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US Pirate Movie Site DNS Seizure Fail

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the routing-around-it dept.

Piracy 343

An anonymous reader writes "Last week, the US government in a highly publicized copyright protection frenzy took the extraordinary step of seizing domain names from foreign movie sites like NinjaVideo.net and TVshack.net. While the seizure raises confusing Internet legal / jurisdiction questions (the US and perhaps the state of Kentucky can seize domain names for foreign companies?), this study shows the legal issues may be moot — the raids mostly failed. Within hours of domain name seizure, tvshack.cc was back up and running (but this time using a Chinese registrar and a Cocos Islands ccTLD)."

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Other countries should start policing Internet too (4, Insightful)

sopssa (1498795) | more than 4 years ago | (#32813818)

More recently in 2008, Kentucky courts seized the domain names for 141 online gambling sites (all for companies based in other countries including Malta and Costa Rica). The Kentucky court action threatened to disrupt global traffic to PokerStars, Full Tilt, Absolute Poker and many others. As of March of this year the case is still winding its way through Kentucky appellate and supreme court (the case has been reversed then upheld and is currently resolving issues of standing).

What gives US the right to seize domains of companies based in other countries and force their laws, views and things like ACTA and banning of internet casinos to citizens of other countries?

You wouldn't want China to take down international sites that violate their laws, would you? Or radical countries like North Korea? It's not even just about Internet, but in general too. What makes it OK for USA to do so. Actually, instead of filtering maybe China should start just taking down the sites they don't like.

Since US tries to put laws on the citizens of other countries, I say it's only fair other countries do the same. Like execute the death sentence of Facebook CEO [softpedia.com] . The best thing about this is that if Zuckerberg gets put into Interpol wanted list, he gets extradited to Pakistan as soon as he visits some other country. It's only fair, right?

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (3, Insightful)

logjon (1411219) | more than 4 years ago | (#32813888)

Please don't confuse us with our government. We're as fucking dumbstruck and horrified with this as you are. Just...wtf?

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (3, Insightful)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 4 years ago | (#32813962)

Please don't confuse us with our government. We're as fucking dumbstruck and horrified with this as you are. Just...wtf?

You voted them in, so the're your responsibility. Unless you want to go the tin-foil hat route and say that the US populace has no influence or control over their government - in which case I would be looking for another country of residence.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (5, Insightful)

logjon (1411219) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814030)

I don't know if you realize this, but we have a 2 party system. Every four years, we're faced with a decision between a giant douche and a turd sandwich. The government is not accountable to us, so long as they're getting the terrorists.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (5, Insightful)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814396)

I don't know where you vote, but my ballots frequently have more than two candidates on them, in addition to a write in option. You are perfectly free to choose as you please. The government is as accountable as we make it, and not one iota more. All this whining is just an attempt to shed personal responsibility.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (1)

logjon (1411219) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814494)

What a crock of shit. Let me know how third party voting and making the government responsible to you goes. By the way, there's 50 morons waving flags and thanking jesus for ever-expanding federal powers and supporting a constitutional amendment outlawing flag-burning, at this very moment while you're on here spewing bullshit about personal responsibility; I'm sorry, but I'm not responsible for them or the idiots they elect.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814646)

What a crock of shit. Let me know how third party voting and making the government responsible to you goes.

And this is why third-party voting in the US fails so miserably. "I don't wanna waste my vote by voting for a guy who actually represents what I want in government. I wanna vote for someone who might win."

Independents and minor parties win seats all the time in other countries.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (4, Insightful)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814690)

You, and only you are responsible for your vote. Propping up the regulars is your choice.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (1)

networkBoy (774728) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814510)

I tried that here in California (Libertarian)...
Seeing their power base eroded the TwoParties pulled the wool over the voters eyes and got a ballot measure passed to consolidate their power. Now the top two vote getters in the primaries will be the only two that can be voted for in the election, thus you will no longer be able to vote for a third party.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (2, Insightful)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814714)

No write in? Then work your magic on the primaries

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (3, Insightful)

mldi (1598123) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814548)

I don't know where you vote, but my ballots frequently have more than two candidates on them, in addition to a write in option. You are perfectly free to choose as you please. The government is as accountable as we make it, and not one iota more. All this whining is just an attempt to shed personal responsibility.

Or it's just realistic. You can vote, technically, for whoever you want. But when the media and 99% of everyone else is touting a choice between a giant douche and a turd sandwich, the dumb masses of the public:
a) won't vote for someone else in an organized effort
b) think voting with "their" party is still the best option (even though their views might be wildly different), or
c) have no idea what the other options are

Realistically, you'd have to have more than a 2-party system in order to pull anything off. That means including more parties in official debates, getting some media exposure (they are currently largely ignored), etc. No exposure = no chance, and right now the media and the existing 2 major parties control the exposure, and thus the chance of anything different happening.

It's not so black and white, and it's not about shedding personal responsibility. It's about what the current situation is.

But yes, actions DO speak louder than words.

Stop copping out. What you're saying is bullshit. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814420)

What you're saying is pure bullshit. There are usually several third-party candidates in most areas. You can vote for one of them. Now, they might not win, but it's sure as fuck better than putting your vote towards any Democrat or Republican candidates. At least then you're part of the solution, rather than part of the problem.

Re:Stop copping out. What you're saying is bullshi (0)

logjon (1411219) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814452)

You think wasting a vote on someone who won't win is part of the fucking solution?

Re:Stop copping out. What you're saying is bullshi (1)

jgagnon (1663075) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814556)

You think wasting a vote for someone you know will constantly infuriate you is a better solution?

Re:Stop copping out. What you're saying is bullshi (0)

logjon (1411219) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814564)

It's no worse.

Re:Stop copping out. What you're saying is bullshi (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814964)

It is.

It makes you responsible and it sends a message to the idiot you voted for to keep doing what they are doing. At the very least, if you vote for a loosing 3rd party, you still sent a message of what you actually want from your leaders.

I'm thoroughly convinced that politics for the majority of U.S. Citizen is no longer about policy, but about being on the winning side. It's why the RNC and DNC look like pep rallies for collage football then a political forum.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814608)

The government is not accountable to us, so long as they're getting the terrorists.

That's bullshit. They're not accountable to us because no one gives a fuck about getting involved in government. No one cares about the issues and so until the government seriously fucks up (usually takes a famine or some sort of tyranny) we mostly don't give a shit. Oh yeah we bitch and groan but the parties control who gets into office so the general public doesn't have a say in the matter. And that is why the government is not accountable to the citizens.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (1)

kimvette (919543) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814752)

I vote for the giant douche -- I'm not into scat.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (1)

whoop (194) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814078)

I tried to Google "another country of residence," but it only came back with this [tinyurl.com] ...

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814114)

I don't suppose you've got a loft for rent?

I have to live here currently, and the Christian fundamentalism, social regressivism, and anti-intellectual attitudes make me ill.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (3, Insightful)

ArhcAngel (247594) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814192)

Unfortunately there are a lot more like this lady [youtube.com] than there are of me.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (1)

networkBoy (774728) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814610)

Thanks.
I only had a little tiny shred of hope for my country left. Now that too is gone to oblivion.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (-1, Flamebait)

Per Wigren (5315) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814684)

Well, she sure is naive and stupid, but Michael Savage is still a douchebag, a bully and a fascist. I honestly don't understand why people like him, Bill O'Reilly and Glenn Beck can be so popular. They do nothing but spread hatred. It must really suck living a life being so bitter.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814776)

Yeah those founders fridays on Glenn Beck's TV show really spread hatred don't they? I mean teaching black people about the Black Founding Fathers is so hate-filled....

You obviously have tuned in to all of none of the shows.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (2, Insightful)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 4 years ago | (#32815040)

You obviously have tuned in to all of none of the shows.

I have tuned in to quite a few of those shows and find in general that their discussions are so propped up by logical fallacies and bad research that they are a joke.

  • I have heard Rush emphatically contradict himself and also use emotive methods to try and slip invalid arguments past critical thinkers.
  • I have heard Hannity complain about politicians not wanting to come on his show and accusing them of basically hating him - yet continue to refer to them with denigrating language.
  • I have heard Beck take lots of topics, focus on some small part of them and beat it to death without considering the whole, because he can't understand overall consequences.
  • I have heard Savage yell and scream and shout down people who disagreed with his extremist views and then whine about how the UK won't let him in.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (1)

kimvette (919543) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814848)

**sigh** It's frightening that she is actually allowed to function in society. She's so typical of Obama supporters. I can't help but wonder if she is the reason we have "texting" laws now, despite that if officers enforced actual safety related laws (improper lane changes, improper turns, driving left of center, failure to maintain control of the vehicle, reckless driving, hindering the flow of traffic, failure to yield, and so on and so forth). "Why there oughtta be a law" then when reminded there are already literally DOZENS of laws which make something unlawful or illegal the answer is "yeah but we need this law."

These people are so batshit stupid that we keep relecting the same frigging crooks every election day.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (2, Insightful)

natophonic (103088) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814922)

Fortunately for you, people like that lady rarely can be bothered to actually go vote, whereas people like this lady [youtube.com] take it as their Holy Mission to get to the polls for every single general, primary, or school board election.

Perhaps if we all didn't get so wrapped up in the moral panics and anger points politicians use to manipulate us, you and I could elect people who'd actually do something sane about things like IP laws and their enforcement... you know, "stuff that matters."

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814212)

Wow, I really wish I could have as much faith in my political system as you obviously have in yours!

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (2, Interesting)

Haffner (1349071) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814214)

The execution of the majority of government policy is left to unelected bureacrats.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814288)

"You voted them in, so the're your responsibility"

You live in Australia and made him what he is today, so you're responsible for Rupert Murdoch, who is just as responsible for the current state of American politics.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (1)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814792)

"You voted them in, so the're your responsibility"

You live in Australia and made him what he is today, so you're responsible for Rupert Murdoch, who is just as responsible for the current state of American politics.

No, Rupert has been a US citizen for quite a while - it was the US rules on foreign media ownership that made him what he is today. You may consider him a bastard, but he is an American bastard.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (0, Flamebait)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814336)

You voted them in, so the're your responsibility.

I didn't marry my sister, so I'm not allowed to vote in Kentucky.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814930)

I didn't marry my sister

You should do - your pa tells me she gives great head

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (1)

ElectricTurtle (1171201) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814386)

OK, so you must like censorship, since you live in Australia and you voted in the fucks who are filtering your internet. What's good for the goose is good for the gander.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (1)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814724)

OK, so you must like censorship, since you live in Australia and you voted in the fucks who are filtering your internet. What's good for the goose is good for the gander.

LOL .. way to try for the win with a logical fallacy (as well as an assumption or two for good measure).

The correct statement of affairs is that by continually partaking in the electoral process I am taking responsibility for the state of my government. However the democratic process doesn't guarantee an outcome that is favourable to a single voter.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (1)

asifyoucare (302582) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814860)

OK, so you must like censorship, since you live in Australia and you voted in the fucks who are filtering your internet. What's good for the goose is good for the gander.

They're all fucks. We had no choice.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (1)

Jedi Alec (258881) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814870)

Taking responsibility for the fuckups of one's government is not the same as liking or even supporting those fuckups.

Please also note the slight disparity between fuckups that only screw over one's own citizenry and fuckups that go beyond the border.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814434)

Attn: Mods

Please correct the erroneous moderation on the parent's comment. The truth is not flamebait.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (1)

dyingtolive (1393037) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814620)

I didn't vote them in.
/ronpaul

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (1)

blackdragon07 (1357701) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814800)

You voted them in, so the're your responsibility. Unless you want to go the tin-foil hat route and say that the US populace has no influence or control over their government - in which case I would be looking for another country of residence.

I think your an idiot! We may have voted them in but they do their own thing once in office. Most of the public doesn't like how he is doing things while some thing he is the best thing in the world. I didn't vote for him so for him to pull this I'm surprised those countries didn't just tell them to piss off, which they have every right to do.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (0, Troll)

ArhcAngel (247594) | more than 4 years ago | (#32813950)

ArhcAngel Likes This

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (4, Insightful)

BigJClark (1226554) | more than 4 years ago | (#32813964)


I think its a sign of desperation. They know they are losing the war, and instead of changing with the times, they are adopting basically undefensable, unwinnable strategies.

I'm not forming an opinion on who's right or who's wrong, but I can tell you who is winning.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (2, Insightful)

paeanblack (191171) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814398)

I think its a sign of desperation. They know they are losing the war, and instead of changing with the times, they are adopting basically undefensable, unwinnable strategies.

Given that I'd never heard of these sites until they got some federally subsidized free publicity, I'd have to agree with you.

That said, I'd love to see the MPAA turn around and sue the Feds for contributory copyright infringement.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (4, Insightful)

wmbetts (1306001) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814008)

Nothing gives the US that right. I'd say a fair amount of people here feel the same way I do about that (at least I hope so).

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (5, Informative)

klingens (147173) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814022)

What gives the US the right is simply this: the registry for said TLD is located in the US.

Just like China can apply their local laws to the TLD registry they control ,.cn, and North Korea can apply its laws to .nk, so can the US do the same for the registries which are based there: .com, .net, .org, .us.

The same applies to webservers: no matter under what TLD a webserver serves, if it's physically located inside the US, US laws apply to this server. In that case the US can't control the DNS name of the sites which are served but the pages/sites themselves.

If you don't like that, you can only try to convince your preferred registry to relocate to a country which has laws and procedures which are better suited to your goals. Or you could simply register a domain under that country's TLD.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814070)

Actually, instead of filtering maybe China should start just taking down the sites they don't like.

It's difficult for countries outside of the US to affect the DNS resolution since, iirc, nearly all of the core DNS/TLD resolving servers are in the US and the US can just change the target of the domain.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (3, Funny)

tophermeyer (1573841) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814074)

But we invented it! Al Gore laid the tubes himself! Shouldn't we get to make the rules and get to say who can use it and who can't?

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (2, Informative)

digitig (1056110) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814622)

That's why you get the three letter TLDs like .com and everybody else has to be satisfied with things like .co.uk and .co.cn. Same reason the UK is the only country that doesn't have the country name on its postage stamps, the USA is the only country that doesn't (have to) have its country identifier as its TLD.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (1)

QuantumRiff (120817) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814094)

It isn't just us.. I seem to remember Ebay being sued, because they allowed the sale of Nazi things on their website, which broke German (I think it was german, might be france) law. Not the country specific ebay.co.de or whatever.. but ebay.com. Because Ebay did not prevent someone from accessing a foreign site..

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (1)

twidarkling (1537077) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814698)

It's Germany that has the laws restricting sale of memorabilia of, and media mentioning, the Nazis.

Somewhat reasonable (4, Interesting)

iYk6 (1425255) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814128)

What gives US the right to seize domains of companies based in other countries and force their laws, views and things like ACTA and banning of internet casinos to citizens of other countries?

It's simple really. .net is a TLD owned by the USA. I don't agree with their views, but their methods are somewhat reasonable. If you get a .net domain, you play by USA rules, if you get a .cn domain, you play by China's rules, and if you get a .ru domain, you play by Russia's rules. TVShack didn't play well with the USA, the USA kicked them out, and now TVShack has shacked up with Cocos Island.

Personally, I wouldn't mind if all domain names had less strict rules, but that just isn't how it is.

Re:Somewhat reasonable (1)

silas_moeckel (234313) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814258)

Problem is the root domain name is effectively under the control of the US. Same goes for a lot of the servers that handle that. Stop thinking about domain names as anything but a resource location. In the real word if you say your store is at 111 main st, somewhere china nobody but china can do much about that. If you servers are at 111 main st in china they should be the only ones policing it. Do not want your citizens going there police your citizens.

Re:Somewhat reasonable (2, Insightful)

WiglyWorm (1139035) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814270)

Absolutely. I wanted to get a .gr domain, but I would have to be greek. Did I complain? No. I found another TLD.

Re:Somewhat reasonable (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814834)

I wanted to get Socrat.es, but apparently speaking Spanish isn't enough =(

Re:Somewhat reasonable (1)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 4 years ago | (#32815010)

Absolutely. I wanted to get a .gr domain, but I would have to be greek. Did I complain? No. I found another TLD.

grrr!

Re:Somewhat reasonable (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814304)

This, and it also shines a very bright light on the importance of getting the root DNSSEC key issue sorted out. As it is, the US could still impose their will on the domains in question by intercepting and manipulating requests for the TLDs that are being used now. The US would have to proxy the traffic to the cc TLD servers, but that's technically feasible and, with control of the root key in the hands of a US company, not even DNSSEC could prevent it.

Re:Somewhat reasonable (2, Insightful)

ElectricTurtle (1171201) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814312)

This should be the first and last post of the discussion, but of course this will turn into a why-I-hate-the-evil-US-imperialists topic, nevermind the fact that most other countries in the first world are more strict with their internets than we are, and the developing world regulate it into tiny pieces if it could. So, yeah, let's internationalize the internet and suffer the same sort of bullshit filtering and bullshit libel laws that exist in most of the rest of the world. That will be awesome.

Re:Somewhat reasonable (1, Insightful)

WiglyWorm (1139035) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814694)

Remember, mods there is no "-1 disagree" and troll is not a substitute. Personally, I find this a worthy point of discussion.

Re:Somewhat reasonable (2, Insightful)

jgagnon (1663075) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814722)

It is not that other countries are saying their laws are worse than the US laws, it is the US saying theirs are better than everyone else. The sooner the US realizes it isn't alone in the world the better the world will be. The sooner the US realizes it isn't at the top of the totem pole for every issue the better the world will be. This blind arrogance needs to stop.

Re:Somewhat reasonable (5, Insightful)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814458)

Those rules are quite reasonable when talking about country TLDs (such as .us). The problem is that .com/.net/.org are semantically global, not US-specific. If you're a global company, you're supposed to have a .com. And that shouldn't automatically mean that US laws apply to you all of a sudden.

Re:Somewhat reasonable (1)

klingens (147173) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814836)

It's not a problem. The servers, and companies running these TLDs are american companies running their servers in the US. As such, they have to obey US laws. Just like Google China has to obey US laws and Google US has to obey US laws: do (physical|legal) business in a location, obey the laws of the place.

If the registries or the customers of the registries or ICANN doesn't like that, they need to find another place to set up shop. It doesn't matter what .tld this is: the US judicial system decided something unlawful was going on on these DNS servers (resolving IPs for unlawful purposes) on US soil, so they shut that down.
No matter which: .com, .us. or .iq for iraq (a few years ago, .iq was served from a texan company IIRC). When something unlawful under US laws happened in that .iq domain space, the US had all the right in the world to interdict it.

your comment would make sense (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814506)

if you limited it to the .us domain

"if you get a .cn domain, you play by China's rules, and if you get a .ru domain, you play by Russia's rules"

absolutely. and that applies also to .us domains. no argument whatsover

but .net, .com, etc., are concepts that are not native to the usa, not used native to the usa, and should not be governed solely by the usa. of course, legally you are still 100% correct, but law has a funny way of not reflecting common sense or morality, and this is one of those cases

Re:your comment would make sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814782)

The registry for .net is Verisign, which is a US company. Thus the .net domain is under US control. It has nothing to do with perceived semantics of .net. All that matters is control.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814560)

What gives US the right to seize domains of companies based in other countries and force their laws, views and things like ACTA and banning of internet casinos to citizens of other countries?

The same sort of laws that give any other country the right to seize the assets of companies, foreign or domestic, that violate their local laws.

Venezuela nationalized foreign oil production (including assets of US oil companies.) China is very close to seizing google.cn. That's life in the real, international, multi-jurisdictional world.

tvshack did exactly the "right" thing: it found a friendly jurisdiction (Cocos Islands) and set up shop there.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (1)

rumith (983060) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814716)

What gives US the right

Its might. "Because we can" is a very unethical but a pretty much incontrovertible argument.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (4, Funny)

Mitsoid (837831) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814854)

What gives US the right to seize domains of companies based in other countries and force their laws, views and things like ACTA and banning of internet casinos to citizens of other countries?

If you are in another country YOU OBEY THEIR LAWS.

The US did NOT overstep their boundries. The mentioned websites Hosted part of their website (the pointer to it) In the US. That 'pointer' was seized as it was illegal in our country.

Again:
1. Internet website did business with US Company. (They used a US registrar)
2. US based Registrar now violated US Law
3. US based Registrar was required to give the US Government the illegal 'property'

Don't host any part of your 'business' or 'website' in a country that violates their laws. If you want to intentionally violate the laws of a country, don't do it IN that country. It's just common sense!

If you think the USA is wrong here, GO TO China, or the UK, and break their laws. See what happens.

Side Note: I agree with most net-neutrality ideas. I agree with free speech (as it exists in the US law) on the internet -- (e.g. illegal to yell FIRE or call in bomb threats, but mostly free). Unfortunately the US General Public has almost no control here. Sorry. Big Business buy votes and forces our government to enforce laws they created.

I'm glad the sites are running again. As they are not illegal in other countries I respect your rights to view the content in accordance with your laws... And I'll leave that at that as I'm in the USA... ;-)

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814944)

Shut up.

You know what the difference between say the US actions, and the Chinese or North Korean ones?

They aren't touching people because what they're saying. The operations here are because of what people are doing, which is RIPPING OFF the copyrighted properties of actual companies that did their own work, but now some douchebags from who knows where are profiteering off them.

Ain't that nice of them? Giving you something for free because...they're doing you better than the other guys.

If somebody was doing this to Open Source products, the outrage would be legendary.

But since it's BIG MEDIA, they're EVIL and doing anything to them is OK.

So shut up.

Re:Other countries should start policing Internet (1)

zen_sky (1157991) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814962)

How is taking down a website for unlawful behavior compare to executing someone for what other people are legally saying on his website? If the government called in an air strike on tvshack's headquarters, then it would be a fair comparison.

Yup (1)

Pojut (1027544) | more than 4 years ago | (#32813856)

Hydras (hydra?) can be vicious bastards.

I have to thank the U.S.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32813872)

I spent this last weekend watching some good DVD rips and some high quality telesync movies, streaming, for absolutely free.

If it weren't for the "takedown", I'd have never known they were around.

So moot is involved in this nao? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32813912)

Send in the clowns...

Foreign Domains (1)

jamesyouwish (1738816) | more than 4 years ago | (#32813924)

How did they bring down foreign domains anyways. If the registar and DNS servers are not in the states how can they do this without corporations from those foreign companies. I think I will RTFA now.

Re:Foreign Domains (1)

guru42101 (851700) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814118)

From TFA

"the video sites registered the domain names using US based companies."

Obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32813960)

You can't stop the signal
~Mr Universe

PWn3d (4, Funny)

xmorg (718633) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814026)

Owned! Now get ice back to work fighting the drug cartels.

Re:PWn3d (1, Insightful)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814492)

I hope that was sarcasm, because most of the drug problems are caused by the drug laws themselves. We're having the same problems with drugs we had with alcohol during prohibition.

Don't people ever learn from history?

Striesand Effect (5, Interesting)

snarfies (115214) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814038)

NinjaVideo.net and TVshack.net? Never heard of either one - UNTIL NOW. I hope one of them has Blake's 7, haven't seen that since I was a kid.

Re:Striesand Effect (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814186)

Don't forget the other domains too!

The domain names seized were: TVShack.net, PlanetMoviez.com, ThePirateCity.org, Movies-Links.TV, FilesPump.com, Now-Movies.com, ZML.com, NinjaVideo.net and NinjaThis.net. All the sites' domain names were registered in the U.S., although one was physically based in the Netherlands.

Re:Striesand Effect (2, Insightful)

v1 (525388) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814198)

Streisand Effect [wikipedia.org] in motion perhaps? You'd think they would've learned this lesson by now? Or maybe they think it's working in their favor, "hey look at all the FREE PRESS we (RIAA) are getting!"

Re:Striesand Effect (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814756)

Your theory is supported by the subject line of the post to which you replied. It seems likely, yes.

Re:Striesand Effect (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814426)

I just threw my Blake's 7 VHS tapes into the trash last week.

Blake's 7 (1)

name_already_taken (540581) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814682)

NinjaVideo.net and TVshack.net? Never heard of either one - UNTIL NOW. I hope one of them has Blake's 7, haven't seen that since I was a kid.

I got every single episode of Blake's 7 a couple of years ago via bittorrent. I used mininova to find the torrents. They included the DVD special features, with the making-of interviews with the cast and crew which are just fascinating.

The only thing I couldn't find there is the Blake's Junction spoof, which you can watch on Youtube.

Netcraft confirms it... (2, Funny)

Lord Dreamshaper (696630) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814076)

rule of law is dead

Obligatory Star Wars quote (4, Interesting)

mcrbids (148650) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814220)

"The more you tighten your grip, Tarkin, the more star systems will slip through your fingers."
- Princess Leia to Grand Moff Tarkin

The United States would do well to understand what this means. We can benefit immensely by being the "central hub" of the Internet but we are pissing this historical advantage away at a frightening pace by not living up to our ideals with respect to "freedom of speech". The Patriot Act did wonders to ensure that we couldn't host data for other countries; and now this retarded "kill switch" idea will do the same for our ability to broker connections.

There really should be an actual litmus test so that people in charge of sectors of our economy have some clue how that sector works. Unfortunately for us, the world doesn't work that way.

Internet Rules (1, Insightful)

helix2301 (1105613) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814278)

The interesting thing is these admins that run these sites are more well versed in how the internet works then the people trying to take down the sites. They basically got taken down then outsmarted everyone by registering with another DNS in another country.

Cue for the response to response (1)

Lead Butthead (321013) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814528)

You do realise the next thing they'll do is requiring TLD DNS to start logging IPs of hosts requesting IP address to those domains, since "they're surely up to No Good (tm) if they're looking up IP address(es) of those IP pirates." (Yes, I know it's absurd. But more bone headed things have happened before.)

Re:Cue for the response to response (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814618)

I have in my archives a resolver that would have only sent to TLD the request for "cc." and continued down the chain asking the cc server for there. It cached entries so it wasn't all that slow.

Re:Internet Rules (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814540)

You must be new to politics. Politicians normally know very little about the bare metal aspects of the legislation they pass. Do you honestly think that they knew anything about practicing medicine when they did the health care reform bill? Do you think that Diane Feinstein knew the first thing about firearms when she was trying to jam the wrong magazine into a rifle on national TV to promote the assult weapons ban?

Slashdot IS useful (1)

wzzzzrd (886091) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814282)

Thanks for all those links, didn't know about them. Entertaining stuff.

Ninjavideo back up yet? (1)

Oyjord (810904) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814488)

I can't find Ninjavideo up with a new domain/registrar. If anyone finds it please let me know.

Um... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814584)

What part of "Ninja" don't you understand?

virus? (4, Informative)

MagicM (85041) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814504)

I just went to tvshack.cc and my virusscanner (NOD32) went nuts and Java things started executing. I killed everything before it had a chance to do anything, but I'd say watch your step if you're going to visit that site.

Re:virus? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814628)

I just went to tvshack.cc and my virusscanner (NOD32) went nuts and Java things started executing.

Ditto.

Be careful.

Re:virus? (5, Funny)

Thing I am (761900) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814696)

Stop using anti-virus software and you won't get those annoying alerts.

Strange (2, Interesting)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | more than 4 years ago | (#32814820)

For me, it opened up a Chrome process which, according to top, was using 19Mbytes. System Monitor shows no unusual activity and no unexpected network traffic. Nothing interesting happened at all. Am I missing something?

Re:virus? (1)

markdavis (642305) | more than 4 years ago | (#32815004)

I just went to tvshack.cc and just got a normal looking website. No Java, no runaways, no issues. Perhaps it is because you are not using Linux+FireFox?

US Pirate Movie Site DNS Seizure Fail? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814566)

The headline sounds like a spam subject or a bunch of captchas.

Fail? Hardly! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32814604)

I still can't resolve ninjavideo.net using OpenDNS

this i5 goatsex (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32815014)

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