Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

World's First Solar-Propelled Blimp To Cross English Channel

timothy posted about 4 years ago | from the all-I've-got's-this-sunny-afternoon dept.

Power 87

An anonymous reader writes "Can a blimp propelled entirely by solar power cross the English Channel? We're about to find out! Nephelios, the world's first solar blimp, was built by Projet Sol'r — a collaboration between students at engineering and technical schools in France. Now, almost a year after its debut (and a year after it was supposed to launch), the helium-filled airship is ready for action, with its inaugural flight set to take place next week. The blimp is covered in semi-flexible solar cells that can generate up to 2.4 kilowatts — enough to keep the blimp moving at 25 mph as it crosses la Manche."

cancel ×

87 comments

First post. yay. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32687536)

first post.

Re:First post. yay. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32687548)

And you fucking wasted it.

Re:First post. yay. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32687586)

Oh I beg to differ! I should have been more clear. I've always wanted to do one of those really lame "first post" posts. Don't know why, but that it just always fascinated me people do that. I thought that trying it myself might lead to a deeper understanding of the practice. No dice. Oh well, Another thing off my bucket list.

English weather (2, Funny)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about 4 years ago | (#32687544)

Can a blimp propelled entirely by solar power cross the English Channel?

Well not in winter obviously

Re:English weather (0, Offtopic)

strack (1051390) | about 4 years ago | (#32688148)

best. sig. EVER.

Re:English weather (2, Informative)

xaxa (988988) | about 4 years ago | (#32688560)

It's 21C here in London, rising to 25C this afternoon. 30C at the weekend. I think they've chosen good weather for it :-)

Re:English weather (1)

Joe Jay Bee (1151309) | about 4 years ago | (#32691768)

I'm in Portsmouth. Everyone here is melting. Fans are useless. Send help.

Re:English weather (1)

Darinbob (1142669) | about 4 years ago | (#32694606)

All fans are busy watching game with Germany. Sorry.

This sounds like a good idea. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32687550)

Let's fly our sunlight-powered flying machine in the most overcast place on earth!

Re:This sounds like a good idea. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32687634)

Hey, if it works there....

Re:This sounds like a good idea. (2, Interesting)

wisdom_brewing (557753) | about 4 years ago | (#32688318)

I believe that would be Hilo, Hawaii...

Re:This sounds like a good idea. (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about 4 years ago | (#32690266)

I believe that would be Hilo, Hawaii...

Well, I don't know how accurate it is, but this link [answers.com] doesn't include anyplace in Hawaii as the cloudiest place on Earth.

Scotland, however, is well represented with 2 of the top 10, which matches their reputation. :-P

Re:This sounds like a good idea. (4, Insightful)

mrjb (547783) | about 4 years ago | (#32688380)

Let's fly our sunlight-powered flying machine in the most overcast place on earth!

Seems perfectly reasonable to me.
First of all- the blimp is not going to crash- helium, not solar power, is what makes it fly. Solar power is just used to propel it.
Second, it's possible to fly above the clouds.
Third, it's going to fly across the channel. Even if it crashes, it's most likely to land on water.
Fourth, aircraft regulations require avoiding densely populated areas if at all possible so even if it crashes on land, it will most likely miss any houses or other important buildings.
Fifth, if against all odds said blimp crashes on land in a populated area, it's filled up with helium, not with hydrogen- so it won't burst into flames and as such it would be a lot less eventful than the Hindenburg. Which was a commercial craft anyway (with paying passengers on board), rather than a somewhat experimental craft attempting to cross the channel.

Re:This sounds like a good idea. (2, Funny)

bipedalhominid (1828798) | about 4 years ago | (#32688750)

Yeah, and if it does crash just think about all those folks wandering around talking in really high pitched voices.

Re:This sounds like a good idea. (1)

somersault (912633) | about 4 years ago | (#32688770)

if against all odds said blimp crashes on land in a populated area, it's filled up with helium, not with hydrogen

I can hear the high pitched chipmunk screams even now.. :)

Re:This sounds like a good idea. (1)

Vintermann (400722) | about 4 years ago | (#32689424)

It's possible to fly above the clouds with a blimp - at least low clouds - but generally airships travel at low altitudes. I think the record is at 20000 feet or something, a lot lower than commercial airliners.

Re:This sounds like a good idea. (1)

paeanblack (191171) | about 4 years ago | (#32692616)

It's possible to fly above the clouds with a blimp - at least low clouds - but generally airships travel at low altitudes. I think the record is at 20000 feet or something, a lot lower than commercial airliners.

Huh? All of the altitude records for manned and unmanned aircraft are held by balloons and blimps. The only things that go higher than blimps are rocket-powered. Current record manned ballooning record is 113,740 ft.

Re:This sounds like a good idea. (1)

Vintermann (400722) | about 4 years ago | (#32727568)

Ballons, yes, blimps, apparently not.

Re:This sounds like a good idea. (0)

luther349 (645380) | about 4 years ago | (#32690032)

helium wile less flammable can still burn. but i don't think anything like that will happen. airship have a pretty good safety record. unlike aircraft where we have a major crash every couple years we only had 1 major airship crash . also its a good idea to fly low on anything with a uncompressed hall. we learned that in world war 1 lol. being we cant get enough air above 10000 feet. but airships can fly at 20000 if you really what to.

Re:This sounds like a good idea. (3, Informative)

dave420 (699308) | about 4 years ago | (#32691254)

No, Helium will not burn. It is simply impossible for it to oxidize.

Re:This sounds like a good idea. (1)

Shotgun (30919) | about 4 years ago | (#32691796)

helium wile less flammable can still burn.

Helium is a noble element. It will not burn.

but i don't think anything like that will happen. airship have a pretty good safety record. unlike aircraft where we have a major crash every couple years we only had 1 major airship crash .

No, airships have a horrible safety record. Which is why they aren't used anymore. The flying wasn't a problem (most of the time). It was getting the thing landed in anything but the most pristinely calm weather. HUGE surface area means that even the slightest of winds generate tremendous forces. It also meant that getting caught near a pop-up thunder-boomer would turn a summer joy ride into a fight for your life.

also its a good idea to fly low on anything with a uncompressed hall. we learned that in world war 1 lol. being we cant get enough air above 10000 feet. but airships can fly at 20000 if you really what to.

We can do just fine at 10,000ft. From AIM, 8-1-6:
For optimum protection, pilots are encouraged to use supplemental oxygen above 10,000 feet during the day, and above 5,000 feet at night. The CFRs require that at the minimum, flight crew be provided with and use supplemental oxygen after 30 minutes of exposure to cabin pressure altitudes between 12,500 and 14,000 feet and immediately on exposure to cabin pressure altitudes above 14,000 feet. Every occupant of the aircraft must be provided with supplemental oxygen at cabin pressure altitudes above 15,000 feet.

People are ignorant.... (1)

crhylove (205956) | about 4 years ago | (#32695980)

....about the Hindenburg anyway.

Hydrogen was not the problem. The entire body of the craft was painted in a mix of powdered aluminum, iron oxide, gun powder, and a chemical similar to rocket fuel as a solvent. It's actually amazing that it didn't explode sooner.

Further, over half the passengers on the Hindenburg survived the wreck. Almost NOBODY survives a plane wreck.

For every reason but speed, zeppelins are a superior idea to planes whose time has definitely come again.

...first post? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32687556)

Awww! All these years I've always wanted to do one of those really lame "first post" posts. I noticed it got automatically deleted. Sigh.
I thought I could cross that off my bucket list.

Top Gear (3, Insightful)

JazzXP (770338) | about 4 years ago | (#32687574)

As long as it's not like the blimp they tried to use on Top Gear. Big plans, didn't really go so well (winds being quite nasty for them).

Re:Top Gear (1)

somersault (912633) | about 4 years ago | (#32688028)

Big plans, didn't really go so well

Ambitious - but rubbish!

Re:Top Gear (1)

bami (1376931) | about 4 years ago | (#32688174)

How hard can it be?

Re:Top Gear (1)

Theoboley (1226542) | about 4 years ago | (#32689124)

are you referring to the one May flew in the episode where he was flying over restricted airspace?

Re:Top Gear (1)

luther349 (645380) | about 4 years ago | (#32690236)

genrely if you wonder into restricted airspace they just tell you so and ask you to leave. if your lost they will escort you out. as long as you comply you wont have a problem.

Re:Top Gear (1)

Theoboley (1226542) | about 4 years ago | (#32690796)

He had no control over his blimp. They got very angry at him.

Re:Top Gear (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32696152)

He had no control over his blimp. They got very angry at him.

... in the edit, at least.

Re:Top Gear (1)

Theoboley (1226542) | about 4 years ago | (#32697446)

This is true... the epic music and the fact that they sounded angry doesnt really mean they were i guess...

Re:Top Gear (2, Insightful)

SydShamino (547793) | about 4 years ago | (#32691926)

Crossing the English Channel with your special contraption doesn't hold any interest or awe for me any more. If Jeremy Clarkson can do it in a car boat of his own design, then any idiot can do it. Big deal.

Desperation from France (4, Funny)

phantomfive (622387) | about 4 years ago | (#32687580)

Wow, and I thought people did crazy thinks to sneak over the border into the US. It's ok, guys, you can have another chance to get out of your group in four years! It's not the end of the world! Just don't try to mess with the Irish luck next time, they invented the four-leaf clover, you know.

Re:Desperation from France (1)

value_added (719364) | about 4 years ago | (#32687670)

Wow, and I thought people did crazy thinks to sneak over the border into the US.

I suspect that unless there's a special "stealth" mode, folks looking to cross the border would be flying in "pinata" mode.

Re:Desperation from France (1, Offtopic)

Hurricane78 (562437) | about 4 years ago | (#32688024)

They do even crazier things to get out of the US. Like going trough the TSA.

And since when is the UK the US?

Re:Desperation from France (2, Informative)

LaRainette (1739938) | about 4 years ago | (#32688548)

Dude, to go to England we take the train. It lasts less than 20 minutes.
And don't make fun of this : my Grad School participate. Else I might cry.

Re:Desperation from France (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 4 years ago | (#32691790)

lol, no, no, I am not making fun of this, the blimp is cool. I am making fun of your soccer team. It feels good to have someone else's team be the one to be made fun of for a change. :)

"We're about to find out!" (5, Funny)

skine (1524819) | about 4 years ago | (#32687628)

"We're about to find out!"

I think that these are the words that every scientist strives for.

They don't come out too often, but when they do...

Surely... (5, Funny)

Jmanamj (1077749) | about 4 years ago | (#32687646)

The mammoth airship measures 72 feet long and 18 feet wide and has a nylon and polyethylene aluminum frame.

Surely, with an airship so large, the earth will be plunged into darkness as it passes overhead!

Re:Surely... (1)

giorgist (1208992) | about 4 years ago | (#32688032)

Why have you ever seen a mammoth ?

Re:Surely... (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32688680)

Large? That's frigging tiny. Many airships could fit this one in, sideways. Seriously, compare the Akron, at ~239 meters (785 feet) by ~40-45 meters (130-155) wide/tall.

Re:Surely... (1)

BlaKmaJiK_ (101711) | about 4 years ago | (#32695586)

-1 Whoosh

Re:Surely... (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about 4 years ago | (#32689270)

Imagine the panic when people think it's Vogons.

like the superbowl in black sunday! (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | about 4 years ago | (#32689388)

like the superbow in black sunday!

Re:Surely... (1)

crhylove (205956) | about 4 years ago | (#32696022)

Mammoth compared to what? Most rigid frame airships are MUCH larger.

Palm to the forehead (0)

oldhack (1037484) | about 4 years ago | (#32687712)

Generally don't wanna discourage any tech stunt, but this sounds particularly dumb. Reminds me of one of those David Blaine(sp?) publicity stunts.

Re:Palm to the forehead (1)

somersault (912633) | about 4 years ago | (#32688044)

Why is it dumb?

Re:Palm to the forehead (2, Interesting)

hairyfish (1653411) | about 4 years ago | (#32688272)

Bleriot did it in 1909. The fact that there's a simple PV motor attached actually makes this less impressive than his original feat over a century ago. I could probably knock up a smaller yet equally effective version with parts from my local electronics shop. It might not be dumb, but it surely isn't news

Re:Palm to the forehead (1)

somersault (912633) | about 4 years ago | (#32688386)

FTS I thought it was more about the solar panel material they were using for the blimp.

I don't think Bleriot would have been doing it under solar power either.. this thing just seems like a really cool project. Not sure how difficult it is to keep the helium topped up, but apart from that it could just stay up indefinitely and not need refuelling.

why is it dumb? 20 miles of floating is easy (3, Insightful)

fantomas (94850) | about 4 years ago | (#32688152)

Why is it so dumb? With the wind in the right direction you can float over the Channel / La Manche with no power in a few hours anyway, it's only 20 miles or so at its narrowest point. They'll have a support boat so even if the blimp crash lands they'll be able to fish the pilot out.

I'd say it's great university students are encouraged to take on technical challenges. I'd say the risks are pretty low (and I am sure they would have been thoroughly checked out by the universities, nobody wants their students dying).

Re:why is it dumb? 20 miles of floating is easy (1)

LaRainette (1739938) | about 4 years ago | (#32688574)

I accept you premises, I reject your conclusion.
you fail to understand the idea of proof of concept.
Obviously next step is crossing the Atlantic and then touring around the world.

Re:why is it dumb? 20 miles of floating is easy (1)

hey! (33014) | about 4 years ago | (#32688622)

You fail to understand the concept of "cool".

Something is "cool" if, on some level, it makes you think "I want one." I could easily imagine commuting to work in one of these (naturally I can't imagine *everyone* doing that, which of course is part of the charm).

Re:why is it dumb? 20 miles of floating is easy (1)

LaRainette (1739938) | about 4 years ago | (#32714846)

I think the ultimate commercial application of this is fret not transportation of people (too slow)

Re:why is it dumb? 20 miles of floating is easy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32689576)

If you say "20 miles of floating is easy" then could you please point out how many times have you made a blimp that did that, let alone a solar powered one?

Some people do stuff while some people just bitch about stuff while they do nothing for themselves. Guess what group you are in?

Re:why is it dumb? 20 miles of floating is easy (1)

fantomas (94850) | about 4 years ago | (#32692150)

Lighter than air craft have crossed the Channel a lot (first crossing recorded by Frenchman Jean-Pierre Blanchard and American John Jeffries, Dover to Calais in 1785) - my comment meant that it was not "dumb" as in not impossible, and clearly well thought out. Perhaps I should have clarified that. As my second paragraph noted I am all for it, great to see university students taking on what will be a significant challenge for them.

I'm definitely in the doing stuff category where I can, all for folk doing things. Got the scars and had the tropical diseases to prove it. Probably most scary experience was driving across the USA though. Texas cops were more frightening than the Cambodian military in my experiences...

Re:why is it dumb? 20 miles of floating is easy (1)

Cederic (9623) | about 4 years ago | (#32691666)

Why is it so dumb? With the wind in the right direction you can float over the Channel / La Manche with no power in a few hours anyway

That's why it's so dumb. Ooh, we can use solar power to do something... we could do with no power.

Oh, that was hard. Next: Making the helium filled blimp rise into the air using just solar power!

a good challenge for university students (1)

fantomas (94850) | about 4 years ago | (#32693502)

My point was that it is not dumb because it is a reasonably safe yet challenging task for university students to undertake. If things go wrong, they are not in dangerous territories. I'd suggest university students attempting solar blimp navigation across the Atlantic or the Antarctic might be dumb. But 20 miles seems like a nice challenge.

And interestingly my comment got it in the neck for somebody with the opposite point of view, who makes the fair point that just because it's easy for NASA or a large corporate doesn't make it easy for a group of 20 year university students. So for these guys, it probably is a big challenge. In that sense, I think it's great. It's brilliant students are attempting real world challenges, this is what university should be about.

Next up: you laughing at ten year olds for being slow at the 100 metres compared to Usain Bolt?

Re:Palm to the forehead (2, Insightful)

strack (1051390) | about 4 years ago | (#32688156)

yeah. cause theres no possible use whatsoever for something that can stay in the sky, powered, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Re:Palm to the forehead (0)

Anachragnome (1008495) | about 4 years ago | (#32688316)

"yeah. cause theres no possible use whatsoever for something that can stay in the sky, powered, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week."

Maybe, when the sun is down, it can become the world's first tidal-powered submarine.

Re:Palm to the forehead (1)

Pteraspidomorphi (1651293) | about 4 years ago | (#32688424)

Maybe I'm just stating the obvious, but a balloon filled with helium doesn't need power to stay airborne, unless things changed since my time. Though who knows, balloons these days...

Re:Palm to the forehead (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 4 years ago | (#32689328)

Maybe it's a hybrid airship... [wikipedia.org]

Or more likely, the GP is just being an ass.

Re:Palm to the forehead (1)

Anachragnome (1008495) | about 4 years ago | (#32695616)

"Maybe I'm just stating the obvious, but a balloon filled with helium doesn't need power to stay airborne, unless things changed since my time. Though who knows, balloons these days..."

To state the REALLY obvious, which you seemed to miss, is that a helium filled balloon also will not sink in WATER, and thus my suggesting it become a submarine would seem to MOST as a joke--as it was intended to be...and apparently not a very good one.

Re:Palm to the forehead (2, Informative)

LaRainette (1739938) | about 4 years ago | (#32688602)

DARPA (which I'm sure you know doesn't have the same kind of budget) has a project about a radar-equipped solar-propelled blimp that would float @ 10,000 meters and include a battery to stock the solar energy of they day for the night.
They expect is to cruise at 60mph with top speed at 100mph. It is supposed to be operational in 2013

This project could totally be adapted, with extra funding like the one they would get by crossing the Channel, with a bigger structure and a battery, to run day and night.

Embrace entrepreneurship (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about 4 years ago | (#32687776)

In the past France gave the world the Lebel rifle, Areva, Train à Grande Vitess, Minitel ect.
How is the next generation going to embrace entrepreneurship via ~
You should have just taken an existing blimp and put a solar panels on it or something.
Less of Homer and more Herbert Powell.

now that's quick! (2, Interesting)

sholdowa (242332) | about 4 years ago | (#32687810)

3HP and it'll do 25mph. Impressive.

Re:now that's quick! (1)

wisdom_brewing (557753) | about 4 years ago | (#32688360)

For something with that aerodynamic profile as well!

I think they factored in wind speed as well though...

Re:now that's quick! (2, Funny)

IflyRC (956454) | about 4 years ago | (#32690712)

This is the future - an F22 Raptor with supersonic cruising speed uses too much oil and isn't green enough. We'll be dogfighting balloons in the 5HP military version.

Oh Yeah? (2, Funny)

sonicmerlin (1505111) | about 4 years ago | (#32687944)

I bet it can't record video at 720p like my cell phone!

Re:Oh Yeah? (1)

sonicmerlin (1505111) | about 4 years ago | (#32687950)

Oh whoops wrong thread. Drat... uh.... next time we have a solar eclipse we can blame it on all the solar-powered air balloons sucking up the sun's rays!

Ultimate greenness (2, Interesting)

estestvoispytatel (1091583) | about 4 years ago | (#32688228)

It needs to be filled with the free range cow farts for extra green points.

Re:Ultimate greenness (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 4 years ago | (#32689350)

That wouldn't work as a lifting gas but it could power a pretty sweet afterburner system.

Solar-powered? (2, Interesting)

muzicman (1148101) | about 4 years ago | (#32688292)

Did they use solar power to create the helium? Since the helium produces the lift, to be solar-powered it would also need to produce the helium. Running a couple of propellers isn't new. Check out the Helios aircraft from NASA for a true solar-powered aircraft. http://www.nasa.gov/centers/dryden/history/pastprojects/Helios/ [nasa.gov]

Re:Solar-powered? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32688462)

Hey, there's an idea. Have some sort of filter or desiccant or whatnot extract water from the air, then use solar power to split into hydrogen and oxygen, and top up the blimp with the hydrogen. It's like Bussard's ramjet, only in the air... if you could get enough hydrogen, that is.

Re:Solar-powered? (3, Informative)

selven (1556643) | about 4 years ago | (#32688606)

Did they use solar power to produce the metal and/or carbon fiber for that plane? If not, then by your argument the plane isn't solar powered either. The helium in the blimp is not being consumed like a fuel source, it's just a structural component like whatever other materials encase it. Helium just happens to passively have negative relative mass compared to the medium the blimp is flying in, which lets the blimp fly.

Re:Solar-powered? (1)

rossdee (243626) | about 4 years ago | (#32689040)

I think most helium is produced by stellar fusion of hydrogen. (May have been a previous star that went supernova and seeded the nebula that created the sun and the planets billions of years ago.

Re:Solar-powered? (1)

Deadstick (535032) | about 4 years ago | (#32691688)

I think most helium is produced by stellar fusion of hydrogen.

Most helium, yes. Most helium used on Earth, no.

Nearly all the helium produced in the twentieth century came from the ground under Amarillo, Texas where it was created by fissioning of alpha-emitting ores. This near-monopoly on helium, and Germany's deployment of military airships in WW1, resulted in an embargo on helium which explains why the Hindenburg was inflated with hydrogen.

AFAIK, Amarillo is the only city in the world that has a monument to an element.

rj

Re:Solar-powered? (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about 4 years ago | (#32689948)

Lift != power. In a winged aircraft the lift is provided by pressure differential which comes from its speed, in a blimp the lift comes from the fact that helium floats in air. It's not powered by helium; the power is for forward movement.

Re:Solar-powered? (1)

Deadstick (535032) | about 4 years ago | (#32691812)

So, a sailboat is not wind-powered because it would still float if the wind weren't blowing?

AERODYNAMIC:AEROSTATIC=HYDRODYNAMIC:HYDROSTATIC, in SAT terms.

rj

Break out the Spitfires boys (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32688312)

It's time for target practice

Algore would LOVE this thing! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32688764)

Too bad he's got his hands full with a divorce and now thesmokinggun.com releasing the police report of a masseuse who claims he nutted on her pants. I always knew there was something phony about that smarmy bastard...

I, for one... (1)

seven of five (578993) | about 4 years ago | (#32688956)

welcome our flight-capable, solar-powered overlords.

Sky Truckers! (1)

HeckRuler (1369601) | about 4 years ago | (#32690058)

I'm waiting for the day that oil runs out and slow-boat solar is the preferred means of goods transportation. That will the age of sky truckers riding blimps across the land.
And that will give rise to sky-pirates, and my dreams will be complete!

Re:Sky Truckers! (1)

Gertlex (722812) | about 4 years ago | (#32690308)

Ya. We have unlimited supplies of helium.

Oh, wait, no we don't.

Hydrogen could be done fairly safe these days, though, I think?

Re:Sky Truckers! (1)

H0p313ss (811249) | about 4 years ago | (#32691912)

Unobtanium FTW

Re:Sky Truckers! (1)

Catbeller (118204) | about 4 years ago | (#32698942)

Hydrogen burns straight up, and anyway you can build the lifting chamber with thermally isolated cells.

We drive next to rolling bombs every day and never notice.

The Hindenburg was coated with metal oxide paint; it was like igniting thermite. The flames you see in the video are mostly paint burning. Hydrogen burns with a nearly transparent flame.

Interesting (1)

Georgh (1831728) | about 4 years ago | (#32714574)

Solar dirigible balloon? And to whom they are necessary, would make solar cars is better. And how to you robots-transformers [ucozinfo.net] ? It is my article, only it in Russian.
Check for New Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...