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The 'Back' Button the Most Clicked Firefox Icon

timothy posted about 4 years ago | from the whatchu-clickin'-about-willis? dept.

Firefox 267

darthcamaro writes "How many times did you click the 'Back' button in your browser last week? According to a new study from Mozilla, it's likely that you clicked 'Back' a whole lot. 'Across Windows, Mac and Linux 93.1 percent of users clicked the button at least once over the course of a five-day period. In total the study reported that users clicked on the back button 66 times over the course of five days. The next most used button is the 'Reload' button with 73.2 percent usage and 22 clicks on average per user over five days. Other areas of the main window that were heavily used include the Search Bar where users input search queries. The study found that 67.9 percent of users used the Search Bar for an average of nearly 16 clicks per user over the course of five days.'"

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Uhhhh (-1)

coolgeek (140561) | about 4 years ago | (#32781116)

How exactly do they know this? Is there some kind of spyware running in FF?

Re:Uhhhh (5, Informative)

Sir_Lewk (967686) | about 4 years ago | (#32781148)

How exactly could you know the answer to your query? Well by RTFA of course!

The study data was collected on an opt-in basis from nearly 10,000 users of the Mozilla Test Pilot addon which surveys Firefox usage.

Re:Uhhhh (1)

allo (1728082) | about 4 years ago | (#32781150)

there is a test-pilot extension for recording such feedback to help improve firefox.

Re:Uhhhh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781160)

Also, does it just count clicks on the interface or what I do (mouse button under right thumb)? Backspace key?

Re:Uhhhh (1)

multisync (218450) | about 4 years ago | (#32782018)

Also, does it just count clicks on the interface or what I do (mouse button under right thumb)? Backspace key?

Ctrl-t is my "most common button," followed by Alt-left arrow, Alt-B + down and right arrows, enter, tab, shift-tab, Ctrl-r, Ctrl-w, Ctrl-c, Ctrl-v, Ctrl-x ...

Why it was made big (4, Informative)

SimonTheSoundMan (1012395) | about 4 years ago | (#32781118)

Old news. This is why they made it bigger in 3.0.

Re:Why it was made big (3, Insightful)

Shin-LaC (1333529) | about 4 years ago | (#32781300)

I never use the back button. I hate having to wait for pages to load/render/whatever, so I got in the habit long ago of opening most links in new tabs so they load while I'm reading something else.

Re:Why it was made big (5, Informative)

spazdor (902907) | about 4 years ago | (#32781578)

Sometimes links won't open in a new tab because they're implemented with some Flash and/or Javascript fuckery. When this happens, I just regular-click on the link and then middle-click on the 'back' button - thereby opening up the previous page in a new tab instead.

Re:Why it was made big (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 4 years ago | (#32781676)

When this happens, I just regular-click on the link and then middle-click on the 'back' button - thereby opening up the previous page in a new tab instead.

I didn't know that, spazdor. Thanks. That's a good one.

Re:Why it was made big (4, Interesting)

berwiki (989827) | about 4 years ago | (#32781822)

If I had mod points, I would have modded you up purely for using the word fuckery. Bravo.

Re:Why it was made big (5, Insightful)

Threni (635302) | about 4 years ago | (#32781738)

I hate Back taking ages cos it's reloading the screen. It's in memory - just show what you showed last time. I don't care that it might have changed. No, I don't want you to resend the message - just show me the bloody page you showed me just seconds ago before I accidentally clicked/changed my mind.

Re:Why it was made big (1)

Blue Stone (582566) | about 4 years ago | (#32781842)

I rarely us the back button either.

All links get opened in tabs, so my tab bar becomes a readily-accessible history trail all immediately visible at any time. Using 'click'+'back' feels too much like wandering along a dark tunnel.

Re:Why it was made big (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | about 4 years ago | (#32782090)

Nor me. I use the right-click to open a menu and select back

But what's really interesting... (1)

msauve (701917) | about 4 years ago | (#32781480)

'Across Windows, Mac and Linux 93.1 percent of users clicked the button at least once over the course of a five-day period. In total the study reported that users clicked on the back button 66 times over the course of five days.

Now, I'm no statistician, but that seems to indicate that there are (66/93.1% =) 70.9 people who use Firefox. Probably less, since some users would have clicked more than once.

Re:But what's really interesting... (1)

Mr Z (6791) | about 4 years ago | (#32781504)

Erm, that's an average of 66 clicks per user I'd imagine.

Re:But what's really interesting... (3, Funny)

Threni (635302) | about 4 years ago | (#32781778)

> Erm, that's an average of 66 clicks per user I'd imagine.

He's no statistician.

Re:But what's really interesting... (2, Informative)

stjobe (78285) | about 4 years ago | (#32782054)

Since the study was made with a Firefox plugin, I think you'll find that 100% of the Windows, Mac and Linux users in the study use Firefox.

Re:Why it was made big (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781996)

And why Microsoft decided to make the thumb buttons on their mice act like "back" and "forward" by default. Would you believe this is still not implemented in Konqueror [kde.org] ? (Bug filed March 2006.) Although perhaps, if the article is right, the small button should be "reload" instead of "forward".

O: (1)

OopsIDied (1764436) | about 4 years ago | (#32781120)

I use alt + left for back. my most clicked button = stumble upon ;)

Re:O: (3, Insightful)

SimonTheSoundMan (1012395) | about 4 years ago | (#32781206)

Or three finger swipe on a Mac.

Re:O: (1)

LostCluster (625375) | about 4 years ago | (#32781296)

Yep... and that's the most-often mistakenly given command I ever issue.

Re:O: (2, Interesting)

zippthorne (748122) | about 4 years ago | (#32781348)

Multitouch is amazing. I'd say get a Mac just for that, if I hadn't heard that windows 7 has some gestures, too. Mac has a decent gesture vocabulary, but they really need some way for you to define your own, too, especially as many applications don't support the full vocabulary.

At any rate, I love my "giant" (or as I now refer to it, "the right size") trackpad. The new iMacs should've come with a USB multitouch pad instead of the new mouse.

Re:O: (1)

roju (193642) | about 4 years ago | (#32781546)

Not being able to rebind four-finger-horizontal-swipe is super annoying. App switch, really? It would be amazing if it went to the next/previous virtual desktop in spaces instead.

Re:O: (1)

tumnasgt (1350615) | about 4 years ago | (#32781612)

I agree, I use the Expose four finger swipe very frequently (so much I feel lost on my iMac), but the side to side application switching is useless, Cmd+Tab is way faster.

Re:O: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32782010)

That sounds dirty.

Re:O: (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 4 years ago | (#32781398)

Backspace is even easier. Assuming you're not in a text field of flash object.

Re:O: (1)

OnlyJedi (709288) | about 4 years ago | (#32781956)

I have a mouse with a back button that maps to alt-left behind the scenes. Most other built-in functions I use mouse or keyboard-shortcuts for as well, so my most-clicked buttons would all be from extensions. Or to close background tabs.

I have never hit the back button (3, Funny)

Codename Dutchess (1782238) | about 4 years ago | (#32781134)

Because I have a 7-button mouse. Hax!

Re:I have never hit the back button (1)

Yaotzin (827566) | about 4 years ago | (#32781892)

Actually, it's the same for me. Although I only use 5 of the buttons. Two of those are right by the thumb, very handy for back/forward usage. MX518, the best mouse I've ever used.

Ha, amateurs! (1)

EnsilZah (575600) | about 4 years ago | (#32782038)

I've stripped my UI to just the menus I need, the address bar and the search bar, for back I either use the mouse or backspace when I'm feeling fancy.
It's quite amusing to see someone else try to use it, though on the downside I don't have a girlfriend anymore.

Or... (4, Insightful)

deesine (722173) | about 4 years ago | (#32781136)

it's the most used gesture: Right button down, drag left.

Re:Or... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781260)

Or, if you have a newer Mac laptop, putting 3 fingers down and sweeping them left. Combine that with two-finger scroll, and I never actually use the back/forward buttons or scrollbar. Hell, for most general browsing, I can do it one-handed without a keyboard and very minimal moving of the mouse.

Yes, I realize that makes it sound like I browse a lot of porn. So?

Actually, I have seen Win laptops with multitouch scrolling, but not sideways. I don't know if those support multi-finger gestures or not, though....

Re:Or... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781336)

Or ALT+Left arrow

Re:Or... or... or... or... (1)

Animaether (411575) | about 4 years ago | (#32781392)

Is that in FireFox by default? It doesn't seem to do anything on this machine (Win/FF3.6.6).
I know I can add it by using e.g. http://www.mousegestures.org/ [mousegestures.org] , but do add-ons count?

A sibling poster already mentioned the alt+left arrow.. I wonder how many ways there actually are...

1. Back button
2. Alt+Left Arrow
3. menubar: History - Back (and thus: Alt+s, B)
4. Right-click (context menu) on any blank area of a page - Back (and thus: Right-click, B)
5. Backspace button (maybe Win only?)
6. Shift+Mousewheel Down

Can't think of a 7+ right now.. any takers?

Re:Or... or... or... or... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781434)

Most mouses have a back button built in. That's what I tend to use more than anything.

Re:Or... or... or... or... (1)

Animaether (411575) | about 4 years ago | (#32781576)

I suppose that would make #7 - an application or driver sending a 'back' command directly to the browser (no idea if that's still DDE or somesuch).

Although it's also possible that the mouse driver simply fakes keystrokes (such as the Backspace key) when that button is pressed.. in which case, I'm not sure that would count as a different FireFox method so much as an input device method.
( my laptop has a little 4-way direction button that can be configured to have left = Back as well )

Re:Or... or... or... or... (1)

jbuk (1581659) | about 4 years ago | (#32781770)

Command-[ on a Mac has the added benefit of breaking free of any keyboard captures a flash applet may have induced.

keyboard (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781152)

What about keyboard shortcuts like command+R or F5?

IE (4, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | about 4 years ago | (#32781166)

For Internet Explorer, Ctrl+Alt+Delete is tops

Waste of time (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781182)

Just right click --> back or install mouse gestures.

How many buttons are there? (1)

line-bundle (235965) | about 4 years ago | (#32781188)

There aren't that many buttons to click on anyway.

I didn't click any ... (5, Funny)

siddesu (698447) | about 4 years ago | (#32781212)

I'm using Vimperator, you insensitive clod!

Or for this Opera user: (1)

Slutticus (1237534) | about 4 years ago | (#32781220)

Right click followed immediately by a left click.

I can't live without Opera mouse gestures. Now if only they would integrate this idea with the mutli-touch functionality of the iPhone for their mobile browser..... Just imagine it.

Zero Times (4, Funny)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 4 years ago | (#32781230)

Zero times, I use vimperator.
I don't need to move my hands from the keyboard like some ape.

Re:Zero Times (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 4 years ago | (#32781414)

I do it gamer/modeler style. One hand on mouse, one hand on keyboard.

Backspace is my back button of choice (I tend to mouse left-handed when I do stuff like surf)

Re:Zero Times (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781488)

I bow before you, oh majestic lizard man from the future! ALL HAIL THE LIZARD MAN! ALL HAIL THE LIZARD MAN!

Re:Zero Times (2, Funny)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 4 years ago | (#32781526)

Good, you can be used to round up others of your kind when I wish to cook and eat your men or mate with your women.

I very seldom "go back"... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781252)

I pretty much consistently use ctrl-click to open links, then just ctrl-w when I'm done with them...

Re:I very seldom "go back"... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 4 years ago | (#32781272)

Middle mouse button would do if you must use a mouse.

Re:I very seldom "go back"... (1)

zippthorne (748122) | about 4 years ago | (#32781376)

That's because firefox still doesn't do page caching properly. Afaik, only Opera does it close to right (Safari used to, with "snap-back" but then they limited it to just google for some stupid reason): you shouldn't have to re-download/refresh the head page when you're exploring links. Opening them in a buncha different tabs to get the same effect is a kludge.

Re:I very seldom "go back"... (1)

Reziac (43301) | about 4 years ago | (#32781816)

Explain exactly what you mean, please? about the improper caching, I mean.

I use "open in new window" all the time, due to not wanting to reload (or lose) some previous page. Old Netscape didn't seem to need to reload stuff, but Moz/SM is inconsistent about it.

Self-contradictory? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781280)

"The heatmap will be updated over the course of the Firefox 4 beta program. Hopefully, this visualization will help us understand how the various UI changes affect user behavior, and ensure that these design decisions are in fact improving the product for our (beloved) end-users."

"Now that we know how users are using FF3, we can figure out how to pessimize FF4's UI. It'll look like Office's Ribbon, or Chrome, or Opera, but whatever it is, it won't look or feel anything like FF3. But it'll look good on our resumes when we can say we're up on all the hot new UI trends, even though everyone's flaming us for them. And we'll make sure to use little icons for everything instead of words, because then we don't have as much stuff to translate when it comes time to localize the product."

Sorry if I sound like a curmudgeon, but UI these days seems more about mental masturbation and keeping up with the Joneses than actually taking a good product and making it better. The first couple of months of any major Firefox upgrade has consisted of nothing more than figuring out what they changed, and which about:config settings I need to tweak in order to change it back to something I found usable.

Re:Self-contradictory? (1)

hkmwbz (531650) | about 4 years ago | (#32781772)

Are you saying that you know better than professional UX people how a UI should look, feel and behave?

You say they are contradicting themselves, but so are you. First you complain about how the UI will get worse because they are just following trends without considering usability, and then you admit that you just don't want Firefox to change.

Re:Self-contradictory? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781928)

This a million times.

And i hope to tech god that they don't go near a Ribbon Style interface, they are AWFUL. I have perfectly decent eyesight, in fact, i had it tested Thursday, perfectly healthy for my age.
Nor will i be using a touchscreen for it. And if i did have a touchscreen, i certainly would not be using my fingers on it, stylus or nothing.

WHY do people insist on ruining perfectly decent designs? Screw silly looks, that is what themes were built for, leave default UIs basic enough to get the job done, and easy enough for customization.

I don't even use the buttons in FF (when i use it), or even tabs, address bar, menu, anything.
Everything is behind a click / hotkey. I want as much visible space for webpages.
Sadly the Chromium devs aren't up for this, despite the fact they want to get rid of the browser and make the webpage the most important part. I haven't came across any of them that want the ability to modify / hide UI elements. I would ditch that tab bar in a heartbeat if i could.
My FF has been smaller than Chromium from before it was even announced...
I still use it as my main browser though, FF is just stuck way behind. Maybe FF4 will bring me back. Maybe.

Also, WHY do Mozilla insist on screwing around with APIs so damn often?
APIs were meant to hide crap like that from the developers, changes shouldn't break anything... unless it is some SERIOUSLY large changes that make it redundant. Apparently this is the case every "major-minor" release.

Re:Self-contradictory? (1)

adbge (1693228) | about 4 years ago | (#32781972)

In my opinion, Firefox could definitely use some work on their UI. I would like the default install of Firefox to take up less screen real estate, but I can see where power users might be uncomfortable with drastic change. It's obviously a balancing act: don't become antiquated, but at the same time don't make large UI changes all at once. However, I'm more interested in performance. When it comes to a web browser, performance probably means more to me than the polish of the GUI (within reason).

Because it's in the upper-left? (5, Interesting)

MrEricSir (398214) | about 4 years ago | (#32781288)

I informally studied the habits of websurfers at my websites with Google Analytics. I found that for almost every page, the most clicked link was whatever I put at the top left.

My hypothesis was that our eyes were just drawn to any graphic at the top left, no matter what it was, and so we'd click on it.

I'd be interested to see some behavioral UI studies about this.

Re:Because it's in the upper-left? (1)

Mitsoid (837831) | about 4 years ago | (#32781384)

been a long time, but back when I was building websites it was commonly stated that (as long as the website is in english/for english audiences), people attempt to read from top-left to bottom-right, just like a book... if you made a well designed menu you might channel their eyes more top-down along the left, if you don't, then they will start top-left but may read across....

At least, that's the natural tendency... annnddd most of the information I'm stating was from the time before Flash was on almost every website... The most 'active' distraction would be a multi-color flashing .GIF that stripped too many colors from the pallet to reduce the file size... so my info's dated ;-p

Re:Because it's in the upper-left? (1)

RivenAleem (1590553) | about 4 years ago | (#32781418)

This is the same for many Instructional documents we use in industry. It has been identified that the first place anyone will look when you give them a page of instructions is the top left (in countries that read right to left this is reversed).

So we always put the most important information up there (Safety) and then the next most important information feeds to the right and down etc.

You might be interested in Talsico [talsico.com] who's ideology we use to create instructional documents.

Re:Because it's in the upper-left? (1)

ratnerstar (609443) | about 4 years ago | (#32781446)

I informally studied the habits of websurfers at my websites with Google Analytics. I found that for almost every page, the most clicked link was whatever I put at the top left.

My hypothesis was that our eyes were just drawn to any graphic at the top left, no matter what it was, and so we'd click on it.

Alternate hypothesis: all those people were trying to click the back button, but missed.

Re:Because it's in the upper-left? (1)

MrEricSir (398214) | about 4 years ago | (#32781898)

Alternate-alternate hypothesis: people who clicked the back button were actually trying to click the top-left of the webpage.

Or maybe there's a bit of both going on there, the two are hardly mutually exclusive.

Re:Because it's in the upper-left? (1)

Reziac (43301) | about 4 years ago | (#32781646)

There are some studies about what people actually SEE on web pages at http://www.useit.com/ [useit.com]

Don't let the site's plainness and 1996 colours put you off, it's got a LOT of good info.

Re:Because it's in the upper-left? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781688)

My hypothesis was that our eyes were just drawn to any graphic at the top left, no matter what it was, and so we'd click on it.

Not too sure how useful this.

Remember how many people complained about where the print/save/etc. command was in Office 2007 applications? It was under an unlabeled "Office Button" menu at the top left. Seems that lots of people need some cue about a buttons function before the button is useful, other than just a location.

Re:Because it's in the upper-left? (1)

MrEricSir (398214) | about 4 years ago | (#32781850)

Glad to know I'm not the only one; it took my 30 minutes to figure out how to print in Office 2007.

(I should have just Googled it.)

Re:Because it's in the upper-left? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781712)

I'd venture that actually it was that most sites have the upper left graphic represent a link back to the root node / home page of the forum / site / whatever.

i got to your page with google, and then i wanted to know more so i try to get to the root..

Or perhaps bad site design affecting usage? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781830)

It could be the most clicked icon because some asshole put javascript in a website that hijacks the back button. As in "Gawddammitwhycan'tIgetbackwhereIwasbefore!!!" while clicking it 500 times. At least that's what happens until they figure out the what the little arrow for the history dropdown is for and then managing to go back by using the list.

When most people hit back, they want to go back, not have the browser refresh send them to the same page they just left. There should be an (obvious) option to disable that kind of (malicious) script somewhere without needing an extension.

Re:Because it's in the upper-left? (1)

PatPending (953482) | about 4 years ago | (#32781974)

You're presuming left-to-right languages. Some languages are right-to-left (e.g., Arabic), so of course "top right" would apply in this case.

Re:Because it's in the upper-left? (1)

hedwards (940851) | about 4 years ago | (#32782108)

That's been known for many years. People tend to scan left to right across the top then diagonally to the middle of the left hand side, then diagonally to the bottom right of the page. It's a habit people picked up presumably from reading things like magazines and newspapers. Not sure what works for languages that go from left to right, but in English and similar languages it works out.

Two types of users (4, Interesting)

ascari (1400977) | about 4 years ago | (#32781310)

Read once in a web usability design book that there are two types of users: The ones who are search oriented and the ones that are navigation oriented. Search oriented users use a search engine instead of the browsers navigation bar and the browsers back and forward buttons instead of the web site navigation and links. Navigation oriented users use the browsers navigation bar and the web sites navigation links.

Of course that's an oversimplification but if that's even remotely true (which I don't know if it is) the high frequency of back button use indicates that there are a lot of search oriented users out there. And if that's the case most web sites are designed poorly or plainly wrong from their usability perspective. What I mean is that in-site navigation is a heavy part of most web sites when it really shouldn't be. Instead web design should promote the use of in-site search and back button use.

Re:Two types of users (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781470)

Search-vs-Navigation sounds like a fancy way of saying command-vs-gui, based upon what we already know about user preferences from non-web applications.

It's the same; multiple simple, powerful commands in sequence to produce the desired output vs. simple, basic, but repetitive - or possibly overgeneralized - commands that don't require any pre-knowledge of the system other than the ability to infer the function of a widget by the graphic (icon) or text (buttons, menus, etc.) associated with it.

So, searching for what you want (if you know how to ask) vs clicking link after link after link, gradually (hopefully) getting closer to what you want each time.

Re:Two types of users (1)

Alwin Henseler (640539) | about 4 years ago | (#32781644)

Your comment makes no sense. First, if there would be these 2 types of users (and each group is significant) then the only thing that makes sense, is to provide both search & navigation options to get around a site, not emphasize one method over the other.

Second, you suggest that one method may be more effective than the other. Which is also nonsense: this depends on the site, how large it is, how well layed out the site's navigation is, the site's users, individual user habits & preferences, and even what contents is being searched. And sometimes a combination of search + navigation may get better results than either method.

Instead web design should promote the use of in-site search and back button use.

I'd assume that users who rely on in-site search, also rely on search engines a la Google to find a site in the 1st place. In that case, 'back' either doesn't work (new browser tab/window), or gets you back to search engine results. Read: makes the user leave a site immediately after hitting 1 page. That makes no sense from web designer's point of view: if you have something to offer, you want users to stay on your site.

As for me, I prefer to start with answering visitors' question "WTF is this?" for each page they land on. As to not annoy / waste time of visitors who were looking for something else, and provide a sense of "I'm here" for users that were looking for whatever you put up.

Linux 93.1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781322)

"Across Windows, Mac and Linux 93.1 ..."

Linux 93.1 ?!?! does this refer to kernel version? have I been in a coma for one helluva long time?

ohhh, i get it. the use of another comma could have saved me much worry

So much... (1)

noncaptusest (1644871) | about 4 years ago | (#32781332)

for technology thrusting you forward!

I hope this doesn't guide programming decisions (1)

wealthychef (584778) | about 4 years ago | (#32781338)

I hope programmers don't equate "most clicked" with "more valuable" or "more useful." In my view this is a useless statistic.

Re:I hope this doesn't guide programming decisions (2, Informative)

SmlFreshwaterBuffalo (608664) | about 4 years ago | (#32781524)

Screen real estate is valuable, and knowing how often buttons are used tells you which ones to make easily accessible and which ones can be buried.

When it comes to UI's, "most clicked" should absolutely be equated to "most valuable". Doing otherwise could result in a horrid design where the simplest tasks require very convoluted and excessive steps.

Context menu (1)

pkbarbiedoll (851110) | about 4 years ago | (#32781360)

Right-click & back. Never use the button on the toolbar.

Re:Context menu (5, Interesting)

Reziac (43301) | about 4 years ago | (#32781730)

Likewise...

Except when the entire visible area is an image, in which case there IS no "back" on the context menu, thanks to a moronic decision back when Mozilla was new, and that persists today across the entire Moz-based family.

Seems the lead programmer thought there was too much "clutter" on the context menu, so removed "back" when the pointer was over an image. There was a huge outcry in the MozDev newsgroup, and a vote of 701 to 2 (yes, real numbers) to restore it, but his response was essentially "*I* like it this way, so fuck you. Moz isn't meant for end users anyway." (I witnessed this exchange in the newsgroup myself.)

Someone made a patch to address the deficiency, but it was not widely distributed and seems lost to history. Perhaps someone will see fit to recreate it, for those of us who curse this decision on a daily basis (but not being coders, have no way to fix it).

People use the search bar? (1)

Zixaphir (845917) | about 4 years ago | (#32781372)

I took the search bar off my firefox. I prefer using keywords. Just gotta type in the address bar, "g query" and it'll do a google search for whatever query I want. I also have it setup for wikipedia, lyricwiki, php.net, isohunt... y'know, the works. I find it to be a ton faster than some drop down menu. Of course, I'm a tinkerer. Most people, sadly, aren't.

Re:People use the search bar? (1)

Garble Snarky (715674) | about 4 years ago | (#32781520)

I use the keyboard shortcut to go to the search bar, then ctrl-up/down to select my search site, which is google or wikipedia in 99% of cases. It's pretty fast.

What's funny to me is that I know technical people that will ignore the google search bar, type "www.google.com" into the url bar, search for wikipedia on the google homepage, click the top result, then FINALLY type their wikipedia search query into the wikipedia search box.

Ctrl-[ (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781388)

I never use the back button but I do use the keyboard shortcut.

back button? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781390)

I got rid of my back button long ago, along with all the other useless button that waste precious screen area.

lrn2kbrd

4th mouse button (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781400)

Fourth mouse button you insensitive clod

Back is my least-clicked (1)

ap0 (587424) | about 4 years ago | (#32781408)

I can't remember the last time I actually clicked the back button. If I'm on my Mac, I three-finger swipe right to left to go back, or if I'm on a desktop, I use backspace. I do use the search toolbar a lot, though.

It's simply because of bad design (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 4 years ago | (#32781412)

The keyboard shortcut for reload is F5, which you hit with the left hand, but the keyboard shortcut for back is backspace (or some combination of keys involving an arrow) which is hit with at least the right hand, if not both. If you're mousing (which is handy for web browsing) then you don't want to have to take your hand off the mouse all the time. Likewise, the back button is near the upper-left corner of the window so it's easy to find.

Huh (2, Funny)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | about 4 years ago | (#32781432)

I would have thought Slashdot's 'submit' button would have been the one most clicked in Firefox.

Zero. (1)

simetra (155655) | about 4 years ago | (#32781452)

In Opera, it's right button down, left button click to go back, left button down, right click to go forward. Always.
It's the same in Firefox, until Firefox gets updated and the gestures plugin is broken for a few weeks until the maintainers fix it for the new firefox version.
Going to IE is a nightmare. Then it's right click, click Back on the right-click menu.
Once you get used to mouse gestures, you wonder why anyone would ever waste so much mouse mileage going up to the Back button all the time.

Re:Zero. (1)

jpate (1356395) | about 4 years ago | (#32781734)

Once you get used to mouse gestures, you wonder why anyone would ever waste so much mouse mileage going up to the Back button all the time.

i'd say something about using vimperator (in a tiling window manager), and wondering why anybody wastes so much time going to the mouse all the time, but I'm just not that smug.

clearly! (1)

Dyinobal (1427207) | about 4 years ago | (#32781472)

Clearly this means they should make the button larger so people can find it more easily!

Re:clearly! (1)

hedwards (940851) | about 4 years ago | (#32782126)

Eh, screw it, just make it take up 3/4 of the screen space and remove all those other annoying buttons. The perhaps replace the URL field with a Google bar. Also it should only actually go to lolcats and pr0n sites.

This thread surprises me (3, Interesting)

Zouden (232738) | about 4 years ago | (#32781496)

Do you all just use the 3-button mouse that came with your Dell? Back and forward buttons have been common on mice for the last decade. Why click a toolbar button when you can just use your thumb?

Re:This thread surprises me (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 4 years ago | (#32781540)

My use a mouse when you can use the keyboard?
Vimperator FTW!

Re:This thread surprises me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781542)

Do you all just use the 3-button mouse that came with your Dell? Back and forward buttons have been common on mice for the last decade. Why click a toolbar button when you can just use your thumb?

Because if my muscle memory is trained for my mouse, I'm going to be nonfunctional when I'm on someone else's machine.

If my muscle memory is trained for the lowest-common-denominator mouse, on the other hand, I'll be functional on any machine I encounter. Keyboards don't change nearly as often (nor between models) as mice.

Once upon a time, the goal of a UI was that it be equally usable on any machine, so that it didn't matter what platform you were on. (Note to self: Find the guy who invented tear-off tabs and tear his tab off. I clicked on the damn tab and moved the mouse down so I could highlight some text, and the fucking thing popped open a new goddamn window. WTF? Fuck mouse gestures.)

Re:This thread surprises me (2, Funny)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 4 years ago | (#32781962)

(Note to self: Find the guy who invented tear-off tabs and tear his tab off. I clicked on the damn tab and moved the mouse down so I could highlight some text, and the fucking thing popped open a new goddamn window. WTF? Fuck mouse gestures.)

let's instead find the guy who decided to implement tear-off tabs without a checkbox to disable them, and check his box until he's disabled.

Open last tab closed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781500)

I'm pretty sure I press Ctrl + Shift + T more than I press Ctrl + T

and in other news (2, Insightful)

rossdee (243626) | about 4 years ago | (#32781558)

the F2 key is the most used key in Solitaire

Am I the only person (1)

CSFFlame (761318) | about 4 years ago | (#32781736)

who just uses the backspace key?

No wonder it's most clicked (1)

A_Non_Moose (413034) | about 4 years ago | (#32781746)

You have to because some freaking idiot made it a unified/menu-like like IE.

So instead of a single click and you're done, it's now, click, menu, choose/click the fwd/back,
go wrong direction (possibly) or too far, click the unified button again (repeat).

A FWD (with menu and clear direction/levels) and BKWD with the same menu and CLEAR direction.

I HATE the way IE does it (can't seem to fix) and it's the first thing I fixed in FF3.

tubg18l (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781874)

hand...don't look at 7our soft,

At least SOME use the search box (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32781926)

I think it's really annoying to watch people use a browser with a search box next to the URL bar (like Firefox). They are blind to this search box. They type www.google.com into the URL bar, then type facebook into the resulting search box. Jesus! What kind of dumbass muscle memory is that? And I've seen this in people who are computer science students, who should be card-carrying geeks. People who should know better.

It's fuckery writ large.

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