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Verizon Makes Offering Service Blocks a Fireable Offense

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the customer-is-always-ripe dept.

Communications 370

Presto Vivace sends in a report from David Pogue at the New York Times, who learned from a Verizon customer service representative that the company has implemented a policy of punishing employees who suggest certain service blocks to customers looking to avoid unwanted or accidental fees. According to the representative, offering (for example) a web access block or premium SMS block without the customer asking for it can now lead to a reprimand or outright termination. The CSRs have also been directed to avoid issuing credits for such charges. "Essentially, we are to upsell customers on the $9.99 25mb/month or $29.99 unlimited packages for customers. Customers are not to be credited for charges unless they ask for the credit. And in cases such as data or premium SMS, where the occurrences may have gone months without the consumer noticing, only an initial credit can be issued."

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370 comments

Surprise? (5, Insightful)

colinrichardday (768814) | more than 3 years ago | (#32631948)

Is this really such a surprise?

Re:Surprise? (5, Interesting)

erroneus (253617) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632140)

It is in the "this is so outrageously disgusting that it can't possibly be true" sense of the word.

People who would offer service blocks are the same people who would endear a customer to the service provider as the company would then appear to show concern and interest in the customer's needs and interests. "Caring about the customer" was once the hallmark of a good and confident business and people were literally attracted to such companies. As I was growing up, this sort of behavior was simply normal and when a company didn't behave that way, I would tend to blame the employee rather than the company. Seeing this simply firms up my feeling about Verizon... and I mean ALL of Verizon.

Without fail, every service channel provided Verizon whether it is Verizon wireless, Verizon FiOS, Verizon business PRI service, Verizon T1 data service, Verizon DS3 or simply Verizon POTS is simply rife with bad customer service. Once the service is working, it stays working -- no complaints there, but every time PEOPLE get involved there are problems and while I have always suspected it came from the top, my suspicions have been increasingly with added evidence and now I get this story to add to it. I literally had to email the executive vice president of business sales to get ANY attention to my problems at all. The business office people would NOT respond to my emails or phone calls. And when I contacted their bosses I would get something along the lines of "I'll get someone on it right now!" and then nothing. Hell, even the EVP of sales didn't respond to her own email mail... she sent it to a lackey who is "showing interest" by investigating my claims before taking any action. So far, several days and NO action... just "showing interest" and "investigating."

* I would never willingly be a Verizon Customer * The character of the company is so rotten and corrupt that it simply makes me sick. If anyone wants this EVP's contact information I would be happy to provide it. They need a COMPLETE earful.

Re:Rife (2, Insightful)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632176)

Yea, I made seventeen phone calls in to the four departments to get a DSL dry loop line. You have to get really aggressive to get anything done. There ARE some service saints in there somewhere, so when you get one, get their ID number or sometimes first and last name and then ask for them.

Re your last line, I AM willingly a (disgusted) customer because I think Comcast is worse! Last I recalled on the Evil front, Verizon was SLIGHTLY less evil.

Re:Rife (2, Insightful)

PCPackrat (1251400) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632348)

Thing is, CSR jobs have more turnover than McDonalds. You can get their name, ID, or extension number, but they probably won't be there in 6 months when your next problem occurs.

Re:Rife (3, Interesting)

nebular (76369) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632574)

Very true. As a CSR your treated like shit by the customer because of restrictive policies that keep you from doing a good job and your treated like shit by the management because you are so easily replaced they don't have to care.

My usual line when it comes to Phone reps is that 20% will be fired within 3 months because they just got the job for the 6 weeks or so of paid training (I knew someone who decided to quit by just putting his headset on the table and reading a book, still in the phone queue, lasted a month before they found out his calls were just dead air) 70% are doing their jobs just to the letter and don't give a shit about you or the job their doing and 10% actually care and try to do what's best for you. That 10% usually quit after 6 months to a year from stress and disillusionment.

I work for Fido Wireless now. Our website actually gives you the steps and walks your through them for a complaint escalation all the way up to the ombudsman. I can, without fear of reprecusions advise customers exactly how to get what they need. I also don't work the phones anymore.

Re:Surprise? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32632424)

Welcome to the US where companies treat their customers like shit - only because hordes of mindless freaks keep giving them money. Along with Verizon and AT&T, Apple is another good example - a rotten company with sick attitude towards their customer base, but they are only going to do better and better as long as you keep throwing money to them.

Re:Surprise? (4, Funny)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632150)

Verizon CRS: Thank you for calling Verizon.
Customer: I'd like to block all of your special services on my Verizon account.
Verizon CRS: Oh, OK. ... I'll need to get special permission for that. Have you submitted that request in writing? We can only accept it in writing.
Customer: In writing? You're a phone company!
Verizon CRS: Not just a phone company - we offer many extra wonderful and expensive services.
Customer: But I don't want any of those extra wonderful and expensive services.
Verizon CRS: I'm very sorry to hear that, but I can't hear you. You'll have to submit that in writing.
Customer: Are you kidding me?
Verizon CRS: No sir. We take our billing practices very seriously. Did you know that blocking all special extra wonderful services includes blocking all incoming and outgoing calls?
Customer: What?
Verizon CRS: Yes, those are part of the 'Premium Call Package'.
Customer: What does the 'Basic' call package include?
Verizon CRS: The opportunity for us to offer you many special extra wonderful and expensive services.
Customer: But I don't want those!
Verizon CRS: Submit your request in writing. Please allow 6 - 8 weeks for processing. There is a $9.99 charge for terminating each of our many special extra wonderful services. Thank you for calling Verizon.

Re:Surprise? (5, Funny)

AkaXakA (695610) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632482)

This Verizon policy is just like in the Incredibles! People working there will have to find ways around it...

MRS. HOGENSON: [sobbing] I'm on a fixed income, and if you can't help me,
I don't know what I'll do. [blows nose loudly] [sobbing]

BOB: All right, listen closely. I'd like to help you, but I
can't. I'd like to tell you to take a copy of your policy to Norma Wilcox
on...[whispering] Norma Wilcox. W-l-L-C-O-X. On the third floor. But I can't. I
also do not advise you to fill out and file a WS2475 form with our legal
department on the second floor. I wouldn't expect someone to get back to you
quickly to resolve the matter. I'd like to help, but there's nothing I can do.

MRS. HOGENSON: Oh, thank you, young man.

BOB: Shhh! [shouting] I'm sorry, ma'am! I know you're upset!
[whispering] Pretend to be upset.

MRS. HOGENSON: [sobbing]

Re:Surprise? (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632606)

Remember that only because someone is stating something, that does not make it reality. Also a contract term is not a law. Not even remotely.
For that to be the case, you first have to buy into their bullshit delusional reality. Secondly, sign that contract. And third, actually accept it as being a legal practice. (A contract term is still illegal when it’s not legal, even when you signed it!)

Protip (obviously): Don’t make such contracts.
If that means no phone, no Internet, and no everything, then I suggest moving to a free country! ^^ (Really!)

Glad I just moved to Sprint. (1)

I'm just joshin (633449) | more than 3 years ago | (#32631950)

Thank you Evo.

-J

Re:Glad I just moved to Sprint. (1)

turkeyfish (950384) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632034)

Thanks for the info. I'll definitely stay away from Verizon. I had thought I might give them a try, but this changed my mind.

Re:Glad I just moved to Sprint. (1)

brain juice (924343) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632124)

Are any of the other alternative really any better?

This hardly seems limited to Verizon. I'm unaware of any for profit business that will review your bill and point out how you could be paying less money to them.

Re:Glad I just moved to Sprint. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32632212)

Tracfone doesn't put up with any shit from either Verizon or AT+T. They just don't. I've found the call quality is head and shoulders above any of the vendor phones too, calling from the same spot. I'll bet there's QOS throttling on their own customers.

If you just need a basic telephone that connects, basic VGA pictures and text messaging and email, it's the way to go. I use 400 minutes a month, have 2 phones for both systems, and pay a hell of a lot less than anybody on a service contract. Hint: get a double minute phone. Their per minute fees are actually declining.

And the damned service just works, even in Wisconsin behind the Cheddar Curtain.

Re:Glad I just moved to Sprint. (2, Informative)

ZosX (517789) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632246)

Sure. T-mobile won't nickel and dime you and they have generous caps on data. I've never paid more on my bill than the original stated amount. If you already have a compatible phone you can go month to month, contract free, or you can pay the full amount for the phone and avoid the contract. I was kind of dumb and did the contract, but I really have no complaints at all as I'm only paying like $30 more than I was before for just voice/sms and I can wirelessly tether with my laptop. They just bumped local speeds to 2.5.3mpbs on average and it should eventually get nearer to 7mpbs for me as their HSPA+ rollout completes, but I'm already pretty happy with the speed I have now for it being wireless and all. I can even watch hulu or netflix, which is pretty decent, though data consumption is awfully high. :)

Re:Glad I just moved to Sprint. (1)

Cylix (55374) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632526)

I have no spoken to a bad CSR at tmobile.

They go out of their way to help you and generally get the job done.

They will even help out with suggesting service plans and whatnot. I actually had to push to bump my minutes above the next tier. (I kept going over and I decided to just make it impossible to go over.) The csr on the line said, "you don't appear to ever use that many."

Re:Glad I just moved to Sprint. (1)

allseason radial (1603753) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632640)

Are any of the other alternative really any better?

This hardly seems limited to Verizon. I'm unaware of any for profit business that will review your bill and point out how you could be paying less money to them.

Certainly customers do not expect this kind of old-fashioned SERVICE from their providers, however it does happen sometimes. The last time I called my insurance company (Ameriprise), the agent looked over my policies and noted where I was spending money inappropriately. He explained the details and-- with my agreement-- updated my coverage. The result? Better insurance coverage while saving just under $250 per year.

This unexpected and terrific experience has totally locked me in to this company. I still check into other insurance companies every so often, but with all their claims, nobody has come close to offering equivalent coverage for my home and vehicles than Ameriprise. I have no affiliation with Ameriprise other than as a very satisfied customer.

Especially in this economic environment, companies like Verizon and AT&T could do much worse than garner customer trust and loyalty in this way.

Re:Glad I just moved to Sprint. (0, Flamebait)

dimeglio (456244) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632158)

Making decisions without facts. Great going dude. I bet you also believe in all the statistics published. I believe in the saying "buyer beware" and yes, companies generally gouge us. All of them.

Customer Service (5, Funny)

selven (1556643) | more than 3 years ago | (#32631952)

Customer Service: We're not happy until you're not happy.

Re:Customer Service (1, Insightful)

Zantac69 (1331461) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632010)

All snarking aside - this is a case of CSRs forgetting who they work for. They work for Verizon - NOT the customer. They have to keep "what is best for Verizon" in mind when dealing with customers.

Now true - it would be a hell of a lot easier if we, as customers, had a list of options that we could choose from so we could make the best decisions possible. But the rub is - what company would ever go for that?

Re:Customer Service (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632060)

They do work for Verizon, however, who do you think is more likely to get laid off in event of a massive exodus from Verizon? The CSRs? Or the corporate execs?

Simply put, I'm glad that I opted to go with a different carrier when I read about things like this. Sure my carrier isn't any better, but at least being on GSM allows me to choose my carrier without having to buy a new phone.

GSM which band? (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632236)

being on GSM allows me to choose my carrier without having to buy a new phone.

If you are in the United States, and you use mobile data, switching GSM carriers means all you'll get is EDGE. AT&T phones don't work on T-Mobile's UMTS band, nor vice versa. Besides, among the four major U.S. carriers, only T-Mobile gives the customer any discount on the "SIM-only" plan for buying or bringing a phone as opposed to subsidizing one.

Ideally, CDMA2000 should make switching just as easy as GSM/UMTS, with a removable CSIM that you can put in your existing CDMA2000 phone. But CSIM hasn't been implemented by U.S. carriers, possibly due to different bands.

Re:GSM which band? (3, Funny)

davester666 (731373) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632476)

Yes, this use of different standards is done in the name of competition, so that the customer has more choice and can receive better service than if the FCC arbitrarily picked a single wireless standard that all of the companies needed to use.

Once again, free enterprise saves the day and makes your life a little better/easier!

Re:Customer Service (5, Insightful)

nitehawk214 (222219) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632100)

All snarking aside - this is a case of CSRs forgetting who they work for. They work for Verizon - NOT the customer. They have to keep "what is best for Verizon" in mind when dealing with customers.

All snarking aside - this is a case of Verizon forgetting who they work for. They work for the Customers - NOT the money. They have to keep "what is best for Customers" in mind when dealing with money.

Yeah, I know I am full of crap. I hate big soulless companies too. But if their policy is to screw their customers at every turn, they will lose me as a customer.

Re:Customer Service (0, Offtopic)

gringofrijolero (1489395) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632318)

You are not the customer. The traders and shareholders are. They didn't buy the company to provide a service. They bought to make a fast buck.. Customer "service" is completely incidental.

Re:Customer Service (1)

penix1 (722987) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632624)

I beg to differ. A company can survive without shareholders at all if they have enough loyal customers built through great customer service. On the other hand, a company that is shedding customers through poor customer service is likely to trigger a huge stock sell off. In either event, customer service is VERY important.

I expected something like this. In West Virginia, they sold their landlines to Frontier after being hit with huge fines by the PSC for poor customer service and long outages. The sale was bitterly contested since it is highly unlikely Frontier can carry the load.

Re:Customer Service (1)

Bigjeff5 (1143585) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632520)

All snarking aside - this is a case of Verizon forgetting who they work for. They work for the Customers - NOT the money. They have to keep "what is best for Customers" in mind when dealing with money.

Yeah, I know I am full of crap. I hate big soulless companies too. But if their policy is to screw their customers at every turn, they will lose me as a customer.

You are completely wrong. No business works for the customer, ever. The customer is a source of income - a market to sell their wares. They do the best they can to maximize the consumption of their product. A business can be about the money and the customers (it's actually a really good strategy for getting more money - a net gain for everybody), and indeed a large consideration for what the customer will buy is necessary, but it cannot only be about the customers. If they were, everything would be free, and they would be broke before they even started. That's usually called a charity, and relies on external support to keep functioning (donations, government funding, etc).

The heartless among business executives may try to screw over the customer at every turn, but it's generally bad practice to do so (whether they actually care or not) in the long term. Sometimes business execs forget that, and then the business starts tanking and it ends up being consumed by another business unless they change their strategy.

Re:Customer Service (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632546)

"But if their policy is to screw their customers at every turn, they will lose me as a customer."

That's business, and business is war. The business wants to take as much customer money as possible, and the customer wants as much product or service as possible.

Of course they try to fuck us, we should try to expose that in detail, and to fight back by voting with our sweet, sweet wallets.

Re:Customer Service (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32632152)

The customer is always the boss. Any good customer service person knows that. If they get pissed off about charges and go to another provider, the company loses money. I've worked at many Customer service jobs, the best way to run business is to make your customers happy.

Re:Customer Service (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32632164)

...and what is best for Verizon is giving the impression that CSRs are advocates for the customer, and having CSRs empowered to make decisions about what kind of "touch" the customer needs to be satisfied. The extra $ Verizon makes in out-of-plan data charges will easily be lost in good will.

Re:Customer Service (3, Insightful)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632250)

The extra $ Verizon makes in out-of-plan data charges will easily be lost in good will.

That's why they lock you into a 24-month service commitment and don't let you pay for your phone up front, so that the loss of goodwill doesn't translate to loss of business.

Re:Customer Service (1)

OctaviusIII (969957) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632380)

Maybe I'm just an idealistic capitalist, but having informed consumers is the (ostensible) basis upon which our economic system is built. If companies cannot be expected to provide the information required to make capitalism work properly, we have a much larger problem that cries for a regulatory intervention, much as I hate to say it.

Re:Customer Service (1)

E IS mC(Square) (721736) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632636)

Going by most of the comments on /., it seems anything and everything is justified in name of capitalism as long as it benefits any company and results into profit. ("the company is only responsible to the share holders" mantra). The sacred religion of capitalism is truly untouched by evils of doing-the-right-thing. Look at Apple and their new avatar of taking away all the freedom and getting away with great rewards, and all I see here is fanbois fapping on the company and it's messiah.

Re:Customer Service (1)

v1 (525388) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632440)

All snarking aside - this is a case of CSRs forgetting who they work for. They work for Verizon - NOT the customer. They have to keep "what is best for Verizon" in mind when dealing with customers.

100% agree. Anyone working in any "customer service" department of a business is not there to look out for the customer's best interest, they're there to look out for the business's best interest. In a mature business / market, customer service is important, and to some degree the CSRs have to start actually helping the customers "beat the system" to at least a small degree in the interest of good customer relations.

However, I believe the point of this article is that Verizon considers screwing the customer in a major way to be in their "best interest". Public backlash and bad press is the fix for that.

But going by Verizon's track record, I rather doubt they care. Right now, they have more to lose by making their business practices more ethical than they do in confirming the public's suspicions of just how badly they are willing to screw you. Summary: we already knew verizon was evil, nothing new to see here.

I'm just rather amazed that considering the options people have, that people voting with their dollar hasn't had a bigger impact on the cell carriers. I guess there's just too much profit to be had right now that the market hasn't settled down yet and good customer service just hasn't had enough time to become an important factor. Until it does, they'll keep shafting the public, we'll keep hearing about it, and we'll keep taking it.

Re:Customer Service (1)

Cylix (55374) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632576)

Verizon employs a volley of interesting tactics targeted at nickle and diming the consumer. Eventually, they will completely destroy their reputation and at some point the consumers shift will force them to blink.

Only when the loss is great enough will they attempt to make some turns. However, given this is a McDonalds nation driven on advertising rather than informed decisions it will take some time.

Re:Customer Service (5, Interesting)

Ephemeriis (315124) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632508)

All snarking aside - this is a case of CSRs forgetting who they work for. They work for Verizon - NOT the customer. They have to keep "what is best for Verizon" in mind when dealing with customers.

They work for Verizon... Which makes its money off its customers... Lose the customers, lose the money, lose the job. It's that simple. Ultimately, the customers are the ones providing your paycheck.

I used to work at Electronics Boutique. I took pride in my job and went out of my way to make sure that the customer left happy. This meant that I would often ignore our product of the month - a game or device that we were supposed to push on people whether they wanted it or not. I would, instead, recommend products that people would actually enjoy.

I had a number of customers who came back to the shop repeatedly specifically because of my service. They would come back and ask me specifically if there was something new available that I thought they'd like - because I actually considered their preferences and past purchases rather than telling them to buy whatever our home office was selling.

This resulted in many repeat sales for Electronics Boutique, even though I wasn't doing what the home office thought was best.

By contrast, my manager was one hell of a salesman. He could convince anyone to buy anything. We had a couple come in looking for a PS2 for their kid for Christmas. He convinced them that the Xbox was a far better system (and it just so happened to be the product of the month). They bought the Xbox.

After Christmas they came back in to return the Xbox, because it wasn't what their kid wanted. It didn't play the games that their kid already owned. It didn't play the games that their kid wanted. They were quite annoyed at my manager for ignoring their desires and selling them the wrong product. They wanted to know why he ignored the fact that they had Playstation games they wanted to play. They wanted to know why he didn't tell them that the games they wanted were Playstation exclusives.

They didn't buy a PS2 from us. They just returned the Xbox. They then went across the hall and bought a PS2 from our competition - even though we had them in-stock for the same price.

I don't know if they ever came back and bought anything else from us... But that was at least one sale that was lost because my manager did what the home office thought was best.

What is best for the customer is, ultimately, what is best for Verizon - whether Verizon realizes that or not.

Shaft your customers enough and they'll switch to a different company.

Re:Customer Service (1)

suomynonAyletamitlU (1618513) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632530)

But the rub is - what company would ever go for that?

A company that figured that they could actually continue to exist by making normal to minimal profit margins, not throwing those profits blindly to shareholders or execs, and instead building up cash reserves and then actually providing more and better service as the focus of their company, rather than considering their corporate motive to be excessive profit?

Crazy idea, I know.

But see here's the thing; if I had a company--and I'm no businessman or economist, and maybe I'm missing practical considerations--I would do that. I don't need to be vastly better paid than the people who actually do the work in my company, and anyone who claimed they did need that I wouldn't trust. I also don't expect to get free money as soon as I find any source of revenue at all (see also RIAA/MPAA); as long as everyone is getting paid what they're worth at that (theoretical) company, I couldn't care less if we lose the opportunity to sue people for bajillions of dollars or wring a cash cow until it's dry.

And if we go out of business after a while, because I wasn't bloodthirsty enough, at least I gave a lot of good people the money they were worth, provided a lot of people a service, and proved to cynical internet folks that yes, in fact, it's entirely possible for a company to exist that isn't trying to screw people over. And maybe, if I was saving my money, I can start again somewhere else.

Jews (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32631958)

Sounds like Bank of America, or as I call it - Bank of Israel.

Re:Jews (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32632120)

Bank of America was originally Bank of Italy, you dumb fuck...

This just in: (3, Funny)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 3 years ago | (#32631968)

Phone companies are assholes.

Film at 11.

Re:This just in: (4, Funny)

nitehawk214 (222219) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632116)

Phone companies are assholes.

Film at 11.

I would rather not see film of their asshole, thank you very much.

Re:This just in: (1)

TDoerner (1837740) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632584)

Phone companies are assholes.

Film at 11.

I would rather not see film of their asshole, thank you very much.

I agree! Such a film would be about 500 years ahead of its time anyway...people are still far too concerned with whose ass [wikipedia.org] it is and why it was farting :D.

Re:This just in: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32632588)

Phone companies are assholes.

Film at 11.

I would rather not see film of their asshole, thank you very much.

Don't fret, there aren't any wide angle lenses quite large enough

Re:This just in: (1)

GaryOlson (737642) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632230)

When are you going to provide the in-depth report? Will this be a deep probe or just wide area coverage?

Re:This just in: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32632282)

I believe the report can be found here [goatse.fr] .

Re:This just in: (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632308)

I once suggested Slashdot have a "Humanity Is Complete Scum" tag for articles, but realized it would apply to every single article and be rendered moot.

Customer Service Is a Misnomer (5, Insightful)

qbel (1792064) | more than 3 years ago | (#32631978)

It is very likely the customer service representatives who are offering those service blocks to better accommodate those customers are the better representatives who are actually trying to do a good job. And people wonder why customer service for some companies is so horrible, it is because of policies like this.

Re:Customer Service Is a Misnomer (3, Insightful)

noidentity (188756) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632050)

CSR = Company Service Representative. See, just a simple misunderstanding.

Re:Customer Service Is a Misnomer (1)

goodtrick (1201109) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632056)

Everyday I see an advertisement on TV that touts being able to talk to a "real person."

Well what is the point of talking to a real person if they are just some clueless automaton following some script. This Verizon policy is just another example.

Personally, I dread the day when I have to call customer service, and I dread calling tech support double.

Re:Customer Service Is a Misnomer (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632306)

Well what is the point of talking to a real person if they are just some clueless automaton following some script

More accurate speech recognition means the script can have more valid responses at each step. This higher branching factor [wikipedia.org] means you get to the end quicker.

Re:Customer Service Is a Misnomer (5, Insightful)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632072)

It is very likely the customer service representatives who are offering those service blocks to better accommodate those customers are the better representatives who are actually trying to do a good job. And people wonder why customer service for some companies is so horrible, it is because of policies like this.

Its the bean-counters' fault.
Revenue losses from service blocks and credits are really easy to measure.
Profits from customers made happy by good customer service are really hard to measure.
So, as is frequently the case when organizations become hyper-focused on metrics,
decisions get made that maximize metrics but don't make good business sense.

Re:Customer Service Is a Misnomer (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632320)

Profits from customers made happy by good customer service are really hard to measure.

But these profits can be estimated based on the revenue from customers who have stayed with the company past month 24.

Re:Customer Service Is a Misnomer (1)

Bigjeff5 (1143585) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632580)

And how do you know how many customers would have left with poorer customer service, and how do you know how many more customers you would have retained/gained had you better customer service? Especially in the case of Verizon, who is consistently ranked at the top in surveys of customer satisfaction?

How do you count that?

It can be estimated, but an estimate always less trustworthy than a fact. The bean counters can say "We saved a million dollars last month by simply cutting out X." What if the effects of cutting out X don't show up for a year? Their total loss could be 5 times what they gained, but because it is spread out over a year they never see it.

That's the problem with bean counters - they aren't visionaries. They cannot take into account loyalty, satisfaction, and desire. They only count numbers, and their numbers will show they are winning even as they lose.

Re:Customer Service Is a Misnomer (1)

Progman3K (515744) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632346)

It's the bean-counters' fault.
Revenue losses from service blocks and credits are really easy to measure.
Profits from customers made happy by good customer service are really hard to measure.
So, as is frequently the case when organizations become hyper-focused on metrics,
decisions get made that maximize metrics but don't make good business sense.

I suppose if they performed long-term trending analysis they'd realize that after adopting a policy like the one they have just put in place, they will lose customers and wind up in a worse place than where they started from but that might take years...

How about a different angle? (1)

khasim (1285) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632378)

Suppose you could identify the customers who you didn't really want to keep? The ones that TRY to optimize their usage of your plans to THEIR benefit?

And the ones who call into your support lines driving up YOUR support line costs?

Everyone else is a "good" customer who takes what you provide and pays the price you demand.

So yeah, it makes sense at the corporate "fuck the customer" level to fire employees who not only aren't trying to "fuck the customer" but are trying to HELP the customer optimize the CUSTOMER'S usage of your plans.

Re:Customer Service Is a Misnomer (1)

phoenixwade (997892) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632432)

I've read many comments about "bad customer service" but I'm not sure that they are accurate: Those customers who are savvy enough to make an informed choice are not going to be affected by this policy and will interact with knowledgeable frendly CSR's or weak stupid CSR's and this policy would have no bearing on customer service, since they will pay attention, know their options, and ask for the services and options. Those that don't will encounter the same good or bad CSR's and forge ahead in blissful ignorance. Either way, a management directive to not offer some services and only implement if the customer asks seems to me to be one of those things that many corporations do all the time - it doesn't matter if they offer CSR's a bonus for upsales, train them to offer premium services first, or issue a written mandate to respond to services that cut income only on request. In any case, I don't think we're talking about customer service. Verizon could respond quickly, have low wait times, and have high solution rates, yielding high levels of customer satisfaction (not saying they DO, just that they could) and this policy still be in place. This strikes me more of those "one more things" that people tack on when they are already aggravated, ratyher than "one of those things" that actually aggravates them.

Re:Customer Service Is a Misnomer (2, Insightful)

Ambitwistor (1041236) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632656)

"Since it is generally impossible to measure what is important, bureaucrats instead turn their energies toward making important what is measurable." — J.M.W. Slack, Egg and Ego

Re:Customer Service Is a Misnomer (1)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632098)

It is very likely the customer service representatives who are offering those service blocks to better accommodate those customers are the better representatives who are actually trying to do a good job. And people wonder why customer service for some companies is so horrible, it is because of policies like this.

I'm likely to be one of the first to complain about bad service and practices, and I strongly dislike the way cell phone companies work in the US. However from TFA all I can see is a case of he said/she said. Is what the CSR said actually company policy, or is it just local management actions? Likewise I would expect a PR flunkie to say whatever in order to protect the company rather than saying the actual truth. But they will say the truth if it to the benefit of the company

I can't deny TFA because I see no proof. But I can't support TFA for the same reason. Show me a document on Verizon letter head that supports TFA and then I'll reconsider my position.

Re:Customer Service Is a Misnomer (1)

Daniel_Staal (609844) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632222)

The PR flunkie never contradicted the CSR: They kept saying that if the customer requests it, the CSRs should implement the block, and that the blocks were still available. And the no CSR will be fired for implementing a block that the customer requests. (Of course, they have to make sure the customer knows all the features they will be missing out on by having the block, by listing them all...)

The CSR said that the policy is that they are never to offer to the customer a block.

So, after reading both: If the customer knows about the possible blocks, and asks for one, they are to be given the runnaround and then allowed the block if they keep insisting on it. If the customer doesn't know about the blocks, it is a firable offense to inform them of them. No contradictions with either statement.

Re:Customer Service Is a Misnomer (1)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632254)

If the customer doesn't know about the blocks, it is a firable offense to inform them of them. No contradictions with either statement.

From TFA

First, she flatly denied that a customer service rep can be fired for suggesting a data block.

Re:Customer Service Is a Misnomer (1)

The Hatchet (1766306) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632404)

um... That's kind of like saying "sure a cure for cancer is available, but we aren't allowed to give it to anyone unless they can follow the treasure map, find the book with the scientific name of the cure in it, and then come to us and repeat it perfectly 3 times strait, we must wipe knowledge that such a thing exists from the world, so it likely won't ever be a problem" - you can't request it if you are never told it is an option, if you are not even aware of its existence. I can't describe the color red if I am color blind.

Sure it is available, but if it is hidden and damn near impossible to get (or just hidden and your average joe) then it existing is just a technicality, for all practical purposes, it doesn't exist.

Just because it is technically true, does not mean it is right. In fact it is quite wrong, to purposely cheat customers, and avoid giving them good service at all costs (literally, you ALL COSTS).

Just because its on a desert island doesn't mean its easily available. It means you have to swim to a fucking island and dig it up. Big difference between "HERE IT IS" and "what are you talking about? oh, blocks? um, like the ones you build with? oh, well, to get that, I have to tell you all of the DEVIL WILL EAT YOUR BRAIN IF YOU GET IT features that you will be losing out on ... list... are you still there sir? maam? goat?? what did you say you wanted again?? oh, blocks? like the ones with letters on the side that you build stuff with?..."

Just because your mom is available doesn't mean I can get with her, maybe she is a lesbian, and that would mean although she is available, it is impossible for me to get her in bed, short of a roofie colada, and even then its pushing it.

Just think of the blocks like your mother, a giant contradiction. Also, I do not mean offence, I am just trying to make a point.

Re:Customer Service Is a Misnomer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32632146)

Anon because I used to work for VZW as an in-store CSR/Tech.

This policy has been unofficial for some time. I regularly would get confronted by store management about offering to block services like text and web when customers were having problems with data charges. I was also often confronted about changing the shortcut keys to something other than mobile web to avoid the 2.99 1-second data charges.

Verizon is very aware of the 2.99 data charge, it's not accidental, nor is it a billing problem. In my experience, 30% of the lines Verizon services get these 2.99 data charges. It's millions of dollars every month in revenue. Shit like this is why I quit. It's also why despite working for, and being entitled to a discount from VZW, I never ever ever became a customer.

Re:Customer Service Is a Misnomer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32632280)

If you used to work for them but don't now, why are you anonymous? The information you've posted is in no way verifiable so you might just as well not have posted it.

Re:Customer Service Is a Misnomer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32632492)

Because VZW has lawyers and all employees sign long-term NDAs. I don't want to get sued for revealing conversations between management and employees over business practice. It's probably unlikely that they'd do anything, but that doesn't mean I shouldn't take one simple step to play it safe.

Re:Customer Service Is a Misnomer (1)

TriezGamer (861238) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632548)

Because posting with a pseudonym somehow makes his information more verifiable? Has VZW leaked a list of employees and their /. IDs or something?

Re:Customer Service Is a Misnomer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32632532)

I worked VZW customer service for about a month. I quit despite the current economy (I only support myself) because of the shit going on there. Unfortunately, the NDA thing is true in my case as well. VZW is a horrible company.

I once was a CSR for a 'Premium' txt company. (1)

SuperBry (1242668) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632020)

God the people who signed up for these things were idiots. We were walked through the sign up process and it was clear that you would be charged on about 10 different screens. The worst were the people who went months even years before noticing the charges and wanted them all refunded. Every one of them claimed they were never notified about the charges but we could look though the history on the account and could see the messages that were sent and they all ended with something to the effect of '9.99 a mo. reply STOP to end messages and disable acct.' Alas they would let it go on for months and yell at me for their stupidity.

Re:I once was a CSR for a 'Premium' txt company. (1)

cliffiecee (136220) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632226)

Sadly, I have to agree with you. Those contracts are usually long and very hard to read, but they are the terms under which you receive their service, so you need to know them, or prepared to be unpleasantly surprised (which is most peoples' method, apparently).

Actually, forcing myself to read these contracts has been a great deterrent to signing up for things I don't really need.

Verizon sells you a literal timebomb (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32632076)

Each phone you buy is so loaded with shit that anyone who tries to run all programs or options on their phone will ring up a hefty bill without realizing it.

T-mobile is great in this respect (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32632118)

T-mobile, say what you will about its coverage. But it has excellent customer service. They voluntarily suggested these blocks, and they have lower rate plans for people out of contract who don't need subsidized phones. As the market is saturated, most people who want cell phones got them. Those who don't need/want premium service are happy with their two or three year old phones. T-mobile, and others who are offering lower rate plans without phone subsidies are going to retain these customers. And the nickle and dimers like AT&T and Verizon would find it difficult to peel off customers from them.

Re:T-mobile is great in this respect (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32632180)

I fully agree with the T-Mobile recommendation. Another thing to try for those of you with minimal needs is one of the prepaid plans offered by some of the smaller carriers. These plans piggyback on the major provider's networks (you'll need to research to see who has paired up with whom), and they are substantially cheaper. My co-worker and his wife use these, and they pay about 100 bucks a year for both phones. There are frequently 2-for-1 minute top-off deals that come up. If you're frugal, you can get some good deals.

Re:T-mobile is great in this respect (3, Interesting)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632478)

IMHO T-Mobile also has the best pre-paid plans in the US for a major carrier. I actually use a prepaid phone and for my usage I am paying well under half of what any of the contracted plans would pay. But then again I only use my phone as a phone so I don't need much in the way of functionality.

Re:T-mobile is great in this respect (5, Informative)

ZosX (517789) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632190)

I second this. I have T-mobile and while their android phone selection is kind of sucking right now, I can still get away with wireless tethering for free and they have one of the largest caps (10 gigs). I've easily blown through 2-5 gigs already this month. They also just boosted their speeds locally and I'm now pulling like 2.5-4mbps, which is a lot better than the 1mbps I was getting previously. Don't know when I'll start to see speeds over 5mbps, but I should probably upgrade to the latest radio. The worst they do to the people that exceed their caps is drop them down to edge, which still at least leaves their phones somewhat usable. Every other provider wants to nickel and dime you to death. Boost is good for cheap phone service, but their network is terrible and nowhere even near edge quality. I'd feel pretty bad for anyone that bought their proposed android phone. Its going to be rather painful. Seems like sprint is content to milk the old nextel network for all its worth.

Re:T-mobile is great in this respect (1)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632442)

Also agree with T-mobile. When I wanted to unlock my phone they said "Sure!". I have also heard that they will support iPhone on their network. My only gripe is that in my own home I get at max 1 or 2 bars

Re:T-mobile is great in this respect (2, Interesting)

mlts (1038732) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632488)

The outstanding thing about T-Mobile is that they are forthright about their fees.

If some app on my Android phone decided to start eating bandwidth like mad, I'd just have to deal with EDGE speeds until the next billing cycle. If this happened on another provider, I'd be owing them a lot of cash.

My idea for a compromise: Have a maximum limit of bandwidth, and throttle (not kill) to EDGE speed once a user hits it. For example, the customer can buy x amount of bandwidth base per month, then authorized y more to be billed. If he or she goes over x+y amount of bandwidth, throttle and notify the user that they got choked, optionally offering to lift the limit to a higher amount on a temporary or permanent basis.

Far weaker would be a "4G" speed service [1] that is truly unlimited in bandwidth ("business class"), but costs $100 a month. I'd rather pay more and at least know that my phone bill will have a maximum bound to it, especially if I just have 1-2 computers and am well off by just using tethering. Long term, this might make cellular providers more money because they would be an alternative to cable. Sprint/Clear is doing a great job at this. I would like it if AT&T would follow suit.

[1]: Technically 4G is all IP communication, compared to 3G/3.5G voice and IP over different channels. However, T-Mobile's HSPA+ is as fast as Sprint/Clear's 4G. Either way, a speed that is usable as a possible replacement for a home Internet connection.

OMG WTF MONOPOLY (1)

eherot (107342) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632142)

In other news: How to tell you're dealing with a company that does not feel it has to do anything to retain its customers

Nothing New (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32632168)

This is nothing new, this is what happens when the CSR tries to "do the right thing" and the management has no qualms about making money from overbilling.

They don't tell you anyways... (1)

Gertlex (722812) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632178)

In my experience, this won't make any difference. They don't tell you about data/web blocks anyways. I happened to read a mention of that concept on /. shortly before getting my most recent phone. So I asked and got that without a problem. Yay.

Though I suppose the noteworthy bit here is to assume that there's hidden money to be had/saved when dissatisfied. Because ya, they don't tell you.

Phone Design (1)

Renraku (518261) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632216)

I'm pretty sure phones are designed to be one button away from a multiple dollar data fee if you don't have a data plan. Every phone I owned would happily connect to some webpage owned by the cell phone company and proceed to download 200-300k before you could figure out you hit the wrong button. Moreover, some of them have flat out refused to stop downloading the page until it's done, meaning that you just got dinged a megabyte on your ten cents per kilobyte lack of data plan.

Re:Phone Design (1)

Compholio (770966) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632366)

Every phone I owned would happily connect to some webpage owned by the cell phone company and proceed to download 200-300k before you could figure out you hit the wrong button.

That's one of the reasons I like older phones, they're too slow to connect to the internet before you can click cancel.

This is why I'm OK with AT&T (1)

Lank (19922) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632234)

Not that I believe AT&T has no problems, because it absolutely does. But I figure I use my iPhone more for data services than phone calls anyway and that's one of AT&T's strong areas. But at least I'm not giving my money to Verizon no matter how good their coverage is -- they're basically jackasses.

Confused a bit here (1)

JoshuaZ (1134087) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632256)

If Verizon doesn't want to sell these options to customers why are they even offering them? Why not just withdraw these options for new customers and only include them for people grandfathered in and already have them? What am I missing here?

Should be automatic (3, Insightful)

webdog314 (960286) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632260)

We seriously need a federal regulation making blocking of excessive fees ($5,000 increase in phone bill due to teenage txting) automatic. Allow the user to put a definable cap on their bill which requires a phone call to the telco to exceed. "I never want to pay more than $300 on my bill." It would cut off all but emergency service and calls to the telco itself if it hit the cap. It could even cut off all but voice service as the cap was approached.

Verizon does allow users to turn on and off various blocking services on their website, but more people don't care enough to even make that much of a decision.

Re:Should be automatic (0)

Kral_Blbec (1201285) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632300)

No, the one thing we do NOT need is more federal regulation. There are plenty of other companies to choose from; pick a prepaid company and work with them.

Re:Should be automatic (4, Insightful)

webdog314 (960286) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632402)

I really don't understand this attitude. There aren't "plenty of other companies to choose from", there are _maybe_ FOUR of any quality and coverage, and they all do the same thing. Simply taking the 'regulation bad, freedom good' line is moronic. Complaining about telco atrocities is almost a standard pastime here on Slashdot, yet when someone suggests a possible solution via actually forcing the telcos to stop raping the consumer the response is 'no regulation'? WTF?! Like they are going to suddenly get all warm and fuzzy and do it on their own?

Re:Should be automatic (5, Insightful)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632494)

No, the one thing we do NOT need is more federal regulation. There are plenty of other companies to choose from; pick a prepaid company and work with them.

As a country, we decided a long time ago that consumer protections are more important than allowing the free hand of the market to work its magic.

In other words: just because there are better options, doesn't mean we should allow abusive practices to continue.

Re:Should be automatic (1)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632612)

No, the one thing we do NOT need is more federal regulation. There are plenty of other companies to choose from; pick a prepaid company and work with them.

This is the myth of the free market. The trouble is that this myth is predicated on an informed consumer being able to make a choice by being able to logically compare all the alternatives. There are two issues with this myth when confronted by the real world. First of all cell phone companies deliberately make the comparison of their services impossible by publishing data in the most obtuse fashion possible. Secondly when you do make an uninformed choice you can only act to select a different provider *after* you have discovered they have acted in bad faith - ie after you have suffered a loss. I would much prefer not to suffer a loss in the first place.

Re:Should be automatic (3, Insightful)

Rich0 (548339) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632564)

Agreed. I'd go a step further and require everybody to pick a maximum monthly charge when they sign up for their account - it can be as low as whatever number was advertised on the TV set (if they advertise an amount that doesn't cover fees, then the fees are on the telco). The telco can block service if you exceed your amount, but if they provide the service they can't bill you for it, and they can't carry it over to next month either, etc.

If somebody CHOOSES to spend $10k on data roaming that is their choice. I don't think we need price fixing (yet). However, people shouldn't be sold services they have no intention of actually buying. Cell phone companies are like the guys who run up and wash your windows in the city and then demand payment.

They All Suck (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32632270)

They All Suck. Every wireless provider has issus with either customer service or with phone/data service. They always have and always will. They've oversold their capacity by God know how much, and customer service is poor at all of them. You personally may have a good experience with your phone and with their customer service, but for everyone who has had a nice, pleasant experience, I'm guessing there are are at least 4-5 others whose story with the same provider would be very different. This is all part of what I call The Greed Creed.... All of these companies PRIMARY goal is to make money. Their secondary goal is to provide a product or a service. As long as these goals are reversed, we will continue to be plagued with these kinds of problems. I'm not opposed to business making lots of money, but I am opposed if they do so at the expense of everything else. I believe it would be very easy for businesses to make even more money than they do now, but for the short term, investment in infastructuer and customer service would make them look unprofitable in the short term.

Well, that's easy.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32632296)

Now, Verizon can be fined.

Sounds Familiar... (1)

The Hatchet (1766306) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632316)

... I see, it's kinda like insurance companies "cheat the customers as much as possible, or YOUR FIRED" yea, same old profit maximizing bullshit. Someday companies will actually give a shit about providing good services and having happy, loyal employees and customers. Someday.

DIY (5, Informative)

audubon (577473) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632326)

You can go to verizonwireless.com and add (or remove) the blocks yourself (note: some of the links are found at the extreme right or bottom of the page):

Account -> Plan -> Set Usage Controls -> Add/Remove Blocks

  • Block Ringback Tone Purchase
  • Block Premium Messaging
  • Block V CAST Music
  • Block Premium Animated Messaging
  • Block Mobile Web
  • Block Web Purchases
  • Block V CAST Video Clips
  • Block Application Downloads

Verizon: New Service: Customer Disservice (1)

mlauzon (818714) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632342)

I've got 16 years of Customer Service experience, I can tell you right now, Verizon is not doing customer service at all, more of a disservice than anything.

They didn't deny it. (4, Informative)

Posting=!Working (197779) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632356)

The source claims that they can be fired if they suggest data blocks unless a customer specifically asks for them.

Verizon's defense was that no employee would be fired for adding a data block if a customer specifically asked for one.

What's really disturbing is that the reporter actually accepted this as a valid defense. Their answer covers when a customer specifically asks for a block, the firing in question occurs when a customer does not.

How specifically do the customers have to ask? Is asking for them to stop these ridiculous charges enough, or do you have to ask for a data block specifically? Would you still have to request download blocking, Vcast blocking, etc. by name?

They designed the phone interface to maximize the frequency of these charges, I'm pretty sure they make stopping them as difficult as possible. As far as companies go, Verizon is among the lowest of the low.

This year's Bonuses (1)

Yaa 101 (664725) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632392)

This year's executive bonuses have to come from some place, it does however tell something about their overall financial health.

Can you hear me now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32632406)

Dear Verizon:
    Please consider the possibility that it is not in your best interest to treat your customers like shit.
    You have stolen money from me by charging my credit card even after I cancelled my service. You have wasted a considerable amount of my time as I waited on the phone just to talk to someone who essentially told me "Yes, we stole your money and there's nothing you can do about it".

  It's not a good idea to put your customers in this type of position. It will cause them to seek more creative ways of exacting satisfaction from you. Perhaps they will post to online message boards about how much you suck. Maybe they will get their friends and family to cancel their service. Maybe they'll request their representatives and regulators to pass laws to force you to behave in a reasonable manner. There's even the risk that
some of your more pissed off customers will resort to "performance art" involving verizon properties and advertising.

It's up to you.

Re:Can you hear me now? (2, Interesting)

jav1231 (539129) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632516)

The problem is Verizon is so big that until they start seeing hundreds of thousands or millions leave their service, they're not likely to do much. What's more, they can afford to slough off several million before they get too scared. If the iPhone moves to Verizon, prepare for things to get worse CS wise.

OTOH, this is a great opportunity for the other carriers. People hate AT&T and Verizon has seen enough growth that they can afford to let CS slide. Sprint has had ever-increasing CS ratings over the past couple of years. If they stick to unlimited plans they will drive a lot of business their way as Verizon appears to be considering tiered pricing. T-Mobile has also seemed to make their customers happy, too. So this is the way the system is supposed to work. Let the big guys get fat and start to slow down and their competitors will take advantage.

Frustration (5, Interesting)

Munden (681257) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632558)

I was given the task of overseeing our company's 102 user Verizon phone bill each month back in Oct. 09. Each month I downloaded the new bill Verizon they put up in an XML format and I threw it into my database. I reduced the bill from about $6000 to $5000 in simple waste and no reduction in service - I could easily drop another $750 with minimal impact affecting only the abusers. Anyways, I noticed in April Verizon started to charge about 60% of the users with a new $1.99 for 1MB usage charge. Now I've seen this 1MB usage charge before, but it was always with one of our users that downloaded a ringtone or had access to the mobile web - it was always attached to something they did. When I called Verizon and spoke with their CSR I asked what the 1MB charge and have they changed anything because there were all these new $1.99 fees. I was told there had been no changes and when I gave them specific examples of users with these fees they said it was for this or that. I had at this point almost 6 months of data and I gave counter-examples for each explanation of what these new 1MB charges were for.

The rep was quickly overwhelmed by my examples and they said they would escalate my case to a tier 2 technical representative. Days go by and I finally get the explanation that the 1MB was for connecting to Verizon's Mobile Web - which was total crap because it's blocked and you can't actually connect. When I asked for clarification they said it was for "trying to connect" even though it is blocked on our plan. I was not satisfied because we went from 2 explainable $1.99 1MB charges a month up to 60+ the next and so the representative requested all of my examples. Two weeks go by and I start to get complaints from our users that they can't text even though they personally pay for text plans. I found out that all of my examples were given full data blocks by the CSR. I had to call and make them reverse all their unauthorized changes but we are still up about $120 each month due to these new charges. It pisses me off to no end and I requested to personally meet with our Verizon rep but that was denied by management and I was told to just let the $120/mo go.

Don't freak out, Slashdot (5, Funny)

fooslacker (961470) | more than 3 years ago | (#32632650)

Verizon has to figure out some way to convince Apple that is it evil enough to deserve the iPhone...I'm guessing it went down something like this.

"I mean come on those things are cool, we want to sell them too...we can treat customers just as poorly as AT&T...watch this!!!"
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