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Deported Russian (Spy?) Worked At Microsoft

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the sure-why-not dept.

United States 162

subtropolis writes "KOMO News in Seattle is reporting that a recently-deported 23-yr-old Russian man 'appears to have ties to the recently-exposed Russian counterintelligence' (according to unnamed Feds). The article states that he admitted to unspecified immigration violations and was promptly shown the door on Tuesday. It also says that 'Microsoft confirms Karetnikov worked as an entry-level software tester for less than a year.' So, I'm thinking that MS had better take a really good at their logs for that time. He may have got in at 'entry-level' but his abilities may have been a fair bit beyond that. ... Interestingly, his admission to mere 'violations' and swift departure would be right in line with how this swap has gone down. The four Russians who were flown to Britain and the US had to first sign a confession before President Medvedev granted them pardons." The same news is at CBS News, too.

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Niggers (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32904536)

You can take a nigger out of the ghetto, but you can't take the ghetto out of the nigger.

That is all.

Re:Niggers (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32905966)

You can take a /. troll out of his mother's basement... Oh wait, you can't.

Oblig Yakov Smirnoff (1, Funny)

PlasmaEye (1128377) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904574)

In Soviet Russia, Microsoft spies on you!

Re:Oblig Yakov Smirnoff (1, Funny)

somaTh (1154199) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904756)

No, no, no. In Soviet Russia, you enforce DRM on Microsoft.

Re:Oblig Yakov Smirnoff (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32905592)

How does a first post get modded redundant??? Weird and me with no mod points today...

No Secret Smirnoff (2, Interesting)

sgt_doom (655561) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905946)

Exactly! Evidently everyone has forgotten that no too long ago Micro$oft opened up their Windows source code to the Peoples Republic of China, a k a the Totalitarian Fascist State, etc.

The only secret this tovarisch picked up was free yogurt, softdrinks and coffee at MS....

The same government that... (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32904590)

appears to have ties to the recently-exposed Russian counterintelligence

...And Iraq appeared to have WMDS...

Re:The same government that... (1, Offtopic)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905154)

At one point in time, Iraq DID have WMDs. We know this for a fact, because they were bought from the US. They were used against Iran, and this is well documented. Saddam also had a vested interest in projecting the illusion he had WMDs currently, to ensure his status as a regional player. Iran may very well have decided to seek some revenge, if they knew Iraq was basically defenseless. That explains his brazen attitude and actions leading up to the invasion (Saddam's, not Bush's... I'm still trying to figure that one out). It's really not quite as clear-cut as either side of the domestic political debate would like us to believe.

Re:The same government that... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32905462)

post anon as I moderated. Iraq used chemical weapons while US was looking for nuclear weapons. So your argument, is misleading and annoying for those seeking intelligent discussion. The rest of them are not much better either.

Re:The same government that... (1)

Qzukk (229616) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905706)

post anon as I moderated

Not anymore you didn't, unless you moved to a new IP.

Slashdot just doesn't tell you that you're undoing your mods when you check the anonymous coward box.

Re:The same government that... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906122)

I think Slashdot just uses a cookie for moderation, and only does cookie+IP for multi-posting. If you use Chrome, moving to Incognito mode should effectively work around it.

Re:The same government that... (1)

smooth wombat (796938) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905514)

It's really not quite as clear-cut as either side of the domestic political debate would like us to believe.

When two separate UN WMD teams went in and found nothing, that should have been a tip off that something wasn't right.

When we gave these UN teams specific locations to search, because we "knew" Saddam had those weapons, and found nothing, that should have been a tip off that something wasn't right.

When the documents from Niger were shown to be an out-and-out fabrication which came from a known purveyor of such documents, that should have been a tip off that something wasn't right.

When a CIA NOC agent was outed because her husband happened to be the one who discovered the Niger documents were forgeries, that should have been a tip off that something wasn't right.

When the aluminum tubes, which were supposedly for uranium processing, were found to be for the creation of short range rockets, that should have been a tip off that something wasn't right.

When those mobile weapons labs were identified by British sources as being used to create hydrogen for mobile weather stations, that should have been a tip off that something wasn't right.

When the only evidence we had for Saddam possibly having the ability to make weapons came from a known drunk and liar, who we were never allowed to interview but had to have his confession transcribed, that should have been a tip off that something wasn't right.

Re:The same government that... (1, Offtopic)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905692)

Nuclear weapons "evidence" was clearly B.S., however he is known to have chemical and biological weapons. He stated not to have nuclear weapons, but beat around the bush on the chem and bio weapons, and played a pseudo-shell game with inspectors, largely to keep up appearances with his neighbors. I am by no means a supporter of the Iraq war. I've lost enough friends to it not to have any romantic notions that we went in for the "right reasons" when the war was sold to us. However, it's not as if Saddam was a nice guy who was open about his intentions and gave full, un-fettered access to inspectors and/or journalists to prove he didn't have any weapons or weapons programs.

Re:The same government that... (1)

Fulcrum of Evil (560260) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906554)

Nobody is arguing that Saddam was a decent guy, just that going in was a really bad mistake.

Re:The same government that... (0, Offtopic)

ooshna (1654125) | more than 4 years ago | (#32907034)

Nuclear weapons "evidence" was clearly B.S., however he is known to have chemical and biological weapons. He stated not to have nuclear weapons, but beat around the bush on the chem and bio weapons, and played a pseudo-shell game with inspectors, largely to keep up appearances with his neighbors. I am by no means a supporter of the Iraq war. I've lost enough friends to it not to have any romantic notions that we went in for the "right reasons" when the war was sold to us. However, it's not as if Saddam was a nice guy who was open about his intentions and gave full, un-fettered access to inspectors and/or journalists to prove he didn't have any weapons or weapons programs.

Yep and you'd give some crazy redneck that lives in another state the permission to search your house and land for illegal automatic weapons if he accused you of having them wouldn't you

Re:The same government that... (1)

vt0asta (16536) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906936)

Oh, yes, it was quite obvious.

When Saddam decided he was going to publicly sympathize with the Taliban post-9/11, that should have been a tip off that something wasn't right.

When Saddam decided to up the payout to suicide bomber's families that attacked Israel post 9/11, that should have been a tip off that something wasn't right.

When Saddam decided to play shell games with the UNSC resolutions, that should have been a tip off that something wasn't right.

When European and Russian contractors were found selling dual use and prohibited items, that should have been a tip off that something wasn't right.

When Europe decided to the throw a colossal hissy fit over the end of food for oil, that should have been a tip off that something wasn't right.

When Europe was no longer calling for action of the humanitarian crisis being caused by food for oil, that should have been a tip off that something wasn't right.

When Europe then wanted to claim that the dual use items were broken, defective, etc., that should have been a tip off that something wasn't right.

When American liberals seized on the opportunity to finally be mad at Bush again for losing what they felt was a stolen election, that should have been a tip off that something wasn't right.

When everyone in the world and especially at the UN who previously didn't trust Saddam, started to say he's not so bad, that should have been a tip off that something wasn't right.

When Osama Bin Laden was ranting a raving about American air bases in holy land (Saudi Arabia), the same bases being used to police no fly zones in Iraq, and people were trying to downplay the Ba'athist's intelligence agency's comfort with consorting with the pre-cursor to Al Qaeda - Egyptian Islamic Jihad, that should have been a tip off that something wasn't right.

When a post-war inspection team took 18 months to scour a defeated Iraq, which I like to call "Iraq and Saddam at their most cooperative", only then were they able to confirm that their were no weapons and that Saddam only had breakout capacity for bio/chemical weapons, that should have been a tip off that something wasn't right.

---

Seriously. Responsible adults had to take the information they had at the time, and make a decision. I continue to agree that keeping the Ba'athist around, trusting bitter partisan enemies of the US administration, trusting UNSC nations that were financially hurt by the end of the food for oil program, and keeping a tentative situation of sanctions and containment, we're exactly top priority.

It may be true that the second war fomented terrorism. However, it is absolutely true that the Ba'athist containment/sanction process as agreed upon by the UN fomented terrorism at the expense of US security.

Not much there? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32904604)

The article does not directly say that this guy was involved in the recent spy trade. This article [bloomberg.com] goes into a little more depth on that particular aspect of the fun and games. Now, can we have more pictured of the red-head? That seems to be the part that the press cares most about.

I'd worry a lot more about employees in China (1, Insightful)

winkydink (650484) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904612)

Aurora, anyone?

Already have the souce... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32904614)

Entry level exploit injector...oh wait they already have the source code

why do the russians need to spy on microsoft? (4, Insightful)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904620)

microsoft has freely given its source code to the kgb (rolls eyes):

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/10/07/09/0042238/Microsoft-Opens-Source-Code-To-KGBs-Successor-Agency [slashdot.org]

Re:why do the russians need to spy on microsoft? (4, Interesting)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904760)

Ah... now here's someone who has been paying attention

Obviously, the Russians were after something other than the Windows source code. Microsoft does a lot more than Windows; maybe this had to do with Office, Microsoft's online service offerings, Exchange Server, SQL Server etc. You know, stuff that wouldn't be in the WIndows 7 source code (bear in mind that Windows 7 is a client OS)

Re:why do the russians need to spy on microsoft? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32904922)

bear in mind that Windows 7 is a client OS

With the same kernel as 2008 Server R2.

Re:why do the russians need to spy on microsoft? (2, Insightful)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904950)

With the same kernel as 2008 Server R2.

Absolutely. But SQL Server, Exchange Server, ConnectPoint, IIS, etc., would all be considered not part of the Windows 7 source code, yes?

Re:why do the russians need to spy on microsoft? (1)

Fulcrum of Evil (560260) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906612)

No, those are applications.

Re:why do the russians need to spy on microsoft? (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905014)

They wanted the secret of Ballmer's monkey dance!

Re:why do the russians need to spy on microsoft? (1)

motorhead (82353) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905098)

Or the secret to 'Tiny Footprint Mode'

Re:why do the russians need to spy on microsoft? (5, Insightful)

moosesocks (264553) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905178)

Speaking of paying attention, has he actually been formally accused of anything beyond immigration violations?

The story seems awfully speculative. Good on the feds for doing their diligence, but as far as I can tell, there's no hard evidence linking him to anything.

Re:why do the russians need to spy on microsoft? (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905294)

Speaking of paying attention, has he actually been formally accused of anything beyond immigration violations?

The article says no. And I'm not surprised that there's no hard evidence linking him to anything. Wouldn't you expect that a Russian counterintelligence agent would necessarily be rather good at hiding his tracks?

Re:why do the russians need to spy on microsoft? (1)

moosesocks (264553) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905972)

And I'm not surprised that there's no hard evidence linking him to anything. Wouldn't you expect that a Russian counterintelligence agent would necessarily be rather good at hiding his tracks?

Well, that's some terrifying logic right there. He turned me into a newt!

Re:why do the russians need to spy on microsoft? (1)

houghi (78078) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905320)

Or perhaps they do not trust Microsoft and suspect them on holding things back.

Uncle Bob...or was it Uncle Ralph? (1)

sgt_doom (655561) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905976)

Dood! Morgan greywolf! You are on to something, big buy!

They evidently heard of the infamous "Uncle Bob" interface written by Mrs. Microsoft (Melissa French Gates), and had to have it......

Re:why do the russians need to spy on microsoft? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32905998)

Clippy?
You appear to be running a spy ring. Do you want help with that?

Code is cheap (1)

ThrowAwaySociety (1351793) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906954)

Ah... now here's someone who has been paying attention

Obviously, the Russians were after something other than the Windows source code. Microsoft does a lot more than Windows; maybe this had to do with Office, Microsoft's online service offerings, Exchange Server, SQL Server etc. You know, stuff that wouldn't be in the WIndows 7 source code (bear in mind that Windows 7 is a client OS)

Or more likely, business strategy, research & development direction, or contract bid pricing. Only a geek would assume he was in it for teh codez.

Re:why do the russians need to spy on microsoft? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32904842)

This would be a nice way to make sure that the source given to them by MS is consistent with what MS actually ships. I would imagine that the Russian intelligence folks are not in the habit of trusting others.

Re:why do the russians need to spy on microsoft? (4, Insightful)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904846)

It's pretty easy to look at the public details of these ops from today's vantage point and go "that's stupid," but remember when these ops were first started the world was different. Dramatically different in the case of the spies which had been here 10 or 20 years, although not so much in this case. It's only been a year. But a year ago, the FSB didn't have a contract with Microsoft for the source code, and so access to that was worth a little more.

When some of the 10 spies that were deported recently were originally placed here, we didn't live with the constant flood of information that we do today. It wasn't as easy as going to washingtonpost.com or reading someone's blog to find out what was going on in the debate on certain issues. You had to wait, for news broadcasts or to get hold of a copy of a paper. Having someone get to know an individual who was an insider and to innocently ask some questions every now and then could actually pay dividends. And once an agency has already invested time and money training operatives, creating their legends and getting them into place, they're not going to just pull them out. They might be useful for something else later. This is type of work is like a marathon, not a sprint.

Re:why do the russians need to spy on microsoft? (1)

hodet (620484) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905004)

From the way they operated he may have taken pictures of the secret source code with a Walmart disposable film camera and handed the film off to another operative in a lunch bag at the train station.

College faculty and students have access too (2, Informative)

perpenso (1613749) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905022)

microsoft has freely given its source code to the kgb (rolls eyes):

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/10/07/09/0042238/Microsoft-Opens-Source-Code-To-KGBs-Successor-Agency [slashdot.org]

It's not just governments. Microsoft gives some college faculty and students complete access to Windows source code. They have to be part of a research team doing something Microsoft finds interesting, sign NDAs, etc. Microsoft gets access to their work but there are no restrictions on publishing their research. A friend was on such a team when he was a grad student.

Re:why do the russians need to spy on microsoft? (3, Funny)

Locutus (9039) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905062)

They don't, but he must have figured out that if he was working for a counter intelligence ring then working at Microsoft where everything runs counter to intelligence is the perfect hiding place.

Remember, the ads for BING are all about there being too many links. You know, links, the things offered to you based on the search criteria you entered. Somehow, fewer links are better. And let's not forget the pretty background which makes you feel happy to see so few responses to your query.

LoB

Re:why do the russians need to spy on microsoft? (2, Interesting)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905348)

Not all spy work is intelligence gathering. Sometimes it is guidance, carefully maneuvering targets to do things. Who did he go drinking with after work from MS? Who could he have influenced? Sometimes spy work is assassination. Did anyone go missing?

If Microsoft Has Given Source Code To Russia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906138)

then, surely, they have volunteereed the source code to the U.S.A. [wikipedia.org] .

I'll let you speculate about what Google has given Team U.S.A.

Yours In Novosibirsk,
K. Trout

Worked for M$? (3, Funny)

koan (80826) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904630)

Wouldn't that be something if you could rootkit a master ISO for M$'s Windows retail disk.

It would explain so much...

Re:Worked for M$? (1)

Mia'cova (691309) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905346)

Testers don't write product code.

Re:Worked for M$? (1)

koan (80826) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905808)

Russian spy with access to M$'s internal network and security policies, if he knew how to hack how further could he have gotten?

The ultimate (well to me) put a kit on a master iso that gets released in the 10's of thousands if not more.

Re:Worked for M$? (3, Funny)

Qzukk (229616) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905932)

Bug #12512523512
Issue: Windows does not have Russian rootkit installed
Status: Critical

Steps to Reproduce:
1) Install Windows
2) KGB unable to access Windows remotely with secret password
3)
---
Reply: Thank you for your feedback, we believe the latest build fixes your problem!

Status: FIXED

What we all suspected is true! (5, Funny)

Eberlin (570874) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904650)

I guess it's official -- Microsoft IS spyware!

Re:What we all suspected is true! (3, Funny)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904822)

Odd, I found this in my task manager...

Image Name | Username | CPU | Memory | Description
rpt2kgb.exe| System . . .| 3 . . . | 13,900k | For the Motherland

I guess I just never noticed it before now.

The reason this is an issue (2, Interesting)

volkerdi (9854) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904656)

Is because Microsoft's source is closed, and a spy might have a chance to find a hole in the source code that's not obvious without the source code, or possibly would have a chance to plant something in the code. On the other hand, spies are welcome to contribute to open source. They won't be able to slip much past the massive peer review.

Re:The reason this is an issue (1)

SquarePixel (1851068) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904796)

Is because Microsoft's source is closed, and a spy might have a chance to find a hole in the source code that's not obvious without the source code

Why go thru that amount of work when they already have the source code [slashdot.org] .

Re:The reason this is an issue (1)

AmaranthineNight (1005185) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904816)

Except for the little detail here:

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/10/07/09/0042238/Microsoft-Opens-Source-Code-To-KGBs-Successor-Agency [slashdot.org]

Not really that necessary to have a spy poking around in source code that was handed to you on a silver platter, huh?

Re:The reason this is an issue (1)

aero6dof (415422) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904902)

It might be nice to verify that you were given the same code as the actual... of course with all the hotfixes and SP releases, who can tell?

Re:The reason this is an issue (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32905006)

They won't be able to slip much past the massive peer review.

You mean the same "massive peer review" that stopped the OpenSSL bug that was committed by a Debian developer or the same review process that spotted the trojan in UnrealIRCD? Oh wait, it missed both of those things.

Re:The reason this is an issue (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32905774)

You mean the same "massive peer review" that stopped the OpenSSL bug that was committed by a Debian developer or the same review process that spotted the trojan in UnrealIRCD? Oh wait, it missed both of those things.

If they were never found and fixed during peer review, how the hell would you even KNOW about them to make that statement?!

You only proved that flaws in open source DO get discovered and fixed, proving the GP right, yourself wrong, and being an asshole in the process.

Re:The reason this is an issue (1)

KillShill (877105) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905446)

You have the same issues in the open source world. Granted, it's slightly better in that anyone can look at the code but how many people can trust trust? Or how many can decode "Obfuscated C"?

Obfuscation takes care of the software side.... CPU microcode deals with the hardware end and then there are the actual circuits of the processors... remember how they etched "bill sucks" on an Intel (ironic name eh?) CPU? What other goodies are on the chips that go into the worlds systems? Undocumented features? http://clusty.com/search?input-form=clusty-simple&v%3Asources=webplus&query=undocumented+x86 [clusty.com]

The only computer/compiler/software you can trust is one you build yourself from scratch. Anything else has varying degrees of mistrust.

Re:The reason this is an issue (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905552)

If it's written in obfuscated C, then it needs to be rewritten anyways. If you can't read it, then you can't maintain or add on to it properly. Poorly formatted code is buggy code, or at least it damn well better not be as you're not going to find the bug hiding in that crap without a lot of effort.

Who cares? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32904662)

All this spy stuff is nothing but national PR. Any real spies...would be quietly dealt with, instead of publicly. The only reason that Spyring was busted was so that they'd have a reason to swap them for some other guys who got busted.

It's nothing more than a little quid pro quo. The Russians get to look good for busting some spies. The US gets to look good for busting some spies. They both get to look good to their spies for exchanging them.

Everybody goes home happy, it's a fun game, next time there will be pie and fruit punch.

Or something.

But I guarantee the real spy stuff? Never mentioned. Might as well be watching Chuck or Covert Affairs.

In Soviet Russia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32904672)

Microsoft works for you

Oh no, it's starting! (2, Funny)

jeffmeden (135043) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904694)

"So, I'm thinking that MS had better take a really good at their logs for that time."

He stole that word (I assume it was "look") from right under your nose! We are in some serious trouble!

My boyfriend is Russian of Nigerian origin (1)

bigfootchick (1855082) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904700)

Dang my boyfriend is Rissian-Nigerian and I need to do a background check on him. I gave him a lot of my money and bought computers for him [xeof.net] . Anyone knows a PI?

Re:My boyfriend is Russian of Nigerian origin (1)

middlemen (765373) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904894)

Well you seem to have a big foot (as per your slashdot id), so maybe you can kick him with it and find out.

Re:My boyfriend is Russian of Nigerian origin (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906630)

Yes, I am. Go ahead and send some money to my account in Nigeria and I will look into him for you.

Where else... (1)

owlnation (858981) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904732)

I think the brown zune was clear proof that counter-intelligence is often found in Microsoft.

Reminds me of Civ4 (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904734)

You've stumbled across a Russian Spy near Redmond!

Modern Spying (2, Insightful)

painandgreed (692585) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904750)

Welcome to the new world of modern espionage. In a world where countries are less worried about invading each other than preserving and succeeding in a stable international economic market, your spies are going to be mostly industrial in nature. Who doesn't think that the CIA is out there trying to figure out what other countries are stealing from our corporations or what we can steal from somebody else's? My real wonder is how we would introduce that knowledge into our side if we got it as it would be a large potential PR blow up. Countries spying on each others military secrets is almost expected, but countries spying on other countries corporate interests so they can turn such knowledge over to their own corporate interests might actually mean war.

Re:Modern Spying (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905070)

"CIA ... trying to figure out what other countries are stealing from our corporations or what we can steal from somebody else's"? That's quite a lot of assumptions about the process already... (and actually it seems [europa.eu] like it was, also & in singular case, sort of the other way around)

Anyway, why it would be such a big practical problem? Think insider trading type of stuff; and leverage in international treaties.

Re:Modern Spying (1)

alen (225700) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905104)

i've seen news specials about this 20 years ago after the wall first fell. as soon as the warsaw pact fell apart the french and some of our allies started spying on us

Re:Modern Spying (2, Insightful)

Blakey Rat (99501) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906014)

i've seen news specials about this 20 years ago after the wall first fell. as soon as the warsaw pact fell apart the french and some of our allies started spying on us

Did they ever stop?

I've always assumed that every country spies on every other country, at least to some minimal extent.

Obviously, if you're the US, you don't commit a *lot* of resources to spying on, say, Canada. But there'd be at least a small team responsible. And in that Canadian Bacon movie, all the dirt they dug up on Canada came in handy.

Re:Modern Spying (1)

PagosaSam (884523) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906620)

CIA official: Senator, our network just picked up something that might be useful for your re-election campaign efforts. Just remember who's your friend when our re-appropriation comes up... wink, wink.

Senator: Thanks! (to aide)Get me the lobbyist for XYZ corp!
Lobbyist: Thanks Senator, here's a check for your re-election campaign.
Senator: Thanks a million! (giggle) Oh by the way here's a little something you boys might find interesting. (hands over folder...)

See that wasn't so hard, now was it?

Re:Modern Spying (2, Informative)

ducomputergeek (595742) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906666)

French intelligence, DGSE, is the only one that I know to admit that about 25% of their budget is for corporate espionage.

Worked as an Entry Level Tester at Microsoft...? (1)

Beardydog (716221) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904768)

OMG AM I A SPY?

Re:Worked as an Entry Level Tester at Microsoft... (2, Funny)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904844)

Depends, are you good at taking out heavies and sapping turrets?

Re:Worked as an Entry Level Tester at Microsoft... (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905984)

No, you're a sleeper. Get back to work.

Useless Speculation (1)

Nailer235 (1822054) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904800)

Really, absent evidence that he stole something, is this news in any way? He was on American soil for ten years, maybe he hacked into America's weapons arsenals too?

Privacy (1)

immakiku (777365) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904840)

You know people stopped caring about privacy when even spies put their details on Facebook.

Facebook (1)

xswl0931 (562013) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905028)

He should have been more careful with putting "Spying @ Microsoft" as his occupation on Facebook

for great justice! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32904888)

all your BSOD are belong to us!

He's not alone (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904924)

The MS spy has a counterpart at Apple too. He's doing the same kind of spying, only he's more smug and pretentious about it.

Re:He's not alone (2, Funny)

bwintx (813768) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905546)

The MS spy has a counterpart at Apple too. He's doing the same kind of spying, only he's more smug and pretentious about it.

Fortunately, the Apple spy doesn't hold his phone correctly, so he can't tell Moscow what he's learned. Whew.

Re:He's not alone (1)

Flea of Pain (1577213) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905572)

So THAT's what happened to the antenna!

Proof positive (0, Troll)

Brett Buck (811747) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904968)

I always suspected that Windows amounted to sabotage!

This could have been a disaster ... for Russia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32904974)

Turns out he was trying to steal the source code for Clippy.

Derp (1)

OverlordQ (264228) | more than 4 years ago | (#32904988)

The four Russians who were flown to Britain and the US had to first sign a confession before President Medvedev granted them pardons.

It's hard to pardon somebody when they've admitted no wrongdoing.

Re:Derp (1)

RML (135014) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905274)

That didn't stop Gerald Ford. [wikipedia.org]

Now that they have it (1)

sv_libertarian (1317837) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905010)

Just what will they do with the source for Bob?

Re:Now that they have it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32905248)

Activate the module that asks you "It looks like you're trying to cause a world-wide nuclear war, can I help you with that?"

That explains Vista... (1)

Trip6 (1184883) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905042)

...it was a Russian plot.

he worked for MS? Is this now in the code... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32905076)

Microsoft has encountered an error, what would you like to do?

- Send information to Microsoft to help us troubleshoot this problem

- Send information home to mother russia to help your spy agency take down those capitalist dogs

- Do nothing

He was also deported quite quickly (3, Interesting)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905282)

The man in the story was deported quickly, too quickly for intelligence services to wring him dry. When spies like him get caught, you need to do a thorough damage assessment, to find out exactly what they knew and how they got the information in the first place. If he penetrated Microsoft, we needed to know everything about it, what he got, how he got it, and who gave it to him. Why so fast? "the prospect of a public trial revealing embarrassing facts about Russian influence operations, like the targeting of a key Democratic Party financier close to Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton." The [FBI's] criminal complaint stated that in February 2009 a New Jersey-based Russian, who posed as Cynthia Murphy and was later identified as SVR officer Lydia Guryev, met several times with a "prominent New York-based financier" who was active in politics and a "active fundraiser" for a "major political party, name omitted." He also was described as a "personal friend of [a current Cabinet official, name omitted]." Source [washingtontimes.com] . You can fill in the [name omitted] yourself - go ahead and guess.

Yeah, He quit (0, Flamebait)

Duane13 (1340371) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905372)

After 6 months of examining the source code, he determined that there are so many security holes that he was wasting his time there and moved on to software that would be a challenge to crack.

What a deep thought... (1)

anglophobe_0 (1383785) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905564)

Because we should always trust the observations of people who say "He may have got in". There's a better way, my friend.

If he was there to change code, he probably did it (1)

mlwmohawk (801821) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905714)

Maybe Microsoft has tightened security in the last few years, but I doubt it. The network is pretty wide open and it isn't run like some sort of movie company with real security. A smart enough guy would be able to get in and do what ever they wanted. People routinely work at all hours and leave their computers running in offices with open doors. Screen savers aren't always password protected.

So, if he was trying to put something into windows, then it s probably there

I am not worried (1)

microbee (682094) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905726)

It should only affect the Russian version of Windows.

shows who the global elite are, who rule the world (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32905734)

Nations, patriotism, economics, terrorism, internet safety, DRM, all part of a bunch of tools used by the rich across the world to keep the rest of the population under control. The world is still ruled by monarchs and dynasties, HNIs and MNCs they support / invest in. All parties of all countries have to interface with the global elite organization every now and then. It's not an out-and-out conspiracy like the tinfoilers of HAARP, Bilderberg, aliens, UFOs, etc would have you believe, but it surely is a nice hierarchy with a proper chain of command even though individual levels might not know the entire structure fully.
Of course, there are shifting alliances, betrayals, compromise pacts, agreements, settlements and so on.
But the aim of most of them at the top is to keep the rest of us busy fighting to survive or busy getting seduced by a variety of pleasures, while they retain control over world or national politics, depending on where they are in the structure.

The key thing is that amongst themselves, they are symbiotic, while with the rest of us, they are parasitic, but we cant see through a layer of obfuscation and deliberate misguidance using tools like legal systems, constitutions, coups, insurgencies, strip mining for resources, and so on,

Heavy Ferengi interference in governance at all levels, in most geographies.
Money, greed and temptation are indeed a very powerful tools to make masses of humans play to your tunes.

Indeed the elite are global. It would be interesting if supercomputer simulations of such dynamics can be created and studied. Will give great insight into how to form and break these groups, and what holds them together so well, that everyone who does not look hard, gets fooled.

Anonymous Coward (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32905994)

anyone checked Steve B. lately?

Double Agent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906026)

CIA PLANT.
It's clear he's a double agent. Give them MS stuff and they'll be crashing for years, BSOD missile systems etc etc. Brilliant.

Bill gates... traitor? (1)

xmorg (718633) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906196)

This just goes to show you that bill gates is a traitor and he needs to immediately resign from m$, discontinue the Xbox360, and put balmer is a padded cell.

Charges:
Consorting with Russian spies
General espionage and cyber terror of PC's around the world.

Evidence
This article
the "RED" ring on death on the xbox 360... did i mention that it was RED!!!!! For those of you who dont know, red is the color for commies long before it was "Assigned" to US republicans.

It's a cover (1)

f3rret (1776822) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906264)

Now assuming this dude really was a spy as opposed to someone who was just hanging out with spies then why are you assuming his job at MS was anything but a cover?

It does not make sense to have your deep cover operative do his deep cover work at a place where he is known (well as known as an office drone can be).

Thinking (1)

Stan Vassilev (939229) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906510)

[...] worked as an entry-level software tester [...] I'm thinking that MS had better take a really good [look] at their logs for that time.

Wow, thinking is hard, huh.

he was really a counter-spy for USA (1)

peter303 (12292) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906706)

He convinced Russia to use insecure version of MSFT-OS all over Russia so the NSA could easily crack their computers, not to mention 8-year old computer geeks.
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