Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Cisco Says Vegas Conference Attendees' Information Was Leaked

timothy posted about 4 years ago | from the hopefully-no-dropped-rows-on-the-flight-home dept.

Security 97

Julie188 writes "Thousands of people got a nasty e-mail this morning from Cisco. The company was warning people that its attendee registration database for its Cisco Live 2010 event was hacked. Cisco Live 2010 is the company's annual user conference, held last week in Las Vegas with an estimated 18,000 in attendance. If it's not embarrassing enough for a company that sells security gear to get hacked, the e-mail also went out to people who didn't register and didn't attend the event. That raises questions about exactly what database was pried open and how bad the damage is. Cisco's e-mail said the hole was quickly closed and only business-card type information was exposed."

cancel ×

97 comments

Routing error (4, Funny)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 4 years ago | (#32843632)

the e-mail also went out to people who didn't register and didn't attend the event.

That's even more embarassing than a security breach -- it's a routing error. From Cisco.

Re:Routing error (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32843750)

They have a mailing list in which they announce their events among other things. Could be that the PR firm who does these mails only has access to that mailing list. Also, it's kind of hard for a security appliance to defend against an error in layer 8 or above. Of course this is a major screw up, but anyone who buys a router, firewall or whatever probably knows what the limitations of that product are. Those in IT dept. are usually the ones who determine what goes into their precious rack and what not.

Re:Routing error (4, Insightful)

skids (119237) | about 4 years ago | (#32843774)

Cisco's customers will not find bureaucratic bungling from them to be anything out of the ordinary, trust me, they are very used to it.

Re:Routing error (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32843822)

A routing error?!?!

Emailing the wrong list, maybe..

A routing error is where a packet of info is sent to the wrong network device.. these emails made it to their intended destination... The question is were there too many destinations.

It seems from reading TFA (which you obviously didn't) that the author was given a press pass, he just didnt attend. I'm guessing his name and badge were still in the database even if he didn't attend, therefore when the list was compromised his data could have been compromised also. So it seems to me Cisco did not have a routing error. The submitter summarized this badly like usual. And you Didn't RTFA.

Re:Routing error (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32843834)

A routing error?!?!

Emailing the wrong list, maybe..

A routing error is where a packet of info is sent to the wrong network device.. these emails made it to their intended destination... The question is were there too many destinations.

It seems from reading TFA (which you obviously didn't) that the author was given a press pass, he just didnt attend. I'm guessing his name and badge were still in the database even if he didn't attend, therefore when the list was compromised his data could have been compromised also. So it seems to me Cisco did not have a routing error. The submitter summarized this badly like usual. And you Didn't RTFA.

She's also a dirty lesbian. The dumb bitch...

Re:Routing error (1)

sleeping143 (1523137) | about 4 years ago | (#32843946)

I believe a more appropriate response would have been, "Woosh".

Re:Routing error (1)

WillKemp (1338605) | about 4 years ago | (#32846124)

She's also a dirty lesbian.

I dunno why that bothers you - even if she wasn't she wouldn't fancy you anyway!

Re:Routing error (2, Funny)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 4 years ago | (#32844066)

.poster.stats.p.girlfriend = "0.02" .poster.stats.p.unemployed_network_engineed = "0.93"

Re:Routing error (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32845024)

It seems jokes automatically route around you. Must be a mis-configured sense of humor. Check your subnet mask.

Re:Routing error (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32844106)

The only one who should be embarrassed is Slashdot.

Re:Routing error (1)

blair1q (305137) | about 4 years ago | (#32844278)

If anyone has a secret collation of all the email lists used in mass-emailings, it's Cisco.

They also know how often you accidentally use the default ".com" instead of ".org".

Re:Routing error (2, Interesting)

ShakaUVM (157947) | about 4 years ago | (#32846466)

For a long time, you could retrieve all of Cisco's customer data (from people who entered data on their web site) from just changing "submit" to "retreive" in the URL. Haven't tried it recently, but they exposed names, addresses and emails by the thousands for years without doing anything to correct it.

Never gave me a good impression of Cisco...

Re:Routing error (2, Funny)

zippthorne (748122) | about 4 years ago | (#32846666)

Perhaps Cisco's purchase of linksys was more like HP's "purchase" of compaq...

TFA (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32843650)

We hope you have returned home safely and are back into your normal routine after a busy week at Cisco Live 2010.

We are contacting you because on the final afternoon of Cisco Live, one of our vendors identified an unexpected attempt to access attendee information through ciscolive2010.com. The ability to access this information was quickly removed, but not before some conference listings were accessed.

Cisco Live takes the security of attendee information very seriously and immediately elevated this matter to our chief security officer. His team completed a thorough review and as a result we believe your registration information – specifically your Cisco Live badge number, name, title, company address and email address– was accessed. No other information was available or accessed.

Although these details are commonly accessed by our World of Solutions partners and often freely provided by Cisco Live attendees, we felt it was our responsibility to inform you as quickly as possible. As we cannot yet confirm the information was accessed by an authorized Cisco Live partner, we encourage you to consider the appropriate precautions to protect against any unwanted email.

Please accept our apologies for any inconvenience that may result and feel free to contact us directly at support@ciscolive2010.com if you have any additional questions or information.

We hope you enjoyed your Cisco Live experience and we look forward to welcoming you to Las Vegas in 2011.
Regards,

Re:TFA (1)

Bryansix (761547) | about 4 years ago | (#32844502)

So it wasn't their fault but it kind of it because they outsourced the solution. Also the data made public is no worse then what gets posted on Facebook. Non-story for the most part.

Re:TFA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32846968)

So it wasn't their fault but it kind of it because they outsourced the solution. Also the data made public is no worse then what gets posted on Facebook. Non-story for the most part.

And the real question was - Did they get Always the Low Price on their solutions? Always?

Re:TFA (1)

WillKemp (1338605) | about 4 years ago | (#32846148)

AC's working for Cisco now???

so what? (3, Insightful)

Lord Ender (156273) | about 4 years ago | (#32843666)

I can't think of anything less important than seeing phonebook-style data made public. Losing credit card numbers or bank account numbers for large groups is bad; losing email addresses is not.

Re:so what? (5, Insightful)

foo1752 (555890) | about 4 years ago | (#32843800)

Losing credit card numbers or bank account numbers for large groups is bad; losing email addresses is not.

Losing email addresses is not AS BAD as losing more sensitive information, but it is still not good. I, for one, wouldn't be happy about that information being exposed.

Re:so what? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32844300)

That's probably because you're a typical whingebag looking for something to whinge about. Self-righteous indignation never felt so good!

Re:so what? (4, Funny)

eln (21727) | about 4 years ago | (#32845068)

I agree. I can't even imagine what would happen if anyone found out I had attended a Cisco conference. I would be a social pariah. My children wouldn't be able to look me in the eye. My wife would leave me. The dog would run away. Even my cats would look at me even more disdainfully than they usually do.

Re:so what? (1)

msauve (701917) | about 4 years ago | (#32918040)

I take it you work for Juniper?

Re:so what? (2, Insightful)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | about 4 years ago | (#32843854)

Assuming they weren't arm-twisted into it, I'd say it's cool that they notified everybody.

Competition? (2, Insightful)

FranTaylor (164577) | about 4 years ago | (#32843892)

Do you really think Cisco is going to be happy if their customer list falls into the hands of their competitors? If this data has profile info like "How much Cisco equipment have you bought in the last year" then it could be VERY VERY useful to their competitors.

Re:Competition? (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | about 4 years ago | (#32843940)

"How much Cisco equipment have you bought in the last year" then it could be VERY VERY useful to their competitors.

How would that data be VERY VERY useful?

(I'm not asking to argue, I'm asking to understand.)

Re:Competition? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32844070)

Dear MobileTatsu-NJG, we noticed some information of yours on a website we are monitoring due to the Cisco data loss.

We can offer BETTER security cheaper. Our services have never been compromised. You will be able to trust again. Guaranteed.

Re:Competition? (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | about 4 years ago | (#32844630)

Okay, that's kinda useful. What about 'really really useful'?

Re:Competition? (1, Funny)

leptons (891340) | about 4 years ago | (#32844752)

you are an idiot

Re:Competition? (2, Insightful)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | about 4 years ago | (#32844826)

I thought 'really really useful' would have a more interesting meaning than "SPAM PEOPLE WHO'VE ALREADY PURCHASED THE PRODUCTS THEY NEED". My bad.

Re:Competition? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32881692)

We aren't talking iphones and ipods as products here, we are talking multi-million dollar investments.

Even the slightest leads to possible new customers/contracts are a huge deal to salesmen especially when we are talking big bucks. Like we are.

Re:Competition? (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | about 4 years ago | (#32881736)

Heh. Yeah, leads to new customers and contracts that have already spent the money and signed contracts. Making lots of sense, there!

Re:Competition? (1)

tomhudson (43916) | about 4 years ago | (#32881872)

Heh. Yeah, leads to new customers and contracts that have already spent the money and signed contracts. Making lots of sense, there!

Those are among the best types. You KNOW they spend money, they're not tire-kickers. You know WHAT they spend it on, so you can go in and tailor your pitch accordingly. You also know HOW MUCH they paid, so you can go in and "innocently" work the conversation around to propose a solution that would have saved them a few bucks (since they'll ask for one anyway to see if they got $crewed), and then go "Oh well, next time you need something, give me a shout, okay?"

Re:Competition? (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | about 4 years ago | (#32882032)

... in a year or two or ten when the contract is up and now you've got the uphill battle of vendor lock-in. Heh.

This is how salesmen keep their jobs.

Re:Competition? (1)

tomhudson (43916) | about 4 years ago | (#32883184)

... in a year or two or ten when the contract is up and now you've got the uphill battle of vendor lock-in. Heh.

... no - companies don't just activate their purchasing department once every two or ten years, and the rest of the time they do nothing.

Re:Competition? (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | about 4 years ago | (#32883286)

You're right! They'd go off and find other people who haven't spent money yet and aren't locked in a contract. Heh.

Re:Competition? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32845784)

you are an idiot

Here on the internet we say "your an idiot". Please try to keep up.

Re:Competition? (2, Insightful)

Threni (635302) | about 4 years ago | (#32844080)

It's useful if, for example, their competitors want to let everyone know that they buy stolen lists of email addresses to spam/cold call people with.

Re:Competition? (1)

FranTaylor (164577) | about 4 years ago | (#32848106)

How better to sell a product, than to know what the customer is currently buying?

Re:Competition? (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | about 4 years ago | (#32851358)

How better to sell a product, than to know what the customer is currently buying?

Umm just about any way would be better. "Hi! Want to buy our cheaper stuff?" "Shoulda asked me last week before I bought this stuff."

Re:Competition? (1)

gregleimbeck (975759) | about 4 years ago | (#32845546)

"Business card like info"

Re:so what? (2, Insightful)

Mikkeles (698461) | about 4 years ago | (#32845226)

The fact that supposedly secure information was accessed is the main story. As in: they broke into your house and only managed to get a stuffed toy (this time).

Re:so what? (1)

hmmm (115599) | about 4 years ago | (#32851326)

That all depends on how the information was leaked/stolen. The "how" could be more important to Cisco's reputation than the "what".

It could be worse... (4, Insightful)

Extremus (1043274) | about 4 years ago | (#32843668)

They could stay quiet about it.

Re:It could be worse... (1)

ShaunC (203807) | about 4 years ago | (#32844852)

They're a California company, aren't they? Certain breaches must be disclosed under California state law, so their merry band of lawyers probably advised them to make this public. (Yes, they could still stay quiet about it, but...)

It's just the website. (2, Insightful)

Securityemo (1407943) | about 4 years ago | (#32843748)

It was just a website hack into a low-security-data backend database. It's not like someone actually subverted any of their products.

Re:It's just the website. (1)

Neil Watson (60859) | about 4 years ago | (#32843840)

If any gear was subverted I doubt CISCO would admit it.

Re:It's just the website. (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | about 4 years ago | (#32843884)

That you are correct in, of course.

Re:It's just the website. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32845544)

That assumption is incorrect [cisco.com] .

Read the source material. Cisco doesn't like full disclosure, but they are serious about tracking, fixing, and then informing. They mention welcoming contributions from 'independent researchers' several times in their docs, maintain multiple related mailing lists, and provide upload facilities for suspect firmware.

Hmmm [cisco.com] :"Cisco Security Advisory: Hard-Coded SNMP Community Names in Cisco Industrial Ethernet 3000 Series Switches Vulnerability: For Public Release 2010 July 07 1600 UTC (GMT) "

Uh huh (1)

sunking2 (521698) | about 4 years ago | (#32843762)

Honest honey! I was no where near Vegas that week!

Re:Uh huh (2, Funny)

ctchristmas (1821682) | about 4 years ago | (#32843852)

What happens in Vegas, will be leaked via email a week later... not to mention via facebook and twitter (not myspace because noone uses it anymore)... or when that stripper you married shows up on your porch.

Re:Uh huh (1)

MBGMorden (803437) | about 4 years ago | (#32843948)

Wait a minute . . . we never actioned SAID that it happened during a week. GRAB HIM!!!!

Is the email from Cisco legit? (5, Interesting)

mulgar (1432387) | about 4 years ago | (#32843770)

Can someone paste the header to see if the email from "Cisco" is legit or fraudulent? I attended Cisco Live and received no such email, and people who didn't attend received the mail, the Cisco Live team has a database of everyone who registered for the event so if the email was legit I would have expected to see it get sent to the correct audience?

Re:Is the email from Cisco legit? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32843860)

It's legit, I saw your info in a few of the dumps.

Re:Is the email from Cisco legit? (1)

mulgar (1432387) | about 4 years ago | (#32843938)

Where did you get the dumps, can you share the source of this information? Thanks.

Re:Is the email from Cisco legit? (1)

beanpoppa (1305757) | about 4 years ago | (#32844032)

Whoosh

Re:Is the email from Cisco legit? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32844058)

Australia, escalation eng, checked in on the 30th?

Re:Is the email from Cisco legit? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32847236)

Not you specifically but it's funny that some people get up in arms about a data breach with their guest data but post far more about themselves for everyone to see on twitter and facebook ;)

Re:Is the email from Cisco legit? (5, Interesting)

mulgar (1432387) | about 4 years ago | (#32843880)

So I'm a Cisco employee who attended Cisco Live as a speaker last week, I just checked with a contact (who sends emails out from support@ciscolive.com) and they are not aware of any of this - which leads me to think the email is faked. If someone can provide the original email header so we can investigate further that would be appreciated... my contact is checking into this further I will update if I find out anything else...

Re:Is the email from Cisco legit? (1)

Anonymous Psychopath (18031) | about 4 years ago | (#32844002)

I attended last week and have not received any emails of this type.

Re:Is the email from Cisco legit? (3, Funny)

blair1q (305137) | about 4 years ago | (#32844304)

I did not attend and I have not received any emails of this type.

In case you're being thorough about data, here.

Re:Is the email from Cisco legit? (1)

mulgar (1432387) | about 4 years ago | (#32844412)

Ha! Thanks for the data :-P

Re:Is the email from Cisco legit? (5, Funny)

bugs2squash (1132591) | about 4 years ago | (#32844014)

The TAC called, and unless you can set up a second Live 2010 conference and reproduce the problem they're going to close the ticket.

Re:Is the email from Cisco legit? (1)

mulgar (1432387) | about 4 years ago | (#32844042)

... and collect the logs with the right debugging enabled ;-)

Re:Is the email from Cisco legit? (1)

222 (551054) | about 4 years ago | (#32844946)

I'm going to need you to run a "show tech" and email me the results, bugs2squash.

Re:Is the email from Cisco legit? (1)

shooteur (1559845) | about 4 years ago | (#32847444)

but but but mr TAC, i just need a 6509 fan tray RMA.

Re:Is the email from Cisco legit? (2, Funny)

Eseell (1694116) | about 4 years ago | (#32846278)

They can't identify any bugs, so they'd like you to update to the latest version of IOS where you're sure to find some.

Re:Is the email from Cisco legit? (5, Informative)

mulgar (1432387) | about 4 years ago | (#32844228)

Okay, as far as I can tell from my Cisco Live team contacts the email is legit and was sent from Cisco, but I don't have any further information on the leaked data as I'm not involved there so I won't speculate - there is a team investigating this and I'll leave it up to them to provide further details. The only details I can provide is pretty much already covered in the email sent out: “Cisco has been made aware that some Cisco Live registration information may have been accessible to an outside party through the conference website. Our first priority is the security of our attendees and we take their privacy very seriously. The ability to access this information was immediately removed and the matter was elevated to Cisco’s chief security officer for immediate review. Our review showed that affected information is strictly limited to the name, title, affiliation, and email address of some Cisco Live attendees. No additional personal information – such as credit card data -- was compromised. As the affected information is limited to data that is commonly available via badge swipes onsite and/or the exchange of business cards, we do not believe this presents any threat to our attendees in terms of identity theft. The impact will likely be limited to unsolicited email communication. We are currently reaching out to those individuals to keep them informed and offer our apologies for any inconvenience.” – Cisco spokesperson.

Re:Is the email from Cisco legit? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32847400)

Dude, so what? Why the fuck are you posting these inquiries on SLASHDOT?!

Do your fucking job, or something. You can't be part of Cisco's PR department; if you are, you SUCK.

Re:Is the email from Cisco legit? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32846984)

Can someone paste the header to see if the email from "Cisco" is legit or fraudulent? I attended Cisco Live and received no such email, and people who didn't attend received the mail, the Cisco Live team has a database of everyone who registered for the event so if the email was legit I would have expected to see it get sent to the correct audience?

Delivered-To: (ME)
Received: by 10.151.7.5 with SMTP id k5cs277541ybi;
                Wed, 7 Jul 2010 19:18:20 -0700 (PDT)
Received: by 10.100.173.20 with SMTP id v20mr9270992ane.145.1278555500518;
                Wed, 07 Jul 2010 19:18:20 -0700 (PDT)
Received-SPF: softfail (google.com: best guess record for domain of transitioning no-reply@ciscolive2010.com does not designate 68.142.139.11 as permitted sender) client-ip=68.142.139.11;
Received: by 10.192.6.7 with POP3 id 7mf61217ywf.134;
                Wed, 07 Jul 2010 19:18:20 -0700 (PDT)
X-Gmail-Fetch-Info: carlfugate@gmail.com 1 smtp.gmail.com 995 (ME)
Delivered-To: (ME)
Received: by 10.100.196.15 with SMTP id t15cs160531anf;
                Wed, 7 Jul 2010 18:46:24 -0700 (PDT)
Received: by 10.142.211.6 with SMTP id j6mr8954783wfg.166.1278553583837;
                Wed, 07 Jul 2010 18:46:23 -0700 (PDT)
Return-Path:
Received: from mail.wingateservices.com (mail.wingateservices.com [68.142.139.11])
                by mx.google.com with ESMTP id l8si15087945wfa.95.2010.07.07.18.46.23;
                Wed, 07 Jul 2010 18:46:23 -0700 (PDT)
Received-SPF: neutral (google.com: 68.142.139.11 is neither permitted nor denied by best guess record for domain of no-reply@ciscolive2010.com) client-ip=68.142.139.11;
Authentication-Results: mx.google.com; spf=neutral (google.com: 68.142.139.11 is neither permitted nor denied by best guess record for domain of no-reply@ciscolive2010.com) smtp.mail=no-reply@ciscolive2010.com
Received: from ciscoapp.wingateservices.com (ciscoapp.wingateservices.com [172.16.33.150])
        by mail.wingateservices.com (8.13.1/8.13.1) with ESMTP id o681kIqX003442
        for ; Wed, 7 Jul 2010 19:46:19 -0600
Date: Wed, 7 Jul 2010 19:46:18 -0600
From: Cisco Live 2010 Team
To: (ME)
Message-ID:
Subject: Cisco Live 2010 Attendee Advisory

Do not shame them for releasing the info! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32843802)

It is good that a company which got hacked informs possible collateral victims. Yes, at first glance it appears to be particularly embarrassing for a company to get hacked if it advertises to security conscious people -- until you realize that there is no perfect security and every worthwhile target eventually gets hacked. How you deal with it when it happens is what separates the pros from the amateurs.

Re:Do not shame them for releasing the info! (1)

Locutus (9039) | about 4 years ago | (#32844740)

and it is very likely that they were not even the ones whos systems got hacked. From what I saw, it was the company who was running the venue, wingateweb.com( owner of ciscolive2010.com ) and not Cisco. I'll bet many of those posting about how bad Cisco is don't dare look under their beds at night. boo! lol

LoB

The other day, upon the stairs . . . (2, Funny)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about 4 years ago | (#32843832)

the e-mail also went out to people who didn't register and didn't attend the event.

. . . I met a man, who wasn't there.

He wasn't there again today . . . I think he's from the CIA . . .

Re:The other day, upon the stairs . . . (1)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | about 4 years ago | (#32844094)

Antigonish much? ;-)

Re:The other day, upon the stairs . . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32846472)

NSA

NSA = No Such Agency.

Don't ya know?

They were going to let their "partners" spam you (4, Interesting)

Animats (122034) | about 4 years ago | (#32843980)

Cisco collected that information so they and their "partners" could spam you: "... we believe your registration information - specifically your Cisco Live badge number, name, title, company address and email address- was accessed. No other information was available or accessed. Although these details are commonly accessed by our World of Solutions partners".... Their "partner locator" [cisco.com] finds 16601 partners in the United States, 3241 in China, 998 in Russia, 427 in Romania. 330 in Nigeria, and 12 in Afghanistan. So just about anybody who wants that data could get it.

They're just irked that someone who didn't pay for their mailing list might spam you.

Re:They were going to let their "partners" spam yo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32844640)

Cisco Partner != Cisco World of Solutions Partner

Re:They were going to let their "partners" spam yo (1)

Locutus (9039) | about 4 years ago | (#32844710)

yo, this is SOP for these conferences and anyone with a clue knows that all the vendors at the show can have access to the attendee list if they pay the $$ for it. They can also rent machines from the conference organizers which lets attendees cards be scanned at the booth and that list is provided to the vendor either on the spot or via a data dump.

I'm afraid of the boogie-man just as much as the next guy but this stuff people are drumming up here is nothing but a witch hunt. There's nothing here so stop trying to scare yourself and others.

LoB

Re:They were going to let their "partners" spam yo (3, Informative)

Anonymous Psychopath (18031) | about 4 years ago | (#32845202)

Cisco's entire worldwide partner ecosystem != Cisco Live! World of Solutions, which was a vendor booth exhibition at Cisco Live in Las Vegas last week.

I'm not sure how many partners were in World of Solutions but there were perhaps 200. Companies like EMC, APC, CA, etc. You want a light-up rubber ball or blinking shot glass or whatever shiny object they were giving away at their booths, you let them scan your badge. Some had booth babes running around with scanners, which was fairly effective at a conference where 95% of the attendees are men.

Every conference I've ever attended has worked this way.

Motives? (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | about 4 years ago | (#32844018)

Hmmm. A "nasty" email that doesn't seem very nasty. A "data breach" that released data that every business partner has access to. "Julie188", Julie Bort ...

This isn't a non-event being blown into a mountain by a trade rag that wants web hits, is it?

What happens in Vegas (1)

CaptStumpy (1851718) | about 4 years ago | (#32844050)

does NOT stay in Vegas

Re:What happens in Vegas (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32844338)

Yes it does, if you do a traceroute on www.ciscolive.com you'll see the server is in Utah. Also, as a reminder, http://www.amazingsuperpowers.com/2009/08/leaving-las-vegas/

Typical corp..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32844174)

Cisco, being a typical giant US corporation... its left hand hasn't got a clue whatever the fuck its right hand is doing.

That's not fair (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32844212)

This is outrages. I have been a long time implementer of Cisco products and I didn't receive one of these emails!
Do they not value my business enough to include me in this database!

Lies... (1)

interval1066 (668936) | about 4 years ago | (#32844252)

...damn lies, and sales opportunities.

Nasty? (1)

acalltoreason (1732266) | about 4 years ago | (#32844302)

"Thousands of people got a nasty e-mail this morning from Cisco" I read the email, maybe I'm missing something but it didn't seem too nasty to me. Which begs the question, why would the submitter try to unfairly bias the reader who didn't follow the link against Cisco?

Re:Nasty? (1)

Bryansix (761547) | about 4 years ago | (#32844656)

Because the author is the same one who accessed the database in the first place? I'm just sayin...

Selling security at conforance (1)

helix2301 (1105613) | about 4 years ago | (#32844568)

This is going to make it much harder for them to now push security at the conference. Plus they better have an all hands meeting with all the staff running the conference to make sure everyone's story is straight that could be terrible Public Relations for Cisco. They could turn this around and have a session about the compromised device and explain how they fixed it and give tips to the customer to avoid having the same situation happen to them. We will see how Cisco handles this.

registration of these events done by others than (2, Interesting)

Locutus (9039) | about 4 years ago | (#32844668)

these conferences always look like they are run by someone other than the company or companies owning the show. For the Cisco Live 2010 conference, Wingateweb.com ran the registration or it looks like they did because they own the domain( ciscolive2010.com ). When I looked up who owned that domain and then looked at their website( wingateweb.com ) and this is what it says:

Trusted Technology
World-class Delivery

Event organizers around the world rely on WingateWeb’s event management software and services to deliver the world’s top conferences, conventions and trade shows. Optimize your strategy, maximize your audience and deliver perfect events every time with WingateWeb.

So before people blame Cisco for someone getting into the database and getting attendee data dumps you might want to ask who really was to blame. And FYI, very often the on site software for registering and checking in is not only run on Windows laptops but they are very poorly done. Way to many times redundant information was requested and don't even try to use tab completion for city, state, etc, tab navigation, or the space bar for button activation. I would not doubt that many many other conference databases have been hacked but this Cisco conference hack was found out because they are very security minded and looked into it.

LoB

Re:registration of these events done by others tha (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 4 years ago | (#32849188)

So before people blame Cisco for someone getting into the database and getting attendee data dumps you might want to ask who really was to blame.

Cisco is to blame for contracting an incompetent.

It's their conference, it's their fault.

What's next, BP's CEO bears no responsibility for the spill? Er, wait...

Re:registration of these events done by others tha (1)

Locutus (9039) | about 4 years ago | (#32855750)

yo Francis, when we see that Cisco knew what was going on and continued to let it happen then you can go and blame them for who was running the event registration.

Regarding the BP comment, have you not read anything of how a BP employee was on the DWH and was directing operations to use unsafe measures? The CEO can say all he wants that he's not to blame but his direct employees caused the problems. But of course, it also appears they hired contractors who sidesteps minor things like BOP systems failures and continued drilling. But even here, we don't know if the BP employees told them to continue only 50% system status and questionable test results.

From what I've seen, Cisco has been very upfront with this and they were the ones who dug into the issue and found access was made. They seem to be doing what an upfront company would do.

LoB

This is (1)

Dunbal (464142) | about 4 years ago | (#32844950)

what happens when you leave the root login as "root" on the database. I mean Cisco and security? LOL. Oh and Hayley Williams was "hacked" too.

Sooo... (1)

God_TM (770659) | about 4 years ago | (#32847056)

What happens in Vegas *doesn't* stay in Vegas?

This sounds familiar, somehow... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32847908)

Does this strike anybody but me as a little bit "Uplink"ish?

-Hacker only gained access long enough to copy some of the data
-Data could be used to screw people over
-It's Cisco

I mean, this sounds exactly like the sort of thing I'd do in Uplink just to be a bastard.

Re: (1)

clint999 (1277046) | about 4 years ago | (#32848208)

Cisco's customers will not find bureaucratic bungling from them to be anything out of the ordinary, trust me, they are very used to it.

Re: (1)

clint999 (1277046) | about 4 years ago | (#32852486)

It was just a website hack into a low-security-data backend database. It's not like someone actually subverted any of their products.

You give em more credit than they deserve (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32852848)

I have worked for Cisco recently. I was surprised to see that most of the employees use IE-6 and the BU's send regular newsletter style emails that is not visible unless you have HTML rendering enabled, and much more. Fun part is they look at you as you gave grown horns on your head when you try to tell them these things are not very secure and Cisco is supposed to be a security aware company. Go figure!

They had to know... (1)

shentino (1139071) | about 4 years ago | (#32913548)

it was a gamble.

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...