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Black Hole Emits a 1,000-Light-Year-Wide Gas Bubble

Soulskill posted about 4 years ago | from the reminds-me-of-a-buddy-of-mine dept.

Space 145

PhrostyMcByte writes "12 million light-years away, in the outer spiral of galaxy NGC 7793, a bubble of hot gas approximately 1,000 light-years in diameter can be found shooting out of a black hole — one of the most powerful jets of energy ever seen. (Abstract available at Nature.) The bubble has been growing for approximately 200,000 years, and is expanding at around 1,000,000 kilometers per hour."

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145 comments

Jokes (-1, Offtopic)

SilverHatHacker (1381259) | about 4 years ago | (#32855816)

This is just begging for a "your momma" joke. Anyone want to do the honors?

Re:Jokes (0, Offtopic)

Lazareth (1756336) | about 4 years ago | (#32855906)

Ya momma so fat that when she tried to mate with the local black hole it just went "hell no!"

Re:Jokes (-1, Offtopic)

mcneely.mike (927221) | about 4 years ago | (#32856764)

Ya momma's so Lesbian, she's trying to have sex with black women who tell her "hell no!".

Re:Jokes (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32855980)

You know what else just emitted a thousand light-year wide gas bubble? ...

Your Mom.

Re:Jokes (0, Offtopic)

Lazareth (1756336) | about 4 years ago | (#32856024)

but do you know who lit it on fire? Right,

Your mom.

Now what does that tell us about our mothers?

Re:Jokes (5, Funny)

Arthur Grumbine (1086397) | about 4 years ago | (#32856008)

This is just begging for a "your momma" joke. Anyone want to do the honors?

Yo mama so unimaginative she can't come up with a good joke given ample material. Apparently it's hereditary.

Re:Jokes (1)

Albinoman (584294) | about 4 years ago | (#32856318)

You sir, have earned your nerd humor merit badge.

Re:Jokes (0, Redundant)

The Clockwork Troll (655321) | about 4 years ago | (#32857284)

Yo momma so fat that when I fucked her my cock redshifted.

Re:Jokes (3, Funny)

should_be_linear (779431) | about 4 years ago | (#32856348)

How about this: "Sciantists named this object "BP"

Third grade truism (-1, Offtopic)

Scareduck (177470) | about 4 years ago | (#32855822)

He who smelt it, dealt it.

Re:Third grade truism (0, Offtopic)

Dan East (318230) | about 4 years ago | (#32855910)

Third grade? That one lasted me well into college.

Re:Third grade truism (1)

PBoyUK (1591865) | about 4 years ago | (#32856050)

Yeah but, "toilet humour" is still toilet humour even outside of the vicinity of a toilet.

Re:Third grade truism (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32856032)

He who smelt it, dealt it.

Whoever denied it supplied it!

Re:Third grade truism (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32857058)

He who said the rhyme, did the crime...

Re:Third grade truism (3, Informative)

blair1q (305137) | about 4 years ago | (#32856154)

smell is chemical. therefore it's based on the interaction of electron clouds around atoms in particular configurations within molecules. therefore it acts by means of the electromagnetic force. therefore it's mediated by virtual photons. virtual photons are light. light can go only one direction in a black hole, and that's down. so the black hole can't smell it because the virtual photons of its nose can't interact with the virtual photons of the gas outside the black hole to indicate that there are electrons, atoms, and molecules there.

so there, smartypants.

Re:Third grade truism (2, Funny)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about 4 years ago | (#32856532)

Can somebody tell "slide rule" here, that Mr. Science left the building, about an hour ago?

It's now fart jokes, "all the way down."

Re:Third grade truism (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32857782)

Han Solo is that you?

Sucked Too Much? (1, Funny)

imscarr (246204) | about 4 years ago | (#32855830)

Maybe it sucked up too much matter and had to fart?

Re:Sucked Too Much? (1)

Goboxer (1821502) | about 4 years ago | (#32856000)

That is what happens when black holes suck up too much of element 16.

Re:Sucked Too Much? (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about 4 years ago | (#32857170)

Sulfur isnt what causes gas, guy.

Obligatory Futurama (2, Funny)

frieko (855745) | about 4 years ago | (#32856976)

"Think of the astronomical odors you'll smell thanks to me!"

Re:Obligatory Futurama (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32857312)

I'm so glad Futurama can explore this with their smelloscope. It is a sign.

Re:Sucked Too Much? (1)

dov_0 (1438253) | about 4 years ago | (#32857814)

Or burp.... "Bwaaaaaaaarpp!! Aaah. Sorry, eaten too much!"

It wasn't the black hole...! (5, Funny)

Braintrust (449843) | about 4 years ago | (#32855844)

...Sirius did it!

Re:It wasn't the black hole...! (1)

sharkey (16670) | about 4 years ago | (#32857194)

No, it was Snape!

Re:It wasn't the black hole...! (1)

Culture20 (968837) | about 4 years ago | (#32857518)

For the astronomically impaired: Sirius is the "dog star"

Re:It wasn't the black hole...! (0, Redundant)

nofx_3 (40519) | about 4 years ago | (#32857712)

Whoever smelt it dealt it.

The Magical Planet (5, Funny)

Kingrames (858416) | about 4 years ago | (#32855852)

You eat just ONE bean-shaped planet...

Re:The Magical Planet (2, Funny)

Alcoholist (160427) | about 4 years ago | (#32857492)

...and no other galaxy wants to be in the room.

very minor issue (5, Informative)

Lazareth (1756336) | about 4 years ago | (#32855862)

A minor issue with the headline (of both the summary and the article) is that the black hole does not really emit the gas bubble per se. It is emitting jets of extremely fast moving particles which then hits nearby interstella gas. Obviously this causes an increase in temperature, creating a "snowball" effect resulting in the aforementioned 1000-light-year-wide (flaming) gas bubble.

Re:very minor issue (1)

SnarfQuest (469614) | about 4 years ago | (#32856012)

It sounds like someone at a drunken frat party playing one of those "look at this" games with a match.

Do we need to call an ambulance for this one too?

Re:very minor issue (1)

Lazareth (1756336) | about 4 years ago | (#32856074)

Don't worry, this happens all the time at physicist frat parties. It helps to weed out the livestock.

Re:very minor issue (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32856964)

I never thought I'd see such furor over a minor god taking a shit.

How can a black hole emit anything? (3, Interesting)

Unoti (731964) | about 4 years ago | (#32855876)

I'm sorry if this is a really dumb question, but how can a black hole emit much of anything? I thought they couldn't emit light, any anything else, not even information.

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (5, Interesting)

Rene S. Hollan (1943) | about 4 years ago | (#32855898)

No, but the combination of gravity and magnetism means they can whip up a lot of stuff outside the event horizon and direct it outward along the poles.

Further, stuff that does fall in adds it's angular momentum to that of the hole, and a spinning black hole has both an inner and outer event horizon. Stuff can fall through one and still escape the other, IIRC, removing angular momentum from the hole.

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32856214)

An inner and outer event horizon? last I checked the event horizon was the point at which nothing not even light escapes. By that definition theres only one event horizon. If something goes in and is able to come out, it obviously hasn't entered the event horizon. I assume what you are talking about is the gravitational swing effect by which an object enters the gravitational field long enough to gain speed before it is slingshots away before being sucked in.

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (3, Informative)

jdb2 (800046) | about 4 years ago | (#32856454)

An inner and outer event horizon? last I checked the event horizon was the point at which nothing not even light escapes. By that definition theres only one event horizon. If something goes in and is able to come out, it obviously hasn't entered the event horizon. I assume what you are talking about is the gravitational swing effect by which an object enters the gravitational field long enough to gain speed before it is slingshots away before being sucked in.

I think he's talking about the ergosphere [wikipedia.org] .

jdb2

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (1)

Rene S. Hollan (1943) | about 4 years ago | (#32856690)

Yes, I've heard the outer ergosphere boundary referred to as an apparent event horizon. I was not referring to ordinary gravitational slingshots.

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (-1, Troll)

BitZtream (692029) | about 4 years ago | (#32856636)

I love how people talk about black holes like they know how they work.

It always amazes me that both laymen and scientists as well talk about such things as if we KNOW whats going on.

We don't. We have theories. I assure you, without a bit of doubt, that should we ever get close enough to a black whole to actually uncover its secrets we will be utterly if not completely wrong about our understanding of them.

We don't know how they work, stop pretending we do, all we have is some observations made based on assumptions that other theories are correct, ignoring the fact that these underlying theories and the theories about black holes themselves don't even all actually add up without us throwing in random tweaks for reasons we don't have the slightest understanding of.

We don't know shit about black holes, even if we have seen a couple drive in movies that talked about them in the cosmos.

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (5, Informative)

DragonWriter (970822) | about 4 years ago | (#32856738)

I love how people talk about black holes like they know how they work.

It always amazes me that both laymen and scientists as well talk about such things as if we KNOW whats going on.

We don't. We have theories.

In science, its important to remember that a "theory" is not the same thing as the loose definition of a theory in casual conversation, or some technical but non-scientific contexts (literary criticism, I'm looking at you.)

In science, a theory is a hypothesis whose predictions which make it falsifiable have withstood testing and which remains viable. The casual-conversation concept of "theory" as an plausible but unverified idea about the world is what in science would be a conjecture or a hypothesis, not a theory.

So, often, we talk about theories (as opposed to mere conjectures or hypotheses) as if they were known except in very particular contexts where there theoretical nature is particularly important (such as in the case of a conflict between two theories that have both withstood scrutiny but where the predictions each makes in conditions impractical to test conflict.) But there's a good reason for that: if it is a "theory" as the term is used in science, it has demonstrated it power in explaining behavior beyond that which was consulted to formulate it. It may need to be refined, but its known to be a useful model.

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (0, Flamebait)

shaitand (626655) | about 4 years ago | (#32857360)

"The casual-conversation concept of "theory" as an plausible but unverified idea about the world is what in science would be a conjecture or a hypothesis, not a theory."

This is oft repeated garbage. Worse is the saying that a theory is essentially a scientific fact. A theory is no more a hypothesis which has withstood testing. All theories remain best guesses consistent with the observations seen to date and completely disposable tomorrow. In fact, there have been many theories which HAVE been tossed out in favor of new theories. In fact, there are multiple conflicting theories in many areas.

Acting as if theories are somehow more than the current best guess(es) of the scientific method is throwing out the skepticism that is the core of said method. It simply isn't worth throwing out science for the sake of dismissing the flippant "it's just a theory" remarks.

And don't bother with "technically that's true but..." technically that's true invalidates the but you'd be tempted to tack on the end. Period.

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (2, Insightful)

Abcd1234 (188840) | about 4 years ago | (#32857544)

Acting as if theories are somehow more than the current best guess(es) of the scientific method is throwing out the skepticism that is the core of said method.

Oh please, you're no better than the original poster. While you accuse the original poster of overstating the rigor of scientific theories, you massively understate it by bringing them down to the level of mere guesses. Of course, as always, the truth lies somewhere in the middle, but don't delude yourself into thinking that your position is at all superior to that of the OPs. You're simply taking the opposite end of the axis of credulity.

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (1)

Trahloc (842734) | about 4 years ago | (#32857602)

Do you really insist that someone constantly tack on "with our current best guess and understanding of the universe" to every comment? That part should be covered by 'this is a science talk' vs 'this is religious dogma'. Just because some people confuse the two doesn't mean everyone who uses the word without a notation is using it wrong.

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (1)

shaitand (626655) | about 4 years ago | (#32857880)

Uses a word without a notation? He didn't skip a notation, he issued about how a theory our current best guess and understanding of the universe.

In science (1)

toolow2 (1570881) | about 4 years ago | (#32857630)

"In science, a theory is a hypothesis" that has not been proven wrong. That does not prove it right. You just believe it is right. We do not have a clue what a black hole really is. The only thing we know is what it looks like in different colors. We do not know for a fact.

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32857352)

If we don't know anything about them, then isn't is equally likely that we are correct about them?

Also, our information on black holes is the best we can do with what we can test. It's important to have these theories, without them we can never further our knowledge. What we can do without is people shitting all over theories based soley on the fact that they are theories. You're saying we shouldn't discuss what we think we understand about black holes because we can't send you up to personally observe one? Rubbish.

Also "utterly" and "completely" are pretty much the same thing. There's no reason to be redundant.

Honestly, it just sounds like you're pissed off that you don't understand what's being discussed.

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32857424)

You must remember that a "black hole" represents a super massive stellar body, forming the most heaviest elements, and presumably most unstable elements, currently unknown. With all that subparticle interaction present in such a scenario, photons will be emitted that might eventually escape the "inner" event horizon via the "magnetic poles".

Besides that, at the outer event horizon, matter, even photons will be captured and, based on the "magnetic field", ejected from the "magnetic poles" as a constant stream of photons, while they are constantly interacting with the other matter/photons having been captured.

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (1)

Rene S. Hollan (1943) | about 4 years ago | (#32857506)

Not likely. Nothing can escape the inner event horizon, thought he boundary is believed to be "fuzzy", so real/virtual particle creation out of the vacuum near it can have the virtual particle captured and the real one escape, with a loss of mass of the black hole.

At least, so believes Stephen Hawking.

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32857758)

Jesus you guys can suck -all- of the humor out of a fart joke.

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (4, Informative)

InterGuru (50986) | about 4 years ago | (#32855932)

The phraseology in the article is misleading. The energy and gas jets are emitted as matter falls towards the black hole and becomes superheated from the falling. Once the matter crosses the boundary ( event horizon ) into the back hole itself it disappears from the rest of the universe.

Information is released, but very very slowly.

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (5, Informative)

sexconker (1179573) | about 4 years ago | (#32855940)

They can emit Hawking radiation.

Basically, pairs of particles appear out of nowhere for extremely brief amounts of time, fly around a bit, then collide together and disappear again.

(Yes, this happens. Matter appears out of nowhere and then disappears again.)

If this pair of particles pops into existence just outside the event horizon of a black hole, there's a chance that, in their brief flying about, one will cross the event horizon and the other will not. Since they're no disjoint, they don't disappear like they normally do.

The particle that is on the outside of the event horizon escapes as Hawking radiation.

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (1)

HungryHobo (1314109) | about 4 years ago | (#32856070)

also, don't ask me why, it apparently tends to be the anti-matter particle which gets pulled into the black hole which eliminates some of the black holes mass.... or something like that.

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32856746)

Disclaimer: IANAP
Actually, what's going on is that You Can't Violate The Laws of Thermodynamics(TM). The event horizon is not thermodynamically special; there is no sharp change in average kinetic energy there. So, if temperate on both sides approaches the same value, particles have to travel in both directions from the radius of the event horizon. (See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawking_radiation#Emission_process [wikipedia.org] ) It happens that Nature is constrained by the mechanisms She allows herself without violating Her own, other laws, so we see matter-antimatter pairs at work.

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (2, Informative)

Randle_Revar (229304) | about 4 years ago | (#32857278)

No, antimatter does not have antimass. And it is 50/50 as to which of the pair falls into the black hole. But for that formerly virtual particle to now exist as a "regular" particle it's energy has to come from somewhere, and in this case, "somewhere" is the black hole. I believe that this is one of those points where to go further, you need to get into the actual math.

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (3, Funny)

blair1q (305137) | about 4 years ago | (#32856178)

Not so much emit as throw away, as a fat kid does with the a wrapper around a candy bar.

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (4, Informative)

DragonWriter (970822) | about 4 years ago | (#32856696)

I'm sorry if this is a really dumb question, but how can a black hole emit much of anything? I thought they couldn't emit light, any anything else, not even information.

The dominant theoretical model of black holes has them emitting energy (Hawking radiation).

Though I don't think the effect here is really the black hole emitting anything (from within the event horizon), but an instead an effect that occurs because of gravitational compression outside the event horizon.

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32857106)

LoLZ!!!! d00D, don't u no they is throwing out all dat Hawking's?? Raaaaar-teex blod, u get me??

Re:How can a black hole emit anything? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32857772)

If you look at the black hole from the other side, it's brown.
It's a fact that brown holes pass gas all the time.
So, the even is perfectly normal, just on a universal level.

Imagery (1)

Dan East (318230) | about 4 years ago | (#32855894)

Is that an actual image, or an artist's rendition? Why is the bubble of gas so spherical? I would have expected it to be asymmetrical.

Re:Imagery (4, Informative)

blair1q (305137) | about 4 years ago | (#32856206)

That's a piss-poor artist's rendition that on the one hand has a silly sun being slurped up like spaghetti by a black hole, and on the other hand has a depiction of the sort of jet that actually occurs at the poles of a spinning black hole.

The actual "bubble" is diffusion of the jet into gas somewhere off in the direction of the black hole, and is not depicted in that image.

Re:Imagery (1, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | about 4 years ago | (#32856304)

Why is the bubble of gas so spherical?

According to my FoxNews Guide to the Universe, the natives considered cubic ones to be eyesores, lowering local real-estate values.

Excuse me! (1, Funny)

Locke2005 (849178) | about 4 years ago | (#32855908)

Anybody got a white dwarf sized Beano?

Re:Excuse me! (1)

mcneely.mike (927221) | about 4 years ago | (#32856786)

The Time Bandits stole it.

Previous Record Holder (1, Offtopic)

xmuskrat (613243) | about 4 years ago | (#32855922)

The previous record holder for a gas bubble discharge was the Poet Master Grunthos the Flatulent. This was done over a seven hour period while reciting his award-winning poem, "Ode to a Small Lump of Green Putty I Found in My Armpit One Midsummer Morning."

Cause and effect (-1, Flamebait)

whizbang77045 (1342005) | about 4 years ago | (#32855926)

Obviously, this must be in some way the result of global warming. Everything else is....

We can fix it... (0, Offtopic)

LynnwoodRooster (966895) | about 4 years ago | (#32855930)

Just send off a rocket full of this [beanogas.com] .

Adjacent to the accretion disk... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32855942)

...is NGC 911 also known as the Taco Bell Nebula.

End of the world. (3, Informative)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | about 4 years ago | (#32855950)

Let's do this grade 6 math puzzle style.

Expanding at ~1,000,000 km/h

12 million light years away.

It already has a radius of 1000 light years.

Assume a light year is 9.46 trillion km long.

Assuming this gas bubble was created by the universes first perpetual motion machine, so the growth is constant, how long before this gas bubble wipes out all life on Earth. Someone watch my math and make sure I didn't slip up.

(9,460,000,000 * 12) - 5000 = 113519995000 km to go.

113519995000 * 1000 = 113519995000000 hours left.

Or 4729999791666.6 repeating days
Or ~675714255952 weeks
or ~12994504922 years.

If we do live forever, mark your calendars, 12994506932, Earth is finished.

Re:End of the world. (1)

GrumblyStuff (870046) | about 4 years ago | (#32856004)

Hmm. Only 7 billion years after our sun turns into a red giant.

Ideally, we'll have moved off this rock and/or moved the rock itself by then.

Re:End of the world. (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | about 4 years ago | (#32856058)

But by that time an entire bubble with a radius of 12 million 1 thousand light years will have engulfed part of our space.

Re:End of the world. (1)

GrumblyStuff (870046) | about 4 years ago | (#32856546)

Ah, but we know where it is. We just go the other way. We'll have to move off in 4-5 billion years and will have a 7 billion year head start.

Re:End of the world. (4, Funny)

PPH (736903) | about 4 years ago | (#32856164)

But it will diminish in density. By the time it reaches us it will be nothing more than a malodorous puff of wind.

Re:End of the world. (2, Funny)

linzeal (197905) | about 4 years ago | (#32856592)

What is this black hole powered by, bean burritos?

Re:End of the world. (1)

blair1q (305137) | about 4 years ago | (#32856250)

Okay. Now do this one:

As population grows, eventually there will be enough people to entirely cover the surface of the earth one person deep. As population grows further, the depth of humans will increase, pushing the surface of the human-earth outward. Given the current population growth rate, how long, in years, will it be until the human-earth surface is expanding outward at the speed of light?

Hint: it's a 4-digit number.

Re:End of the world. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32857778)

The human-earth won't expand unless we add additional outside (i.e., moon, asteroid belt) materials.

Re:End of the world. (1)

Jake Griffin (1153451) | about 4 years ago | (#32856306)

Let's do this grade 6 math puzzle style.

Expanding at ~1,000,000 km/h

12 million light years away.

It already has a radius of 1000 light years.

Assume a light year is 9.46 trillion km long.

Assuming this gas bubble was created by the universes first perpetual motion machine, so the growth is constant, how long before this gas bubble wipes out all life on Earth. Someone watch my math and make sure I didn't slip up.

9,460,000,000,000 km/ly * (12,000,000 ly - 1000 ly) = 113,510,540,000,000,000,000 km to go.

113,510,540,000,000,000,000 km / 1,000,000 km/hr = 113,510,540,000,000 hrs left.

Or ~4,729,605,833,333 days

Or ~675,657,976,190 weeks

Or ~12,993,422,619 years.

If we do live forever, mark your calendars, 12,993,424,639, Earth is finished.

FTFY.

Somehow, despite the fact that you...

- substituting 9.46 billion for 9.46 trillion

- multiplying by 12 then subtracting 5000 instead of multiplying by 12 million minus 1 thousand

- multiplying by 1,000 instead of dividing by 1,000,000

... you still managed to get an answer that was a small error off. Will you PLEASE explain the steps you took? I can't make any sense of them, but obviously there is some legitimacy to them.

Oh, and if it's growing at 1,000,000 km/hr in DIAMETER, it will take twice as long...

Re:End of the world. (1)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | about 4 years ago | (#32857126)

Still incorrect, if only be a small percentage, because this doesn't take into account the 12 million years it has already been traveling.

Re:End of the world. (1)

El_Oscuro (1022477) | about 4 years ago | (#32857486)

Head explodes!!!!!!

Re:End of the world. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32856500)

Unfortunately we will not see it because EoW is scheduled for this Thursday at 2:47pm. Kiss your ./ goodbye.

Re:End of the world. (1)

BikeHelmet (1437881) | about 4 years ago | (#32856554)

Isn't our sun going to be dead long before then?

Re:End of the world. (2, Insightful)

BitZtream (692029) | about 4 years ago | (#32856642)

Only if we happen to be in the path of the jet, its not a sphere you know. I'm not upping my life insurance policy.

Re:End of the world. (1)

chebucto (992517) | about 4 years ago | (#32857184)

Won't the rate of increase in the radius of the sphere decrease as a cube function of time? Or something like that? :)

pictures are here (4, Informative)

at10u8 (179705) | about 4 years ago | (#32855988)

Radio and x-ray images in their astro-ph preprint [arxiv.org] .

Re:pictures are here (1)

LittleRedStar (723170) | about 4 years ago | (#32856238)

Thanks!! Original article incorrectly uses an artists illustration of another situation and the Nature link wants fee to view.

Go ahead (0, Offtopic)

PPH (736903) | about 4 years ago | (#32856112)

Pull my event horizon.

Re:Go ahead (1)

westcoast philly (991705) | about 4 years ago | (#32857892)

I hardly know you!
.. besides, I just ate, and I wouldn't want to cramp up and drown.

Mini-"Big Bang" in action (1)

cyberspittle (519754) | about 4 years ago | (#32856120)

Mini-"Big Bang" in action

drumroll... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32856226)

It was Elvis!

Galactic Petroleum (1)

Tablizer (95088) | about 4 years ago | (#32856234)

GP really screwed up this time. They put their energy well too far into the black hole's accretion disk, and it triggered a run-away tidal friction cascade, spewing hot plasma toward Jar Jar Bink's planet.

I'm sure it's just an accident. After all, who'd want to kill Jar Jar?

BP is 200,000 years old? (1)

Krystlih (543841) | about 4 years ago | (#32856320)

So BP has been in space all this time?

WTF happened to my /.? (0)

Huntr (951770) | about 4 years ago | (#32856358)

A whole hour and not 1 goatse reference?

This is a day that shall live in infamy.

200,000 years (2, Interesting)

Lord Lode (1290856) | about 4 years ago | (#32856566)

Is that 200,000 years from now, or 200,000 years from 12 million years ago? (since it's that many lightyears away)

Don't know about your mama... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32856710)

...but that's a very big fart!

Send the GSV Beano to investigate (1)

SteeldrivingJon (842919) | about 4 years ago | (#32856792)

lol

Puppeteers Need to Change Course (1)

Game_Ender (815505) | about 4 years ago | (#32856820)

Quick! Someone tell the puppeteers, before they run into *another* exploding galaxy.

Just a minute (1)

nu1x (992092) | about 4 years ago | (#32857542)

I need to boot up my not well-known of subspace red-phone to The Hindmost.

It's seldom used ...

So (4, Funny)

Dunbal (464142) | about 4 years ago | (#32857198)

I guess BP was drilling there, too.

Big bang what if... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32857238)

What if this is really how the "big bang" started and really the universe was the result of multiple events similar to this? What if we are witnessing the rebirth of the universe, an alternate universe or an expansion?

There are so many things that we still have to discover and witness - it still amazes me how much we know and how little we do at the same time.

Just some thoughts.

WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32857296)

In the presented picture, the so called gas cloud seems to be more like a concrete body which is slowly but surely sucked into by the quasar, and not the other way around.

Interstellar light saber ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32857500)

So its an interstellar light saber ? Lucas's lawyers seen rushing to the area to issue the blackhole a C&D..

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