ALT key. Pressing ALT underlines the letters in the menu options to press to activate that menu option, so if you can't remember CTRL+O to open a file, you can press ALT, then F to activate the file menu, then O to select the open option. And incidentally, the CTRL keys are unchanged in Office 2007, the tool tips still tell you the CTRL keys, and pressing ALT still causes key commands to appear on the ribbon options, so if you've ever used keyboard shortcuts in office ever, they still work basically the same way.

Re:not to be an asshole... (2, Insightful)

stewbacca (1033764) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463200)

Not only that, but books like this are good for pointing out useful things that otherwise would be hard to find out about just from using it.

Hence the "Missing Manual" part of the title. Pogue has made a career off of this technique. I, for one, am a fan.

Re:not to be an asshole... (2, Interesting)

hairyfeet (841228) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462110)

I have to agree, if anything Windows 7 is easier than any MSFT OS that came before it. My dad is 67 and completely clueless about PCs, but after giving him the Win7 Beta to try out he had me go and get him the family pack on release date, because according to him it was the first time he had seen Windows "make sense" to him. With the built in tutorials, the easy to use search, it didn't take him anytime at all to find his way around the OS and now he uses more features than he ever did on XP.

While Vista was crap, and XP took until SP2 to get really usable, I think MSFT may have actually gotten one right with W7. It is easy enough for my dad to use, and for me it just gets out of my way and lets me do what I want. So I don't really see who would need this book, as power users will have no problem figuring w7 out and those like my dad can just follow the handy help tutorials.

Re:not to be an asshole... (5, Interesting)

CAIMLAS (41445) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462306)

I've heard this several times from tech friends who 'support' clueless users in one way or another: the common user is actually getting significantly more use out of W7 than they did with 8 years of XP. They're frequently saying "ah, I always wondered how to do that!"

Ironically, from what I've heard, one of the biggest boons allowing this to happen is the contextual run/search bar. People find out what it can do and they use it - for everything. Sure, it's similar to Spotlight and Beagle and a dozen other things that came before it - so what? It works, and the way it's built into the system, it works well. (The irony comes from the fact that the 'click-it-it's-easy-to-use Windows GUI' gets actual functionality from a CLI interface that invariably leads to increased productivity.)

Re:not to be an asshole... (1)

Delusion_ (56114) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462528)

I haven't switched to Win7 yet, but the computer I've barely started buying parts for will have it. The context menu impressed me from the standpoint of lowering the barrier to accomplishing frequently used tasks. The fact that the taskbar defaults to unlabeled icons, however, I find bizarre, and I'm sure I'll change that the first day. I find it as bizarre as XP's default of hiding the status bar from the user in Windows Explorer. The Win7 Windows Explorer I find utterly godawful, but that won't affect me, as I'm a total DirectoryOpus fanboy.

Re:not to be an asshole... (3, Informative)

ashridah (72567) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463110)

You get used to the text-less icons pretty quickly. Particularly since most of the modern apps use high-resolution icons and are quite visible at the default icon size. Visually the Word, Explorer, IE/Chrome/Firefox buttons are all immediately identifiable, in a way that text just isn't.

Also, since you can order the buttons, and pin them, you essentially get Win-1 through Win-9 or so to launch/access them. Adding shift to make it Shift-Win-1 will launch a new copy. Alt-Win-1 launches the context menu. It becomes far more quick to use, and can become muscle memory reasonably quickly.
Beats the pants off the quick-launch bar that any app could poison with its own icons during install for. That kind of stuff used to piss me off.

Re:not to be an asshole... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32462836)

Ironically, from what I've heard, one of the biggest boons allowing this to happen is the contextual run/search bar. People find out what it can do and they use it - for everything.

Problem is, even those of us who know what we're doing have to use it, since half the stuff that used to be in the Control Panel is now hidden under submenus that can only be accessed from within Control Panel applets.

Fucking annoying.

to be an asshole... (2, Informative)

macbiv (1695966) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463030)

1.start 2.control panel 3. click the arrow next to "view by" and select large icons 4. stop complaining

Re:not to be an asshole... (1)

pongo000 (97357) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462976)

I have to agree, if anything Windows 7 is easier than any MSFT OS that came before it.

Not networking. That high-level "helper" interface they've interposed between the user and the network details? It's meaningless...I still haven't figured out why I would want to make an interface "public" or "private." Not to mention it now takes 3 or 4 properly placed mouse clicks to get to the network setup dialog. I'm sure there's a direct route, but if there is, I've yet to find it.

Re:not to be an asshole... (1)

bakawolf (1362361) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463046)

I'd wondered if that bothered anyone else but me.
As far as setting interfaces? you basically get 2 options that mean "Do not work properly", and one proper option.

Re:not to be an asshole... (1)

ashridah (72567) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463190)

They're firewall rules.
At home, i use "Home", and my homegroup stuff is immediately visible. At work, it gets automatically assigned "Work/Domain" by group policy. At a wifi hotspot, i use "Public" and none of my filesharing stuff is visible. Works great on a laptop. Less useful on a desktop, of course, but then you only have to click "Home" once and things tend to just work.

Out of Curiosity, what kind of "Network Setup" are we talking? IP/DNS assignment? Or something else? I could see you needing to select wireless settings if you're on the go, and that can get a little annoying, but any other scenario is pretty automagic if you have a NATing router/gateway in your home (which is by far the easiest to use scenario)
Setting IPs manually is definitely more of a pain, but who wants to regularly use a network where they have to actually do that kind of thing? I certainly don't. I deliberately run bind/dhcpd on a gateway to specifically avoid it, and anyone who's just turned on their consumer-grade router has the exact same thing. This isn't Win9x we're talking about here :)

Re:not to be an asshole... (1)

stewbacca (1033764) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463374)

You say that because you are experienced in setting up a network in WinOS. For somebody who has never configured their cable modem and wireless router, this sort of interface is better. It's still not as good as the OSX network setup "wizard" (shudder...I hate that term, based on how bad MS wizards have been in the past), but it is far better than anything they've tried in the past with new users and networking.

Re:not to be an asshole... (1)

DudemanX (44606) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463018)

While Vista was crap, and XP took until SP2 to get really usable

The "Vista is crap" mentality that still pervades is rather baffling to me. Especially in the context of interface and ease of use. Vista is just as easy to use as Win7. The only real interface difference is the updated taskbar to be more like the dock. The "start" menu, control panel, and keyboard shortcuts are all basically the same as Vista. To say one is crap while another is near perfection seems rather silly and ignorant.

As for XP, other than the security center, firewall, and wireless interfaces there were no major interface changes between release and SP2. I fail to see how the release version was so hard to use compared to SP2.

If you want to talk speed, stability, and security then your observations become more valid though not to the degree to which you imply. In the context of ease of use(as being discussed here) I think that you are way off base.

Re:not to be an asshole... (1)

dingen (958134) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462166)

Even in 1996 I saw books such as these and wondered who would buy them. I understand why people buy books about operating systems or applications that lack a GUI, or books about development or other non-obvious things you can't figure out by simply trying. But this is so extremely basic and obvious, I really can't imagine the intended audience. They talk about people having a "intermediate skill level", but I also can't really figure out what that means. What sort of stuff can't these people figure out and how does a book like this help them?

Re:not to be an asshole... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32462380)

You're not an asshole. (Well not for this.) What you're missing is W7 is used by a lot of people who aren't much interested in learning about the OS, and /. is populated by people who are the friend/relative who gets asked the computer questions.

I've just been one of each for two who've got nice new machines with W7. And you know what? I don't know shit about where things are in Windows menus these days, and don't much care to find out. So I insisted both buy Chris Fehily's Windows 7 Visual QuickStart Guide [fehily.com] .

Maybe The Missing Manual is just as good. I simply went to the book store and browsed the titles and liked Fehily's book. It's well written, thorough, and has just the right sort of depth to be the desk reference for these folks. Thank you /. for including a review of Missing Manual to spotlight another.

----
Obligatory reply to Why Not Ubuntu?: Did that. Both got fed up with dual booting to XP to do things like run apps that aren't available on Ubuntu, and do basics like clean the printer heads and find out how much ink is left. Or print duplex. At least they listened to me insisting that Vista must be avoided, and waited for W7 before getting a new computer that does everything they want again.

And yeah, they miss some things about Ubuntu. They didn't hate it at all. Just on the balance the compromises were in favour of Win in their own situations. When W7 corks up with malware like their XPs did, they'll be quicker to switch to Ubuntu again. They definitely respect it now as 'pretty good'.

Re:not to be an asshole... (1)

noncaptusest (1644871) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462444)

I mostly agree to this. Assuming the target group for this title, I think the most useful part will be the security chapter. At least make users of this level a bit more conscious about safeguards that need to be in place to run a healthy system.

I Am Reminded Of One Of My Favorite Titles... (1)

RobotRunAmok (595286) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462994)

"AOL for Dummies."

When I first saw that on a shelf at B&N, I seriously thought it was a parody from The Onion.

Re:I Am Reminded Of One Of My Favorite Titles... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32463410)

Hmmm... I wonder if they have a "How to Write a Book for Dummies" book?

THE Manual (Hardly) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32461790)

is probably mostly white space given all the space devoted to "Point and Click".

Point and Click is for losers.

Lostdows Seven (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32461806)

.HardeharharNeverbeforeseenyousawitfirstnow

Windows 7 manual (-1, Flamebait)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 4 years ago | (#32461824)

It's just like all other flavors of windows:

1. Install/purchase it.
2. Patch it.
3. Connect it to internet (carefully).
4. Download antivirus, antimalware, antispyware, a better firewall.
5. Spend an hour turning off all the resident scanners so you can use it again.
6. Install all your applications.
7. Defrag. Scandisk. Coffee.
8. Click on an icon and try to do some real work.
9. Reboot, because it crashed. Admire the new bootup screen and chrome.

Yup... Now you know everything there is to know about Windows 3 to 7.

Re:Windows 7 manual (1)

Jeng (926980) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462170)

I haven't ran across step 9 yet or for that matter step 5.

I tend to do step 4 prior to the install so its ready for when I do connect to the net then I do step 2.

I also don't go to the extend you do on step 4 considering that malware and spyware are the same damn thing and tend to be incorporated into the anti-virus now.

Re:Windows 7 manual (1)

stewbacca (1033764) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463478)

Agreed. The past 20 years of obligatory Microsoft jokes are seemingly dying out.

However, my Win7 does not wake up consistently, which requires a reboot. But other than that, in four months, I have not had one crash or hangup from an app.

Re:Windows 7 manual (1)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462264)

That may have applied to some earlier versions of Windows but not Windows 7. It hasn't crashed yet even once, it comes with a firewall that works well enough. I don't know what you mean by "spend an hour turning off all the resident scanners so you can use it again", I certainly didn't have to do that. The rest of your list are things I expect to do when buying a new computer anyway.

Re:Windows 7 manual (1)

ashridah (72567) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463206)

Agreed. Win7 was remarkably stable even in the beta/RC period. My main problems came from the video drivers (I'm looking at you ATI, and at you to a lesser extent, NVidia). Fortunately, neither of these are instant-kill for the most part (Except ATI, I've had a few moments where video has been permanently hosed, but fortunately, the pwoer button still triggered a normal "turn off" process)

Sign of changing times (0, Offtopic)

OutputLogic (1566511) | more than 4 years ago | (#32461912)

Only a couple of years ago /. would never allow anything with "Windows" in the article title on a front page. Either times have changed, or /.

Re:Sign of changing times (1, Funny)

dingen (958134) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462252)

Now that Apple's market cap is larger than Microsoft, Windows became the product of an underdog and with that comes a lot of love.

Re:Sign of changing times (1)

ChefInnocent (667809) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462686)

Maybe because the year of the Linux desktop has arrived (NetBooks & phones), and the other OS is offered by a more poisonous snake. Now that valid competition exists, and MicroSoft doesn't look so evil any more, we can consider it a valid alternative.

Libraries (3, Insightful)

PoiBoy (525770) | more than 4 years ago | (#32461930)

Is it me, or are the libraries in Windows 7 stupid? I prefer Vista because it doesn't have those damn things. I've read about registry hacks to disable them, though I've not had any luck getting those hacks to work.

Re:Libraries (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32461966)

Is it me, or are the libraries in Windows 7 stupid? I prefer Vista because it doesn't have those damn things. I've read about registry hacks to disable them, though I've not had any luck getting those hacks to work.

Its probably only you. Libraries are good for me. Now, I can group all my music under one setting.

Re:Libraries (1)

MrTripps (1306469) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462280)

Or you could, you know, use them. I found it kind of nice to have my own called TV or eBooks and point them to a directory (or more than one directory) where those things are already at. If you don't want them, all you have to do right click on a library and select delete. No registry hacks required.

Re:Libraries (2, Informative)

hairyfeet (841228) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462476)

What exactly is wrong with the libraries? I keep my music and videos on a separate drive and libraries make keeping up with new stuff as simple as drag and drop. I never have to go to where I actually keep anything anymore, simply drop it into the library under videos,music,whatever and it automatically places it into the appropriate place, easy peasy. And since Windows 7 disc image and backup gives you a simple checkbox for if you want your libraries backed up as well I don't even have to hunt or remember to back up my different media folders, just plug in the USB drive once a week and hit backup.

Trust me, libraries are one of those new features that if you just use them for a little while you'll start to wonder how you did without them. I felt the same way about having breadcrumbs instead of a back button, but after I got used to how quickly you can jump around with breadcrumbs going back to WinXP irritates the hell out of me. Just spend a few minutes customizing your library and telling it where you like to keep your stuff, and then you'll never have to mess with hunting media folders again.

Re:Libraries (1)

stewbacca (1033764) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463558)

Trust me, libraries are one of those new features that if you just use them for a little while you'll start to wonder how you did without them.

This same revelation happened to me when I bought OSX back in the early 2000s. I know MS critics will just blame them for yet another copy of OSX, but if it makes Win7 better, then why not?

The problem is, many hard core XP types have learned the XP way and this new (well, old) paradigm is really foreign to them. I'm going to guess most people who are used to their old way won't bother learning the new, even if the new could be argued to be "better".

Re:Libraries (1)

oakgrove (845019) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463236)

I don't so much have a problem with the concept of "Libraries", however, I do think it's funny how people think it's a new thing considering the fact that Sun [wikipedia.org] came up with it way back in 1986 and several other operating systems [wikipedia.org] have been using it since the 90's.

I prefer vista! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32462010)

At least with vista, you can turn off the new craptacular user interface and go back to the classic interface.

What's more, the majority of management mmc snapins still exist the same as always. You can run them directly using the .msc file.

Not to mention the onerous activation requirements using the windows activation technology (TWAT).

Wait, what? (3, Insightful)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462056)

People keep saying they don't want to switch to Mac OS X or Linux because they don't want to re-learn how to use their computer... But simply changing the Windows version is enough to warrant an article on a nerd website about a manual about Windows 7?

I'm betting some people would find the switch from Windows XP to either Mac OS X or any Linux distro to be easier than switching to Windows 7.

Protip #1 for 7 Starter (2, Interesting)

st_adamin (1029910) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462088)

Oceanis Change Background.

Additionally, while I'm a die-hard 2K and even kind-of XP supporter, I'm really not unhappy with Windows 7, now that I've had a chance to try it. 7 or 8 security/notifications to shut off, and I haven't had a problem with it for 2 months. I'm impressed. Only the 1 year mark will tell.

//Sat on a flight beside an MS engineer, told him the biggest problem I had was an annual reformat/reinstall. He said he did the same thing(?!?). He also suggested I install VMWare, as it eases the annual reinstall process considerably.

Re:Protip #1 for 7 Starter (1)

clang_jangle (975789) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462192)

There it is folks, a true endorsement from a real microsoft user in the field:

I'm really not unhappy with Windows 7...

Has a nice ring to it, doesn't it?

Re:Protip #1 for 7 Starter (1)

st_adamin (1029910) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462360)

Free BSD Just Works for me.

See, I tried at least 6 different flavors. I'm no slouch, but I'm no guru either. They never "just worked" for me. (Of course those were the days when you had to find drivers for the specific chip on your eth0, then make them work for your card). Tried a VirtualBox Ubuntu recently. It was OK I guess. Tried VB - Fedora 12 as well, it just worked fantastically until I installed the guest additions, then it crashed and burned.

I'm a fan of the FOSS movement, because it just feels right. But if it comes to anything mission critical, I have to use Windows. Or at least XP32 emulated on XP64, because x64 never "just worked" either.

Re:Protip #1 for 7 Starter (1)

clang_jangle (975789) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462546)

It looks as though you may be under the impression that FreeBSD is a Linux distro, but it is definitely not.

My sig has an attempt at humor and irony about it, note that the link is to the FreeBSD handbook. It's kind of like, "FreeBSD Just Works for me -- now that I've RTFA!" Yes, I know -- very obscure humor, not likely to be appreciated by most people, etc. It's ok, I'm used to that sort of thing. :)

Thanks for being good-natured about my ribbing, BTW.

Re:Protip #1 for 7 Starter (1)

oakgrove (845019) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463710)

See, I tried at least 6 different flavors.

That's a shame you're having such a hard time with your Linux VM's. Maybe if you went here [vmware.com] first and just downloaded Ubuntu or something that's already ready to go, you could get started on the right foot.

I find it interesting that I mirror your problems except in the reverse. I've had very positive experiences with Linux (primarily Debian and Ubuntu) and not so great experiences with Win7 vm's. I first tried 7 in vmware on a machine with an e8400 c2d and 1 GB of RAM allocated to the virtual machine but after a little while, had to just give up. It consistently thrashed the disk, pegged the CPU, and I just couldn't do anything with it. I then tried it in VirtualBox and it did run much better, especially after I turned everything off. The only problem was that while it started programs faster, they just didn't perform nearly as well as they do in my XP vm. This is a serious problem as I use XP primarily for Mappoint which needs a lot of CPU since the last 3 or so iterations. I don't really care a whole lot about the additional security in 7 since I leave the virtual network disconnected from Windows anyway.

I'm a fan of the FOSS movement, because it just feels right. But if it comes to anything mission critical, I have to use Windows. Or at least XP32 emulated on XP64, because x64 never "just worked" either.

There are a lot of people running mission critical stuff on Linux too so, since you at least like the idea of FLOSS, don't give up. Try one of the vm's on the site I linked to and if you break it, just start over. Don't let it beat you. That's how I started in a vm and now several years later, I find Linux to be an absolute joy to use and there is no way I would use anything else on my hardware. Something else too. I run Linux and Windows in virtual machines and on my Ubuntu host, I always find the Linux guests run better than the XP guests. For example, I can move windows on XP and get lots of tearing, not so in the Linux machines. Maybe it's just me but that's my experience.

WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32462140)

I always thought David Pogue was a hardcore Apple fanboy. He and Walt Mossberg seem to be about the biggest Jobs worshippers in the mainstream press. So it comes as a bit of a shock to me that he wrote this Windows 7 book (though the title follows exactly the same form as his OS X books).

Is this his first foray into non-Mac tech writing, or has he been doing it all along? The review doesn't mention any comparisons to Mac or jabs against Windows, but I wonder if he writes with that kind of slant?

Re:WTF? (4, Informative)

dingen (958134) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462322)

Altough Pogue did write a lot of books about Apple and Mac-related software, he also wrote lots of other stuff, including books about every major version of Windows since ME, but also books about things such as Twitter, the Palm Pilot and the Opera web browser.

Re:WTF? (2, Funny)

Arthur Grumbine (1086397) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463248)

I also heard that he posts on /. under the UID "dingen" :-P

Re:WTF? (1)

dingen (958134) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463602)

He is a very talented writer and you should all buy his books.

wth? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32462204)

next on slashdot -NEWS AT ELEVEN - MANUAL HOW DO I TURN ON THE PC

i could understand if it was a description about api changes or about controlling the security layers - but since when is slashdot a place for kindergarten level manuals?

Undoubtably... (1)

tthomas48 (180798) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462272)

Windows 7 is best when connected to a network, which makes it so puzzling why so many of its networking features only work with other Windows 7 machines.

I also like the fact this book explains regedit. That's one program that's seen a lot of change over the years.

Bells and Whistles? (2, Informative)

MLCT (1148749) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462292)

It would seem to me that the manual aimed at the xp -> 7 movers should spend most of its time covering all of the inexplicable little changes that have been made. There aren't many new things, just lots of changed (or entirely removed) things.

As I decided to change my work PC over to 7 last week I can testify. I had superficially played with vista and 7 up until now, but it is a different thing when your main machine moves completely. For example, in W7 MS have inexplicably removed the ability for auto arrange on files to be turned off in explorer - they now always "spring" to the grid - an annoying change. While day to day I didn't use this, it was used in xp now and then in sorting out a large folder full of files, as it is much more intuitive to spatially sort. Gone from W7, and no hack to get it back.

The picture viewer is also crap now, slow, with a initially loaded blurred preview, then 1/2 a second later the real preview loads. Also when you zoom in it doesn't interpolate as it did in xp, just pixellates.

Re:Bells and Whistles? (1)

Draconmythica (1057150) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463816)

If you don't like auto arrange you simply have to right click and hover over View to see the option. I know that takes about 1 second longer that it did in xp and it must be hard but I would think you would have at least looked at little for it if it bothered you so much

credential-based samba is STILL broken, though (1)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462296)

and even regular 'public' shares on non-win platforms (linux and freebsd, for me) don't work right with win7.

all my other devices (hardware and software) connect just fine to my 2 unix share servers. win7 at first install would NOT work. simply would not. tried the 128bit encryption reg key hack and a few others on google search. nothing worked. gave up. a month later I bought a new motherboard and tried once more. this time it worked.

but my shares are 'public' (inside my lan I don't use user/pass stuff to get to shares) and I'm told that credential based requests are still not working right.

major red flag: MS changed a bunch of things in their smb client stack and things, well, broke all over the place in the multivendor world. just be warned about that. it may be a showstopper for many (it was for me).

Shell context menu for folder you are in? (2, Interesting)

A Friendly Troll (1017492) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462304)

I'm not using 7even (or Fista), but I do "have" a 2008 Server that I often RD into, and the one thing that irritates me incredibly (even more than UAC) is that I have no idea how to pop up the shell context menu for the folder I'm currently in.

In XP and earlier Windows, you'd just right-click on the folder icon on the top left of the window.

In Fista and above, that just pops up the standard useless menu with move/restore/minimize/maximize, just as when you right-click on the title bar.

Google is not helpful at all. The best I could get is an addition of "Open command prompt here" through shift+rightclick, but that's not what I want.

Please help me out here if you've figured it out... I often use that context menu to fire up 7-zip, or grep, or a duplicate copy of Win Explorer, or other things, and every time I have to do something on that server, I want to scream.

Re:Shell context menu for folder you are in? (1)

ZERO1ZERO (948669) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462658)

In XP and earlier Windows, you'd just right-click on the folder icon on the top left of the window.

Wow. I can honestly say I've never used that functionality and to be honest I don't even think I knew it was there.

I will try and use it and report back.

Re:Shell context menu for folder you are in? (1)

jpcarter (1098791) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462708)

Wow. A cool feature I never knew I lost. Thanks!

A workaround might be to just use the navigation pane & select "Automatically expand to current folder" from Folder Options.

Re:Shell context menu for folder you are in? (1)

waynetv (112053) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462808)

Just right-clicking into the blank space of the folder you're in will give you the context menu for that folder.

Re:Shell context menu for folder you are in? (2, Interesting)

A Friendly Troll (1017492) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462912)

Just right-clicking into the blank space of the folder you're in will give you the context menu for that folder.

Yes, it will, but it won't have the shell items that I need. That context menu is completely useless.

Right-click on a folder and notice what items the context menu has... Then right-click on an empty space inside the window and compare. They aren't even similar.

(And whoever modded my parent post troll - please die in a fire. Thanks.)

Re:Shell context menu for folder you are in? (1)

hf256 (627209) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463220)

I'm not using 7even (or Fista), but I do "have" a 2008 Server that I often RD into, and the one thing that irritates me incredibly (even more than UAC) is that I have no idea how to pop up the shell context menu for the folder I'm currently in.

In XP and earlier Windows, you'd just right-click on the folder icon on the top left of the window.

In Fista and above, that just pops up the standard useless menu with move/restore/minimize/maximize, just as when you right-click on the title bar.

Google is not helpful at all. The best I could get is an addition of "Open command prompt here" through shift+rightclick, but that's not what I want.

Please help me out here if you've figured it out... I often use that context menu to fire up 7-zip, or grep, or a duplicate copy of Win Explorer, or other things, and every time I have to do something on that server, I want to scream.

Right clicking on it in the folders list to the left (under Favorite Links)works for me

Windows8 (0, Troll)

drumcat (1659893) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462358)

Bring on Windows Ocho (tm) already. 7 is another swing and miss.

I'll install Windows 7... (1)

sfled (231432) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462398)

I'll install Windows 7 when IT pries Windows 98SE from m'cold dead fingers!

Just kidding - send help, IT is in love with XP.

I've never really seen the appeal of these (1)

Delusion_ (56114) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462482)

"missing manual" books. They all seem far too shallow for even basic users, and insufficiently technical for advanced users. Maybe the two I've browsed through were just bad examples of the series. I'm not pre-disposed to dislike the idea; at least unlike the "Dummies" and "Complete Idiot's Guide" books, they're not blatantly insulting the intelligence of the novice user.

I ran a comparison (2, Informative)

AndGodSed (968378) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462702)

Interface wise Win7 is a lot better than XP in *some* areas, but is seriously beginning to trail behind popular Linux distros. I did a comparison of Win7, Ubuntu, PCLOS, Linux Mint, Kubuntu with 6 everyday tasks and found it wanting a bit.

(Warning shameless blog punt ahead, proceed with caution...)
http://g33q.co.za/2010/06/01/usability-comparison-five-pc-operating-systems-compared/ [g33q.co.za]

Given it's performance I think a book such as this will help out some users. I often buy books like these for the techs in our office to help them out, I use Ubuntu full-time myself since I am more involved with the servers atm, but given some confusing task layouts like checking connection info (in XP it used to be three clicks of a mouse, not it is a road-trip) it helps having something to refer to handy.

Seriously win 2000/XP (1)

future assassin (639396) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462744)

for day to day usage was just way simpler then Vista/7. No fancy graphics just plain old start button and control panel. Even easier would have been a separate button for Programs instead of Start > Programs > Your App. I don't get why the Desktop has to look fancy but thats just me.

Re:Seriously win 2000/XP (1)

prestonmichaelh (773400) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463324)

I disagree. The search bar (or whatever its proper name in) in Windows 7 is amazing. I can't tell you how many people's computers I have worked on that have so many things in their "Start->Programs" menu that you can't even see them all. Couple that with the fact that they don't resort them (and if you do, they can't find anything anymore and yell at you), I have spent many minutes hunting through the long list of programs to find the one I needed.

With the Windows 7 search, all I need to know is a little bit of the program name. I click the Start circle thing and just start typing. By the time I have two or three letters of the programs name typed in, it has shown up. If it is the top result, I can just hit enter and it will run. If not, I just click it from the short list of apps/files.

Maybe it is because I use a Linux desktop at work all day, mainly CLI stuff, but once I upgraded to Windows 7 and got this feature I couldn't stand to use XP anymore on my home machine. Vista tried to have the same thing, but their implementation was so horribly slow (at least last time I tried a Vista machine) that it was next to worthless. Windows 7 it great.

Win7 vs... (1)

neostorm (462848) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462788)

When Win7 came out, to much praise, I sat down at home and did some thorough tests. I am a developer who uses some resource-intensive applications for 3D visualization, physics simulations and graphic design. Currently my OS of choice is XP 64-bit.

When I compared the two however, while Win 7 stood out as being superficially faster through caching everything and *appearing* to boot your OS and your applications in a split second, prolonged use of these applications under this OS just ground to a snails pace over the course of a single weekend of use on a 16GB machine.
While WinXP64 didn't boot as fast or launch applications as quickly, it never crashed (Win7 crashed multiple times), performance within the applications I use was exponentially better when loading and managing large files, and the overall experience was much more robust.

Ultimately what it seemed to me was that Win7 was geared toward selling you a copy of itself in the store. 5 minutes of use will show you what appears to be an extremely fast OS that launches whole applications like they were text files. In reality it's Vista with an extremely efficient booting process and nothing more.

MS continues to push the bar though! XP used to be the worst OS you could make your machine suffer to run, but if history repeats I'm sure they'll release something so far worse in the future, after XP is deprecated and beyond maintaining, that will make me fall absolutely in *love* with the features of Win7.

Re:Win7 vs... (1)

Blakey Rat (99501) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463802)

Maybe it just means Microsoft hasn't decided to optimize for your extraordinarily rare use-case. The caching changes you mention benefit the vast majority of Windows users.

While WinXP64 didn't boot as fast or launch applications as quickly, it never crashed (Win7 crashed multiple times),

If you literally mean Windows crashed (and not your application), then that is one of two things:
1) You have faulty hardware (perhaps overheating if it only happens after a long run?)
2) You have a faulty driver

Windows 7 is rock-solid, at least as much as XP 64-bit. (And, it's a lot more likely to have mature drivers, unlike XP 64-bit.)

performance within the applications I use was exponentially better

Again, assuming this isn't a blatant lie, you're dealing with a hardware or driver fault. This could be the result of a drive in PIO mode, for example. (My guess is that it's a blatant lie.)

In reality it's Vista with an extremely efficient booting process and nothing more.

That's not a bad thing.

MS continues to push the bar though! XP used to be the worst OS you could make your machine suffer to run, but if history repeats I'm sure they'll release something so far worse in the future, after XP is deprecated and beyond maintaining, that will make me fall absolutely in *love* with the features of Win7.

Then stop using it. Nobody's holding a gun to your head, there are many alternatives available, and you'd save us all a lot of whining.

Missing Inaction (1)

NicknamesAreStupid (1040118) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462850)

After a quarter of a century, you would think that Windows would be so refined that you wouldn't need a 904-page, 3rd-party manual ($39.99). For those who want to peek under the hood, would the Windows 7 Resource Kit be better (http://www.amazon.com/Windows-Resource-Kit-Mitch-Tulloch/dp/0735627002)?

Re:Missing Inaction (2, Funny)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463048)

I think you are misunderstanding how the MS software design process works.
I can put it in geek terms for you:

app = code(design(BASIC_ARCHITECTURE)) # original design and intentions are instantly forgotten
bf = marketing.getBlingFactory()
while (sales.sell(app)) {
    f = bf.getNewFeature()
    management.fuckUp(f)
    sales.addLockIn(f)
    hammerIntoSomethingPhysicallyPossible(f,IGNORE_MANAGEMENT)
    try {
        code(f)
    } catch (ManagementExpectsItToBeFinishedAlreadyError) {
        tieTogheterLooseStrings(f,[SPAGHETTI_STYLE,IGNORE_BUG_HAZARDS,MAKE_HASTE])
    }
    try {
        app.add(f)
    } catch (DoesntFitArchitectureAnymoreError) {
        p = code(new Patchwork(NASTY))
        p.add(f)
        app.add(p,USE_BRUTE_FORCE)
    }
}

Which results in what I call the “upside-down pyramid” model of software design. Except that the pyramid looks like MIR in its late days. ;)

Who needs a manual?? (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#32462952)

If you need a manual for Windows (pretty much any version), you’re offically mentally disabled.
It may be that what disables you, is being used to Windows’s way too much dumbed-down interfaces (Clippy would be proud), though.

But sorry, if you can’t handle Windows 7, then maybe you should try switching your brain to ON for a change. ^^
(Yes, I know that that won’t help in understanding Windows, as people would instantly switch to Linux. ;)

Pocket edition available for free! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32462984)

It's only one page long and it says:

format c:

Who needs a manual? (1)

NetServices (1479949) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463250)

According to Microsoft commercials Windows 7 was my idea!

The laptop on the cover (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32463252)

is a PowerBook G4 with the logo Photoshopped out.

That's not gonna run Windows 7 very well :)

Too old-fashioned, I have one for iPad (1)

microbee (682094) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463256)

It's called: iPad, the Missing Fingers.

Windows 7, Advanced users, LOL (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32463356)

Can't stop laughing.

Short Version (1)

cmacb (547347) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463438)

(1) Insert DVD in appropriate drive (no, the other one).

(2) If this is an upgrade edition, make sure you have an official upgrade license with Abraham Lincoln's original signature.

(3) Follow instructions on screen. If there is no screen, contact your hardware vendor.

(4) Don't call us, we'll call you.

(5) Send more money.

OMG! He's right, it IS missing!!! (2, Funny)

rts008 (812749) | more than 4 years ago | (#32463790)

user@computer:~$ man windows7
No manual entry for windows7

Oh No!

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