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Indian Government Threatens RIM, Skype With Ban

Soulskill posted more than 4 years ago | from the can-we-hear-you-now dept.

Privacy 281

gauharjk writes "India's Department of Telecommunications has been asked by the government to serve a notice to Skype and Research In Motion to ensure that their email and other data services comply with formats that can be read by security and intelligence agencies, or face a ban in India if they do not comply within 15 days. A similar notice is also being sent to Google, asking it to provide access to content on Gmail in a readable format."

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This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (5, Interesting)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780634)

The terrorists used mobile phones and tools like Google Earth to plan, coordinate and execute the operations, India and Israel have been howling about those tools ever since.

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (5, Insightful)

kawabago (551139) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780708)

Bank robbers usually escape in cars so maybe we should ban automobiles to cut down on the number of bank robberies! Its' the same logic.

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (4, Interesting)

discord5 (798235) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780794)

Bank robbers usually escape in cars so maybe we should ban automobiles to cut down on the number of bank robberies! Its' the same logic.

Why is it always cars for the analogies? Why not ducks? Or oranges?

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (5, Funny)

0123456 (636235) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780834)

Why is it always cars for the analogies? Why not ducks? Or oranges?

It's not easy for a bank robber to escape on a duck.

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (5, Funny)

XSpud (801834) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780930)

It's not easy for a bank robber to escape on a duck.

Are you sure? AFAIK no bank robber has ever been caught when escaping on a duck.

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (1)

0123456 (636235) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780994)

Are you sure? AFAIK no bank robber has ever been caught when escaping on a duck.

You make a good point there.

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (1)

Cylix (55374) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781872)

Are you sure? AFAIK no bank robber has ever been caught when escaping on a duck.

You make a good point there.

Quick, someone get me the fastest duck in town! I've got a full proof plan to get rich.

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (1)

the_fat_kid (1094399) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781828)

I think that you are either misunderstanding the point or trying to mislead us.
Everybody knows that oranges are the superior escape vehicle.
Ducks, on the other hand, are just a tool for terrorists.

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32781274)

Orange you glad you chose a car for your last heist?

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (1, Funny)

DittoBox (978894) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781606)

What is the air speed velocity of an unladen duck?

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (1, Funny)

FatdogHaiku (978357) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781944)

What is the air speed velocity of an unladen duck?

Is that an African duck or a European duck?

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (1)

agent_vee (1801664) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780836)

Because using ducks or oranges in a bank heist would be too hard to understand.

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (1)

eihab (823648) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780862)

Why is it always cars for the analogies? Why not ducks? Or oranges?

Why that's like asking a NASCAR engineer why do they need engines with extremely radical cam profiles! [howstuffworks.com]

P.S.: The joke is probably funnier if you are like me and know nothing about cars.

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (4, Funny)

dunng808 (448849) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780868)

Why is it always cars for the analogies? Why not ducks? Or oranges?

Fair enough. How about this:

Bank robbers usually duck when police shoot at them, so we should kill all ducks and serve Canard a l'Orange in prison.

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (1)

Threni (635302) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781144)

> Bank robbers usually duck when police shoot at them, so we should kill all ducks and serve Canard a l'Orange in prison.

I hereby invoke Ramsey's Law - in any online discussion about ducks it's inevitable that at some point someone will bring up foul 70's French cuisine!

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (1)

daremonai (859175) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781344)

s^foul^fowl^

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (1)

bpsbr_ernie (1121681) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780878)

Perhaps, because it would be difficult to drive away from a bank robbery on a duck or orange?

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (4, Funny)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781386)

Why is it always cars for the analogies?

It's easy to make a car analogy that sounds right, so you get modded up. Then the guy that actually understands how digital technology works can correct you and then HE gets modded up. If a good metaphor was used, only one guy would get modded up. It's a win-win!

oranges are evil (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32782072)

people tossed oranges at a protest so we should destroy all the orange fields

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (2, Insightful)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780832)

Bank robbers don't kill 175 and wound 308 people.

Furthermore, cars are regulated, stealing a car to commit a felony is an extra felony, driving a car to take someone else to a bank robbery is a felony.

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32780844)

This is the reason behind the license plate. If a car is used in a crime it simplifies locating the registered owner of the vehicle.

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32780928)

Not if the vehicle is stolen, or the license plate is stolen or forged.

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781362)

Not really - cars used in robberies are generally, where i live at least, jacked shortly before the heist and then torched somewhere secluded together with other evidence before a quick switch into another vehicle. Sort of like a real-life pay-n-spray.

The problem with that approach (4, Insightful)

mollog (841386) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780890)

The Bush administration violated a few constitutional laws in its effort to close the barn door after the terrorists had burned the barn down. They wanted to impress upon us how earnestly they believed in thwarting the terrorists, so they decided that we needed to give up our rights so that they could score political points.

But, as everybody knows, the Bush administration had more than enough information to do the job long before the terrorists ever hit us. What was needed isn't more information, what was needed was better use of the existing information. (Notice that I'm not using the word intelligence. Clearly, Bush needed more intelligence, but that would not be forthcoming.) But we can expect our leaders to make lazy, self-serving choices rather than to take on the hard jobs they seemed to want so badly.

India is an authoritarian state, perfectly comfortable with internal corruption and cronyism. This choice, to compel telecommunications businesses to open up their data for 'security and intelligence' agencies, will surely be abused for political reasons and its impact on security will be marginal.

Re:The problem with that approach (4, Interesting)

mrops (927562) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780964)

I for one welcome this for entirely selfish reasons. More barriers the Indian government can put for running a competitive business and outsourcing, the better for us out here in Europe and North America :)

When Company XYZ looks to outsource, one more check mark on the sheet, Employee can't use BB [X]

More local jobs, yippee!

Re:The problem with that approach (0, Flamebait)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781410)

It's this kind of mercantilistic selfishness that leads to the third world continuing to be the third world. Engineering, Science and Art is not a zero-sum game. And if you're a blue-collar worker, well, that's on the level of luddism. Better yourself instead of complaining.

Re:The problem with that approach (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 4 years ago | (#32782046)

Nope, that's not a flamebait. I mean what I say, even though I realize that unlike where I come from there's next to nothing stopping your fall if you loose your grip in the US. My parents have both been unemployed during most of my entire life, so I'm not exactly unfamiliar with a lower-class-bordering-on-middle only-reason-we're-not-poorer-is-'cause-none-of-us-are-drug-addicts lifestyle.

Re:The problem with that approach (1)

Lifyre (960576) | more than 4 years ago | (#32782058)

No what keeps the third world the third world is the lack of food, water, and the constant violence or threat of violence. The reason the USA, Europe and large parts of Asia have been able to focus on being the first world is they've been able to grow their own food in excess and drink plenty of clean water. When, as a society, you don't have to worry about where your next meal or drink is coming from it makes it amazingly easy to focus on progress.

Re:The problem with that approach (1)

ZorinLynx (31751) | more than 4 years ago | (#32782102)

It's not selfish to want US companies to hire US citizens and keep them employed. When I hear of friends being laid off because their job went to India, I have every right to be pissed off.

Outsourcing has hurt this country a lot more than it has helped.

Re:The problem with that approach (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 4 years ago | (#32782204)

Sure, outsourcing only benefits corporations large enough to benefit from it. But eventually, as the standard of living rises in the area being outsourced to, the corporations are forced to move on and eventually the standard of living in the entire world is more or less on the same level, at least on the physical plane. Globalization, and the countries being able to fairly trade their natural resources, which would dump prices creating less jobs in the related area but much higher global prosperity in the long run, are the only realistic way solving the problem of most of the globe living in misery by our standards in any timeframe shorter than them reinventing the wheel completely. Your friends job is nothing compared to that.

Re:The problem with that approach (1, Insightful)

stumblingblock (409645) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781476)

My take on this is that it is simply sabre-rattling. India wants to gain some sort of concessions or financial consideration from these big fat rich American companies.

Re:The problem with that approach (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32781628)

Insightful? RIM is Canadian and SKYPE is owned by companies and investment groups from at least 2 countries, one group being the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board.

Re:The problem with that approach (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32782190)

RIM is Canadian

Re:The problem with that approach (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32782060)

India is an authoritarian state

Wow you are retarded.

Re:The problem with that approach (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32782520)

India is an authoritarian state

Well... I am an Indian and that is news to me.

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (5, Insightful)

ghee22 (781277) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780976)

Bank robbers usually escape in cars so maybe we should ban automobiles to cut down on the number of bank robberies! Its' the same logic.

To be fair, the automobiles have 15 days to comply with publishing who is in the car and coordinates of all travel.

Intelligence? I think not... (1)

TiggertheMad (556308) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780978)

The terrorists used mobile phones and tools like Google Earth to plan, coordinate and execute the operations, India and Israel have been howling about those tools ever since.

...and they are idiots for asking for access to like this. Anyone who is using services for sensitive information will just pre-encrypt, and they will be back to square 1.

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (2, Informative)

Caledfwlch (1434813) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781594)

So they want content in a readable format, are they going to prohibit VPNs? I'm sure there will be an outcry from all the companies outsourcing to their country. Anyway there will always be a way to hide information not matter how much they legislate.

Re:This is all from the Mumbai terror attacks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32782512)

Fuck India.

But if students in India can't access Google, (5, Funny)

sconeu (64226) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780642)

How will they post their homework problems on comp.lang.c++ for us to solve?

Re:But if students in India can't access Google, (4, Funny)

Revotron (1115029) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780758)

"please for help with homework, i give problems below. for all grade, please showing steps. due tomorrow."

1) P=NP?

2) List and explain three one-way functions.

3) List five rhymes for the word "orange".

Re:But if students in India can't access Google, (5, Funny)

Jhon (241832) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780990)

"1) P=NP?"
P="BOB"
NP="BOB"
if P=NP then write("TRUE!")

"2) List and explain three one-way functions."
Birth (just try to go back the other way)
Sex (Well, this is kind of an while/endwhile or some other type of loop)
Death (see Birth)

"3) List five rhymes for the word "orange"."
Door Hinge
Beer Binge
Infringe
Dope Syringe
Spine twinge

Re:But if students in India can't access Google, (1)

RichMan (8097) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781074)

"1) P = NP?"

Solution number 1: N==1, any P

Solution number 2: P==0. any N

Re:But if students in India can't access Google, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32781248)

"1) P = NP?"

Solution number 2: P==0. any N

N := infinity as defined by IEEE754

Re:But if students in India can't access Google, (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 4 years ago | (#32782396)

-inge does not rhyme with -ange.

Re:But if students in India can't access Google, (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781046)

3)
    a) "Door Hinge"
    b) "Your fringe"
    c) "you're singed"
    d) "whores binge"
    e) "sore grinch" (?)

Re:But if students in India can't access Google, (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32781198)

Only if you pronounce "orange" like a tool.

Re:But if students in India can't access Google, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32781936)

Wow, you have got to be the stupidest person I've ever had the mispleasure of reading a reply for.

Re:But if students in India can't access Google, (1)

GreatDrok (684119) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781934)

Heh heh, you're not kidding. I work the support desk for a specialist software company and I regularly get e-mail that essentially says 'I don't know enough to do my job and I don't want to do the leg work to find out myself, teach me'. I usually respond as nicely as I can and provide some information to give them a leg up but basically I point them at a bunch of reference sources for them to read and leave it at that. I'm here to support them, not educate them. I don't think they know the difference.

Hmmm... (4, Insightful)

Jhon (241832) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780656)

Glad I don't correspond with anyone in India.

Really? (1)

Ilgaz (86384) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780736)

It all depends to a single phone call or support request regarding a critical issue. You may even end up giving private/semi private info.

Yes, the call centers in India. Wonder why companies panic when Satyam had issues?

Re:Hmmm... (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | more than 4 years ago | (#32782064)

Help desk too?

Re:Hmmm... (1)

mano.m (1587187) | more than 4 years ago | (#32782392)

Yes, I'm sure your communication is of immense interest to the Government of India.

Hey, Little Brother? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32780678)

Yeah, you're doing it wrong. Just use MITM DNS attacks to use fake SSL certs.

Love, China.

India please do that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32780690)

we need more taxpayers here in the US.

And I want a pony! (1)

mandelbr0t (1015855) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780698)

But you don't see me complaining

Re:And I want a pony! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32780792)

Yes, we just did.

We don't see you getting what you want, but hey; you don't have a market with ~1 Billion potential customers to threaten anyone with.

So what happens if google says ok!? (2, Informative)

socz (1057222) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780768)

Does that mean they might potentially have access to my gmail? What about people who send mail to me? Does that mean that they automatically get the right to look in my inbox? What if they're spammers and they use that as cover?

I don't comprehend India's reasoning behind this. It's a serious case of "Hey, you're doing it wrong..." What is the point of protecting (encrypting) or communications if we just hand over a key?

I don't honestly expect G or anyone else to bend to their demands... but then again, most companies 'have a price' if it can be met.

Finally, what do you think the likelihood of ANY company allowing India's DoT to actually place one of THEIR servers in the companies network?

Rediculoussss! (*waves his wand*)

Re:So what happens if google says ok!? (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780850)

Mumbai police found that the attackers had used illegal SIM cards not linked to their identities as well as SIM cards from other countries. So they are cracking down on SIM cards so if some terrorist enters the country they can track him and tap his calls.

Then they heard about skype which uses IP so they need a way to tap that as well. Then there is google voice (maybe) and FaceTime. They have to crack down on wifi because it works a bit like cellular comms.

You see the whole tracking of communication thing is slipping between their fingers and they are grabbing whatever they can, not expecting to get even 1%. I doubt it will make a difference in the next attack.

Re:So what happens if google says ok!? (1)

socz (1057222) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780904)

You see the whole tracking of communication thing is slipping between their fingers and they are grabbing whatever they can, not expecting to get even 1%. I doubt it will make a difference in the next attack.

And I agree with you. I always tell people, if I was to become a criminal I'd never get caught! That's what they "all say" right? But people who fall into actually doing that sort of thing don't actually think the way we do (most of the anyways).

If anything, it's probably for PR and to scare people off from using those resources for 'crime.' I mean, most of them would believe it as long as they demanded it and the companies remain active in the country even IF it didn't happen.

I've heard SO MANY STORIES from many people from asia/"middle east" that said when they first came state side, they thought the streets were paved in gold. I laughed because I thought they were joking, and they laughed as well. But because from what they saw on tv and saw in the movies, they believed it. So maybe that's really what is going on here. Because really, do they think they could control everything? They better give the pentagon some tips if they figure it out eh?

Re:So what happens if google says ok!? (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781014)

Nope. However, people who fall into "that sort of thing" and are able to cope with it have much higher tolerance to stress than your average middle-class geek - leading to greater risk taking.
(Also, I'm not from the US, but how could you get the impression that "the streets are paved with gold" in the US from watching american television? Or does Bollywood portray the US like that?)

Re:So what happens if google says ok!? (1)

socz (1057222) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781178)

At first thought, it was the Wizard of Oz. But after explanation, it was simply their 'perception' from stories told. I've been very fortunate to have many acquaintances from asia/'middle east.' Mostly egyptian, pakistani and indian. But to be honest, this isn't limited to people that far and in rural villages... although I believe the more remote means more believing crazy things. I came across some of that in mexico.

Thank for the internet!

Re:So what happens if google says ok!? (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781234)

So, you'd say that the internet could actually be useful to third-world people in the regard of amalgamating a more reality-based world-view, even though it's information and memes that westerners take for granted?

Re:So what happens if google says ok!? (1)

socz (1057222) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781588)

You know what? I don't know. Sometimes, believing an outrageous tale is better than knowing the truth. Sometimes.

Re:So what happens if google says ok!? (2, Insightful)

russotto (537200) | more than 4 years ago | (#32782196)

Also, I'm not from the US, but how could you get the impression that "the streets are paved with gold" in the US from watching american television?

One famous example (though a movie, not TV... and yes, I know it was a book first): The dirt poor Joads from _The Grapes of Wrath_ had a truck.

Desparate Housewives: On one income, everyone's living in a large house and has two cars. Even the one with more kids than I can count. Oh, and when one becomes _really_ poor when her husband is blinded, the extent of her problems is she has to drive to WalMart-equivalent to shop. (Yes, that's satire... you and I recognize that. But would someone from a third-world country?)

Married, With Children: Same idea. Al's a shoe salesman, his wife doesn't work. He's still got a house and a car.

Probably any sitcom not about the upper class has this issue; the supposed working-class as portrayed on those shows has an embarrassment of riches from a third-world perspective.

Re:So what happens if google says ok!? (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 4 years ago | (#32782462)

Al's situation never struck me as strange, but I always assumed they where meant to be stuck in a debt trap of satirical proportions. As for desperate housewives, several people I know live with house+car even though they have only one income and kids - however, they are in debt, and all have middle-class jobs like phone system techie/specialist and ambulance nurse. On the other hand, as stated, I don't live in the US (I live in sweden.)

Re:So what happens if google says ok!? (1)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780864)

RIM will probably tell them to go piss up a rope - they can't afford to lose all their non-Indian government customers.

The other two should do the same.

Speaking of which - all those outsourced-to-India types are going to complain when they can't use their crackberries any more.

Re:So what happens if google says ok!? (1)

socz (1057222) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780924)

Hmm, that just made me think of all the cust serv centers out there. So if lets say, RIM or G placed "one of their servers in India" so DoT can put their server in to monitor, as customers of say, Verizon or AT&T, could we say they're violating our rights to privacy?

Re:So what happens if google says ok!? (4, Informative)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781320)

The problem is that RIM can't comply - their system is designed so that only the customer has the decryption key. The customer creates the key, not RIM. If India wants the key, they have to sue the customer, not RIM.

Re:So what happens if google says ok!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32781634)

The eavesdropping capabilities are in place. They just want it spoon fed to them. There is also a more nefarious reason for this:

They want overlap to other countries. They want Google to make a mistake and hand India's intel account information from other countries. They want RIM to hand them a backdoor that not just gives them custody of information in their country, but in other places.

If I were one of the three companies, I'd just blackhole the .in TLD and the IP addresses that are geographically linked to it, and move on.

Double or Politics? (2, Insightful)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780790)

I hate it when I can't judge if things like this is just power-play or if they actually honestly mean what they say.

Re:Double or Politics? (1)

Compholio (770966) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780826)

I hate it when I can't judge if things like this is just power-play or if they actually honestly mean what they say.

Does it matter when the end result is always that they do both?

I like Chinese (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32780828)

I like Chinese - they are more discreet and tend to gain access to systems by means of security vulnerabilities which they discover themselves. Meanwhile Indians have adopted the western approach - if you are not sure you can solve a technical problem, negotiate with the customer.

Re:I like Chinese (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32781804)

I like Chinese [youtube.com] too.

what do u think (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32780920)

look here ever one is complaining, but what do you think of US government. Don't u think they have access to ur email and all those stuffs. Recent update was about ICQ chat going to russian company and US law enforcement agencies. http://yro.slashdot.org/story/10/06/26/2149233/US-Fears-Loss-of-ICQ-Honeypot [slashdot.org] . Take it ever one has to comply with individual nations monitoring laws....

Does this apply to ALL accounts? (2, Interesting)

PerformanceDude (1798324) | more than 4 years ago | (#32780980)

Logically it will be impossible to tell if an account belongs to a citizen or a visitor (unless they add some authenticated sign-up procedure for users). So if I use my email account in India as a visitor, does that make me open to have all my emails read? I have done business in India and lost several deals due to refusing to pay the "special fee" asked by the buyer to make the deal happen. So with my present level of trust in how things are done in India, I can't even begin to imagine how the knowledge gleaned by "intelligence services" from foreign visitors will find its way into the Indian economy. If the providers cave in to this, then that would be an EPIC FAIL and I would have to stop using most of those services and/or find secure alternatives. So, this is not a matter of the service providers missing out on business just in India. If they cave in, India might still have the services available, but many of the lucrative business users in the rest of the world may well walk.

Governments are the problem, not the solution (5, Insightful)

VTEngineer (1033634) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781038)

they have no right whatsoever to read email traffic. Terrorists have officially won as government is leveraging attacks to increase their power over all. Wake up people, government is the problem. Terrorists, even when very successful, effect a tiny percentage of a population. Yet, the government grows more powerful over all in order to supposedly protect the population. This is about control, not protection. Such a shame that so may are willing to throw away their rights in the face of terror. The terrorists have won. Now they are fighting over who will control the levers of power. The citizens have already lost all liberty.

Re:Governments are the problem, not the solution (0)

logjon (1411219) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781162)

We fucking know; you're preaching to the choir. The problem is that for every one of us there are 10 hillbillies with 15 kids each, waving their flags and saying "this is 'murica, you don't like it, you can get out."

Re:Governments are the problem, not the solution (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32781216)

Terrorists, even when very successful, effect a tiny percentage of a population.

You might want to read up on affect vs effect [rutgers.edu]

Self Inflicted (1)

Linux-Fiend (309073) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781100)

Awesome way for a government to send it's country back to the stone ages.

Requirements Engineering 101 (2, Insightful)

dasunst3r (947970) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781236)

RIM, Skype, and Google's communications already "comply with formats that can be read by security and intelligence agencies" if the government wants to wiretap the suspects upstream of their devices.
Can it be read? Print it out or keep it on the screen, your choice.
Is it human-readable? Sure!
Does it mean anything on first glance? That's questionable.

I am merely playing devil's advocate.

I'll be forwarding this to my employer. (4, Interesting)

Mal-2 (675116) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781246)

We have outsourced some of our repetitive grunt work to a company in India. Once we got the glitches and language barrier out of the way, they have proven they can do the job so long as they are told EXACTLY what to do. Otherwise they will halt the moment they go off-script and not continue until we have made a decision. Sometimes I think they "get confused" just to get a break on some of the shittier work, but there's no way to prove this. It doesn't make them extra money to do this, since they have more than one job in the pipeline at any given time.

The problem is that we have to use e-mail to communicate with them. It's hosted on our own server, and they use a VPN to access it. Will WE have to comply with these conditions as well? If so, they can kiss the contract goodbye because we are bound by privacy laws to keep this information out of the hands of third parties -- including foreign government agencies.

For example, one of the things they will do is check to make sure an insurance policy has the same drivers and vehicles on it that we submitted to the carrier. In order to do this, they must cross-reference the driver list containing the name, date of birth, driver license number, and state of residence. The middle two of these four are considered protected information under both state and federal statutes.

Mal-2

Re:I'll be forwarding this to my employer. (1)

McGiraf (196030) | more than 4 years ago | (#32782050)

"we are bound by privacy laws to keep this information out of the hands of third parties"

outsourcing to India does not involve a third party? sheesh

RIM cannot comply... (1)

Local ID10T (790134) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781306)

FTFA...

The BlackBerry security architecture for enterprise customers is specially designed to exclude the capability for RIM or any third party to read encrypted information under any circumstances, the company said in 2008 in a note to customers. The security architecture is based on a symmetric key system whereby the customer creates his own key, and only the customer possesses a copy of his encryption key, RIM said.

Re:RIM cannot comply... (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781324)

Same it seems as a linux distro with gpg integrated into an email client.

Re:RIM cannot comply... (1)

Martin Blank (154261) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781548)

That applies to the enterprise customers. How many terrorist groups have set up a BES server? I don't think that the protections on general public users are nearly the same.

Note that I'm not supportive of the Indian government's demands, but not because they're entirely infeasible, as some have suggested. They need to learn to keep doing some things the hard way.

Acceptable... (5, Interesting)

Todd Knarr (15451) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781352)

The proper response from Google should be a simple "Your terms are acceptable.". Followed by all IP addresses assigned in India getting only a "403 Forbidden" page when accessing any Google service, and all search results leading to sites located in India or operated by Indian entities being removed from the listings. For extra Bastard points, all e-mail originating from Indian addresses gets rejected and all phone calls from India get a no-service tone.

Re:Acceptable... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32781648)

It's always funny to see people going "omg governments are evul" suggesting corporations should act both government like, and evilly. Idiots.

Re:Acceptable... (1)

JesseMcDonald (536341) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781970)

Except that the GP's suggestion was neither government-like nor evil. Where is the coercion? That is what is evil about government, and there is no coercion in simply refusing to interact with someone.

Well, Easy to solve. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32781396)

Very easy problem to solve, just have countries who own those two companies, ban all imports from India, till they stop acting like assholes. I'm sure when they see their export earnings down the commode, they will think different.

Re:Well, Easy to solve. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32781538)

Too many people want their bananas.

The Fractured Internet (0, Troll)

gavron (1300111) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781468)

It's time to remind the world that the Internet is the result of US DoD research.

It is a privilege to connect to it, not a right.

India, China, and other countries with false sense of entitlements -- take note -- the plug can be pulled.

E

Re:The Fractured Internet (1)

hacksoncode (239847) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781662)

Ok, sure *originally*, but that's a bit like saying that NASA can put conditions on people's ability to buy and drink Tang.

Only a *tiny* fraction of the internet is government funded, created or even researched any more. If they want to prohibit India from visiting .gov sites, more power to them.

Re:The Fractured Internet (1)

agnosticnixie (1481609) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781664)

No actually, ARPAnet is dod research, the protocols in the internet are all open and have people from a lot of countries working of them. The US also has no power to pull a plug, only 24% of the major DNS servers are american, if the US wants to get out of the world, they will be the only ones to suffer.

Re:The Fractured Internet (1)

epiphani (254981) | more than 4 years ago | (#32781980)

Wow, you obviously don't understand how the internet works. The US has no more ability to unplug India or China than Iran has the ability to unplug the US.

Re:The Fractured Internet (1)

russotto (537200) | more than 4 years ago | (#32782236)

Wow, you obviously don't understand how the internet works. The US has no more ability to unplug India or China than Iran has the ability to unplug the US.

Actually, unplugging India would be fairly simple for the US. It simply involves submarine work. Disconnecting China could likely be effectively accomplished the same way, at higher risk; I don't think there's significant overland cable from China to the rest of the world.

Iran, lacking much naval power, could not disconnect the US the same way.

Hope they ban landlines soon too. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32781848)

Stupid call centers..... what the hell are those people saying.

No Hotmail? (1)

Teun (17872) | more than 4 years ago | (#32782224)

The first thing that struck me is the absence of Hotmail on this list.

Could it mean Microsoft is already complying?

Re:No Hotmail? (1)

mano.m (1587187) | more than 4 years ago | (#32782382)

Hotmail was built by an Indian, so special privileges.

What could possibly go wrong? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32782370)

And there's 0% chance that these backdoors will be used for industrial espionage, because nobody in India is corrupt enough to turn classified business information over to someone's competitor in exchange for a bribe, righit?

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