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Video Games Linked To Reckless Driving

CmdrTaco posted more than 4 years ago | from the causation-tag-here-we-come dept.

Transportation 337

An anonymous reader writes "'A new study suggests video games that involve reckless driving may play out in real life. Researchers say their data should not be taken lightly since car accidents are the number one cause of death for teenagers.' Just a case of video games being used as a convenient scapegoat, or could there be some truth to this?"

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Kudos (4, Informative)

Lord Grey (463613) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579116)

From the last paragraph of TFA:

The findings do not directly link playing video games to reckless driving. They only show an association. Researchers say the impact of playing games like "Grand Theft Auto" is minimal.

Bingo. Driving games could cause reckless driving in real life. Or people who drive recklessly enjoy driving games. Reckless go-kart racing could also be associated with both games and automobile driving, but that wasn't the focus of the study.

I'm glad TFA admitted that one isn't necessarily the cause of the other, thereby bypassing the whole causation != correlation argument. Kudos for that.

Re:Kudos (1)

silicondope (1705976) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579218)

I started playing TF2 last week and now I'm making it to work in less than 15 minutes. I'm also more likely to look for a taunt button by the wiper controls.

Re:Kudos (1)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579700)

I dunno if it is playing games so much as being 'male'...as far as driving on a more extreme basis (I hate the wreckless word, it implies necessarily unsafe with disregard to current road conditions). I was reading an article the other day in Men's Health that said while women have more wrecks per mile than men do....that men have a greater percentage of fatalities than women.

I think it comes more from male tendencies to show off, flaunt power, and general aggressiveness that is built into us. Hell, that's generally why we LOVE fast and powerful cars, and they actually mean something to us more than they do with women, in general.

And, one certainly doesn't buy a Porsche or a Vette to drive at 20mph everywhere.

Isn't testosterone a wonderful thing??

:)

Re:Kudos (1)

garyisabusyguy (732330) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579244)

I gotta admit that I imagine throwing some red shells while driving after playing mario kart, but I can't find the button on the steering wheel so it's "back to reality" and no multi-car pileups for me.

Re:Kudos (2, Insightful)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579246)

When I got involved in airplane modeling, I wrecked my first machine. So then I went out and bought an R/C simulator to practice at home, and about two months later I tried again.

Video gaming taught me how to fly
.

Re:Kudos (1)

SirLestat (452396) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579374)

I'd like to see a study on how much can a game improve someones skill in real life? Does playing some mostly realistic racing game help you drive in everyday life (I'm talking about regular day to day driving, not racing or speeding). Pilots trains on simulators. Ok there is training involved and their "game" is pretty close to reality. I'd think a good game should help at least a little?

Re:Kudos (2, Interesting)

hardburn (141468) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579724)

Does playing some mostly realistic racing game help you drive in everyday life

There are certain maneuvers it can help you with that apply to regular road driving.

When cars go into either understeer or oversteer, the natural reaction of most people is to slam on the brakes. This is fine for understeer but only makes oversteer worse. The correct reaction there is to countersteer a bit and apply more throttle. It's not enough to know technically how to do it--you have to be able to do it reflexively when you weren't expecting it to happen. A good sim racing game can train you to do that.

(Not surprisingly, manufacturers tend to setup cars from the factory in ways that tend to make it understeer, such as putting on oversized tires in back.)

Re:Kudos (3, Interesting)

smitty777 (1612557) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579676)

I've done a little bit of research on the transfer of training from video simulations to real life. Research has shown that not everything transfers to real life, but what does transfer is procedural knowledge. If you're practicing on a flight simulator, you will learn the correct order to pull out the carb heat, drop the RPMs, lower flaps and gear. But it's a pretty rich environment up there, and there is no substitute for feeling the bumps of turbulence and engine vibration.

I've also done some practicing on an RC simulator, and it's a great way to learn without wrecking your kite. Different mental model, as you don't have the "first person" perspective of being in the plane, though.

Re:Kudos (1)

timeOday (582209) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579698)

Games with an element of driving differ hugely in how realistic they are. I don't think games like Microsoft CART, Grand Prix Legends, Gran Turismo, and Forza have hurt my driving any. But when I play Burnout with my son, I like to remind him that we both die at least 10 times during every race.

because before the computer (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32579256)

because before the computer, there were never any reckless horse n buggy drivers

Re:Kudos (3, Insightful)

NewWorldDan (899800) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579318)

I, for one, remain skeptical. My wife doesn't play driving games of any sort and she's an awful driver. I don't play driving games either, and I'm about as boring of a driver as you'll find outside of rural Iowa. (I've been to rural Iowa, everyone drives exactly 3 miles under the posted speed limit.)

Can we do a controlled study on this? Subject some non-gamers to a large dose of GTA for 6 months and see how their driving changes with respect to a control group? Can we do actual science instead of bullshit stuides? Also, get off my lawn.

Re:Kudos (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32579360)

I think you got that backwards. Causation = correlation.

Correclation != causation.

Anyway, can we please stop using that overused faggot expression. I reminds me of Billy Joel's Piano Man. Great tune but, I'm just so fucking tired of hearing it.

Re:Kudos (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32579406)

Correlation still isn't causation, you insensitive clod!

Re: Kudos (1)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579416)

The findings do not directly link playing video games to reckless driving. They only show an association. Researchers say the impact of playing games like "Grand Theft Auto" is minimal.

I'm glad TFA admitted that one isn't necessarily the cause of the other, thereby bypassing the whole causation != correlation argument. Kudos for that.

Funny, the very last thing I did before bringing up this story was skim a newsletter from my alma mater, which included a story "Study shows teens wired to engage in risky behavior".

Re:Kudos (1)

Uttles (324447) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579498)

It's much more likely that younger drivers like playing video games, and younger drivers are shown to be more reckless. But then again maybe not. Either way, correlation is all we have here.

Re:Kudos (1)

Suki I (1546431) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579524)

Bingo. Driving games could cause reckless driving in real life. Or people who drive recklessly enjoy driving games. Reckless go-kart racing could also be associated with both games and automobile driving, but that wasn't the focus of the study.

I'm glad TFA admitted that one isn't necessarily the cause of the other, thereby bypassing the whole causation != correlation argument. Kudos for that.

My thoughts exactly. [shakes fist] you got to it before me!

Re:Kudos (1)

jayme0227 (1558821) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579660)

Normally I would also be one to throw up the correlation != causation flag, but in this case, I'm leaning towards actually believing that there is a causal effect. I know that when I play video online games, the swearing rubs off on me and I curse like crazy for the next day or two (or, when I still played WoW, the next year and a half). I know that after I played Burnout or Need for Speed, I was harder on the accelerator and more likely to change lanes instead of slow down when approaching a car in front of me.

Of course, this is one person's anecdotal evidence, but when it corroborates the findings of a study, I find it hard to dismiss. This would be relatively easy to actually experiment on, though. Just take a random sample of teenagers who can drive, give them a random task to perform for an hour, including, but not limited to, playing racing games, then put them in the driver's seat on a controlled course. If the ones that played racing games complete the course faster or more recklessly than the ones who played other types of games, then you can demonstrate causation, if not, then you can't.

Re:Kudos (1)

mshannon78660 (1030880) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579708)

I had the same experience once. Spent a couple of hours with a friend at an arcade (back when we still had those) playing a racing game. Driving home afterward, I suddenly realized I was driving way too fast and aggressively. Since then, I just try to be aware of effects like that, and have not had it happen again.

Re:Kudos (1)

Danse (1026) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579796)

Normally I would also be one to throw up the correlation != causation flag, but in this case, I'm leaning towards actually believing that there is a causal effect. I know that when I play video online games, the swearing rubs off on me and I curse like crazy for the next day or two (or, when I still played WoW, the next year and a half). I know that after I played Burnout or Need for Speed, I was harder on the accelerator and more likely to change lanes instead of slow down when approaching a car in front of me.

Of course, this is one person's anecdotal evidence, but when it corroborates the findings of a study, I find it hard to dismiss. This would be relatively easy to actually experiment on, though. Just take a random sample of teenagers who can drive, give them a random task to perform for an hour, including, but not limited to, playing racing games, then put them in the driver's seat on a controlled course. If the ones that played racing games complete the course faster or more recklessly than the ones who played other types of games, then you can demonstrate causation, if not, then you can't.

Actually that wouldn't show causation at all, because you've put them on a controlled course where pretty much anyone with an interest in driving would want to experiment. After all, that's what a controlled course is best for!

Re:Kudos (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32579682)

Driving games could cause reckless driving in real life. Or people who drive recklessly enjoy driving games.

Also, playing video games while driving can be dangerous. I know, I know, correlation is not causation...

Re:Kudos (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32579776)

I'm glad TFA admitted that one isn't necessarily the cause of the other, thereby bypassing the whole causation != correlation argument. Kudos for that.

Also from the article, the very first sentence reads:

A new study suggests video games that involve reckless driving may play out in real life.

Since most people do not read the entire article, but just the first few sentences (or sometimes even an entire paragraph or three), they will most likely read the one that seems to suggest causation and not correlation. Also, for the average reader, I don't expect they truly understand what correlation means. As other posters have stated, there are other correlations the study that didn't look at that are equally valid but would never lead to the same outlandish statements of causation being made.

Its the same nuance as in the following: most abusers of children were abused as a child; however, most abused children do not become abusers. Unfortunately, people hear only the first statement and assume the second is true.

Ridiculous (4, Funny)

MeanMF (631837) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579140)

That's just nonsense.. Without all those extended training sessions playing Forza, I'd never be able to drive safely on the highway at 90+ mph.

Re:Ridiculous (1)

Amouth (879122) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579388)

Test Drive - taught me how to drive a manual - and the importance of gear ratios :)

Re:Ridiculous (1)

Crudely_Indecent (739699) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579442)

I really wonder how your evading-arrest, hooker-abuse and car-jacking skills have improved since you started playing GTA.

Re:Ridiculous (1)

kalirion (728907) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579488)

Considering I can't finish a single GRID race, even in last place, without wiping out half a dozen times, maybe I should stay away from cars IRL?

Re:Ridiculous (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32579772)

Yes, you should probably avoid Indy Racing League.

Re:Ridiculous (1)

magarity (164372) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579542)

As for myself, without all those extended training sessions playing Carmageddon I'd never be able to jump from rooftop to rooftop safely.

I for one welcome this (5, Funny)

AlastairLynn (1366585) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579142)

Frankly, there are too many of these damn kids around anyway.

Re:I for one welcome this (5, Funny)

ch-chuck (9622) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579194)

Get your car off my lawn!

Re:I for one welcome this (0)

butterflysrage (1066514) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579238)

Get your car off my house!

Re:I for one welcome this (1)

Pojut (1027544) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579330)

That's not a house; that's my wife, clod!

Re:I for one welcome this (1)

discord5 (798235) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579404)

That's not a house; that's my wife, clod!

<insert degoratory comment on airbags/bumper here>

Re:I for one welcome this (1)

EmperorKagato (689705) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579370)

Get outta my dreams, get into my car!

Naw ... (4, Funny)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579156)

The only time my poor driving skills from video games crosses over into my real driving is when I'm playing a driving game while driving my car.

"NEVER TELL ME THE ODDS!" (1)

starglider29a (719559) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579162)

Video games! HAH! I learned to drive recklessly from Han Solo on the big screen. I didn't need no stinkin' video game! Kiss my asteroids!

New genre of games ? (1)

ProdigyPuNk (614140) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579182)

Perhaps we need a new genre of driving games. Anyone remember Driver, where the cops would leave you alone so long as you stopped at traffic lights and whatnot ? We need that, only if you do get in a high speed chase you almost always lose, and your xbox/playstation/etc is deactivated for the length of your would-be prison sentence. Maybe that'll get through to the kids ;p

Re:New genre of games ? (1)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579248)

And who would want to play your game, again...?

Re:New genre of games ? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32579456)

Who cares about who would play it? That's not the point. It's about who would BUY it, namely "concerned" parents who'd "gift" this to their children.

Who do you think buys all these inane "educational" games?

Re:New genre of games ? (2, Funny)

afex (693734) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579386)

i know you are joking, but the whole point of Driver was to learn how to do terrible things while the cops weren't looking...

Re:New genre of games ? (3, Insightful)

sammyF70 (1154563) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579600)

see .. you made his point : Video Games teach you how to behave in real life : Do whatever you want, jus don't get caught!

Re:New genre of games ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32579650)

You say that like it's a bad thing.

Re:New genre of games ? (1)

Itninja (937614) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579652)

God I loved that game! I thought it was cool that all the audio was standard CD music format...so I could drop the CD in my smokin hot Aiwa stereo and kick those 70's disco clone tunes.

I found the opposite (5, Interesting)

localman57 (1340533) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579222)

About 10 years ago I got really into the game "Midtown Madness" which features races where you race free-form through downtown Chicago picking your own route to hit a number of checkpoints. The game requires you to read traffic patterns, lights, etc far in advance. After playing the game, I found that I was doing the same thing in real traffic. My brain had been trained to observe and anticipate as if I were driving through city traffic at 80MPH rather than 35. I became much more aware of what was happening on cross streets, and in lanes other than mine. It faded back to normal, though, as I moved on to other games.

I do wonder, however, if being able to crash a car repeatedly with no real consequences has an impact on your subconcious risk-assesment of various manuvers.

Re:I found the opposite (5, Funny)

hoggoth (414195) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579492)

I was really into Marble Madness. After playing the game, I found myself bouncing off walls and dropping into manhole covers.

Re:I found the opposite (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32579534)

I do wonder, however, if being able to crash a car repeatedly with no real consequences has an impact on your subconcious risk-assesment of various manuvers.

It does, but only once.

Re:I found the opposite (1)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579728)

Midtown Madness was really fun. :)

Re:I found the opposite (1)

amiga3D (567632) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579784)

I drove like hell long before I bought my commdore 64. I've been playing driving games for almost 30 years now and my driving has greatly improved. I generally go at or near the speed limit and seldom run red lights anymore. I even come to a FULL stop at stop signs. It could be due to the video games or the steady fucking my insurance company gave me for all those tickets I got when I was younger. They made me pay for several accidents in advance which I never had....no refund though, they kept the money to bribe my state legislature with.

Definitely (1)

SnugglesTheBear (1822258) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579234)

I can totally see this. If I drive after about an hour or two playing GTA and I see a cop car, my first instinct is to ram into the cop car, wait for the cop to get out, jump into his car, speed off, find a hooker and sleep with her (killing her promptly after), and repeat.

"Links" (1)

Reason58 (775044) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579250)

Perhaps the simplest solution is true? People who enjoy driving fast are naturally attracted to games featuring fast driving?

Re:"Links" (1)

Lord Grey (463613) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579440)

Perhaps the simplest solution is true? People who enjoy driving fast are naturally attracted to games featuring fast driving?

I think people who enjoy driving (not "cruising") also enjoy driving games. Reckless driving, however, is not defined as only "driving fast." Maneuvers that other drivers are not expecting, or maneuvers that are overly dangerous to yourself, are "reckless."

I love driving games, with Gran Turismo being my favorite. Speed is (obviously) an essential part of the game, but that part of it doesn't translate a desire for me to shoot down the road at 140mph (often). However, the handling aspects of the game -- proper high-speed cornering techniques, for instance -- do sometimes translate into the real world and can land you into trouble. I'm guilty of sometimes following driving lines while going back and forth to work. If anyone was nearby, I'm sure they'd say that was reckless, if only because they're not expecting it. If we were all on a road course somewhere, those maneuvers would be expected (and praised).

Anyway, I do think that a love for driving causes people to push the limits on their cars, whether in a game or on the road. The reckless bit starts where common sense leaves off.

Kids are kids (1)

Krneki (1192201) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579254)

Since the dawn of humans, kids were always reckless.

When I was a young driver the only way I could drive was flat out, no compromises, just pure speed. Now 20 years later I'm calm and polite. I still enjoy a random race on the track, but on the road I have full respect for other drivers.

And you can see the exact same patter in online racing. Most of the youngster drive like they play a single player game.

Re:Kids are kids (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579478)

Just because *you* were reckless doesn't mean *all kids* are reckless. False generalization. It's not 'since the dawn of time' it's 'since modern American culture started in the 50s'.

Re:Kids are kids (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579626)

Um, no, kids were still reckless. Its just before the '50s cars were prohibitively expensive for kids to get so kids generally weren't driving. They just generally were reckless in other ways like with farm machinery, going out and getting themselves killed in wars, etc.

Not having a car is going to make it hard to be reckless with a car, but it sure didn't cut down on recklessness.

Re:Kids are kids (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579704)

See? These cultural blinders we don't even know we're wearing. Only in America and related countries is it "traditional" for teenagers to be risk-takers. Decades of MTV have taken effect. I live inside another culture and here, teens are assumed to have other traits, none of which is a fondness for irresponsible behavior. In fact, the very idea of "teenager" doesn't really exist.

Not video games... video game music (1)

Brandee07 (964634) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579258)

Try driving an SUV while listening to the Halo soundtrack. THAT'S dangerous.

Re:Not video games... video game music (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579366)

No, the Guitar Hero Soundtrack... I don't think I want to be near anyone who is listening to "Through the fire and the flames" and driving.

Re:Not video games... video game music (1)

Duradin (1261418) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579444)

Cruise control is a necessity whenever random brings up "Truth and Reconciliation Suite". Doesn't matter what sort of vehicle.

Actually (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32579274)

Back in the days of need of speed 3, I'd feel my sense of distance was a little off if I stopped playing and needed to drive somewhere IRL. Of course, this has no relation whatsoever with the "fast and furious" style of the game or the "omg i'm a gangsta" of GTA. Just the fake 3d screwing up my brain auto-adjustments.

Bunch of idiots (2, Insightful)

JamesP (688957) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579278)

Why they don't go and study the effects of videogames in driving on the following subjects:

- improved reflexes
- risk control (you know what happens in the vg if you do this, so I'm not trying in real life)
- steering control (see above)

Instead they just want to go the "videogames are bad" route

Re:Bunch of idiots (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32579750)

Yeaaa .... no.

1) I buy that.
2) Wrecking your own and everybody else's car without consequence is teaching you risk control? Hah! Paying 100€ for a minor scratch and the hassle with repair shops and insurance, THAT teaches you risk control.
3) Hey, I recently played H.A.W.X., I now know how to pilot the latest high-tech combat aircrafts!

Re:Bunch of idiots (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32579762)

Maybe it's the cumulative effect of video games, violence in movies and TV, gangsta' rap and even some other genre's of music, and a generation of parents who grew up in a little looser society than their parents. Things we buy are more throwaway than ever, so even our belongings don't mean much anymore.

Just saying it's not this or that doesn't explain why my old high school, for example, which was pretty much as boring and suburban as you can get, is now filled with gangs and has police patroling it. Same neighborhood, same demographics, and we're talking about silicon valley, not Detroit or some other economically ravaged area. It's been that way for about 20 years now.

I don't know of anyone ever bringing a gun to that school in the late 70's.

Something's making kids act out in ways we never did.

And yeah, I know, I hinted at my age and must be out of touch. Get off my lawn.

Spy Hunter (5, Interesting)

Stargoat (658863) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579280)

People have been claiming this since Spy Hunter came out. It was bunk then and it is bunk now. It's not video games that make you drive fast, it's the Peter Gunn theme.

Re:Spy Hunter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32579696)

Spy Hunter taught me how to suck my own dick. I haven't left the house since 1988.

oh the irony (3, Funny)

rarel (697734) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579290)

Aptly enough the fortune right now reads "You can get *anywhere* in ten minutes if you drive fast enough." :D

That's not surprising (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32579306)

I was too afraid to learn to drive (it looks dangerous!) until I played Crazy Taxi. That got my confidence up enough that I was willing to take driver's training. I still hate driving, but at least I have the confidence that other people will try to get out of my way when I drive on the sidewalk.

Re:That's not surprising (1)

VoidCrow (836595) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579384)

That made me laugh... fanx mate :)

Pfft! (1)

MrTripps (1306469) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579322)

Oddly, teenagers died in car accidents before video games existed. Playing Joust on an Atari 2600 didn't suddenly give me an urge to pick up a lance and ride a giant bird. There still is no credible evidence that associates aggressive real life behavior to video games.

Re:Pfft! (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579618)

Heavy video gamer credits gaming for saving his life while driving [slashdot.org] . Read the whole thread.

We say condescending, discrediting things only when we have no other argument and someone on the other side appears to be winning. When it's positive everyone jumps all over each other and says video games help develop reflexes, hand-eye coordination, etc.

Very Sad (1)

ADRA (37398) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579364)

Teens found a way of dieing by driving accidents way before video games ever came along. If there's a way to identify higher risk youths then that's all and good I suppose. This just brings me back to my teenage years where there were a few people in my schools who ended up dieing in accidents (usually associated with drinking and driving, but that's another discussion).

I call BS (1)

stevegee58 (1179505) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579400)

As long as teens have been driving cars, car accidents have been the leading cause of death among teenagers.

Re:I call BS (1)

nelsonal (549144) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579692)

Teens pretty much don't die disease or natural causes. So guns/cars/toxins are of course going to be the leading causes of death.

I'll believe it. (1)

colmore (56499) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579420)

Teenagers are really really stupid.

lies (1)

Dionysus (12737) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579430)

Everybody knows that anything I use and/or are interest in, cause no problems at all.

Some people just like to drive fast. (1)

human-cyborg (450395) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579438)

First off, I'll admit, I recently had my licence reinstated after a six-month suspension.
Speeding is fun. Video games are fun. Teenagers like to have fun. This also extends to other things like sex, drugs, and (I guess) rock and roll.
Driving at 170Km/h (105MPH) for over an hour on the 401 was fun.
If we want kids to be safe drivers, we'd have to teach them that fun is bad.
Now that I have my licence back, fun is over. Time for video games I guess.

I just want be prepared... (4, Funny)

PFritz21 (766949) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579470)

So, this is my fault for making sure I'm properly prepared for my road trip by packing plenty of turtle shells, banana peels, and mushrooms? Unbelieveable...

I'd say definitely "yes"! (1)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579476)

I've gotten big into sim racing e.g. GTR 2 and I noticed that my driving habits changed in a negative way. I found myself following "the line" on roads, cutting corners, accelerating faster, and breaking harder. This wasn't intentional at all since I've always been a cautious driver to the point of paranoia. It wasn't until blew past a slower truck (in the mindset of a slower GT2 class car in my way) half on a median and half in his lane that I realized how bad I had gotten. I'm now very conscious about what I'm doing, but I still catch myself following the best line on turns (which isn't safe and totally pointless at traffic speeds).

Re:I'd say definitely "yes"! (1)

nelsonal (549144) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579742)

I agree, after entering a corner at a little too high a speed for my not race tuned car, I learned to give myself a little cool down time from GTR/Forza before driving.

Play GTA 4 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32579506)

then try pulling up to a toll bridge. You'll feel the urge to tear right through it!

Re:Play GTA 4 (1)

sleeping143 (1523137) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579706)

What if I've always felt that urge?

True story (1)

jeffblevins (554702) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579512)

I find that I'm more reckless on my horse after playing Red Dead Redemption.

Kids suck at driving, and mostly play games (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579516)

You can't say that just because kids play video games and also drive poorly there's any relation. Kids always have driven badly - it's just that the worst drivers are also attracted to playing games. Violent driving games are not a cause, they are an indication of the interests of the average testosterone filled youth.

The best thing you can do for a teenage driver is to give them cars with great handling but not too much engine. Something like a mini cooper (not the S), or otehr car that handles well but will not let the kid get into speed related trouble too quickly and give them a chance at getting out of a situation without crashing.

alleiviates organ donor shortage (1)

peter303 (12292) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579532)

What would the medical industry do without all these reckless gamers?

Parallels (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32579536)

This sounds really similar to the situation race car drivers get into. They have problems slowing down.

I guess it's a testament to the increasing realism and immersion factors in today's games.

That said, no one ever accused race car drivers of being the sharpest knives in the drawer. Just because you want to/feel like going fast doesn't mean you should. Brains people....use em.

Overconfidence (1)

smitty777 (1612557) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579548)

While the study assumes that the gamers learn bad habits like tailgating and driving over curbs from GTA, overconfidence may be another factor (assuming causation = correlation here, which I'm not completely convinced). How many teens have spent hours driving around in virtual worlds and think it will be a piece of cake when they get behind the wheel of a car made out of atoms instead of bits/bytes.

My daughter is an expert driver in Ralley GT, but she came within 3 feet of taking out our fence the other day by mistaking the gas pedal for the brake. The pucker factor was pretty high.

Na naa na na na nana na na (1)

r00tyroot (536356) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579558)

Sounds familiar. I've had this propensity to roll things up into a giant ball, since about 2006 or so. Katamari!!!!

Simulations can have unexpected impacts (1)

BlankStare (709795) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579566)

During the late 70's to mid-80's it was a common practice during U.S.N. flight simulator sessions for the flight instructor to pause a simulation in mid-flight, then give feedback and instruction to the student. Then they began having pilots "freeze" under similar conditions during actual flight-time. Policy was ammended to ban the interruption of any simulation training scenario and debriefs were performed at the end of the session. The incidents of "freezing pilot" began to decline. You most likely WILL fight the way you train.

The plural of "anecdote" is "data", right? (1)

Divide By Zero (70303) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579612)

I was a victim of this. I'd been playing about four hours straight of Gran Turismo or Forza or one of those sim-style racers, and immediately after finishing I had to head out to an appointment. I floored it, maintained a nice outside-inside-out line around the first curve, then realized I was doing 50mph in a residential zone. Stopped at the first (well, second, I blew the first) stop sign, took a breath, made a conscious effort to recalibrate myself back to Reality, and carried on to wherever it was I had to go in a more "civilian" style and pace.

These games have made me a better driver on every other day, more cognizant of the weight distribution on my tires, available friction to turn/accelerate/brake and the like, so it's been a positive thing on the whole, but for that minute or so, I wouldn't've wanted to be out there with me.

This happened to me. (1)

Overunderrated (1518503) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579614)

I had been playing a Need For Speed open-world type game for hours, which IIRC had full stop signs and lights and stuff that you'd generally ignore. Then I had to make a real life trip to the grocery store. I ran a stop sign without even thinking about it and even after seeing it clearly, something I never ever do. Not making any judgments here, just throwing out a personal experience.

News Flash (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32579622)

PLAYING Video games - increases teenage preganancies ... oh sorry it dosnt.

Define reckless (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32579662)

By my definition, being a reckless driver causes a high incidence of also being a police officer.

Or it could just be a common cause (1)

Todd Knarr (15451) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579664)

It could just be that the kind of reckless idiot who drives dangerously also likes to drive dangerously in his video games. The link isn't between the video game and the reckless driving, it's between the basic recklessness and the behavior in both games and driving.

Probably so (1)

DaveV1.0 (203135) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579668)

If it is true, then it is probably caused by subconscious programming. Just like kata "programs" the body and mind to respond without thought, aggressive driving games probably program aggressive driving behavior. It probably doesn't effect everyone and those it effects are probably effected to varying degrees.

Some of it will come from one confusing one's ability in video games with one's abilities in real life.
Some will come from believing that video game physics are the same as real world physics.
Some will come from, as other's have said, the "fast is fun" mentality.

Really, this is not going to be a case of A causing B, just A exacerbating the pre-existing tendency towards B.

Grand Turismo... (1)

Temkin (112574) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579674)

About 8 or more years ago I spent a saturday morning playing GT on the PS/2. I was working on unlocking the various license classes, and was really into it for 2 or 3 hours. The wife asked me to run to the store to pick up something. About a mile from my house I realized I was driving like a complete maniac...

Games!??? What about music. (1)

Aceticon (140883) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579680)

I don't know about you guys, but with myself I noticed that when my car radio is playing an "agressive" (for example, heavy metal) or fast beat kind of music my driving gets a lot more reckless than after I've just had a session of playing GTA.

In fact, interestingly enough, while playing GTA I find myself tunning the in-game car radio for that kind of tunes much more than slower/placid ones.

Mario Kart (1)

AthleteMusicianNerd (1633805) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579754)

I once tried to power-slide around a curve after playing it. It didn't work.

More effect than cause (1)

JustNiz (692889) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579758)

Yeah because none of us that were teenagers before games consoles were invented ever drove fast. NOT.

Latest study released! (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579770)

Study claims some people react poorly to some things! World stunned! Slashdot enraged! Members engorged! Politicians scandalized! Pointless and boring film at 11 between the police blotter and the taped report from the orchid festival!

Why am I elbow deep in 1000-pin parts and ruing my eyesight scanning 600 page user manuals for the one poorly documented "gotcha" that could ruin my whole multimillion dollar R&D? Why do I live with this stress? Where do I send my resume so I can spend my work days doing *Important* *Studies* like this?

Race Drivin' (3, Interesting)

MattW (97290) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579780)

When I was 15, Race Drivin' (the sequel to Hard Drivin') was out; it was a sit-down racing simulator with amazingly realistic wheel feedback/physics. Unlike basically every other game I've played, the car you were driving behaved much like a real car. (ie, you could fish tail, and if you steered with the slide you could recover)

The first time I ever accidentally fishtailed my car in real life, I instinctively steered with the slide and recovered. I've heard that people without training tend to turn against the slide and exacerbate the problem. I have always thought that without my really extensive Race Drivin' playing, I wouldn't have reacted that way. (And when I say extensive, I mean it - I got to the point where I could gain time on laps and once played for an entire hour and stood up with the "remaining time" at the cap.)

May be true. Still no scapegoat for common sense. (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32579782)

People talk about having positive role models for children. This is because we, as humans, look towards those we admire and emulate them. Race car drivers, whether real, in a video game, on a movie screen are "cool" in a lot of people's eyes. What they do is cool. Their lives are cool. We envy the thrills for which they get paid.

I remember several years ago I had some sneak preview tickets for The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift. Let me just say that I waited 30 minutes after the end of that movie before everyone who had just seen it had finished peeling out of the parking lot and speeding away recklessly. And these were normal people, from a wide range of age groups. Maybe the young ARE more impressionable, but that doesn't allow one to place the blame solely on the medium. Any example of alternate behavior lends itself to emulation. Whether that takes the form of a "copycat" killer or holding the door open for someone isn't necessarily the result of exposure, but merely the impulsiveness and decision-making skills of the one exposed. Whether you agree or disagree on the merits, this is why we have ratings systems for video games. And for film. To limit the exposure from those whose decision-making skills haven't completely matured, albeit deciding who is limited in an arbitrary manner.

This isn't meant to advance a viewpoint one way or the other - it's merely an observation.

I'm very old (1)

VojakSvejk (315965) | more than 4 years ago | (#32579798)

I think it's true, but it's not just driving games. I for one, am always thinking Mattel Electronic Football when I drive.

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