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China Restricts Minors From Using Virtual Currency

kdawson posted more than 3 years ago | from the only-physical-filthy-lucre dept.

Censorship 142

eldavojohn writes "For those under eighteen who play video games in China, life just got a little harder. Not only is gold farming illegal, but starting August 1, virtual currency platform makers are expected to put in safeties that prohibit underage players from using virtual currencies — because doing such a thing might promote 'unwholesome' behavior. The new regulations explicitly 'forbid content advocating pornography, cults, superstitions, gambling, and violence in all online games.' The business papers are picking it up as a number of stocks from companies like Tencent Holdings — which is heavily based in virtual currency in China — fell about 5%, though the company said that the ban on minors will not affect it."

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142 comments

slashdot is broken (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32656156)

your "more" button works like shit

Re:slashdot is broken (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32656322)

Slashdot is broken today... badly..

unwholesome behavior (1)

ravenspear (756059) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656178)

All the minors need to do to see that is to look at that state's example of systematically denying them access to information about how they are being oppressed.

Re:unwholesome behavior (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32656222)

Uh huh, yeah, sure. After all, the young rising up against the system works so well in western democracies where they have full access to information and the right to protest, so I'm sure it'll work just fine in an authoritarian state like China.

Re:unwholesome behavior (1)

HungryHobo (1314109) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656436)

All I know is that games of monopoly are going to be pretty in china.

Are barter systems still ok?

Re:unwholesome behavior (1, Interesting)

CarpetShark (865376) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657138)

information about how they are being oppressed.

And yet, if it was an american parent making those decisions for their children, we might applaud them as more responsible than the average parent who lets their kid get up to anything online, unmonitored.

Let's stop demonising one of the oldest, and traditionally if not currently most advanced civilisations in the world, OK? Yes, they make some poor decisions. Are they evil, or completely misguided compared to the western cultures where kids are running into schools and shooting their classmates before shooting themselves? Perhaps not.

Re:unwholesome behavior (3, Insightful)

masterzora (871343) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657314)

And yet, if it was an american parent making those decisions for their children, we might applaud them as more responsible than the average parent who lets their kid get up to anything online, unmonitored.

There is a stark difference between a parent setting such rules for their children and a state doing it on their behalf, and to suggest otherwise is disingenuous at best.

Re:unwholesome behavior (1)

Thinboy00 (1190815) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657542)

Well said sir!

Acting as a surrogate parent is never the state's business. Even if a child loses his/her real parents, the state's only responsibility is to find foster parents.

Re:unwholesome behavior (2, Insightful)

Lemmy Caution (8378) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657562)

The difference between the state and the family is not so clear-cut. The family was the "first" state, and to this day, it can be seen as a "delegee" of the state, fulfilling certain expectations - and losing its privileges to act as a family if they fail to do so. We have, in the West, grown accustomed to a number of stark distinctions - between family and state, between the political and the economic, between the civil and the religious/philosophical - that do not apply in other cultures, and do not really stand up to deep scrutiny in our own.

Re:unwholesome behavior (1)

CarpetShark (865376) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657684)

We have, in the West, grown accustomed to a number of stark distinctions - between family and state, between the political and the economic, between the civil and the religious/philosophical - that do not apply in other cultures, and do not really stand up to deep scrutiny in our own.

Exactly. I'm reminded of the Vietnamese finding "Uncle Ho" a much more likeable and believable pretender for the crown than the cold, Western-like South Vietnamese President Ngo Dinh Diem.

Re:unwholesome behavior (2, Insightful)

CarpetShark (865376) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657750)

There is a stark difference between a parent setting such rules for their children and a state doing it on their behalf

No, you just like to imagine there's a stark difference. There's a lot of gray area and general governmental complexity, but as other commenters have explained in other ways, the distinction isn't so clear at all. What it all boils down to is that government is an extension of family values; that government is essentially expected to create the kind of society that families want their kids to grow up in.

Re:unwholesome behavior (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32658900)

you really shouldn't try to differentiate Western and Chinese civilizations right now based on how many school shootings their have been, considering the crazy wave of machete assaults on school children in china over the last few months. They must be going for some sort of high score.

Re:unwholesome behavior (1)

CarpetShark (865376) | more than 3 years ago | (#32659026)

You raise a fair point, but I was specifically referring to schoolchildren killing classmates due to societal pressures, not to the varied attacks that have SOMEHOW been related to schools in countries with huge populations. A crime of passion between and adult schoolteacher and an adult lover that spills over to her students, for instance, isn't quite the same, in terms of judging the nurturing qualities of a society.

Re:unwholesome behavior (1)

mqduck (232646) | more than 3 years ago | (#32659016)

All the minors need to do to see that is to look at that state's example of systematically denying them access to information about how they are being oppressed.

All they need to do is look at that, and...? And then they'll get ice cream? Or, and then the underage nerds of China will rise up and lead a liberal revolution? Or, and then they'll make the point to their lawmakers that they feel that the censorship is worse than what it's censoring, causing those lawmakers to resign in shame?

Predicted outcome (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32656242)

So the underage will go work in factory sweatshops and the adults will become gold farmers. I'm sure that's the social outcome they were going for ... another success story of the Chinese gov't.

cults? (1)

gandhi_2 (1108023) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656256)

you mean like the communist party?

Re:cults? (3, Insightful)

mea37 (1201159) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656384)

Hmm... I can't find a single definition of "cult" that's more applicable to communism than to capitalism, but I suppose if you want to apply any and every label you perceive as negative to any and every belief you perceive as negative that's your prerogative.

Re:cults? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32656688)

Hmm... I can't find a single definition of "cult" that's more applicable to communism than to capitalism, but I suppose if you want to apply any and every label you perceive as negative to any and every belief you perceive as negative that's your prerogative.

Lay off gandhi 2... No wonder he's cranky... His blood sugar is probably low from all the fasting he's doing.

Re:cults? (1)

mog007 (677810) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656708)

Doesn't chairman Mao have a huge cult of personality? It seems that in most "Communist" countries, the leader seems to generate a cult of personality: North Korea under both Kims, the USSR under Stalin, Cuba under Castro.

Granted, you're exactly right that Communism itself is no more a cult than Capitalism.

Re:cults? (2, Insightful)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656752)

Except that capitalism allows for self-determination.....

Re:cults? (1)

mea37 (1201159) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656850)

I'm not going to get into a debate about whether self-determination is possible under communism.

Instead, I'm going to reiterate my original point: Where in the definition of cult do you see anything about self-determination?

Re:cults? (2, Informative)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657136)

From Wikipedia: The word cult pejoratively refers to a group whose beliefs or practices are reasonably considered strange. The word originally denoted a system of ritual practices. The narrower, derogatory sense of the word is a product of the 20th century, especially since the 1980s, and is considered subjective, and is a result of the anti-cult movement, which uses the word in reference to groups seen as authoritarian, exploitative and possibly dangerous.

Re:cults? (1)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657662)

Yup.

If you have a health problem, you are free to work or die.

If you don't come from a wealthy family who can support you in hard times, you are free to work or starve on the streets.

"Choice. The problem is choice." Neo

When the program later known as the Oracle aided the Matrix by adding to its programming the power of choice, human minds connected to the Matrix were not only able to accept the artificial reality as their only reality, but feel enabled to make decisions that affected palpable changes in their existence, even if the minds were only vaguely aware of their options. (Matrix Wiki)

Every system collapses on its own waste. Capitalism is a system that contains the seeds of Oligarchy and Facism. It's impossible to keep them from growing over time and eventually, as with the matrix, there must be a revolution to reboot the system. To remove the 99.999% of wealth from the .1% of the population who are letting everyone else starve. Because anyone who gains an edge, can build on that edge until they have a complete lock on their position, including passing it to their children, eventually a tiny group of society comes to have most of the wealth and power.

Communism starts out as a nice dream of fairness and eventually turns into a dictatorship. Because no one in the center is smart enough to determine the needs of the many, it is increasingly inefficient.

There is a LOT of propoganda around capitalism in america. the basic idea of capitalism is sound (if hot dogs are $3.25 here and $6.25 two blocks away- somehow those prices are going to arbitrage. Either people will start going to the $3.25 hot dog place or people will start carrying the $3.25 hot dogs to the $6.25 place).

But then, in our system, the $6.25 hot dog place has laws passed which prevent the $3.25 hot dogs from being sold or carried to the $6.25 place. Then that extra money is used to further prevent the $3.25 hot dogs from being sold within 20 blocks of the $6.25 hot dog's "exclusive" territory. And so on.

And for the same reason, no other Matrix movies will be made. Only the creators could make other Matrix movies, and fortunately they realized they couldn't do a decent job and just stopped at #1.

Re:cults? (1)

Captain Splendid (673276) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657742)

Communism starts out as a nice dream of fairness and eventually turns into a dictatorship.

Nope. Read anything on, or by, Lenin or Mao (just pulling two examples out of thin air), and you'll quickly discover that the countries they conquered started off as dictatorships under a veneer of communism.

Not saying communism can't eventually become a dictatorship, but seeing as we don't have any actual examples of such, claiming that as fact is dead wrong.

Re:cults? (1, Insightful)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 3 years ago | (#32658014)

If you have a health problem, you are free to work or die.

Liberty isn't freedom from want, it's the freedom to make your own choices in life. I would rather live in a system where I can go broke paying my medical bills than one that compels me to purchase insurance from for-profit enterprises or to receive all of my care from Doctors working under contract with the Government. Collectivism can't exist without trampling on individual liberty and I do not regard that as a fair trade.

But then, in our system, the $6.25 hot dog place has laws passed which prevent the $3.25 hot dogs from being sold or carried to the $6.25 place. Then that extra money is used to further prevent the $3.25 hot dogs from being sold within 20 blocks of the $6.25 hot dog's "exclusive" territory. And so on.

What you've described is not capitalism, it's corporatism. It's responsible for a large number of broken markets in our country, including the market for internet access. The mono/duopoly situation that exists there is written into law in the form of "franchise" agreements that grant one or two companies the exclusive right to use something (the utility easement) that's theoretically owned by the entire community.

Re:cults? (1)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | more than 3 years ago | (#32658528)

Capitalism- like libertarianism- never exists for long in it's true form.
Capitalism always corrupts to oligarchy, corporatism, and fascism.

Re:cults? (1)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656870)

There is a difference between the theoretical economic system and the cabal of sycophants demanding absolute authority and unquestioning belief, reinforced by indoctrination from birth and violence in the face of confrontation. I'm not saying that capitalism doesn't itself have such a cabal (it does, but it doesn't wield quite the same degree of absolute power and authority as the CCCP), just that you are not really discussing the same thing as the grandparent.

Re:cults? (1)

Man On Pink Corner (1089867) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656904)

Hmm... I can't find a single definition of "cult" that's more applicable to communism than to capitalism

Hint: which -ism requires you to shoot your own people to keep them from practicing it?

Re:cults? (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657646)

Neither have a very good track record on that.

Re:cults? (1)

Man On Pink Corner (1089867) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657862)

Really? Thirty million killed by Stalin alone is matched by Western capitalist democracies, how?

Re:cults? (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657992)

So anything less than 30M is a good track record? Capitalism has spun off plenty of wars, killing at least thousands. That's pretty bad in my POV.

Re:cults? (2, Insightful)

Man On Pink Corner (1089867) | more than 3 years ago | (#32658048)

Capitalism has spun off plenty of wars, killing at least thousands.

Sure, certain capitalist-leaning countries have committed international atrocities, and no one is trying to justify those actions.

The point is, the capitalist countries are the ones that don't shoot their own citizens for trying to leave.

Re:cults? (3, Interesting)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 3 years ago | (#32658390)

You do know that China is now extremely capitalist, right? Since Mao's demise and Xiaoping's rise to power, the shift towards capitalist economic tendencies was abrupt. This is the guy who said "We mustn't fear to adopt the advanced management methods applied in capitalist countries". China is the country that is planning on reforming the VAT and cutting billions from (privately owned) corporate taxes.

Capitalism != democracy.

Re:cults? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32658066)

Since you can't tell the difference, you are a muddleheaded nincompoop.

Re:cults? (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657846)

Real world capitalism isn't very cult-like but the Libertarian extreme of "the free market will fix everything" probably qualifies. Real world communism on the other hand is fairly cult-like.

It's for your own good. (1)

Dutchmaan (442553) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656260)

Yeah... you go ahead and do that China. Tighten those screws, add another barrier to people enjoying themselves. Mark my words, you're only sowing the seeds of a revolution your trying to avoid.

Re:It's for your own good. (1)

decipher_saint (72686) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656296)

No kidding, talk about turning up the heat on the pressure cooker.

Is this what thousands of Chinese died for?

Re:It's for your own good. (1)

angelwolf71885 (1181671) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656408)

well with Chinese MMO company's like TQ Digital and Net Dragon Web Soft; screwing its customers it free to play pay to win i say its about damn time China stopped these company's!

Re:It's for your own good. (1)

VendettaMF (629699) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656782)

That's just how things work here.

Most players here are perfectly happy to defeat their opponent by handing over credit card details instead of grinding/learning to play. So why shouldn't the companies make a profit from it?

Re:It's for your own good. (1)

angelwolf71885 (1181671) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656890)

if it was worthless things that didn't affect the players but looked cool i wouldn't care; but when you can buy power and wipe out the hard working players that just not right! as well as company's like that attack free servers because it takes away there profits! screwing the customer ISN'T capitalism repeat business and referral IS capitalism!

Re:It's for your own good. (1)

VendettaMF (629699) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656958)

All companies that want to stay in business tend to work hard to remove illegal copies of their servers. That's basic business. I know here (China, not \.) folks try to get away with euphemisms like "open server" and "server emulator", but when you duplicate the functionality of the IP of a company by copying their source code (generally leaked by employees) and try to make out that "writing your own server" function by function with their code in the next window over, well, that doesn't really add up.

If they have created or legally licensed the game then how they charge for it is up to them, and more power to them in shutting down and pursuing legal action against the assholes who copy their stuff illegally.

Re:It's for your own good. (1)

angelwolf71885 (1181671) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657124)

breaking encryption to ADD functionality or improvements IS exempt from the DMCA making the server free IS adding functionality as well as increasing drops and evening out the classes ( piss poor TQ Digital encryption at that ) there were servers before the binary leaks it was written in C+ and started with an L ive forgotten its name i support anything that screws of TQ and all other china games

Re:It's for your own good. (1)

Thinboy00 (1190815) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657612)

This is in China. The DMCA is irrelevant. Parent is talking about morals, not laws. And ACTA hasn't passed yet so it doesn't apply.

Re:It's for your own good. (1)

ljgshkg (1223086) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657564)

I guess it's because for most families, money is really not so easy to earn. And prices of everything is rising in cities. And job market is not very good also. Most of these parents save up every bit of their money trying to support their child's education in the future.

  Now, most of these kids who pay for these games probably get their money from parents, and the problem of "addition" to internet and internet games games are pretty serious. This can potentially harm their family's financial and their future education situation.

So personally, I think they do have enough reason behind that.

You got to know, finance situation of most companies in mainland China are much worse than in western countries. It's "just enough" for living and is very hard to support higher education already. It's sometimes hard to control the kids on parent's side. Then law like that can just stop a lot of problems caused by this.

If they can't tax it then ban it! (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656292)

If they can't tax it then ban it!

But They DO Tax It, Or At Least Try To ... (2, Informative)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656336)

If they can't tax it then ban it!

After it challenged the Yuan [slashdot.org] , they did implement a tax [slashdot.org] . Although, who knows, if the tax collector comes knocking maybe he won't find anything wrong if the right amount of paper is left in his hand after you shake it?

Kenfukky Tied Chicken! (1)

NyteGeek (1085779) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656308)

Help! I'm being chased by a virtual Kenfukky Tied Chicken! I need gold to buy uber armor!

Awesome! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32656374)

Way to go china!

I always expected the games to finally do something about the damm gold farmers. But no... they won't dare do anything that might annoy paying customers.

Now to just get rid of the korean farmers and mmo games will get even better!

There goes WoW (1)

butterflysrage (1066514) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656376)

Twilight's Hammer is a cult (and a major player in the next expantion)

Re:There goes WoW (1)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656530)

Right, because it didn't have any violence at all.

Anyhow, the restrictions only apply to minors. Adults can still get all the violence and cults they crave.

Re:There goes WoW (1)

rainmouse (1784278) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656584)

I don't think killing cultists counts as advocating cults.

Gold selling is actually illegal in most countries including the UK (not sure about the USA) but is largely unenforced.

I'm not sure what all the fuss is about. Why all the nerdrage about China wanting to restrict childrens access to material that promotes pornography, cults or gambling etc? As for the online currency regulations, I also don't see a problem in games that use target kids and then use addiction in order to lure them into using their parents credit cards to buy in game money. Perhaps if a lot of Chinese were voicing their concerns I might think otherwise, but I'm assuming its mostly westerners getting riled up on other peoples behalf with limited information.

What minors? (1)

iPhr0stByt3 (1278060) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656430)

There is a foolproof method that video games use to prove that the end-user is at least 18 and according to this infallible system's statistics it seems there are VERY little minors. But I will say it's odd that there are so many players whose birthday is 1992-01-01 0.o

Virtual Currency vs 'play money'? (1)

HockeyPuck (141947) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656446)

What's the difference between virtual currency in the WoW sense and the pieces of paper you get with the game monopoly?

Re:Virtual Currency vs 'play money'? (2, Informative)

cf18 (943501) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656496)

You can trade WoW golds to real $.

Re:Virtual Currency vs 'play money'? (1)

nephilimsd (936642) | more than 3 years ago | (#32658848)

Play with a competitive enough group, and you can charge real money for monopoly money, too.

Maybe this is a bit selfish but... (1)

Rinnon (1474161) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656506)

I wonder how this is going to affect Gold Farming in WoW. It's a relatively known fact that the majority of Gold Farmers are in China. While this can't be proven, it's the theory I subscribe too. I also subscribe to the theory that the majority of that majority are minors, who are being paid, probably very little, to farm gold. I wonder if this ban is going to have a positive affect on the problem of gold farming? It's probably too hopeful to think so, I'm sure they'd just find ways around this law. But it's worth thinking about.

Re:Maybe this is a bit selfish but... (1)

VendettaMF (629699) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656624)

Given that gold farming and child labor are already illegal here, it probably won't affect much at all. This is just another "company shakedown law", implemented because simple tax increases are too inflexible and put too many paper trails on the money.

As always when any topic of China is raised on /. (5, Insightful)

VendettaMF (629699) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656526)

The point is completely missed.

This law is not being created to control "the people". It is not being made to be enforced.

This law, as with well over half of Chinese law, has only one purpose. To ensure that no one may exist in a fully legal state within the borders of China. Seriously. You can't. It is not actually possible to complete all the legal requirements to exist as a citizen, a foreigner or a company in China without committing crimes in other areas of the countries laws. The classic example being that if you try to migrate legally from rural to urban China as a Chinese citizen it will be noted that you either illegally entered a city to visit the offices of the PSB (police dept responsible for all "person location" aspects of control) to fill in the necessary forms, or that you obtained forms illegally removed from PSB offices.

(The equivalent for foreigners is the medical exam. You may not enter China without a full medical exam. Only medical exams performed in Chinese hospitals are legally accepted.
(Entry with medical reports from foreign (or S.A.R.) hospitals are routinely accepted, but right there they have all the grounds they need to deport you should you ever try to (for example) take someone rich enough to own a car to court for hitting you with said car.)

But why?
Well, that's got two parts to it.

The first is the same as many western states with laws prohibiting things such as "wasting police time", "loitering" and "resisting arrest". Purely so they have something to charge you with if they decide they don't like the look of your face.

The second, closely related, is so that those in power have something to hold over people who they feel are being less than sufficiently forthcoming with the bribes.

Re:As always when any topic of China is raised on (1)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656622)

In California, you cannot be arrested for resisting arrest -- there has to be some other crime for which you are being arrested before they can charge you with resisting. However, if you object to anything the police do, you are generally charged with "disturbing the peace" or "obstructing a police officer".

Re:As always when any topic of China is raised on (3, Insightful)

VendettaMF (629699) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656674)

And I'm going to take a wild guess that when an officer says "He disturbed the peace", and the bloke who happened to laugh too loudly when the police officer got shat on by a pigeon denies it, the "punk with a badge"'s word is held as truth by default?

Re:As always when any topic of China is raised on (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656636)

This law, as with well over half of Chinese law, has only one purpose. To ensure that no one may exist in a fully legal state within the borders of China.

How is that any different from any other country?

Re:As always when any topic of China is raised on (1)

VendettaMF (629699) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656704)

There are a few countries out there (small ones with governments designed to be ineffective) where it is possible to exist (for brief periods of time) in a legally guilt-free state.
Not many, and not often, true.

As opposed to here where a single glance at a persons face tells those in the know which set of pre-stamped arrest forms to use to tie you legally in knots while they decide whether to extract cash from you or disappear you.

More info needed (1)

BenEnglishAtHome (449670) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656828)

There are a few countries out there (small ones with governments designed to be ineffective) where it is possible to exist (for brief periods of time) in a legally guilt-free state.

Cite, please.

I'm serious; I'm retiring soon and I'd put such countries on my list of residence options.

Re:More info needed (1)

VendettaMF (629699) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656994)

Try Ireland. It's neither easy nor automatic, but it is possible both to live in a legally innocent state, and/or through careful restitution restore yourself to such a state if you screw up.

Re:As always when any topic of China is raised on (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657414)

I'm not sure about the medical, but when you visit China (Shanghai at least), you must register with the police or a hotel within 24 hours. Every hotel I've been to so far has scanned my passport into their system.

Re:As always when any topic of China is raised on (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32657732)

Must be a Shanghai only thing. I have been to a handful of cities in China. I never had to show a passport anywhere.

Re:As always when any topic of China is raised on (1)

hackingbear (988354) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657738)

(The equivalent for foreigners is the medical exam. You may not enter China without a full medical exam. Only medical exams performed in Chinese hospitals are legally accepted. (Entry with medical reports from foreign (or S.A.R.) hospitals are routinely accepted, but right there they have all the grounds they need to deport you should you ever try to (for example) take someone rich enough to own a car to court for hitting you with said car.)

What are you talking about? In the rather distance past, outside people should get the city permit in their local police office for visit; that rule was scrapped quite long ago as I remember. Outside people still need to get resident permit, but there is no restriction in entering the cities. (For the 'special economic zones," one can apply for the entry permit at the checkpoint.)

Foreigners need medical exam only if they stay in China for employment. Therefore you can enter China with medical exams, like thousands of tourists every day do, and only do the medical within China when you apply for the working permit. I got one before.

So there are not many intrinsic contradictions in the rules. However, partially because of there are many inconvenient rules and partially because the governments are not creditworthy and having little actual controls, people tend to ignore rules whenever they find any need to. That's why in China one doesn't have a lot of freedom legally speaking but not many seem to be bothered because they don't care about everyday laws since the 1980s.

Re:As always when any topic of China is raised on (1)

hackingbear (988354) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657756)

Therefore you can enter China with medical exams, like ...

Oh... typo. I meant "Therefore you can enter China without medical exams, like ...".

Thankfully (1)

obarthelemy (160321) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656548)

Capitalism wants the opposite of communism.

oh, wait...

Re:Thankfully (2, Insightful)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656644)

Communism is a system of man's exploitation by man, whereas in Capitalism, it is the other way around!

Re:Thankfully (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32657528)

So then capitalism is a system of women's exploitation by women?

Holy hell video games banned (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32656638)

The new regulations explicitly 'forbid content advocating violence in all online games.'

So any game where you have to kill mobs is banned, wow!

New restrictions (1)

Drakkenmensch (1255800) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656666)

The new regulations explicitly 'forbid content advocating pornography, cults, superstitions, gambling, and violence in all online games.'

So what's left to play with?

Minors (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32656668)

Don't some online games already try to restrict gold mining?

Or are we talking about people who work in real world mines. I don't know if china has a lot of gold mines, but they sure have a lot of coal mines.

Hmm ... (1)

Korbeau (913903) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656682)

I also think that it is a good thing to prevent minors to do online transactions, particularly of "virtual currency" stuff, without some kind of monitoring or parental consent etc. This sounds perfectly reasonable.

And to put the "unwholesome" comment into context which seems to annoy everyone, imagine a US politician saying vague words like "it is morally irresponsible to do X" or "it is to protect the rights our fathers gave us" etc. I mean, it's a speech.

So China makes what seem a sensible law ... can someone explain to me why it is that bad?

What games are left ? (1)

RichMan (8097) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656690)

"The new regulations explicitly 'forbid content advocating pornography, cults, superstitions, gambling, and violence in all online games.' "

No guns, swords, knives, portals .....
No minesweeper.
No Solitaire (you can gamble on that in some casino's)
No bubble popping.
No reversi (Go is basic strategic battle simulation)
No chess
No Mahjongg

Re:What games are left ? (1)

izomiac (815208) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657078)

Basically non-contact sports games (assuming they don't reference "Taiwan"). In other words, stuff that you have no reason to do virtually rather than physically. One of the main advantages of games is to the ability do things you can't or shouldn't in real life.

Re:What games are left ? (1)

DaveV1.0 (203135) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657248)

Minesweeper does not advocate violence, quite the opposite in fact. You are attempting mark destructive devices.
While one can gamble on solitaire, one can not do so in the game, so it does not advocate gambling. The same goes for Mahjongg.
Bubble popping is not violent.
Reversi and chess teach strategy, not violence or war.

One does not have to do something even if one is able to do said thing.
Slippery slope is a fallacy. Just because one takes one step, it does not follow that one will take any or all of the steps necessary to bring one down the slope. One can say "Here and no farther!"

Re:What games are left ? (1)

mattholimeau (1027730) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657686)

I dunno about your solitaire argument - even though people do gamble on it, the cards aren't saying "bet with me, bet with me" when you look at them. (While they could - and that might be a neat concept for an online casino game or something, this is aside from the point.) Card games don't afford gambling simply because they are gambled on. But as to all your other points, yeah - no minesweeper, no chess, no bubble popping, no reversi... chess and go *do* (intrinsically) say "we're fighting a war" when you look at them. I agree this just won't be enforced, adding to the air of hypocrisy that is commonly held as the image of the chinese government.

I'm going to register as a minor... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#32656710)

If this happens, I will register as a minor that way I won't have to put up with all of that gold mining crap. Maybe virtual currency should be banned all together.

China has moved past farming (1)

quarmar (125648) | more than 3 years ago | (#32656894)

I liked the part of Tencent saying that this won't affect their business. The Chinese gold sellers don't farm for gold anymore, they are simply hacking into accounts, selling off the characters' possessions and taking the gold.

Superstition? (1)

DaveV1.0 (203135) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657154)

This from a country that forbids the depiction of skeletons?

just like porn (2, Insightful)

icegreentea (974342) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657762)

Not like no country is the free world is evil enough to ban porn for children right? Right?

Get a grip guys. China may do some horrible/stupid things. But this is overblowing things. We have laws preventing commercial entities from selling certain products/services to people underage in north america (and most of the industrial world). We have laws making underage possession of said entities illegal for fuck's sake, and we've all gone out and made arguments based on children's lack of education/inability to take responsibility of themselves, and then went and ahead and accepted the unfortunate coarseness of age based laws.

So don't go out and bash the fuck out of China for this. Yes, they are controlling the Chinese children's freedom. Just like how I wasn't able to buy my own booze when I was 16. There are better things to criticize China for.

Re:just like porn (1, Interesting)

selven (1556643) | more than 3 years ago | (#32657960)

So don't go out and bash the fuck out of China for this. Yes, they are controlling the Chinese children's freedom. Just like how I wasn't able to buy my own booze when I was 16. There are better things to criticize China for.

Being prevalent does not make injustice less unjust. France survives just fine with its lax alcohol policies, so allowing people to buy booze at age 16 is clearly practical. We've decided that we'd rather lose freedom than require parents to actually do their jobs, and so has China, but that doesn't make it right.

virtual currency (1)

slick7 (1703596) | more than 3 years ago | (#32658318)

The Chinese should come to America, we've been running on virtual currency since the government went off the gold standard.
How else could the private corporate banksters bankrupt a nation? Look at the world and prove this wrong.
Announce NESARA, it's time to put these bastards away.http://www.nesara.us/pages/home.html [nesara.us]
It's time for the government to print the currency, interest free, backed by precious metals. Then and only then will inflation become manageable, if not reversed.
Here's something worth watching.. http://truinternational2.blogspot.com/2009/06/part-1-part-2-legacy-of-freedom-that.html [blogspot.com]
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