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Hack Exposes Pirate Bay User Data

Soulskill posted more than 4 years ago | from the now-looking-for-a-torrent-tracker dept.

Security 156

tsu doh nimh writes "A group of hackers from Argentina recently broke into the database for thepiratebay.org, the Internet's largest torrent search engine, exposing user names, Internet addresses, and (MD5) hashed password data on more than 4 million users, according to Brian Krebs. He interviewed the leader of the group, Ch Russo, who said they briefly considered what the information would be worth to the RIAA and MPAA before going public with the breach. From the story: 'Probably these groups would be very interested in this information, but we are not [trying] to sell it,' Russo said. 'Instead we wanted to tell people that their information may not be so well protected.'"

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Leak It (-1, Troll)

SquarePixel (1851068) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855600)

After all the other leaked information via The Pirate Bay and Wikileaks (many username, password, email and ip lists like this too), I'd say it's only fair if they upload a torrent of it to The Pirate Bay and additionally send the same info for Wikileaks to publish.

Open information and knowledge is always for the better, right? It would be hypocrisy of them to remove the torrent.

Re:Leak It (2, Insightful)

Andorin (1624303) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855624)

Nice troll, but there's a difference between publicly available information (copyrighted works) and private information (peoples' personal info, login credentials, etc).

Re:Leak It (1)

SquarePixel (1851068) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855646)

Such lists have been many times published on TPB - for other private torrent trackers too.

Re:Leak It (1)

Andorin (1624303) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855736)

Even if that is true, not only does it not matter because it was likely a user that posted them and not the site itself, but my point is still valid: we make a distinction between personal data and public data.

Re:Leak It (-1, Troll)

pgmrdlm (1642279) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856150)

They dealt with a criminal web site(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pirate_Bay_trial) to perform criminal acts. They deserve to be robbed of their personal information. What goes around comes around. Hope the information is sold to other criminals so they can continue to be robbed just like these people continue to rob others. fuck em, they deserve what they got.

Re:Leak It (1)

bertoelcon (1557907) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856212)

Since when does civil law make criminals?

Re:Leak It (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32856246)

Sweden doesn't have separate civil and criminal laws or court, they're both the same.

Re:Leak It (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32856562)

I believe this to be false - crimes fall under public prosecution, allmänt åtal, and this is not the case for civil law like a patent dispute.

Re:Leak It (2, Interesting)

bonch (38532) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856190)

Since when does The Pirate Bay have a policy of only distributing "publicly available information?" Pprivate information has been distributed via Pirate Bay before, such as the leaked Half-Life 2 source code or Paris Hilton's hacked cell phone pictures. Why should this information be any different?

Re:Leak It (3, Interesting)

Andorin (1624303) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856228)

If a torrent for the users' info appeared on the site and the admins ignored a community demand to take it down, you bet that community would ditch the site and TPB would die. It's in TPB's best interest to keep user information secret; I do not understand why this is hard to grasp.

Re:Leak It (2, Insightful)

SquarePixel (1851068) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856366)

If a torrent for the users' info appeared on the site and the admins ignored a community demand to take it down, you bet that community would ditch the site and TPB would die. It's in TPB's best interest to keep user information secret; I do not understand why this is hard to grasp.

Which again would make their actions hypocrisy, especially when they in turn laugh and try to ridicule people who ask them to remove such info from the site.

Re:Leak It (3, Insightful)

Andorin (1624303) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856398)

Which again would make their actions hypocrisy, especially when they in turn laugh and try to ridicule people who ask them to remove such info from the site.

[citation needed]. Show me one event in which The Pirate Bay refused to remove a torrent for the personal, private information of an individual or a large group of individuals.

Re:Leak It (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856624)

>>>Which again would make their actions hypocrisy, especially when they in turn laugh and try to ridicule people who ask them to remove such info from the site.

You have any songs or movies or games recorded to CD, DVD, or hard drive that you never purchased?
Then you are hypocrite too, so shut up.
"Do not criticize your neighbor for the splinter in his eye, when you have a log in your own." - Buddha

Re:Leak It (1)

thrawn_aj (1073100) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856682)

you bet that community would ditch the site and TPB would die

I'm not responding to any other point (of the many) that you have posted so far but the one quoted above made me laugh. The "community" in question is merely a group of opportunistic* users who come to TPB for downloading free stuff. I would be less surprised to see satan stepping out of my shower drying his goatee than to see this so-called community take any such organized action against TPB. TPB could kill kittens everyday and post the pics on its home page and it still wouldn't be boycotted =p

Having said that, you're probably right that TPB would pull down the torrent to protect its own interests. It's hypocritical but also good business sense.

The whole thing is a rather amusing 'for teh lulz' - good for an afternoon chuckle. Kudos to the hacker group for picking the most ironic victim imaginable =) and also one that it knows won't get any official sympathy whatsoever.

_____________
*this is merely a matter of fact, not a qualitative judgment.

Re:Leak It (1)

Andorin (1624303) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856740)

The "community" in question is merely a group of opportunistic* users who come to TPB for downloading free stuff.

There is also a decent number of users who are essentially top uploaders (think trusted/VIP users) and that are kinda important to the site. A great deal of them are, for example, active on TPB's forums. If many of them decided to leave TPB, it would be rather detrimental to the overall community. Remember, for BitTorrent (or just about any peer-to-peer network) to work, you need good seeders as well as downloaders.

Re:Leak It (1)

thrawn_aj (1073100) | more than 4 years ago | (#32857044)

Interesting. I didn't know that. Since I share a wireless connection with no access to the router (for port forwarding setup), I'm unfortunately cut off from the entire torrenting world. Good thing I guess - keeps me honest through no fault of my own ;)

By the way, I took back the "TPB is hypocritical" comment in a later post.

Re:Leak It (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855628)

Open information and knowledge is always for the better, right?

I don't believe anyone has ever said that, other than trolls perpetuating it as an arguement we never said.

Re:Leak It (1)

countSudoku() (1047544) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855762)

He's confusing the quote; "information wants to be free". I think that might have been Doctorow who said that, but the misinterpretation is just as sad. Passwords and logins are NOT public information, otherwise we'd all use no authentication, or the same login and password everywhere, or not care. Content is the info being referenced here; music, films, written works. THOSE are data sets that need to be freed. Why? Why not? I can listen to a song for free on the radio, or video on the free digital wireless signals of HDTV, but I'm not supposed to copy those and share them with my friends who missed, or are not aware, of this work? Same thing with a CD or DVD I purchase and make copies for my friends and family. I am protected by fair use and no one can enforce that on me. NO ONE. Good luck if you think otherwise. Tell me how the wall tastes? Thanks for letting me beat your dead horse though! ;)

Re:Leak It (1)

Zerth (26112) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856498)

"information wants to be free"

That phrase is way before Doctorow(he actually dislikes the phrase, see his article "IWTBF considered harmful"). It was first used famously(that I'm aware of) by Stewart Brand in the 1984 Hacker Conference.

Re:Leak It (2, Interesting)

Lincolnshire Poacher (1205798) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856620)

> THOSE are data sets that need to be freed

Arrrgh...

Perhaps it should be expressed instead as "information tends towards the public domain".

The meaning of IWTBF is the antonym of what you stated; instead of having to "be freed" by some liberator, information *will free itself* if constraints to its movement *are not applied*.

The activity is on the part of the anthropomorphic information itself.

That is: passwords, secrets and proprietary information will gradually drift towards becoming public knowledge unless an entity spends time, money and resources in stemming that movement. For information to become free, no-one has to do anything. It will gradually happen as an aspect of daily human interaction.

Re:Leak It (1)

thrawn_aj (1073100) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856770)

I agree with you - in principle. However, if you think the vast majority of TPB users are using it for such noble purposes (pirating things they already own in some form or have paid for otherwise), you're being extraordinarily naive. For that matter, you conveniently left out software, all of which falls squarely in the "not public information" (unless it's free to begin with) and which accounts for a large fraction of traffic on TPB and other torrent sites.

Bottom line - freedom is limited to what you can enforce. So are laws. If laws can be broken easily on the internet because enforcement is spotty/problematic, this story should serve as a grim reminder that this fact may not always work FOR you. Also, there's precious little you can do if you get burned trying to do things that are illegal in the first place. Note that I'm not defending those laws, just stating the practical consequences of not following those laws.

Re:Leak It (1, Interesting)

meatplow (184288) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855644)

MOD UP PARENT.

Explain how this post get hit with troll pts.
UGH.

Re:Leak It (4, Informative)

spazdor (902907) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855664)

Because it conflates privacy issues with intellectual property issues. There is nothing hypocritical in trying to contain private data but not copyrighted works.

Re:Leak It (1)

SquarePixel (1851068) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855676)

Because it conflates privacy issues with intellectual property issues. There is nothing hypocritical in trying to contain private data but not copyrighted works.

Are you saying The Pirate Bay is mostly used for illegally transferring copyrighted works? I thought TPB admins have always tried to make a point that they're solely allowing people to transfer information and files with each other.

Re:Leak It (1)

spazdor (902907) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855738)

What's inconsistent between those two things? Just because people use TPB for copyrighted works, doesn't mean TPB itself is providing anything more than a matchmaking service between different clients.

Re:Leak It (-1, Troll)

SquarePixel (1851068) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855774)

Which also is my point exactly. TPB has always said it doesn't interfere with the content and is only providing, like you said, a matchmaking service between clients. This content should also be fine then.

Re:Leak It (1)

Andorin (1624303) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855800)

Actually, they do interfere with the service, insofar as they remove fake torrents and ban the people who upload them. Why would it be inconceivable for the site to act in its own self-interest, along with the interests of its users, and take down a torrent that included the private information of its users?

Re:Leak It (1)

SquarePixel (1851068) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855834)

Yes, they do. While they say they don't, this was actually one of the major reasons why TPB earlier lost in court, as copyright holders were able to prove that TPB admins monitor and delete the torrents. This put more liability on them.

Re:Leak It (1)

spazdor (902907) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855954)

But we're not talking about whether TPB should censor such a list (though they undoubtedly should), we're talking about whether the haxors should redistribute it in the first place.

So yes, per your point, if they did do this, TPB's complicity in the act of distribution would be minimal, and if they did stomp it out but the haxors were even moderately determined, they could ensure that the list's contents become public knowledge. But this does nothing to address the hypothetical dick-moveness of their endeavouring to redistribute this data in the first place.

Re:Leak It (1)

thrawn_aj (1073100) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856790)

hypothetical dick-moveness

Aw come on. Where's our traditional admiration for sheer chutzpah? =)

Re:Leak It (1)

bonch (38532) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856216)

They're facilitating the illegal transfer of copyrighted materials via their tracker. If you were the guy organizing the travel routes of a cocaine trafficking trade, you'd still be guilty even if you never handled the cocaine.

Re:Leak It (1)

Andorin (1624303) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856264)

The Pirate Bay no longer operates a torrent tracker. All they offer is a torrent indexing service (this is not necessarily a torrent hosting service, either, thanks to magnet links) that is indifferent to what the users choose to do with it (except for fakes and malware).

Re:Leak It (1)

Andorin (1624303) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855760)

What the administrators set up the site for and what the users use it for can be different, albeit related, things. This post was pointless- it's undeniable that TPB is mostly used for piracy, but the point that personal data != public data is, again, still valid.

Re:Leak It (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855764)

Are you saying The Pirate Bay is mostly used for illegally transferring copyrighted works? I thought TPB admins have always tried to make a point that they're solely allowing people to transfer information and files with each other.

Ah, but if it IS mostly used for illegally transfering copyrighted works, than the host of the file cannot be held liable for the copyrighted work if they are in a country that does not hold up that copyright agreement (and as far as I know ACTA hasn't been passed). So the most the **AA could sue someone for liable damages would then be ~$1. If you ARE going to somehow create the host responsible, than these Argentinians would be liable for the crime of hacking a database, regardless that hacking is legal in Argentina.

So - I mean, they can't exactly have their cake and eat it too.

Re:Leak It (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855780)

$1 per song I mean, which is funny because the Tenenbaum update was just posted moments ago.

The RIAA downloading the leaked file of TPB user credentials would go precisely against everything they are working for.

Re:Leak It (1)

BitZtream (692029) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855824)

From your perspective, sure. However whats the difference between a private item and a public item?

Many of the things you consider private, you also share with other people, likely because they agree to use that information in a way you agree with. Is that not the exact same as what intellectual property issues come down to ... the owner of the information will let you use it, but only if you use it the way they accept.

Funny how its only YOUR information you care about that you want laws for YOUR protection, but if its someone elses information the only reason you want it protected is because its the same class as the information of yours you want protected.

You say the confusion was on the original post, I say you are the one whos confused and you don't even realize it.

Re:Leak It (1)

Andorin (1624303) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855868)

Many of the things you consider private, you also share with other people, likely because they agree to use that information in a way you agree with. Is that not the exact same as what intellectual property issues come down to ... the owner of the information will let you use it, but only if you use it the way they accept.

No, it's not the exact same. Private information (ie, name, address, medical records, SSN) is meant to be inclusive in that only certain people get to know about it. Copyrighted works, on the other hand, are supposed to be seen, consumed and known of by as many people as possible (in theory). You're comparing apples and oranges.

Re:Leak It (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856036)

Your name, essentially, is not private information. Once you tell anyone your name it can be legally shared with anyone without your express permission.

Re:Leak It (1)

spazdor (902907) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856188)

Your IP address and the md5sum of your passwords, not so much.

Re:Leak It (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855918)

The difference is they had to hack the website to get the content. In the other case, they bought the content legally, so that copy is effectively theirs.

Many of the things you consider private, you also share with other people, likely because they agree to use that information in a way you agree with.

Nobody "shared" the hashes with Mr. Russo and told him "you can't redistribute this". Mr. Russo took it by force (hacking the system). That makes *all* the difference, imho.

Your analogy would only be valid the TPB themselves had shared the password. In that case I wouldn't think law enforcement should do anything. I'd simply never do business with them again.

Re:Leak It (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32856198)

Because it conflates privacy issues with intellectual property issues. There is nothing hypocritical in trying to contain private data but not copyrighted works.

If you want to lock people up in a rape room or kill them because they know something or told someone something they know, you're a monster. Please read up on libertarianism before you reach voting age.

Re:Leak It (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855690)

Explain how this post get hit with troll pts.

Well, you are correct. The very last statement is worded specifically to insight an arguement, so really it SHOULD have been moderated Flamebait. Come on Mods, get your head in the game.

Re:Leak It (1)

migla (1099771) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855758)

To answer your joke seriously: No. Opening up of the little guys info, so that the big bad guys can exploit it, wouldn't be appropriate, I think.

Re:Leak It (1)

bonch (38532) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856168)

It's irritating that you're post is marked down as Troll, because you make a very good point. Why shouldn't the information be put up as a torrent and distributed via Pirate Bay and WikiLeaks? Is it not hypocrisy otherwise?

Re:Leak It (2, Insightful)

Andorin (1624303) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856376)

Why shouldn't the information be put up as a torrent and distributed via Pirate Bay and WikiLeaks? Is it not hypocrisy otherwise?

In that case you'll excuse me while I break into your computer/smartphone/$device and all your online accounts, harvest as much personal information as I can, and release it on TPB and Wikileaks.

After all, there's no difference between publicly released copyrighted works and private information, right? And it'd be hypocrisy to complain about the distribution of this information, right?

Re:Leak It (1)

thrawn_aj (1073100) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856916)

There are many actors here contributing to/affected by the action you're calling hypocritical. Let's break it down so it's clear who would be hypocrites and who wouldn't.

(a) the hackers: they did something illegal - distributing this ill-gotten information would be immoral for them (though just a bit funny, but I digress). Whatever they do though, there's nothing hypocritical about it.

(b) TPB: it's their site. They can choose to host the torrent of that information or not. Since they routinely allow torrents of illegally obtained material to be indexed by their site, they can either (hypothetically) let this one stay or remove it. They have no stated morality however, so it wouldn't be hypocritical of them either way. Unwise perhaps, for it would piss off their users.

(c) Wikileaks: since they routinely host illegally obtained information (and even private information such as emails, memos, etc.) it would be hypocritical of them not to publish because it would go against their stated morality. The question is moot because they have not been given that opportunity.

(d) TPB users: the ones who traffic in material stolen from content creators - hypocritical (but understandable). The ones who don't (perhaps the ones who use it to find torrents of F/OSS stuff - not hypocritical.

See now, isn't it nice when we state things clearly? =)

Re:Leak It (1)

Requiem18th (742389) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856812)

I guess they could, and they may give RIAA executives multiple orgasms, but they''ll get shunned in the court of public opinion.

You see, this is why I support whistle blowers. Because despite the claims of national security threats and the ridiculous conflation of government abuse and individual privacy rights, the ultimate judge is the public, and it just so happen that whistle blowers have an excellent record of watching over the best interests of the public.

Re:Leak It (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856848)

'Probably these groups would be very interested in this information, but we are not [trying] to sell it,' Russo said, just before going to jail for hacking, much less mebbe selling.

Incoming incessant sopssa trolling! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32855626)

Sopssa is a fucking worthless troll. Remember it moderators.

Peace out!

Enemies List (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32855660)

I wonder how many instant enemies these guys have made overnight?

Re:Enemies List (3, Informative)

Andorin (1624303) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855786)

Evidently enough to DoS the hacker [twitter.com] .

I don't mind anyone knowing my personal stuff (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32855662)

or my name isn't Bobby ';Drop Table Students;--' Tables.

xkcd [xkcd.com]

Re:I don't mind anyone knowing my personal stuff (1)

thrawn_aj (1073100) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856924)

That's farking HI-larious =)

Marketing effort (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32855684)

Note the last paragraph where he sells a subscription security service which will benefit from the notoriety. So I am left wondering if he is a black hat, white hat, or plain scumbag. I guess the success of his subscription sales will determine if he moves on to blackmail.

The pendulum swings both ways (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32855686)

Mod parent up, and cut the bullshit "Its not the same" rhetoric. Spew that faux moral bullshit elsewhere.

~Posting AC@Work

A couple of notes (5, Informative)

Andorin (1624303) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855706)

Part of Krebs's story is that he joined TPB's IRC channel in order to bring the issue to the mods' attention. He says he was taunted by mods who didn't believe he was a journalist or that he actually had anything, and then was kicked/banned after he posted the md5 sums for some administrative passwords. In this manner he makes the channel mods look like immature jerks, but I talked to the mod that actually kicked him not long after the story broke. Evidently the guy was typing like an idiot (multiple messages per sentence) and acting in a rather unprofessional manner. Too, the kick was not because of the hashes, which he posted over half an hour before the kick. I just want people to know the other side of the story.

Oh, and for the record, this leak isn't as big a deal as some might think. IP addresses can be gathered from the swarms themselves, email addresses used by TPB users should hopefully be throwaway addresses, and torrent hashes are inconsequential. Login details might be a problem for Trusted/VIP/staff accounts, but any serious users are not that concerned about this and would have changed their passwords/emails by now.

Re:A couple of notes (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855812)

The emails they SHOULD be using are HOPEFULLY throwaway addresses.

I just wonder how many aren't though.

Re:A couple of notes (2, Insightful)

erroneus (253617) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856388)

LOTS and LOTS are not. People don't do what's best for themselves... they do what's easiest and feels best.

Re:A couple of notes (2, Informative)

gknoy (899301) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855864)

What makes this valuable (as opposed to trawling the torrent connections themselves) is the centralized nature: It's already collected. This makes data analysis on it much easier, since prospective users wouldn't need to gather the information themselves.

Re:A couple of notes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32855878)

Evidently the guy was typing like an idiot (multiple messages per sentence) and acting in a rather unprofessional manner. Too, the kick was not because of the hashes, which he posted over half an hour before the kick. I just want people to know the other side of the story.

Because it's professional to kick someone who is telling you about a security breach in your product because you don't like the way that they type.

email addresses used by TPB users should hopefully be throwaway addresses

Then why do they ask for them? And why are they storing them?

Re:A couple of notes (2, Insightful)

Andorin (1624303) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855900)

Because it's professional to kick someone who is telling you about a security breach in your product because you don't like the way that they type.

Are you saying that they should have taken him at his word, right off the bat, that he's a serious journalist? If someone walked up to you on the street in a fancy business suit but started speaking Pig Latin, would you take them seriously?

Then why do they ask for them? And why are they storing them?

Account verification and password changing. Duh.

Re:A couple of notes (1)

thrawn_aj (1073100) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856974)

If someone walked up to you on the street in a fancy business suit but started speaking Pig Latin, would you take them seriously?

If he said "ouryay ousehay isway onay irefay", I would at least hear him out before kicking him in the backside and strolling away humming a fugue =)

But that's just me ...

Re:A couple of notes (2, Interesting)

jd (1658) | more than 4 years ago | (#32857048)

One solution is to have people enter their e-mail address when they want to change their password. If the MD5 or SHA1 has of the entered address matches the hash of the e-mail address on file, then send out the e-mail. If it does not, then that's not the right person. Then you don't need the actual address on file at all.

Re:A couple of notes (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32855902)

Andorin, it's typical of a journalist to leave out important details and do their best to make the story into "sensationalism". I've heard of TPB getting hacked into many times, this is nothing new/newsworthy.

Nationalism, fuck yeah? (1)

piemcfly (1232770) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855708)

I like how *random hacker group X* is not accountable to anybody.
It offers possibilities for good and bad... all depending on the poltiical agenda of said group

Which only makes it even more incredibly sad that so many hacker groups go for a ridiculous Nationalist-with-a-big-N route.

Chinese, Iranian, Turkish, American, Argentinian, Chilean... fucling pathetic for a subculture that generally prides itself on non-alliance and independence.

Citizen++ (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32855714)

narks.

Whodunnit? Jewdunnit! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32855722)

Lifting the Lid on the Guilty Yid

The liberals got it exactly right. For years now they’ve been telling us how “vibrant” mass immigration has made stale, pale White societies. Well, London was certainly vibrating on 7th July and that got me thinking: What else have the liberals got right? Mass immigration “enriches” us too, they’ve always said. Is that “enrich” as in “enriched uranium”, an excellent way of making atom bombs? Because that’s what comes next: a weapon of real mass destruction that won’t kill people in piffling dozens but in hundreds of thousands or millions. Bye-bye London, bye-bye Washington, bye-bye Tel Aviv.

I’m not too sure I’d shed a tear if the last-named went up in a shower of radioactive cinders, but Tel Aviv is actually the least likely of the three to be hit. What’s good for you ain’t good for Jews, and though Jews have striven mightily, and mighty successfully, to turn White nations into multi-racial fever-swamps, mass immigration has passed the Muzzerland safely by. And mass immigration is the key to what happened in London. You don’t need a sophisticated socio-political analysis taking in Iraq, Afghanistan, Bosnia, Jewish control of Anglo-American foreign policy, British colonialism, and fifteen centuries of Christian-Muslim conflict. You can explain the London bombs in five simple words:

Pakis do not belong here.

And you can sum up how to prevent further London bombs – and worse – in three simple words:

PAKI GO HOME.

At any time before the 1950s, brown-skinned Muslim terrorists would have found it nearly impossible to plan and commit atrocities on British soil, because they would have stood out like sore thumbs in Britain’s overwhelmingly White cities. Today, thanks to decades of mass immigration, it’s often Whites who stand out like sore thumbs. Our cities swarm with non-whites full of anti-White grievances and hatreds created by Judeo-liberal propaganda. And let’s forget the hot air about how potential terrorists and terrorist sympathizers are a “tiny minority” of Britain’s vibrant, peace-loving Muslim “community”.

Even if that’s true, a tiny minority of 1.6 million (2001 estimate) is a hell of a lot of people, and there’s very good reason to believe it isn’t true. Tony Blair has tried to buy off Britain’s corrupt and greedy “moderate” Muslims with knighthoods and public flattery, but his rhetoric about the “religion of peace” wore thin long ago. After the bombings he vowed, with his trademark bad actor’s pauses, that we will... not rest until... the guilty men are identified... and as far... as is humanly possible... brought to justice for this... this murderous carnage... of the innocent.

His slimy lawyer’s get-out clause – “as far as is humanly possible” – was soon needed. Unlike Blair and his pal Dubya in Iraq and Afghanistan, the bombers were prepared not only to kill the innocent but to die themselves as they did so. And to laugh at the prospect: they were captured on CCTV sharing a joke about the limbs and heads that would shortly be flying. Even someone as dim as Blair must know you’ve got a big problem on your hands when there are over 1.6 million people in your country following a religion like that.

If he doesn’t know, there are plenty of Jewish journalists who will point it out for him. There’s the neo-conservative Melanie Phillips in Britain, for example, who never met an indignant adverb she didn’t like, and the neo-conservative Mark Steyn in Canada, who never met an indignant Arab he didn’t kick. Reading their hard-hitting columns on Muslim psychosis, I was reminded of a famous scene in Charles Dickens’ notoriously anti-Semitic novel Oliver Twist (1839). The hero watches the training of the villainous old Jew Fagin put into action by the Artful Dodger:

What was Oliver’s horror and alarm to see the Dodger plunge his hand into the old gentleman’s pocket, and draw from thence a handkerchief! To see him hand the same to Charley Bates; and finally to behold them both running away round the corner at full speed! He stood for a moment tingling from terror; then, confused and frightened, he took to his heels and made off as fast as he could lay his feet to the ground.
In the very instant when Oliver began to run, the old gentleman, putting his hand to his pocket, and missing his handkerchief, turned sharp round. Seeing the boy scudding away, he very naturally concluded him to be the depredator; and shouting “Stop thief!” with all his might, made off after him. But the old gentleman was not the only person who raised the hue-and-cry. The Dodger and Master Bates, unwilling to attract public attention by running down the open street, had merely retired into the very first doorway round the corner. They no sooner heard the cry, and saw Oliver running, than, guessing exactly how the matter stood, they issued forth with great promptitude; and, shouting “Stop thief!” too, joined in the pursuit like good citizens.

“Wicked Muslims!” our two Jewish Artful Dodgers are shouting. “Can’t you see how they hate the West and want to destroy us?” Well, yes, we can, but some of us can also see who the original West-haters are. Mark Steyn claims not to be Jewish, but his ancestry shines through time after time in his writing. Above all, there’s his dishonesty. One week he’s mocking anti-Semites for claiming that the tiny nation of Israel could have such a powerful influence for bad on the world’s affairs. The following week he’s praising the British Empire for having had such a powerful influence for good. You know, the world-bestriding British Empire – as created by a tiny nation called Britain.

If the Brits could do it openly and honestly, Mr Steyn, why can’t the yids do it by fraud and deception? And the yids have done it, of course. They’ve run immigration policy and “race relations” in Europe and America since the 1960s, and Steyn is very fond of pointing out what’s in store for Europe as our Jew-invited non-white guests grow in number and really start to show their appreciation of our hospitality.

Funnily enough, I’ve never seen him point out that the same is in store for North America, which has its own rapidly growing non-white swarms. And when Steyn launches one of his regular attacks on the lunacies of multi-culturalism and anti-racism, a central fact always somehow seems to escape his notice. He recently once again bemoaned the psychotic “Western self-loathing” that has such a “grip on the academy, the media, the Congregational and Episcopal Churches, the ‘arts’ and Hollywood”. Exhibit one: the multi-culti, hug-the-world, “Let’s all be nice to the Muslims” memorial for 9/11. This was his list of those responsible for it:

Tom Bernstein... Michael Posner... Eric Foner... George Soros...
Well, that’s a Jew, a Jew, a Jew, and a Jew – sounds like a lampshade collector showing off his Auschwitz shelf. But fearless “Tell It Like It Is” Steyn, ever-ready to mock the “racial sensitivity” of deluded liberals, is himself very sensitive about race when it comes to the Chosen Ones. He’ll kick dark-skinned Muslims and their liberal appeasers till the sacred cows come home and he can start kicking them too, but just like Melanie Phillips he never whispers a word about the Jews who created liberal appeasement or about the enormous power Jews wield in “the academy, the media, the 'arts', and Hollywood”.

The same is true of all other Jewish “conservatives”. They’re shouting “Stop thief!” at the top of their voices and hoping that no-one will notice that they all belong to the biggest race of thieves who ever existed. Those bombs went off in London because Jews have stolen large parts of Britain from their rightful White inhabitants and handed them over to the non-white followers of a psychotic alien religion. When non-whites commit more and worse atrocities in future, you won’t need to ask who’s really responsible: it’s liberal Jews like Tom Bernstein and George Soros, who organize mass immigration and the anti-racism industry, and “conservative” Jews like Mark Steyn and Melanie Phillips, who distract White attention from the racial motives of Jews like Soros and Bernstein. Heads they win, tails we lose – liberal, “conservative”, they’re all of them Jews.

what fool provides personal info to pirate bay? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32855724)

C'mon guys...don't register your info with pirate bay. That's just stupid. It was only a matter of time. Just be glad it came from a hacker group and not the courts. Use these services anonymously until the legal crap is sorted out.

Re:what fool provides personal info to pirate bay? (2, Informative)

Andorin (1624303) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855998)

The only personal info in question are IP addresses and email addresses. Not that high on the Identifiability scale.

Your daily dose of irony (3, Insightful)

Caerdwyn (829058) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855752)

So here's a question. Who else has gotten into PirateBay's servers and NOT told them about it?

I'd think that an organization like PirateBay would be the very last people on Earth whom you'd want to give any sort of personally-identifiable information. I guess we can put this one into the "Darwin Filter" category.

side question: how many accounts are from president@whitehouse,gov, 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington DC 20050 USA?

Re:Your daily dose of irony (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32855924)

what the hell, man. you just posted the president's snail mail address so now someone can send him a bomb.

is there any way for /. to delete that post? the poster is going to get v& anyway.

Re:Your daily dose of irony (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855958)

I'm pretty sure TPB never asks for anything as personal as a real address. Personal info here means emails, passwords, IPs and little else.

worth to the RIAA and MPAA? (4, Insightful)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855856)

Nothing at all.

1 - If they accept stolen information anything they do with it will be tossed out of court and taint any pending or future litigation.
2 - Having an account isn't grounds for anything.. I doubt even logs of what you searched for would be.

Re:worth to the RIAA and MPAA? (2, Insightful)

arbiter1 (1204146) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856282)

that is what i was thinking, info stolen is pretty useless i think under law. anyone they go after off those lists could claim it was altered to frame them

Re:worth to the RIAA and MPAA? (2, Insightful)

thrawn_aj (1073100) | more than 4 years ago | (#32857000)

Crucifying pirates isn't their only function. Their other function is shutting down/sabotaging these networks. Can you imagine the junk/booby traps (mmmm boobies) they could scatter throughout these networks in a few hours USING these stolen credentials? The nuisance value itself is enormous. Don't think that big organizations, simply because they are big, limit themselves to legal means of achieving their ends.

Re:worth to the RIAA and MPAA? (1)

Lehk228 (705449) | more than 4 years ago | (#32857100)

they would have to crack the MD5 hashes first

And this... (1)

Red_Chaos1 (95148) | more than 4 years ago | (#32855962)

...is why having to register for a tracker is utterly retarded. Having any kind of identifying info linked to any piracy is just dumb. Yes I know IP addresses and all that, but folks can use proxies. But a proxy doesn't stop anyone form gleaning your true whereabouts via cookies and other login related stuff.

Re:And this... (4, Informative)

Andorin (1624303) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856026)

One, TPB isn't a tracker, it's an indexer. Two, you don't have to register for it; you can download torrents without an account. You only need an account for uploading, posting comments, and viewing/downloading porn torrents.

Re:And this... (5, Insightful)

idontgno (624372) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856092)

You only need an account for uploading, posting comments, and viewing/downloading porn torrents.

Well, there's your problem!

Or, more specifically, there's why the hack yielded 4 million users when a great deal of the torrents are available without registration.

Re:And this... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32856480)

You only need an account for uploading, posting comments, and viewing/downloading porn torrents.

You don't even need that.

Complicated way:
All you need to view/download porn torrents is to look at uploaded torrents of some user who has uploaded torrents in the porn section.
Pretty easy to find such a user.
If you look at uploaded torrents, you'll see "Type" on the left, which will be "Porn > Foo".
If you click on it, you can browse that Porn section.

Easier way:
just browse to
thepiratebay.org/browse/50*
with *={1,2,3,4,5,6}
1=Movies
2=Movies DVDR
3=Pictures
4=Games
5=HighRes-Movies
6=Movie clips

TPB doesn't check whether you're logged in to validate if you want to allow porn material.
So you really only need an account if you want to upload something or post comments no one cares about.

Re:And this... (2, Funny)

Andorin (1624303) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856510)

Thank you, Mr. AC! Mod this one informative. I've been unable to browse teh pronz for the past couple of days as I can't log in, but you've given me new reason to live again.

Re:And this... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32856878)

You only need an account for [..] viewing/downloading porn torrents.

Actually, that's not true.
If you go to http://thepiratebay.org/browse [thepiratebay.org] and look at the main category urls, you'll notice they go from /browse/100 to 200, 300, 400, 600..

Hey, where did 500 go? Let's just edit that url and voila, porn.

http://thepiratebay.org/browse/500 [thepiratebay.org]

And it's the same for top100:
http://thepiratebay.org/top/500 [thepiratebay.org]

Not Worth Concern (1)

Neptunes_Trident (1452997) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856104)

What you are seeing right here in this article, is paid for marketing, promoting fear tactics to scare the masses. Registering at the Bay does not provide proof of illegal activities. There are plenty of legitimate torrents out in cyberspace and on Pirate Bay. Nothing to see here, move along folks.

Re:Not Worth Concern (1, Troll)

bonch (38532) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856308)

With usernames and passwords, you can see what torrents an account has uploaded and seeded, as well as other stats. Pirate Bay is facilitating the distribution of illegal materials through their tracker, and being an uploader makes you equally culpable.

Your "paid for marketing" accusation is absolutely hysterical and typical of the loony worldview pirates have.

Re:Not Worth Concern (0, Troll)

Andorin (1624303) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856342)

and typical of the loony worldview pirates have.

Given your other posts I would assume that by "pirates" you meant to say "people who disagree with me about copyright law."

Re:Not Worth Concern (0, Troll)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856912)

uploading is copy right infringement, not downloading. Asshole.

""Copyright law is obsolete and should be disregarded--except when it protects my precious GPL code!" - Slashdotters"

Three things.
1) /. don't isn't a group mind. it has a diverse set of opinions.

2) Almost everyone wants a reasonable copyright

3) Thos that want no copyright want that for everything. In there mind the idea of a GPL is equally useless.

Pirate bay is not distributing illegal materials. what? you downloading atomic bombs?

The might be facilitating in the illegal distribution of copyrighted material*, but none of the material is illegal in civilized countries.

You really have no clue what you are talking about.

Re:Not Worth Concern (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32856324)

Registering at the Bay does not provide proof of illegal activities.

Bingo! I have gone to the Pirate Bay on numerous occasions, every time for the purpose of searching for something that I knew was 100% legal for me to download. Perhaps it gives me a smug feeling to do that, like sipping pop out of a bottle concealed in a paper bag just to piss people off who get uptight about that sort of thing. In fact, I think I'll go download some Oblivion mods right now. Arrrrr!

Re:Not Worth Concern (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856884)

Except someone giot al the usernames and passwords.

But hay, getting that information from a major site is nothing to worry about.

I wonder if you would have the same attitude of someone got names and passwords from Apple.com.

Not caring (1)

zennyboy (1002544) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856266)

I don't care - I live in Spain. Bring it onnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ;-)

Re:Not caring (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856872)

YOu better start caring,. sooner or later, if not already, there will be a treaty regarding copyright.

Re:Not caring (1)

zennyboy (1002544) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856910)

Nah - we're on the 'pay through blank media' shit. It wound be illegal to fine us twice for the same crime, so they can f*ck themselves

anyone that has data (1)

zcold (916632) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856336)

on the piratebay that is worth any salt is an idot..

And no salt! (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32856346)

Thepiratebay didn't salt their hashes [krebsonsecurity.com] . This site deserves to die.

Wait, people actually login to TPB? (1)

ProfanityHead (198878) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856372)

In other news, people login to the most notorious torrent site around. Film at 11.

Honor among theives? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32856536)

Why would anyone wanna hack into the pirate bay? Leave that up to the morons at the RIAA/MPAA... even if they can find a competent tech guru to work for them, at any price.

The RIAA/MPAA are the enemy, which means, you try your best to refrain from benefiting them. We already know that our private information isn't safe... all it takes is for a HR
rep at a government agency to lose their laptop.

This might be time, to eat our own. I certainly do not applaud this skit.

Screenshot (1)

Mathness (145187) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856568)

.torrent or it didn't happen. ;P

What this is most likely is just a ..... (1)

3seas (184403) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856774)

....scare tactic.

What's it worth to the RIAA? (2, Insightful)

Simonetta (207550) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856892)

Well, the RIAA might find out that millions of people are downloading artistic material that they claim to 'own'. And they would know who.

    Would they launch millions of lawsuits against these people? Would they go to the ISP providers and demand that that these millions of people be denied service? And would they offer to compensate the ISPs for the millions of dollars in lost revenue?

    Would they put a microchip like an RFID into the brains of each of these millions of people so that if these people ever again tryed to experience an artistic work by an 'artist' that they have downloaded then they would get a splitting headache for a day? You downloaded a Lady Gaga song once long ago to check out what the buzz on her was about and now whenever you see her picture in the mall the RFID chip in your head starts to blast migraines. So you don't ever go to shopping malls anymore and do retail shopping over the web instead? How many millions of people are going to be subjected to this before the mall owners get pissed?

    Never forget: the RIAA is based on extortion. They don't care how many millions of people are downloading their product. They select a few people at random and focus their extensive brutal legal teams on these people, making their lives hell until they get paid off. The RIAA copyright 'violations' are just an excuse for extortion. If it wasn't copyright, then it would be something else.

    We do have laws against this kind of thing. It's called RICO. It worked against the mafia and it will work against the RIAA.

    If you ran a record company, and someone came to you with a list of the songs that people are willing to risk extortion to download and the names of those people, then you would have the perfect marketing tool. You know exactly who wants what in terms of artistic product. All that you don't know is the price that they are willing and able to pay. If they are downloading instead of buying, then the starting price point is too high. It's a negotiation beginning point; not a fucking Interpol crime. These downloaders are your customers, they are your best customers. Cultivate them; don't unleash the dogs of war against them.

ARG (1)

ez151 (835695) | more than 4 years ago | (#32856996)

Well they did lose hard core 4-0...so they have had plenty of spare time.......

Had to be from Argentina (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32857084)

It had to be an asshole from Argentina... what a place full of assholes.

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