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Intel Says Farewell To PCI Bus

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the ok-fine-I-get-it-my-computer-is-old dept.

Intel 415

KingofGnG writes with this snippet from Sir Arthur's Den, which will make my desktop computer sad: "Soon another technology that in past years dominated the always changing universe of computer hardware will bite the dust. That's the decision by Intel, the merciless executioner of standards that the company itself imposes on the market. In upcoming months it will end official support for the PCI bus. Developed by the chipmaker in 1993, the PCI Local Bus standard was implemented on all motherboards for x86 and compatible platforms until 2004, the year it passed the baton to the younger and faster PCI Express technology."

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Now What? (5, Funny)

stewbacca (1033764) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668184)

Now what am I supposed to do with my Voodoo II video card?

Re:Now What? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32668208)

Sell it to Amiga user.

Re:Now What? (1)

PerfectionLost (1004287) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668678)

+1 Hilarious

You already have better (4, Insightful)

tepples (727027) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668218)

Any Intel motherboard you buy will have a chipset with Intel GMA graphics on it. Virtually every GMA in current production, from the GMA 950 in netbooks to the four-digit GMAs on desktop and larger laptop PCs, is at least as powerful as a Voodoo3.

Re:You already have better (1)

Zarhan (415465) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668242)

Yes, but Glide => OpenGL (or DirectX) wrappers still don't have exactly full functionality (for playing e.g. I-War).

Re:You already have better (1)

BitZtream (692029) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668352)

You do realize that Glide was a subset of OpenGL ... right?

Re:You already have better (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32668440)

You do realize you're full of shit, right?

Re:You already have better (2, Informative)

91degrees (207121) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668512)

It's not. It's a different API that has a subset of the functionality of OpenGL, and some superficial similarities.

Re:You already have better (4, Informative)

FreonTrip (694097) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668798)

Glide was a low-level rasterization library hooked deeply into 3dfx's hardware design that followed a limited subset of OpenGL calls and conventions. Applications written for Glide wouldn't run on any hardware but 3dfx's unless some level of emulation was added, a process which 3dfx vigorously campaigned against until they went belly-up. Nvidia turned a blind eye to it after buying up most of their IP, and thus there are several, variably functional emulators available today.

Re:You already have better (2, Funny)

boneclinkz (1284458) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668256)

Voodoo3 was the one that was 27 inches long and required an external AC power source, right?

Re:You already have better (3, Interesting)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668446)

You are thinking of the (never released) Voodoo 5 6000 [wikipedia.org] .

The Voodoo 3 actually fell into a quite modest size and power envelope.

Re:You already have better (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32668674)

(Incidentally, while it was a risible failure that didn't even make it out the door of a dying company, the Voodoo 5 6000 was in many respects ahead of its time. The notion of multiple identical GPUs designed to achieve some semblance of linear scaling when working together, along with ridiculous power requirements that grossly exceed those of the bus and require additional connectors, should be wholly familiar to any contemporary SLI or Crossfire user...)

Re:You already have better (4, Insightful)

FreonTrip (694097) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668826)

Yep. A terrific example of the student becoming the teacher, and all of them riding the short bus together.

Re:You already have better (1)

badran (973386) | more than 4 years ago | (#32669072)

They designed SLI:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scan-Line_Interleave [wikipedia.org]

Re:You already have better (2, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#32669284)

True, but Scan-line Interleave and Scalable Link Interface share not much more than an acronym and a marketing strategy...

Re:You already have better (3, Informative)

Guspaz (556486) | more than 4 years ago | (#32669256)

The Voodoo 5 5500, which also featured multiple identical GPUs, did make it to market. It had two, the 6000 had four.

While the 6000 didn't make it to market, there are examples of them in the wild. I remember a few years back, it was reported that somebody had gotten hold of one and sold it on eBay, and the buyer posted benchmarks so that people could see what might have been.

Re:You already have better (3, Funny)

PerfectionLost (1004287) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668692)

I thought he was talking about a vibrator.

Re:You already have better (1)

alta (1263) | more than 4 years ago | (#32669104)

I had someone give me a voodoo5 5500. a huge dual processor video card. It was neat, but quickly became outdated...

Now I'm pretty sure my 1st gen Iphone can out compute it.

Re:You already have better (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32668468)

Nope, that was the Voodoo 5 6000.

RIP Voodoo :-(

Re:You already have better (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32668414)

miss the joke?

doodoo 3 vs graphics-my-@$$ (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32669046)

or maybe the joke missed you? (hint: GMA 950 and voodoo 3 have one thing in common, namely no hardware T&L)

Re:Now What? (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668238)

The same thing you can do with it now...nothing~

It is voodoo after all... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32668240)

Now what am I supposed to do with my Voodoo II video card?

Put a hex on intel?

Re:Now What? (1)

Skatox (1109939) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668282)

Sorry bro, you'll need to migrate to AGP XD

Re:Now What? (5, Interesting)

toastar (573882) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668340)

Now what am I supposed to do with my Voodoo II video card?

A Better Question is how am I going to hook up my legacy scsi array?

Re:Now What? (1)

DMiax (915735) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668372)

if you have that old hardware you surely are not upgrading cpu or motherboard, are you? if you are you can get a cheap card that is much better than your old one or just an integrated card.

PCI controller card (2)

teko_teko (653164) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668438)

Time to get a PCIe PCI controller card.

Re:Now What? (5, Insightful)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668462)

Screw that, what about my $2800.00 Sensor input card for this pile of thermocouples and Ph probes in the lab? I guess it's time to go out and buy some PC gear with PCI to make sure the lab can have parts for repairs until the idiots in management give us money to buy new test gear.

That's the real rub. Those of us doing REAL work with computers are getting screwed. Most new scientific and high end test equipment still use PCI and RS232.

Re:Now What? (5, Informative)

ngg (193578) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668888)

Google for "PCI PCI-e expansion box" (no quotes). One of the first few hits should be for a box that turns a 1x PCI-e slot into 4 33MHz/32bit PCI slots. We recently considered buying one for our PCI National Instruments boards because there are fewer cheap, commodity motherboards with lots of PCI slots.

Re:Now What? (5, Informative)

greed (112493) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668940)

Since many current systems implement PCI via a PCIe to PCI bridge chip, there is no reason a riser or backplane card cannot be made to connect to the PCIe bus.

In fact, a quick search for such a beast hit a Google Ad that offered a variety of combinations, starting with one that will connect a low-profile PCI card to a PCIe slot for EUR49.

And system vendors can do the same thing to keep offering PCI slots on the motherboard itself.

Re:Now What? (2, Insightful)

kdkirmse (801423) | more than 4 years ago | (#32669038)

Embedded and industrial machines typically have the old interfaces linger much longer then consumer boards. I have finally given up on an ISA instrument board I had used since the 90s. It is still possible to find hardware with ISA slots just not very powerful. PCI will certainly follow the same path.

Re:Now What? (4, Insightful)

fearlezz (594718) | more than 4 years ago | (#32669200)

I'm not surprised at all. Just a few months ago I did a job fixing a computer that controls some part of a multi-million dollar ship. The software requires a specific card, that specific card is only available with an ISA interface.

Since PCI still has enough bandwidth to manage 100% of the consumer sound cards, >90% of the consumer network cards and 75% of all other non-video cards, I think it's way too soon.

Re:Now What? (1)

stewbacca (1033764) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668466)

You've all ruined my first first post ever by taking my joke literally. Thanks, you insensitive clods (also the first time I've used that meme).

Re:Now What? (1)

morty_vikka (1112597) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668652)

Nice try, grasshopper, but the correct response to all those with no sense of humour is.. "whoosh"!

Re:Now What? (1)

Matrix14 (135171) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668536)

Damn, I have one of those somewhere!

Re:Now What? (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668660)

Simulate it in Python and run it in a VM.

It'll be faster, most likely.

Not so painful (4, Interesting)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668222)

Back when they started dropping ISA support, I had to hunt a bit for a board with ISA support. Things like sound cards, modems, COM / LPT port cards, and so on all came on ISA cards. The couple of desktops that I've used only had one PCI card between them - a network card because there weren't drivers for the on-board one. It's much less common to have a collection of PCI cards than it was to have a collection of ISA (or EISA / VLB) cards to move to a new machine. Graphics cards are about the only thing that you regularly find as expansion cards, and these are typically upgraded at least as frequently as the motherboard anyway.

PCI is now more of a way of connecting the chips on the motherboard than a way of connecting daughter boards, and as such it's far less traumatic when it is replaced by something newer. Aside from driver developers, few people care what interconnect is used between two chips on a motherboard.

Re:Not so painful (1)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668270)

VLB was awful! The form factor was simply too large. Many of today's desktops wouldn't even be able to fit even one of those monstrosities inside.

Thankfully, not that many cards used it, aside from graphics cards which were easily replaceable and quickly obsolete.

Re:Not so painful (1)

mikael_j (106439) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668406)

The worst part about VLB was that the cards had a nasty tendency to get dislodged just a little forcing you to open up the case and reseat the card. Not that opening up the case was all that unusual back in those days, messing around with the hardware inside your computer was a lot more common back then, even for regular users...

Re:Not so painful (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32668608)

Eh, have you looked at a current high-end radeon or geforce card? A radeon 5870 is a massive chunk of hardware. :)

And to think, if we just bought 68K machines (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668224)

We'd still have Nubus

Re:And to think, if we just bought 68K machines (4, Interesting)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668272)

Number of buses that have been killed off during the years is considerable:

  • 4680
  • VME
  • ISA
  • NuBus
  • Unibus
  • Micro Channel
  • EISA

And those are only the ones I can come up with out of my head.

Re:And to think, if we just bought 68K machines (1)

Jeremi (14640) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668486)

And those are only the ones I can come up with out of my head.

Don't forget Zorro I, Zorro II, and Zorro III -- all dead as a doornail now. :^)

Re:And to think, if we just bought 68K machines (3, Funny)

Bobfrankly1 (1043848) | more than 4 years ago | (#32669012)

Number of buses that have been killed off during the years is considerable:

And yet, the short bus isn't killed off, and it continues to grow it's user base.

Re:And to think, if we just bought 68K machines (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668286)

as well as a 30Mbs max, and need twice the power.

ISA and PCI (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32668258)

I for one will miss PCI about as much as I miss ISA. Not at all.

Let's not be too sentimental now, this tech served us well, but its just that: tech.

Some of us still have PCI cards (2)

NJRoadfan (1254248) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668260)

I wasn't too happy that Intel axed the parallel port, but I could get cards/USB adapters for that. Now they axe PCI? I still have a Soundblaster X-Fi, its likely the last PCI card I'll ever buy.

This will lead to headaches for embedded and industrial system users, most of them are now just moving from ISA to PCI based solutions. There were a few P4 motherboards with ISA slots for that market even.

Re:Some of us still have PCI cards (5, Informative)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668402)

You can buy expansion cards that run a PCI bridge off the PCIe bus. The chips cost about $5 in bulk, $50 retail for the cards, and make more sense than including the PCIe to PCI bridge chip on all motherboards, when most people don't need them. If there's a large enough market for industrial PCs that have PCI slots then no doubt some board maker will produce a motherboard with the chip built in. All this announcement means is that there won't be PCI support in Intel's southbridge chips.

Re:Some of us still have PCI cards (1)

NJRoadfan (1254248) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668478)

Is there any native PCIe firewire chipset? Quite a few motherboards are still hanging it off of the PCI bus. I guess that standard will be dead soon enough. While Apple is mostly to blame due to royalty payments, Intel not bothering to adopt it on any of their chipsets certainly didn't help.

Re:Some of us still have PCI cards (4, Informative)

MikeBabcock (65886) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668560)

You mean like Belkin's? Or my fav, this one [firewiredirect.com] (1394b with FW800 support)? Yes.

Re:Some of us still have PCI cards (2, Interesting)

dgatwood (11270) | more than 4 years ago | (#32669226)

Depends on how you define native. The TI XIO2213 is "native" if your definition of native is a chip that connects directly to a PCIe bus. If you are more pedantic about it, the XIO2213 is really just a PCI FireWire chip with a PCIe-to-PCI bridge part combined into a single package, and thus decidedly non-native. It's a fuzzy grey area. Either way, though, it gets the job done.

Re:Some of us still have PCI cards (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32668434)

Likewise. I looking at building a system and wanted some decent sound quality without spending big bucks. The best options available were PCI soundcards which were reasonably priced. Everything else would have cost almost as much as the rest of the system put together. Part of that does have a bit to do with the soundcard market itself but still.

Re:Some of us still have PCI cards (1)

Bacon Bits (926911) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668436)

National Instruments began gravitating towards PCI-E in 2006 because of the much greater bandwidth allowed. I'd imagine by now that most of the PLCs and PXI computers my former employer uses for new stands are all PCI-E. There is no problem because the industry has already acknowledged that PCI-E is better than PCI.

That's a shame. (1)

Petersko (564140) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668284)

I realize it's time to move on, but I'm still happily running several prosumer audio cards that will probably see their end with my next hardware cycle.

Gina, Layla, Darla... farewell.

ok... (5, Insightful)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668290)

Can we get rid of PS/2, VGA, parallel, and serial ports now, too? Hell, let's axe DVI in favor if HDMI while we're at it!

Oh, and can someone tell the shitty mobo makers to stop requiring MS DOS floppy disks to flash their BIOSs?

Re:ok... (4, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668344)

No, some of us do real work we need to be able to interface with serial stuff. You should make like the rest of the kids and get a mac.

Re:ok... (2, Insightful)

vijayiyer (728590) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668396)

And some of us use Macs to do real work which interfaces with serial stuff. That doesn't mean we need a huge D-sub connector in our laptops.

Re:ok... (4, Insightful)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668584)

Some people do "real work" with 10BASE2 networks. It's would still be stupid to put 10BASE2 adapters on every motherboard.

Re:ok... (2, Funny)

GuruBuckaroo (833982) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668718)

I'll stick with my Thicknet [wikipedia.org] , thank you very much. Transceivers and vampire taps FTW!

Re:ok... (2, Funny)

yuhong (1378501) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668978)

Yea, there is a reason why AUI and AAUI was created.

Re:ok... (1)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668538)

USB and bluetooth serial ports are available for freaks like you who need to do anachronistic "work."

Re:ok... (3, Informative)

RJHelms (1554807) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668750)

I don't know about bluetooth, but for lots of applications USB serial ports won't work because USB operates at 5V and serial is supposed to be 12V.

Some devices handle the far-below-spec voltage gracefully, but results are unpredictable at best. But that's ok, I've got my trusty PCI serial card... oh.

Re:ok... (1)

jweller (926629) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668766)

USB and Bluetooth to serial converters are at best, a hack. Windows up through XP also does not handle them in a way that anyone familiar with could consider graceful. They may have fixed it in Vista or 7, so I will refrain from judgment there. Linux support for them is spotty, although some do work fairly well.

Re:ok... (2)

badran (973386) | more than 4 years ago | (#32669302)

Also timing does not work all that well with USB/BT serial ports.

Serial ports are a simple and easy way to move data to an embedded system and they can run of very low power systems (unlike USB).

Re:ok... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32668710)

And many more of us do real work that requires plentiful horsepower for limited money, but no serial or parallel ports. Get over yourself and realize that you're in a niche that would be more sensibly served by optional separate controllers.

Re:ok... (1)

Coren22 (1625475) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668360)

My last three mobos had Windows flash utilities, flash the bios then reboot...

Re:ok... (1)

omnichad (1198475) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668658)

Requiring Windows is no less dumb. My current mobo lets me flash straight from a usb flash drive from a BIOS interface.

Re:ok... (2, Interesting)

ronocdh (906309) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668416)

Oh, and can someone tell the shitty mobo makers to stop requiring MS DOS floppy disks to flash their BIOSs?

Yes, definitely. But most motherboards these days, even old ones, tend to support booting to USB devices. That means you can often flash from a USB drive as long as you configure it right. (I keep a specially formatted stick in my bag for just such cases, so I can just toss on the right drivers and plug it in.) But really, the problem is with BIOS. Let's just transition to EFI already, can't we?

And because I'm sure someone's going to reply and chastise me, I'll ask upfront: what are some EFI-like projects, i.e. BIOS replacements, that are free and open?

Re:ok... (3, Informative)

ifrag (984323) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668700)

But most motherboards these days, even old ones, tend to support booting to USB devices. That means you can often flash from a USB drive as long as you configure it right.

Screw configuration and USB booting even (at least for this purpose). The good motherboards these days (such as Asus R2E and others) have the tool ready to launch from bios which can lift the bin file directly from the USB disk. Much easier than going through the steps to make a bootable USB.

Re:ok... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32669024)

Some motherboards from asus have what they call dual bios where you run the mb utility, it downloads and installs the firmware in windows then reboots. No messing around necessary.

Re:ok... (1)

yuhong (1378501) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668716)

Coreboot, for one. EFI could in theory ported to run on top of it.

Re:ok... (3, Insightful)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668494)

No. Because those of us that do real work use them.

Rs232 is still a big standard in the commercial and industrial world.

Re:ok... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32668972)

It's interesting, whenever serial ports come up, there will be a few people who essentially write off a massive majority of the work done with computers as "not real".
Define "real work" for me, will you. Does it have to require serial ports? Does it have to be exactly what you're doing?

CNC mills (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 4 years ago | (#32669304)

Define "real work" for me, will you.

In physics, work is a force applied through a distance. Information processing involves far less "work" in the physics sense than, say, controlling a cutting plotter [wikipedia.org] .

Re:ok... (3, Insightful)

91degrees (207121) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668544)

A lot of PCs only have VGA outputs out of that list.

Re:ok... (1)

Steauengeglase (512315) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668654)

Man, either I've been here too long or the community is getting smaller. I can remember the last time Intel dropped support for something and Lord Ender said virtually the exact same thing.

Meanwhile you can measure the generations by counting the number of adapters and dongles coming out of my Modem M.

Re:ok... (1)

jonbryce (703250) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668656)

Especially as they generally don't even come with a floppy interface socket these days.

Re:ok... (1)

reub2000 (705806) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668758)

HDMI is simply DVI-D with sound and a different connector. Why does it need to be axed?

Re:ok... (1)

RoboRay (735839) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668896)

Don't forget the poorly designed, non-locking HDMI connector that can just slip right out of the jack.

Re:ok... (1)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668938)

I have a huge box of cables of every sort of connection I'm likely to encounter. I would love to throw it out and keep only ethernet, HDMI, USB3, TOSLINK, and standard audio connectors around. Having fewer types of ports also makes devices cheaper, smaller, and more likely to interoperate.

Re:ok... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32668762)

No to serial ports, even if there are USB serial adapters.
While i like the idea of throwing everything behind a unified cable format, some things are better left to being separate.
Mainly because serial is a pretty simple communication format to the board compared to USB.
Scrapping simple input systems for more complicated systems is backwards.

I certainly agree with everything else though, especially dependency on PS/2, DAMN WHY IS THAT STILL ALIVE?! IT IS AWFUL.
WORST PORT DESIGN IN THE HISTORY OF ANYTHING, WHAT ARE HALF OF THOSE PRONGS EVEN USED FOR?!

One thing i would like to see happen is orientation-insensitive ports on USB.
I HATE getting the cable in the wrong way. No, i won't turn the damn light on to see the USB logo, nor will i feel around for it to see if i need to rotate it.
It isn't exactly hard to make a phono-lead / headphone style USB plug (jack), there has been quite a few of 3+ input systems in that style of plug over the years.
Making it slightly thicker for the sake of someone not plugging it in to a headphone socket would obviously be a smart idea as well, and it leads to less complications fitting in the wiring.
It doesn't even need to be a circle, even if it was rectangular and still plugged in at any of the 4 90degree angles would be nice.
One can dream...

Re:ok... (1)

eldepeche (854916) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668764)

I'd love to get rid of PS/2, but then I wouldn't be able to boot FreeBSD, since the 64-bit version freezes if you have a USB keyboard connected at boot. USB input devices have only been ubiquitous for about 10 years, so I'll cut them some slack.

I'm just getting used to this new fangled AGP.... (5, Funny)

LazLong (757) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668364)

I'm just getting used to these new fangled AGP cards and their single connectors. I feel so much more secure with the dual connectors of my VLB cards....Maybe if I saw the boards in half they'll work in my new PCI-based motherboards. What do think? They fit, but all I get is sparks and a strange smoking smell....

Re:I'm just getting used to this new fangled AGP.. (1)

omnichad (1198475) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668682)

You must not have done well at sawing the board in half. At the very least, you shouldn't be getting sparks. The worst you'd have done is sever most of the connections on the card. Not having electricity making a complete circuit isn't the same as a short circuit.

Eh... (4, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668400)

This seems like a fairly minimal matter.

Intel is shaving a few more pennies off the implementation cost for boring business boxes that will see no expansion at all, gamer boxes that will see no expansion beyond a so-new-the-solder-is-still-warm graphics card, and your basic home-user "everything-on-motherboard" use cases.

Given the availability of PCIe to PCI bridge chips(both ones for cheaply retooling a PCI design into a PCIe design, and ones for hanging an actual PCI bus off a PCIe bus), motherboards to accommodate PCI cards should be available at a fairly modest premium for another 5 years, and at an industrial/embedded/specialty premium for another decade or two....

Hell, you can still find new ISA motherboards... (5, Interesting)

BUL2294 (1081735) | more than 4 years ago | (#32669002)

Out of curiosity, I was looking for motherboards that still support ISA, and apparently there's still a market...

This ATX board I found, supporting C2Duo/C2Quad processors, has ISA, 4x serial, parallel, FDD, PS/2 mouse & keyboard, etc., in addition to dual gigabit Ethernet, RAID, SATA, PCI-Express x16, PCI, HD audio, DDR2, etc.

http://www.adek.com/PDF/MB-P4BWA.pdf [adek.com]

Re:Hell, you can still find new ISA motherboards.. (3, Funny)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#32669036)

Freaky. I wonder if the manufacturer provides driver support for Windows for Workgroups and OS/2 warp...

Re:Eh... (1)

yuhong (1378501) | more than 4 years ago | (#32669144)

Intel is shaving a few more pennies off the implementation cost

And more importantly, PCI uses a lot of pins on the chipsets, as it is a parallel bus.

most on board chips use pci and pci-e waste lanes (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668492)

most on board chips use pci and using pci-e for some of them is a waste of lanes.

Most on board sound is still pci based.

Most severs have on board pci video and I don't x1 pci-e video chips out there.

Re:most on board chips use pci and pci-e waste lan (1)

yuhong (1378501) | more than 4 years ago | (#32669080)

On the other hand, most pci-e x16 devices can technically run at only x1 if the physical slot arrangement allows.

Re:most on board chips use pci and pci-e waste lan (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32669266)

I am taking a guess that your last sentence was "... and I don't know of any x1 pci-e video chips out there." Part of the PCIe spec requires that the two points must able to run with fewer lanes than they were designed for. You can connect an x16 chip to an x1 chip and they will still work together. You may not be pleased by the results but it won't stop it from running.

Another "local bus" (1)

macraig (621737) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668552)

How many people still living even remember the other "local bus" that preceded it, VESA Local Bus? I still have two boxed motherboards with VLB slots and a couple interface cards intended for it.

Re:Another "local bus" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32668690)

How many people still living even remember the other "local bus" that preceded it, VESA Local Bus? I still have two boxed motherboards with VLB slots and a couple interface cards intended for it.

I recalling blowing $399 at a compUSA store on a diamond stealth video card vesa local bus. It was my first ever video card purchase (had a whipping 8mb of VRAM!) and I was excited to be on the cutting edge for once in my life.

sigh.

Re:Another "local bus" (1)

Dr. Manhattan (29720) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668714)

My first computer had a 486/100MHz motherboard with ISA, VESA, and PCI slots. I eventually upgraded it to 64MB RAM. I wish my wife hadn't guilted me into giving to my brother-in-law a few years later.

Oh, well, I still have a VESA/ISA system with all the slots filled (SB32 sound, VESA video, IDE caching controller with 16MB SIMMS, tape controller)... the dream machine of 1993.

Re:Another "local bus" (1)

plsander (30907) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668830)

IBM's Microchannel?

Re:Another "local bus" (1)

macraig (621737) | more than 4 years ago | (#32669176)

I knew about it, serviced machines that had it, but never actually owned a system with it myself. I can't even recall which models used it (PS/2?).

PCI DSS sucks anyways (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668566)

Thanks for phasing that out, Intel.

Reasonable security standards are one thing.

Security standards designed only to appease security vendors are a waste of shareholder $$$.

max 8 PCIe 2.0 lanes? wow that is way to few! (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668732)

max 8 PCIe 2.0 lanes? wow that is way to few!

A video card eats up about 8-16 just for video.

add sata 6 about 4

usb 3 2-4??

Sooo... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32668752)

When will ISA...err I mean...LPC go away? Oh right, Intel TPM relies on it.

Not really. (3, Informative)

Applekid (993327) | more than 4 years ago | (#32668834)

From TFA:

Intel PCI-free chipsets expected to be unveiled are H67, P67 e H61, they will implement the new LGA1155 CPU socket (which would be a pin less than the current LGA1156), will support 8 independent PCIe 2.0 lanes, Serial ATA connections at 6 Gigabits and 14 USB 2.0 ports. Just to be clear, these chipset are targeted at the consumer market while the new chipsets designed for the enterprise market (Q67, Q65 e B65) will continue to support the PCI bus.

So, Intel says farewell, except that it didn't.

Even if they were, if there's money to be had, I'm pretty sure someone will carve some silicon that motherboard manufacturers can use to bridge PCIe with PCI further downstream from the chipset.

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