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Hands-on With Pixel Qi Screens In Full Sunlight

timothy posted about 4 years ago | from the no-shame-in-salivating dept.

Displays 87

griffjon writes with this drool-inducing bit, describing a "side-by-side comparison of the OLPC's screen and an Acer with the new Pixel Qi screen installed, both of course sharing Mary Lou Jepsen's screen technology: 'The XO's dual mode screen still rules in terms of pixel resolution at 1200 x 900 vs. the Acer's 1024 x 600. It was amazing to see Windows 7, Amazon Kindle software, the New York Times web site and a QuickTime video in direct sunlight. Shades of gray and some color tints are visible. Besides the XOs and e-ink based Kindle ereaders, no other color screen device I own can be seen as clearly in sunlight. Not even the famed iPad. In the video, you can see that at a certain angle where line of sight and sun are aligned, the new Pixel Qi screen glows as if backlit!'"

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87 comments

Whodunnit? Jewdunnit! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32826806)

Lifting the Lid on the Guilty Yid

The liberals got it exactly right. For years now they’ve been telling us how “vibrant” mass immigration has made stale, pale White societies. Well, London was certainly vibrating on 7th July and that got me thinking: What else have the liberals got right? Mass immigration “enriches” us too, they’ve always said. Is that “enrich” as in “enriched uranium”, an excellent way of making atom bombs? Because that’s what comes next: a weapon of real mass destruction that won’t kill people in piffling dozens but in hundreds of thousands or millions. Bye-bye London, bye-bye Washington, bye-bye Tel Aviv.

I’m not too sure I’d shed a tear if the last-named went up in a shower of radioactive cinders, but Tel Aviv is actually the least likely of the three to be hit. What’s good for you ain’t good for Jews, and though Jews have striven mightily, and mighty successfully, to turn White nations into multi-racial fever-swamps, mass immigration has passed the Muzzerland safely by. And mass immigration is the key to what happened in London. You don’t need a sophisticated socio-political analysis taking in Iraq, Afghanistan, Bosnia, Jewish control of Anglo-American foreign policy, British colonialism, and fifteen centuries of Christian-Muslim conflict. You can explain the London bombs in five simple words:

Pakis do not belong here.

And you can sum up how to prevent further London bombs – and worse – in three simple words:

PAKI GO HOME.

At any time before the 1950s, brown-skinned Muslim terrorists would have found it nearly impossible to plan and commit atrocities on British soil, because they would have stood out like sore thumbs in Britain’s overwhelmingly White cities. Today, thanks to decades of mass immigration, it’s often Whites who stand out like sore thumbs. Our cities swarm with non-whites full of anti-White grievances and hatreds created by Judeo-liberal propaganda. And let’s forget the hot air about how potential terrorists and terrorist sympathizers are a “tiny minority” of Britain’s vibrant, peace-loving Muslim “community”.

Even if that’s true, a tiny minority of 1.6 million (2001 estimate) is a hell of a lot of people, and there’s very good reason to believe it isn’t true. Tony Blair has tried to buy off Britain’s corrupt and greedy “moderate” Muslims with knighthoods and public flattery, but his rhetoric about the “religion of peace” wore thin long ago. After the bombings he vowed, with his trademark bad actor’s pauses, that we will... not rest until... the guilty men are identified... and as far... as is humanly possible... brought to justice for this... this murderous carnage... of the innocent.

His slimy lawyer’s get-out clause – “as far as is humanly possible” – was soon needed. Unlike Blair and his pal Dubya in Iraq and Afghanistan, the bombers were prepared not only to kill the innocent but to die themselves as they did so. And to laugh at the prospect: they were captured on CCTV sharing a joke about the limbs and heads that would shortly be flying. Even someone as dim as Blair must know you’ve got a big problem on your hands when there are over 1.6 million people in your country following a religion like that.

If he doesn’t know, there are plenty of Jewish journalists who will point it out for him. There’s the neo-conservative Melanie Phillips in Britain, for example, who never met an indignant adverb she didn’t like, and the neo-conservative Mark Steyn in Canada, who never met an indignant Arab he didn’t kick. Reading their hard-hitting columns on Muslim psychosis, I was reminded of a famous scene in Charles Dickens’ notoriously anti-Semitic novel Oliver Twist (1839). The hero watches the training of the villainous old Jew Fagin put into action by the Artful Dodger:

What was Oliver’s horror and alarm to see the Dodger plunge his hand into the old gentleman’s pocket, and draw from thence a handkerchief! To see him hand the same to Charley Bates; and finally to behold them both running away round the corner at full speed! He stood for a moment tingling from terror; then, confused and frightened, he took to his heels and made off as fast as he could lay his feet to the ground.
In the very instant when Oliver began to run, the old gentleman, putting his hand to his pocket, and missing his handkerchief, turned sharp round. Seeing the boy scudding away, he very naturally concluded him to be the depredator; and shouting “Stop thief!” with all his might, made off after him. But the old gentleman was not the only person who raised the hue-and-cry. The Dodger and Master Bates, unwilling to attract public attention by running down the open street, had merely retired into the very first doorway round the corner. They no sooner heard the cry, and saw Oliver running, than, guessing exactly how the matter stood, they issued forth with great promptitude; and, shouting “Stop thief!” too, joined in the pursuit like good citizens.

“Wicked Muslims!” our two Jewish Artful Dodgers are shouting. “Can’t you see how they hate the West and want to destroy us?” Well, yes, we can, but some of us can also see who the original West-haters are. Mark Steyn claims not to be Jewish, but his ancestry shines through time after time in his writing. Above all, there’s his dishonesty. One week he’s mocking anti-Semites for claiming that the tiny nation of Israel could have such a powerful influence for bad on the world’s affairs. The following week he’s praising the British Empire for having had such a powerful influence for good. You know, the world-bestriding British Empire – as created by a tiny nation called Britain.

If the Brits could do it openly and honestly, Mr Steyn, why can’t the yids do it by fraud and deception? And the yids have done it, of course. They’ve run immigration policy and “race relations” in Europe and America since the 1960s, and Steyn is very fond of pointing out what’s in store for Europe as our Jew-invited non-white guests grow in number and really start to show their appreciation of our hospitality.

Funnily enough, I’ve never seen him point out that the same is in store for North America, which has its own rapidly growing non-white swarms. And when Steyn launches one of his regular attacks on the lunacies of multi-culturalism and anti-racism, a central fact always somehow seems to escape his notice. He recently once again bemoaned the psychotic “Western self-loathing” that has such a “grip on the academy, the media, the Congregational and Episcopal Churches, the ‘arts’ and Hollywood”. Exhibit one: the multi-culti, hug-the-world, “Let’s all be nice to the Muslims” memorial for 9/11. This was his list of those responsible for it:

Tom Bernstein... Michael Posner... Eric Foner... George Soros...
Well, that’s a Jew, a Jew, a Jew, and a Jew – sounds like a lampshade collector showing off his Auschwitz shelf. But fearless “Tell It Like It Is” Steyn, ever-ready to mock the “racial sensitivity” of deluded liberals, is himself very sensitive about race when it comes to the Chosen Ones. He’ll kick dark-skinned Muslims and their liberal appeasers till the sacred cows come home and he can start kicking them too, but just like Melanie Phillips he never whispers a word about the Jews who created liberal appeasement or about the enormous power Jews wield in “the academy, the media, the 'arts', and Hollywood”.

The same is true of all other Jewish “conservatives”. They’re shouting “Stop thief!” at the top of their voices and hoping that no-one will notice that they all belong to the biggest race of thieves who ever existed. Those bombs went off in London because Jews have stolen large parts of Britain from their rightful White inhabitants and handed them over to the non-white followers of a psychotic alien religion. When non-whites commit more and worse atrocities in future, you won’t need to ask who’s really responsible: it’s liberal Jews like Tom Bernstein and George Soros, who organize mass immigration and the anti-racism industry, and “conservative” Jews like Mark Steyn and Melanie Phillips, who distract White attention from the racial motives of Jews like Soros and Bernstein. Heads they win, tails we lose – liberal, “conservative”, they’re all of them Jews.

Outside, leave the laptop at home (-1, Flamebait)

Gothmolly (148874) | about 4 years ago | (#32826832)

If you're outside, you should, you know, be outside, doing outsidey kinds of things.

Re:Outside, leave the laptop at home (3, Interesting)

necro81 (917438) | about 4 years ago | (#32826952)

This is mostly true. However, I have had legitimate uses for a laptop while in a bright outdoorsy environment. For instance, I've worked on rovers of various sorts that I drove using a laptop. Even when they operated autonomously, I would still trail along behind with a laptop for data collection purposes, or to just keep on eye on what they were doing. This was especially difficult when the rovers were working out in the middle of a snow/ice field. Between the sun shining overhead and the glare of the snow, the laptop screen was almost unreadable.

Re:Outside, leave the laptop at home (1)

SimonTheSoundMan (1012395) | about 4 years ago | (#32827610)

Why did you have to trail behind the car, why not just sit in the passenger seats?

Re:Outside, leave the laptop at home (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32828620)

Because he didn't want to end up dead?

Re:Outside, leave the laptop at home (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32829776)

He said rover, not car, so the vehicle was either too small for him to sit in/on without breaking it, or it was full of stuff (batteries) to operate.

Don't put words in the mouthes of others to make them look stupid.

Re:Outside, leave the laptop at home (1)

SimonTheSoundMan (1012395) | about 4 years ago | (#32833784)

Rover is/was a car manufacturer.

Re:Outside, leave the laptop at home (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32861588)

If he meant the car manufacturer he probably would have spelt it with a capital R, as the manufacturer's name is a proper noun.

Re:Outside, leave the laptop at home (3, Insightful)

cc1984_ (1096355) | about 4 years ago | (#32827058)

If you're outside, you should, you know, be outside, doing outsidey kinds of things.

Man , please look at the potential rather than just immediately pigeonholing these type of devices as things that cross social boundaries that shouldn't be crossed. I for one read books in the park and maybe in 20 years time I won't need to lug around a 1000 page novel when I'm only going to be reading 1 or two pages in a lunchtime; this device will suit me down to the ground.

Re:Outside, leave the laptop at home (1)

HikingStick (878216) | about 4 years ago | (#32827082)

Like relaxing on a beach while reading a book?

I have an eeePC, and because of the screen-rotation feature, found it an ideal little book reader. It is lighter than many books of the same size, it can be cradled comfortably in my off-hand (left, in my case), and the arrow keys end up in about the location where I'd naturally reach to turn a page. Beyond casual reading on a beach, that little laptop is great for caching offline web pages for bird and plant identification, and for a variety of other field references. Its only weakness is viewing the display in sunlight, so I, for one, welcome this innovation.

Re:Outside, leave the laptop at home (4, Interesting)

icebraining (1313345) | about 4 years ago | (#32827104)

You seem to only see the how people will use the computer instead of doing "outsidey things".

I see it as the opposite. If I work with a computer anyway, and assuming I'm not confined to the company's office, why shouldn't I at least be able to do it outside, enjoying the sun and fresh hair?

If people are "nerds" they'll be using a computer anyway. Preventing them from using it outside won't result in people spending more time doing sports, it'll just result in more people being in the darkness of their houses.

Re:Outside, leave the laptop at home (1)

icebraining (1313345) | about 4 years ago | (#32827144)

hair

Damn, just noticed it. Sorry!

Re:Outside, leave the laptop at home (2, Interesting)

slim (1652) | about 4 years ago | (#32827588)

I see it as the opposite. If I work with a computer anyway, and assuming I'm not confined to the company's office, why shouldn't I at least be able to do it outside, enjoying the sun and fresh hair?

Exactly. There's a nicely landscaped grassy area outside my office. If I was doing something paper based I could go out there and work on a fine day. With a suitable screen and WiFi, I could work on my laptop out there.

With my current standard laptop screen, I can't do that. I can't even sit and work in my conservatory at home if the sun's out.

Re:Outside, leave the laptop at home (2, Funny)

jgardia (985157) | about 4 years ago | (#32828578)

Move here to Munich! you won't have any problem about full sunlight, but maybe you will need a weatherproof notebook...

Re:Outside, leave the laptop at home (4, Funny)

AnonymousClown (1788472) | about 4 years ago | (#32827212)

If you're outside, you should, you know, be outside, doing outsidey kinds of things.

You mean like: masturbating, having sex with animals, anal sex, sex, peeping, ... things like that?

Re:Outside, leave the laptop at home (1)

tehcyder (746570) | about 4 years ago | (#32850794)

If you're outside, you should, you know, be outside, doing outsidey kinds of things.

You mean like: masturbating, having sex with animals, anal sex, sex, peeping, ... things like that?

Remind me not to go camping where you live.

Re:Outside, leave the laptop at home (1)

FranTaylor (164577) | about 4 years ago | (#32827440)

Tell that to the UPS delivery person.

Re:Outside, leave the laptop at home (4, Insightful)

couchslug (175151) | about 4 years ago | (#32827504)

"If you're outside, you should, you know, be outside, doing outsidey kinds of things."

Such as reading vehicle manuals when I work on them outdoors, ordering parts with the help of online catalogs, looking up welding consumables so I can email the part number and pick them up later... :)

With a display I can read in sunlight, I could comfortably speed up much of the work I do. Even inside, squinting to see detail sucks, and being able to stand back from a screen and read it easily is a plus.

Re:Outside, leave the laptop at home (1)

obarthelemy (160321) | about 4 years ago | (#32827750)

yep. no reading outside. If/when you work at home, no taking your laptop poolside instead of locking yourself up.

Half-full vs Half-empty: do while outdoors things we would normally have to be indoors to do, or start doing indoor-sy things when we have to be outdoors. Oh wait, when do we HAVE TO be outdoors ?

Re:Outside, leave the laptop at home (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 4 years ago | (#32828214)

Do these words of wisdom also apply to people who work outside?

Now, it isn't like I have to sully the purity of my untanned pastiness by facing sunlight on the clock; but I've heard persistent rumors of people who make vocational use of computers, among other tools, in the merciless company of our nearest star...

Re:Outside, leave the laptop at home (2, Informative)

Warbothong (905464) | about 4 years ago | (#32828532)

If you're outside, you should, you know, be outside, doing outsidey kinds of things.

Laptops are only an "indoorey" thing because their screens are pretty crap in the sunlight. This fixes the problem, thus why shouldn't computers be an "outsidey" kind of thing?

I use my XO outside all of the time. It's great to sit on a quiet bench in a park, have some lunch, feed the ducks and hack on some Python :)

Re:Outside, leave the laptop at home (1)

sootman (158191) | about 4 years ago | (#32829456)

> Laptops are only an "indoorey" thing because their screens are pretty crap in the sunlight.

Also: heat, humidity, dust, and bugs.

i will (1)

overcaffein8d (1101951) | about 4 years ago | (#32826942)

i will buy one when they come out with a netbook like that standard. not because i want to replace the screen, but because of the cost. after a few months of competition, the sunlight screen netbooks will become reasonably priced.

also, it would be nice if it had one of those fancy middle hinges so you can truly read it like an ebook reader. and, of course, a touch screen version of this would be too awesome for words.

Recipe For Success (0, Offtopic)

Revotron (1115029) | about 4 years ago | (#32827022)

Pixel Qi + Cortex + Android + MeeGo + Open-Source Hardware + XO Laptop + Arduino

Mentioning all of the above at least once will guarantee submission of your story to Slashdot and/or rampant circulation among hobbyists who think tacking a few wires to an already-built PCB while following a "how-to" guide makes them a "hacker". Even if your design doesn't incorporate any of the above, it's still good to mention them for street cred.

Re:Recipe For Success (1)

Overzeetop (214511) | about 4 years ago | (#32827102)

Why go to all that trouble - it's easier just to put "iPhone" or "iPad" in the summary to the editors and be done with it. Especially if it's on Timothy's watch.

Re:Recipe For Success (4, Funny)

YourExperiment (1081089) | about 4 years ago | (#32827540)

Pixel Qi + Cortex + Android + MeeGo + Open-Source Hardware + XO Laptop + Arduino

Oh god, I thought you were describing an actual device for a minute there. I think I just had a nerdgasm.

Re:Recipe For Success (2, Interesting)

peragrin (659227) | about 4 years ago | (#32827862)

perfect now shove it all into an ipad body and sell it for $399 and i will buy it.

the ipad is a nice form factor I just have to wait 2-3 years for anyone else to make something similar, as for what I want it for I will want features apple won't approve.

Re:Recipe For Success (1)

elewton (1743958) | about 4 years ago | (#32828212)

Not necessarily. The Notion Ink guys, if you believe them, will be coming out with one later this year.
I've been patiently holding my breath for a while now.

Re:Recipe For Success (1)

peragrin (659227) | about 4 years ago | (#32832514)

yep. any quarter now.

next quarter it will become 2011, After that it will be late 2011.

The real secret to apple's success is they don't announce anything that isn't actually ready for shipping. Even in software there are very few broken promises. It is the one thing that I wish every other computer company would mimic.

Re:Recipe For Success (1)

joh (27088) | about 4 years ago | (#32842314)

Last I read Notion Ink *will* come later this year with their tablet. But with a regular TFT. The Pixel Qi display will have to wait for a later model.

I agree though that this type of display is more important for tablets than for regular netbooks or notebooks. Only geeks use notebooks out in the sun and even then only rarely. You're much more likely to do only some light consuming out in the sun and this is what tablets are good at. I can image roasting in the sun and reading a book, but programming or such? Give me a dark basement deep at night for that.

Re:Recipe For Success (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about 4 years ago | (#32829728)

Meh, the iPad won't fit into my pocket. Give me something in the same sort of form factor as the N900, with an HDMI output, and I'll happily pay a similar amount.

here we go (4, Insightful)

VMaN (164134) | about 4 years ago | (#32827148)

"no other color screen device I own can be seen as clearly in sunlight. Not even the famed iPad."

is the ipad a particularly good screen in direct sunlight, or was it just an excuse to mention your "famed ipad" ?

Re:here we go (1)

gumbi west (610122) | about 4 years ago | (#32827268)

It is also worth pointing out that The New Yorker found the Kindle II's low contrast made it too difficult to read. In the review, the author ends up using it to buy books and then reads them on his iPhone even though he obviously wished there was a larger iPhone like device for reading books (obviously, pre iPad).

You have to wonder, are these screens higher contrast or the same dark gray on light gray?

Re:here we go (1)

camperdave (969942) | about 4 years ago | (#32827546)

Those were color? Why did they choose a B&W newspaper site as their comparison basis?

Re:here we go (1)

slim (1652) | about 4 years ago | (#32827620)

is the ipad a particularly good screen in direct sunlight, or was it just an excuse to mention your "famed ipad" ?

I think the iPad is advertised as being usable in daylight.

Re:here we go (1)

imakemusic (1164993) | about 4 years ago | (#32827810)

I've not used an iPad myself but from the reviews I've read it is in fact particularly bad for outside use.

Re:here we go (1)

rinoid (451982) | about 4 years ago | (#32828948)

Not if you turn up the brightness and of course read it at an angle which diminishes the reflection off of the glass! I find it highly readable and use it often on lunch in the sun or in my backyard. So, not particularly bad for outside use, in fact it's QUITE readable outside in full sunlight.

Red on Red! (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 4 years ago | (#32828150)

or was it just an excuse to mention your "famed ipad" ?

Stand down there soldier! I know you Apple Haters just go wild at any mention of an Apple product, so you probably overlooked the fact that "famed iPad" was heavily sarcastic! He dislikes Apple as much as you, no need to attack him.

Re:Red on Red! (1)

VMaN (164134) | about 4 years ago | (#32828478)

If you think that was an attack, you need to grow thicker skin :)

Re:Red on Red! (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 4 years ago | (#32828572)

It was fairly mild, but it was still sarcastic. It still displays as I said, a dislike for the iPad and is not trying to promote it... do you disagree?

On my mobile phone (5, Insightful)

markus_baertschi (259069) | about 4 years ago | (#32827162)

I'd like that screen on my mobile phone. That's where I'd need a sunlight-readable, battery conserving display most. Most GPS functions only work outside due to feeble GPS signals, but at the same time the display become almost unreadable.

There are plenty of business opportunities and markets for Mary Lou to explore !

Markus

Re:On my mobile phone (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about 4 years ago | (#32827494)

Not a phone, but I'd love to have one on a pocket-sized device. Something I could fit, along with a bluetooth keyboard, into my pocket and take with me when I want to work outside and not have to worry about finding some shade with a lot of cover for the screen.

Re:On my mobile phone (2, Interesting)

lobiusmoop (305328) | about 4 years ago | (#32827986)

I've had something like that for over 15 years now. [wikipedia.org] . Old-school greyscale LCD, in calculators and digital watches, has always had the advantage of being daylight-readable and low-power.

Re:On my mobile phone (4, Interesting)

Warbothong (905464) | about 4 years ago | (#32828602)

There are plenty of business opportunities and markets for Mary Lou to explore !

I can't wait until these are in ATMs (cash machines). Those bastards are so hard to read sometimes that I can have my face right up to them, hands forming a tunnel to the screen and STILL not make out the text!

Re:On my mobile phone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32835158)

Yep. You don't seem to be able to read it with the hand cup tunnel method, even when my raised hand, gripping my weathered blackjack, casts a shadow across the screen.

Re:On my mobile phone (1)

tehcyder (746570) | about 4 years ago | (#32850608)

I can't wait until these are in ATMs (cash machines). Those bastards are so hard to read sometimes that I can have my face right up to them, hands forming a tunnel to the screen and STILL not make out the text!

I normally ask one of the helpful homeless people who gather around these machines to hold my coat as a sunshade while I enter the PIN number.

Re:On my mobile phone (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | about 4 years ago | (#32831094)

The display on my Palm Pre is awesome in direct sunlight. I was honestly shocked the first time i was out hiking and using the GPS and it was perfectly usuable and enjoyable. I probably wouldnt watch movies on it in direct sunlight, but for just for digesting information ive never seen a screen like it. My old XV6700 was completely unusable in sunlight.

Re:On my mobile phone (1)

evilviper (135110) | about 4 years ago | (#32831648)

I'd like that screen on my mobile phone. That's where I'd need a sunlight-readable, battery conserving display most.

I don't get it... My $30 Motorola i425 phone has a (small) screen which is perfectly readable in direct sunlight.

Drop-in replacement is AWESOME (3, Insightful)

Gopal.V (532678) | about 4 years ago | (#32827236)

For once, I see the standardized parts working as they are meant to be. Swapping components on a netbook is hard to say the least, but to see someone just grab a part & shove it into a netbook, tells me that this could very well turn out to be one of the "optional" features for people when ordering off their favourite supplier.

When will these be available for 11.6in screens? (1)

Ardeaem (625311) | about 4 years ago | (#32827244)

I really want one for my HP mini 311, but the screen is 11.6" compared to this DIU kit. I've searched for details, but couldn't find any.

Maybe in my next laptop (1)

kg8484 (1755554) | about 4 years ago | (#32827318)

Every time I buy a laptop, I take a look at what my laptop is lacking and put that into a list of what I want in my next one. Being able to use it outside effectively has been on the list since my first one (after all, it's a laptop, it's portable, I want to use it outside). My current one converts into a tablet, which is definitely nice; I can now use it while walking, but the display is not up to snuff and in bright daylight it is unreadable. Depending upon how things play out with OLED displays (still 5 years away nearly 10 years after I heard about the technology), a transflective screen may be what I end up looking for in my next portable computer.

Re:Maybe in my next laptop (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 4 years ago | (#32827768)

Even OLED displays, being an emissive technology, still lose a great deal of their contrast when viewed under direct sunlight or any very bright light. This is completely countrary to how we see normal objects that reflect light, where the brighter the illumination is on an object that is diffusely reflecting light, the _greater_ the contrast is on the details of the object

OLED often worse than LCD in sunlight (1)

guidryp (702488) | about 4 years ago | (#32828550)

So far the early OLED cell phones are worse than LCDs. The need to try to overpower the sun for visibilty which isn't a great idea.

Transreflective solutions will win in these circumstances.

Re:OLED often worse than LCD in sunlight (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 4 years ago | (#32830794)

So what you mean is *any* reflective solution, not necessarily a transflective one (which is a particular implementation of combining reflective and emissive display technologies).

Re:Maybe in my next laptop (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about 4 years ago | (#32830176)

My netbvook would be a hell of a lot better if it had non-reflective glass/plastic. If it did you could use it in the shade, but reflections on the screen are brighter than the screen itself. That and the keyboard are the only things I don't like about it.

Uh... thanks, but no. (0)

mark-t (151149) | about 4 years ago | (#32827556)

"Shades of gray and some color tints are visible."

No thanks.

I want video-capable screen update times, full and vibrant color under all types of lighting conditions that I could otherwise comfortably read a normal book in, and not have the requirement that under any of them I might have to feel like I'm reading while staring into a flashlight.

Re:Uh... thanks, but no. (3, Insightful)

fastest fascist (1086001) | about 4 years ago | (#32827724)

Tough. I want a neural interface. This is here now, though.

Re:Uh... thanks, but no. (0)

mark-t (151149) | about 4 years ago | (#32827786)

Pratical neural interfaces are quite a few years away yet, possibly even a decade or more. A display like I described is probably no more than a year away now.

Re:Uh... thanks, but no. (3, Interesting)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 4 years ago | (#32827888)

I want video-capable screen update times, full and vibrant color under all types of lighting conditions that I could otherwise comfortably read a normal book in, and not have the requirement that under any of them I might have to feel like I'm reading while staring into a flashlight.

And I want a pony. Well, no, actually, I want a Maserati, but the outcome is still the same. I don't get what I want, so I have to live with the best that I can afford.

Pixel Qi screens are not perfect, but they are still a major step ahead compared to contemporary display tech, in that they blend some of the best qualities of normal and eInk screens with practically no downsides. That is already a big deal - if I can have a general-purpose tablet that can also work as non-eye-straining ebook reader with great battery life, well, that's awesome!

More will come in due time.

Re:Uh... thanks, but no. (0)

mark-t (151149) | about 4 years ago | (#32827998)

Yes, more will come in due time. I'm willing to wait. That's my point.

Re:Uh... thanks, but no. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32829648)

But you're bitching about it now, tearing down somebody's success. If people always focused on what products did not do, then nobody would ever buy anything, because nothing is EVER perfect.

Re:Uh... thanks, but no. (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 4 years ago | (#32829924)

Reread what I wrote. At no point did I diminish the accomplishments of this display. I simply pointed out where, in my opinion, its shortcomings are for my purposes.

I reread what you wrote: "No thanks" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32832392)

I reread what you wrote: "No thanks". This is diminishing the accomplishments by cavalierly dismissing it as completely unworthy of consideration. At no point did you point out any accomplishments, so the only thing you've said about it was effectively "GTFO".

Re:I reread what you wrote: "No thanks" (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 4 years ago | (#32832904)

Actually, I said "Thanks, but no". I said that the lack of good color viewable in direct sunlight does not meet my own expectations for a display. At most, I say it's unworthy of *MY* consideration, as my initial post really only focused on what *MY* expectations are, yet for some reason all but one of the responses I've seen here so far (and it also appears I've been modded down as well) seem to suggest that the purpose of my post was actually to belittle the endeavor. I didn't just stop and say something like "that's just not good enough", and leave it at that. I actually described what I _would_ expect from a display. And if people just aren't allowed to say what they want just because they can't have it right now, what's the point of looking forward at all?

Anyways, my expectations are not unrealistically high. For me, this display represents an accomplishment is not significant enough at this point in time. A few years ago, I probably would have been all over this transflective technology, but there's far better (IMO) coming down the pipe within the next year or so.

PS (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 4 years ago | (#32832970)

P.S. Actually, I did say "no thanks"... i was initially just looking at the subject heading and had forgotten the exact words I used in the original post. However, I still don't think that what I wrote was particularly rude.

Re:Uh... thanks, but no. (2, Informative)

charlesj68 (1170655) | about 4 years ago | (#32828102)

Like these? http://www.mirasoldisplays.com/ [mirasoldisplays.com]

Re:Uh... thanks, but no. (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 4 years ago | (#32828310)

Yes, exactly.

Re:Uh... thanks, but no. (1)

forkazoo (138186) | about 4 years ago | (#32833306)

I want video-capable screen update times, full and vibrant color under all types of lighting conditions that I could otherwise comfortably read a normal book in, and not have the requirement that under any of them I might have to feel like I'm reading while staring into a flashlight.

Basically, it sounds like you are asking for a reflective color display with no backlight. They exist, but they aren't particularly popular, so it'll be very expensive. Most people are used to having to adjust a lamp to be able to read a book, but expect to be able to see their laptop screen in cases where reading a book wouldn't be particularly convenient.

Re:Uh... thanks, but no. (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 4 years ago | (#32833718)

They exist? Where? The only one I know of that meets the requirements I listed won't be appearing in any commercial devices before the last quarter of this year.

this is new? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32827582)

The rebadged clevo laptop I bought 3 years ago behaves very similarly in direct sunlight. It's great cause I can turn the backlight right down (unfortunately it can't be completely disabled) and use the direct sunlight to illuminate the screen. doubles my battery life (or it would if it didn't overheat in the hot sun and sit revving up the fan to full whack the whole time! you can't have everything)

Re:this is new? (1)

tehcyder (746570) | about 4 years ago | (#32850668)

I've always found that the solution to reading books in direct sunlight is to turn around so that your back is to the sun. Of course, I'm not sure this would work with a computer.

E-Readers? (1)

milbournosphere (1273186) | about 4 years ago | (#32827634)

How long before this screen makes its way into e-readers? I would imagine that being able to play content at that high frame rate would be a boon to the e-reader as a multi-use device. The kindle already has limited internet capability; this screen would greatly increase the utility of the device.

Re:E-Readers? (3, Interesting)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 4 years ago | (#32827914)

It doesn't make sense to make a dedicated e-reader with such a screen, as it would be capable of much more. For example, you could actually have usable web browsing and video playback on it. At which point you call such a gadget a "tablet" - and, yes, there has been a bunch of those announced with PQ screens. I, for one, am waiting for Adam [notionink.in] .

Re:E-Readers? (1)

milbournosphere (1273186) | about 4 years ago | (#32828204)

Good point. I guess I messed up my terminology. My aim was to point out that a screen such as this would allow devices like the Kindle to expand their utility to compete better against tablets such as the iPad, while maintaining book reading as their 'killer app'. The industry is certainly in flux right now, and I am curious to see what comes out of it. Whatever happens, I am sure that Pixel Qi will be a big player.

Re:E-Readers? (1)

marcosdumay (620877) | about 4 years ago | (#32828066)

As somebody already said, that device would have tablet like capabilities. It will also have tablet like weight, and tablet like battery life (ok, some doulbe or triple of tablet like battery life, still, you can't spend a week reading it without recharge). I wouldn't classify that as an ebook reader, I'd go for something more adventurous, like calling it a "tablet".

Oh Crap (4, Funny)

AttillaTheNun (618721) | about 4 years ago | (#32827832)

This is just great. So much for telling my kids to go outside to play to get them off the video games.

XO-1.5 (2, Interesting)

soupforare (542403) | about 4 years ago | (#32828052)

TFA compares the 1.5 to an Acer. When the hell did the 1.5 start shipping and where can I get one? Or even just the motherboard? :(

Re:XO-1.5 (1)

Abcd1234 (188840) | about 4 years ago | (#32842122)

The 1.5 hardware rev initially debuted last September [olpcnews.com] . The design was filed with the FCC this past February [olpcnews.com] , and they started distributing models through their contributors program a few weeks later [olpcnews.com] . Unfortunately, you still can't get a full machine, or even a motherboard, through the G1G1 program [olpcnews.com] ... yet, anyway.

sunlight (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32828076)

If you have ever used a decent navigation system before, it works just like this. The OEM navigation system in my car might possibly be more readable in direct sunlight than any other time (my BMW is better than my Acura in this respect). It's about time someone put the same technology to use in laptops.

transflective displays are available (3, Informative)

WillAdams (45638) | about 4 years ago | (#32828358)

which are indoor / outdoor viewable.

The problem is finding units which have them --- picked up a Fujitsu Stylistic ST-4121 w/ one and it's perfectly readable in direct sunlight --- I use it as a map display unit on long trips.

Not many new units being made w/ such displays though.

Of course (2, Interesting)

^_^x (178540) | about 4 years ago | (#32829098)

I have an XO-1 and its screen is fantastic in the sun. Of course Pixel Qi screens will excel there.

What I'm curious about is whether they fixed the reflection angle (reflective mode indoors only works if you bounce light off a wall, otherwise you just get a point of reflected light somewhere on the screen.) Also, when you go backlit, there's color, but everything looks fuzzy, and you get a diagonal line effect across the screen. I'm wondering if they've fixed those yet...

I'm cheering for their efforts though. Some day hopefully I have a laptop that's visible outside AND performs better than my desktop in 1998.

Sunlight friendly display in gameboy color (1)

countSudoku() (1047544) | about 4 years ago | (#32829156)

no other color screen device I own can be seen as clearly in sunlight

The ancient GameBoy Color has such a display. Although horrible indoors, it shines outdoors due to a highly reflective display that lacks back-lighting. And the kids love 'em like the Zune! Plus, none of those messy downloadable games. Just pure cartridgy goodness.

has everyone forgotten reflective TFT already? (1)

sayu (1782578) | about 4 years ago | (#32829804)

No one's played an original Game Boy? (or even the Game Boy Advance...) It used to be that for most LCD screens, you ~needed~ to be in direct sunlight to see anything at all. There was a mirror where we expect the backlight to be today. It worked pretty well, really.

Average nerd sunlight time: 0.75 minutes per week (0, Flamebait)

gig (78408) | about 4 years ago | (#32830238)

So now nerds have a display specifically for those occasional moments in the sun. Nobody else knows or cares about these devices.

iPad works great in sunlight. Sorry that Apple's super bright IPS screens are fucking up people's OLED, eInk, and Qi reviews, but lying about iPad to give these other devices some marginal utility is truly lame. Try to have an iPad in front of you before mentioning it in your review you starfucker. A good tip is to review tablets and readers without saying "iPad" and see if there is anything to say. It's like every Android phone review should above all else not say "iPhone." For example, tell me why a 4-5 inch screen is advantageous on a phone, don't tell me "it has a bigger screen than iPhone." I can see from the fucking marketing materials that 5 is bigger than 3.5. Does it provide any advantage that is worth it not fitting in my jeans pocket?

Re:Average nerd sunlight time: 0.75 minutes per we (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32833320)

Steve, shouldn't you be working on fixing iphone reception, proximity sensor and itune hacking problems instead of posting on slashdot? nice username, btw!

My mum's basement (1)

mavasplode (1808684) | about 4 years ago | (#32834744)

doesn't have direct sunlight, you insensitive clod.
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