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Your Feces Is a Wonderland of Viruses

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the and-so-can-you dept.

Science 211

sciencehabit writes "Thanks to an anlaysis of fecal samples from four sets of Missouri-born female identical twins and their mothers, researchers have concluded that human guts harbor viruses as unique as the people they inhabit; the viral lineup differs even between identical twins. Even more surprising? These viruses may be doing good work inside of us."

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CmdrTaco's micropenis is a wonderland too (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32905970)

I'm sorry to inform you nerds of Slashdot but your hero Rob "CmdrTaco" Malda (or "Stumpy" as they call him at the glory hole) has a tiny penis. It's so tiny that he gets confused with toddlers at the glory hole.

How wonderful! (4, Funny)

electricprof (1410233) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905988)

Don't I feel special!

Mod me on-topic! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906136)

A few years ago, while browsing around the library downtown, I had to take a piss. As I entered the john, a big beautiful all-American football hero type, about twenty five, came out of one of the booths. I stood at the urinal looking at him out of the corner of my eye as he washed his hands. He didn't once look at me. He was "straight" and married -- and in any case I was sure I wouldn't have a chance with him.

As soon as he left, I darted into the booth he'd vacated, hoping there might be a lingering smell of shit and even a seat still warm from his sturdy young ass. I found not only the smell but the shit itself. He'd forgotten to flush. And what a treasure he had left behind. Three or four beautiful specimens floated in the bowl. It apparently had been a fairly dry, constipated shit, for all were fat, stiff, and ruggedly textured. The real prize was a great feast of turd -- a nine inch gastrointestinal triumph as thick as a man's wrist. I knelt before the bowl, inhaling the rich brown fragrance and wondered if I should obey the impulse building up inside me. I'd always been a heavy rimmer and had lapped up more than one little clump of shit, but that had been just an inevitable part of eating ass and not an end in itself.

Of course I'd had jerkoff fantasies of devouring great loads of it (what rimmer hasn't?), but I had never done it. Now, here I was, confronted with the most beautiful five-pound turd I'd ever feasted my eyes on, a sausage fit to star in any fantasy and one I knew to have been hatched from the asshole of the world's handsomest young stud.

Why not? I plucked it from the bowl, holding it with both hands to keep it from breaking.

I lifted it to my nose. It smelled like rich, ripe limburger (horrid, but thrilling), yet had the consistency of cheddar. What is cheese anyway but milk turning to shit without the benefit of a digestive tract? I gave it a lick and found that it tasted better then it smelled. I've found since then that shit nearly almost does. I hesitated no longer. I shoved the fucking thing as far into my mouth as I could get it and sucked on it like a big brown cock, beating my meat like a madman. I wanted to completely engulf it and bit off a large chunk, flooding my mouth with the intense, bittersweet flavor. To my delight I found that while the water in the bowl had chilled the outside of the turd, it was still warm inside. As I chewed I discovered that it was filled with hard little bits of something I soon identified as peanuts. He hadn't chewed them carefully and they'd passed through his body virtually unchanged. I ate it greedily, sending lump after peanutty lump sliding scratchily down my throat. My only regret was the donor of this feast wasn't there to wash it down with his piss. I soon reached a terrific climax. I caught my cum in the cupped palm of my hand and drank it down. Believe me, there is no more delightful combination of flavors than the hot sweetness of cum with the rich bitterness of shit. Afterwards I was sorry that I hadn't made it last longer. But then I realized that I still had a lot of fun in store for me. There was still a clutch of virile turds left in the bowl. I tenderly fished them out, rolled them into my hankercheif, and stashed them in my briefcase.

In the week to come I found all kinds of ways to eat the shit without bolting it right down. Once eaten it's gone forever unless you want to filch it third hand out of your own asshole -- not an unreasonable recourse in moments of desperation or simple boredom.

I stored the turds in the refrigerator when I was not using them but within a week they were all gone.

The last one I held in my mouth without chewing, letting it slowly dissolve. I had liquid shit trickling down my throat for nearly four hours. I must have had six orgasms in the process. I often think of that lovely young guy dropping solid gold out of his sweet, pink asshole every day, never knowing what joy it could, and at least once did,bring to a grateful shiteater.

Re:Mod me on-topic! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906996)

There's a job for you here at my dog kennel.
The pay is shit, but all-you-can-eat meals are included.

Re:How wonderful! (3, Funny)

FreonTrip (694097) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906350)

You are a beautiful and unique poo-flake. And so am I! POO BROTHERS!

Your Feces is a Wonderland (5, Funny)

Evro (18923) | more than 4 years ago | (#32905996)

... I love that song.

Re:Your Feces is a Wonderland (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906292)

Should be "Your Feces Are a Wonderland of Viruses". The word feces is plural.

Re:Your Feces is a Wonderland (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906518)

Should be "Your Feces are Wonderlands of Viri"

Re:Your Feces is a Wonderland (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906570)

Wrong. Virus is not a 2nd declension masculine term so going virus -> viri is incorrect. Did you get your education from a school taught by retards?

Re:Your Feces is a Wonderland (1)

Conchobair (1648793) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906654)

succedful troll was succedful.

Re:Your Feces is a Wonderland (1)

paiute (550198) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906876)

I AP'd Latin.

John Mayor Parody? (2, Funny)

gblackwo (1087063) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906004)

Is Weird Al back in town?

Evolution (4, Insightful)

dward90 (1813520) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906012)

From my understanding of evolution, I think it would be more surprising if something we all have inside of us was doing something bad.

Re:Evolution (2, Funny)

mrsteveman1 (1010381) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906064)

We haven't yet evolved to be smart enough to eat real food, at least most of us haven't.

Re:Evolution (2, Interesting)

Reilaos (1544173) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906116)

Well, it's not inside all of us, guessing by the article. It differs between all of us, and besides, people generally think of viruses as bad things. Bacteria, yes, but I can't really think of very useful viruses.

Re:Evolution (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906300)

What about the man-modified viruses that can reprogram DNA to fix defects? :)

Re:Evolution (4, Interesting)

spun (1352) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906514)

I just read a Scientific American article discussing how plants selectively hold on to certain viruses that benefit them. A researcher inoculated tomato plants with mycorrhiza from plants found growing near very hot springs in Yellowstone. Viruses in the mycorrhiza infected the tomatoes, granting them the ability to grow in temperatures up to 140F. Best of all, the plants passed the beneficial viruses on to their offspring in the seed coating.

Re:Evolution (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906530)

Isn't there one that makes crocuses (or maybe it's tulips) go all stripy?

Re:Evolution (4, Funny)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906142)

From my understanding of evolution, I think its surprising that we'd put the central waste facility right next to the playground and manufacturing plant.

Re:Evolution (2, Funny)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906192)

Considering they were, in the distant past, almost the same facility - that's not too surprising.

Re:Evolution (4, Funny)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906598)

From my understanding of evolution, I think its surprising that we'd put the central waste facility right next to the playground and manufacturing plant.

Well, obviously, it's because the playground is so important that we need redundancy. Evolution has granted us a playground, and a backup playground right next to it.

Re:Evolution (2, Informative)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906148)

So you haven't ever heard about parasites or, more generally, infections of all kind? Sure, it's a matter of finding a balance for bost host and "attackers" to survive, but it doesn't mean the latter "doing something bad inside of us" aren't present (of course together with those which are pretty much neutral (but good but taking resources from "bad") or outright "good")

Re:Evolution (1)

dward90 (1813520) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906436)

Parasites exist, but parasites aren't present in every individual of a host species.

Yes butt (1, Funny)

xednieht (1117791) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906018)

My viruses don't stink....

Everything Comes Down To Poo (5, Funny)

LoudMusic (199347) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906022)

One of the greatest episodes of any show ever.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uRvk-CnXYhI [youtube.com]

Oblig (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906460)

What a crappy comment.

Re:Oblig (1)

sentientbeing (688713) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906980)

No shit.

Re:Oblig (1)

LoudMusic (199347) | more than 4 years ago | (#32907036)

I guess it was a bit poopy.

FecesBook (3, Funny)

donstenk (74880) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906032)

Why did I think the post was related to FaceBook?

THIS EXPLAINS A LOT (0, Flamebait)

mr_da3m0n (887821) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906040)

>Your Feces Is a Wonderland of Viruses

This explains a lot about Windows ME.

(Sorry, sorry. Remain seated, pleased.)

Yea, and? (1, Informative)

BitZtream (692029) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906060)

Uhm, this is rather well known and well established. You have good AND 'bad' ones inside of you at any given time. Some are useful, even required as the body depends on them to get the job done, ESPECIALLY in the gut. Some can make you sick, some can even kill you.

The 'germs' you have in you are heavily influenced by your environment as that is often the source of their replenishment. They mostly come from your environment so of course they are wildly different between people. Genetic twins are the same genetically, once you leave that the environment makes them unique and different as soon as the egg splits. Theres no such thing as 'identical twins' in the general, only the genetic.

Doctors have been prescribing 'pro-botics' to make up for using anti-botics to kill bacteria for years so people can take heavy anti-biotics and still have a mostly functional balanced gut and vagina. Yes those are for bacteria, not viruses but its not because they haven't known about viruses.

Of course, I wrote all this before I bothered to notice Timothy pushed the story to the front page. Just stop man, seriously, just freaking stop.

Re:Yea, and? (0)

CyprusBlue113 (1294000) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906202)

If you read the actual article, or even the summary, you might have noticed that they are discussing virii, not bacteria, and their interactivity and relative stability, not just "oh look they're there!"

Re:Yea, and? (4, Informative)

msauve (701917) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906344)

No, they're discussing viruses and bacteria. Nowhere do they use the incorrect term "virii" [archive.org] in a failed attempt to look intelligent.

Re:Yea, and? (1)

CyprusBlue113 (1294000) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906466)

Unfortunately, that wasn't an attempt at looking intelligent, but a bad habit I picked up years ago as a less than white hat. I honestly didn't even see that I did that, good catch.

Re:Yea, and? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906676)

Faggot.

Re:Yea, and? (0, Flamebait)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906978)

I don't remember a spelling OR grammar test to be a black hat. I do remember all the people that new what they where doing laughing at posers using the term virii.

"that wasn't an attempt at looking intelligent"
that's for sure.

Re:Yea, and? (2, Insightful)

VTI9600 (1143169) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906330)

Uhm, this is rather well known and well established.

I thought it was well known and established that viruses are exclusively parasitic. Now it turns out that some bacteriophages are not only harmless to their hosts, but can actually assist bacteria by exchanging their genetic material, creating an accelerated evolutionary process which results in advantageous mutations to the ultimate benefit of the human host. I'm not sure if this is a new discovery, but it definitely goes against the conventional wisdom.

I'll admit that the title could have been worded better, but still, you should RTFA before criticizing.

Re:Yea, and? (2, Funny)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906552)

The idea that a "fecal transplant" is a real thing revolts me.



Kudos to sciencehabit for getting this fine piece of trollbait on the front page.

So, I should only eat my own feces? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906084)

What are the guidelines here?

I wonder... (1)

PotatoFarmer (1250696) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906088)

I wonder if any of those viruses is a key "log"-ger. Better that than a worm, I guess.

I'll show myself out...

Re:I wonder... (3, Funny)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906152)

I'll show myself out...

Please Doodoo.

So what we are anyway? (4, Funny)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906100)

It was already established, IIRC, how the number of bacterial cells in our bodies is greater than "human" ones; now this. "Human" genetic material (what this is all about in the end) seems to be in a minority inside us - though with such viruses it might be much less clear, perhaps they are a much more integral part of us; could pass RNA between cells, for example.

So...I, for one, welcome our viral overlords. I welcome us.

Re:So what we are anyway? (1, Interesting)

Luckyo (1726890) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906336)

Could you please source this one? I'm no biologist, but I'm fairly certain that most of the human mass, and cell count is still that of human. You may be referring to our gastrointestinal tract, where indeed the human cells are just the superstructure and enzyme-generating tissue and various absorbing surfaces, and much of the actual work breaking down the food is done by bacterial cells that are non-human. Elsewhere however, I just don't see that being possible, seeing just how aggressive our immune system is, and how carefully tuned many issues (such as nerve and bone for example) are.

Some internal organs also utilize bacterial assistance for some chemical processes, but I find myself sceptical that they would form a majority of cells in human body.

Re:So what we are anyway? (2, Insightful)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906486)

Mass != number of cells. Bacterial ones are typically quite a bit smaller.

Yes, most in gut, but not all - if our immune system was so efficient as you paint it to be, there wouldn't be much infectious diseases to speak of (BTW, up to 1/3rd of world population has just one [wikipedia.org] brain parasite)

Re:So what we are anyway? (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906606)

Could you please source this one? I'm no biologist, but I'm fairly certain that most of the human mass, and cell count is still that of human.

I'm not a biologist but I own a microscope and know how to use it.

Mass, yes, we win. Count, possibly not. Very crude rule of thumb is prokaryote (bacteria and friends) cell diameter is "about" a tenth or less than that of eukaryotes (us, assuming you're not a sentient bacterium).

In a typical microscope bacteria at like dots compared to animal cells. I'm sure some goof can reply with the worlds biggest bacteria cell and the worlds tiniest animal cell, just to make it clear I'm talking about 99% of the respective cell types not all that have ever been studied.

A lot of the debate hinges on our digestive system, is a "donut hole" actually inside the donut itself? And then there's the goofs that may, or may not, define "our body" as including everything living on the surface of our skin. The royal "our" or royal "we"?

Re:So what we are anyway? (4, Informative)

mdielmann (514750) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906622)

We comprise about 1% by weight of bacteria. Given the small size of bacteria cells, we have 10 times the bacterial cells to "human" cells. Here's [sciencedaily.com] where you can start reading.
And then there's mitochondria, which look a lot more like foreign microbes within our own cells than just a structure built by our cell, complete with their own DNA.
It is correct that much of those bacteria live in your gut, but apparently skin has its fair share, too. Nonetheless, those gut bacteria are also vital to the proper function of your body.

Re:So what we are anyway? (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906778)

I'd say that skin ones (etc.; generally those which just sit there & take care of themselves, without giving anything obvious in return) are also vital - they compete for their niche with those who are not so benign, helping to keep the latter in check.

Re:So what we are anyway? (-1)

BitZtream (692029) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906506)

The problem is that people quote random bullshit about the number of cells in the body.

For example, the article states that the gut has more foreign cells than human cells, which with very specific limits, is true.

Unfortunately, the statement falls apart entirely when you get your head out of the microscope long enough to realize that the 0.1mm by 0.1mm area you're looking at on the microscope slide DOES NOT REPRESENT THE ENTIRE INTESTINAL TRACT.

Yes, if you look in specific clusters and locations you'll find more external types of cells. Likewise, after you eat some chicken, you'll find spots in your gut that are over run with cells from the foul ... but that doesn't mean you're actually more chicken cells than human cells.

Its all a matter of perspective, and any perspective that says there are more 'xxx cells than human cells in the human body' is a very narrow and probably utterly warped perspective.

by count 90% bacteria and 98% viruses (1)

peter303 (12292) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906534)

By volume about 7% bacteria and 0.5% viruses.

Reminds me of the Phantom Menance movie (1)

peter303 (12292) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906658)

According to Nick Lane's mitochondria book [amazon.com] there are 20 times more mitochondria than human cells in order bodies. And they supply 90% of our metabolic energy. Multicellular animals could not move without them. I instantly though of Star War's mediclodrians mediating The Force.

anlaysis ? (5, Funny)

Mathinker (909784) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906134)

Geez, the Slashdot editors couldn't even spell "anal" when it was even on-topic.

For fans of Sam and Max (1)

Improv (2467) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906144)

Imagine this being said in a Hugh Bliss voice.

This is going too far (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906150)

I think there are some limits to the show me in the "show me" state.

bacterial - viral symbiosis (1)

curious.corn (167387) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906174)

This thing about bacteria using viruses to transport and exchange genetic material makes me wonder if sexual reproduction could have evolved from here. Are there any theories about this...

???

Just be glad you're not an elephant (4, Informative)

OrangeMonkey11 (1553753) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906184)

Humans are born with all these bacteria built into the body and advances as we grew up; on the other hand young elephant have to eat their parents feces in order to gain these valuable bacteria to help them have an immune system and digest food.

So aren't you glad you're not an elephant.

Re:Just be glad you're not an elephant (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906354)

I think human babies eat worse things then their mother's poo.

Re:Just be glad you're not an elephant (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906362)

Do you not understand the difference between bacteria and viruses? This claims to be about viruses.

Re:Just be glad you're not an elephant (2, Interesting)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906402)

Not strictly "born with all these built in" - remember that those who are born naturally have quite prolonged contact of their mouths with mother's vagina/etc., for starters. And IIRC those after caesarean section can show some "irregularities" in bacterial flora.

I even have an impression that dietary preferences might change in some real way, not just by habit & accustomization, after regular close contact with people from slightly different areas...

Re:Just be glad you're not an elephant (5, Informative)

PCM2 (4486) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906414)

Actually, humans spend the nine months in utero in a completely bacteria-free environment. However, babies born vaginally pick up their first dose of bacteria immediately as they emerge from their mother's birth canal, and even babies born via Caeserian section are bacteria magnets. The natural birth babies generally get a big dose of lactobacillus, while C-section babies tend to pick up strains found on the skin and the general hospital environment. Or so they say. [sciencenews.org] But the bacteria are hardly "built into the body," which is why identical twins will have different gut flora.

Still, you may notice that TFA is about viruses, not bacteria.

Re:Just be glad you're not an elephant (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906940)

Note from the article you referred to:

Some work suggests colonization may begin even earlier. While the paradigm has been that babies are sterile until birth, Neu’s recent work found a microbial community already dwelling in the first poop of some babies born prematurely. While a baby is in the uterus, it typically swallows 400 to 500 milliliters of amniotic fluid per day, which may harbor some of the mother’s microbes, Neu speculates.

We ARE elephants (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906450)

Some would say the lack of eating shit, dirt, and living with animals has unbalanced our immune systems and lead to an increase of food and other allergies and increases in autoimmune diseases. So perhaps, we should be more like elephants.

Re:Just be glad you're not an elephant (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906582)

I am an ICU nurse and was shocked the first time the doctor ordered a "fecal transplant." This is for someone who has been on so many antibiotics that they have depleted the bacteria in their gut. Feces is collected from family members, processed, and "transplanted" to the patient via a feeding tube. It is not common or palatable but effective.

Re:Just be glad you're not an elephant (1)

Crudely_Indecent (739699) | more than 4 years ago | (#32907072)

I hope the doctor has the courtesy to provide an after-dinner mint.

Excuse me, there's a peanut stuck in my straw - er, feeding tube.

Re:Just be glad you're not an elephant (1)

Grizzley9 (1407005) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906652)

Citation Please.

Really I'd like to see it as I know adult elephants (and likely babies) do that when there are nutritional shortages in the food sources (or are just really curious), just have never seen or heard of baby elephants doing it for digestion development reasons.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2y_LEbdEVE [youtube.com]

Re:Just be glad you're not an elephant (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906736)

Humans are born with all these bacteria built into the body and advances as we grew up; on the other hand young elephant have to eat their parents feces in order to gain these valuable bacteria to help them have an immune system and digest food.

So aren't you glad you're not an elephant.

As a microbiologist in studying the gut microbiota, I can tell you that this is 100% wrong, no-one is born with bacteria built into them, in fact gnotobiotic animals, ones completely free of all bacteria and viruses are (somewhat easily) made by C-section in a sterile environment for the purposes of gut and nutrition research all the time. These animals are difficult to maintain, however, because they essentially must live like the "boy in the bubble" all their food and water, as well as all the tools used for their examination must be sterilized ( food is typically irradiated up to 5 times to make sure all the stuff in it is dead) to keep them from being contaminated, and facilities that maintain these animals must be built specifically for this task - which is not exactly cheap. *** As an aside, please keep in mind that even ignoring the subject of virii transferring DNA within the bacterial soup, some scientists estimate that to date we have sequenced and discovered less than 1% of all the bacterial species in the human gut even with massive throughput technologies like pyrosequencing. *** Also keep in mind that at the moment, we (scientists) still have not come to a consensus about what a unique bacterial (or viral, if they are even alive) species is! In other words, while nicely defined terms work for the rest of the living stuff on this planet, ( if you can produce viable offspring with another organism, then you are the same species) this does not apply to bacteria or viruses because they reproduce asexually. All we have to go on as far as classification is the DNA sequences of all these microorganisms, and how similar those sequences are to others - so where does one draw the line and say "this is a new species" ? At >3% difference? at >1% , or something else? People can't agree on this because what ends up happening is you end up finding two bacteria that are 99% identical but behave completely differently, while another pair of two supposedly different species are functionally/metabolically indistinguishable. *** Oh and to shed some light on the deal with identical twins: basically everyone is right, diet, location, lifestyle (smoking/ drinking vs. not, working in a sewer, etc.) AND host genetics all play important roles in what bacteria end up permanently colonizing a persons intestine. To elaborate, two identical twins separated at birth, eating different things will still be more similar to each other than would a pair of two complete strangers. If these twins lived in the same house and had similar diets, they would be even MORE similar than if they were separated, but never identical. At the same time, a pair of complete strangers living in the same house and eating the same things would be more similar than if they lived separately and had different diets. **** Fun fact: twins also have different fingerprints

Re:Just be glad you're not an elephant (2, Informative)

priegog (1291820) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906774)

Yeah, I'm sorry to burst your bubble, but as a couple of people already pointed out, we actually do get our colonic flora from our mothers' (most of the time) poo (or perineal region, which is essentially the same thing). Of course all throughout our lives it gets modified by our own immune system makeup, eating habits, antibiotic use, etc... But the bacteria that protect us on those first few days/weeks/months come DIRECTLY out of our moms' butts.

Is it safe to eat somone else's shit? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906190)

I've seen Germans do it.

But I thought girls didn't poop (3, Funny)

stevegee58 (1179505) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906198)

Now my illusion is shattered. *sniff*

Re:But I thought girls didn't poop (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906698)

Now my illusion is shattered. *sniff*

Get into live-in relationship with one. Then you'll discover that not only do they poop, they often poop on you (figuratively speaking, of course).

Lack of control groups in study (3, Informative)

Tisha_AH (600987) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906200)

The article mentions the identical twins but it does not indicate if they are adult, identical twins living in different places, with different environmental conditions. If you took two 25 year old identical twins and raised one in Florida and the other in Seattle for five years you would definitely find different flora in the gut.

Now if these identical twins were still children, raised in the same environment, then that would indeed be interesting.

Re:Lack of control groups in study (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906760)

Now if these identical twins were still children, raised in the same environment, then that would indeed be interesting.

Yeah that would be interesting, like winning the lotto unlikely interesting. My wife and I eat McDonalds breakfast, same stuff. One of us spends the next 12 hours on the can due to salmonella. Repeat for a lifetime of experiences at Taco Bell, street vendors, etc.

That's before considering we both dig up the garden but only one of us gets an infected scratch.

And we never seem to catch cold/flu whatever at the same exact time. One catches it from the other, but never in the same order.

No shit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906222)

Sherlock!

Best compliment ever? (1)

charlesbakerharris (623282) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906232)

I mean seriously, I'm blushing after hearing this good (and, I should note, widely-publicized) review of my feces.

Wow (1)

Khyber (864651) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906240)

Just a couple days ago I read about people getting FECAL TRANSPLANTS to cure intestinal problems, now this.

Looks like the solutions to many of life's problems lies in the asshole.

Re:Wow (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906566)

people getting FECAL TRANSPLANTS...

Two girl's one cup?

CSI (1)

Itninja (937614) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906252)

I think this will drastically change the dialog in future episodes of CSI.

"You can suck it CSI guy! You can't prove nothin'"
"Mr. Jones, there's no need to deny being at the crime scene. Your poop was all over the murder weapon"

Obviously a bogus test... (3, Funny)

fuo (941897) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906254)

fecal samples from four sets of Missouri-born female identical twins and their mothers

Impossible. It's common knowledge that girls don't pewp.

Fabio C(r)appello (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906360)

Faeces something.

Liverpool paper. One of the great spelling mistakes.

That's why you don't eat poo (1)

AthleteMusicianNerd (1633805) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906378)

geeeeeeeeeeeesssssshhhhhhhhhhhhh!

Re:That's why you don't eat poo (1)

stimpleton (732392) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906544)

No?

Best not watch this you tube video [youtube.com] then.

nt (1)

shentino (1139071) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906380)

No SHIT sherlock...

Re:nt (1)

pushing-robot (1037830) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906458)

I must admit that at first this seemed incredibly obvious, so I thought "no shit!"

But then I started reading TFA and found it was really quite surprising. So now I'm thinking "no shit?"

I have to credit Dr. Gordon for researching the shit out of what seems on its face a shitty subject. He's really the shit in my book.

(And now I must apologize to the non-native English speakers.)

Can you imagine (5, Funny)

SnarfQuest (469614) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906424)

What fun the children of these scientists must have.

What does your daddy do? He plays with shit.

What did you do on your "take your son to work" day? We got people to poop for us.

What did you bring for show and tell? Here's some poop in the shape of Obama.

Researchers (3, Funny)

kpainter (901021) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906452)

Man, talk about a shit job! Also, why is it particularly relevant that the subjects were born in Missouri? Just to make Mississippi jealous?

Re:Researchers (1)

NevarMore (248971) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906656)

Test subjects familiar with the use of indoor plumbing makes it easier to get samples.

Re:Researchers (1)

Xadnem (1120075) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906942)

Well, Missouri does proclaim itself the Show-Me state. . .

Ob (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906498)

My feces am plural, you insensitive clod!

Shit! (1)

w0mprat (1317953) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906560)

I for one, welcome our microbial overlords. We are walking colonies of our single celled ancestors. Nothing new, but most people don't realize there are ten times more cells living in your gut than there are in the rest of your body (due to bacteria being much smaller than many cells in our bodies, in particular fat cells are enormous). A sobering reminder of who really rules the planet.

I can't think how much new research keeps popping up about the role gut flora plays in health and disease. But one has to wonder, what level of control our little friends really have over us?

Grammar in the headline? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32906648)

"You're Feces Is a Wonderland of Viruses"

"You're Feces are a Wonderland of Viruses"

Do the editors even care about grammar?

sigh... (1)

Godskitchen (1017786) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906674)

Why is this news?

Bad late news. (1)

topcoder (1662257) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906708)

This news arrives too late for two semi-famous uninformed girls ;).

These viruses may be doing good work inside of us. (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906712)

Will they make me super intelligent?

Holly Shit! (1)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906714)

Women shit?

then again

what are women?

Best... (3, Funny)

N0Man74 (1620447) | more than 4 years ago | (#32906720)

Best Pickup Line... Ever!

Now, I feel like going to the bathroom/restroom! (1)

antdude (79039) | more than 4 years ago | (#32907044)

Thanks a lot, /.! :P

Acidophilis (1)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | more than 4 years ago | (#32907068)

Twice in my life, something besides antibiotics has killed my gut bacteria.

The first time it took me 8 weeks to realize. Basically felt terrible, real trouble digesting food, etc. etc.
Finally bought acidopholis pills from whole foods (yellow bottle, purple bottle: about $20).
One of the pills (2 billion germs) each and I was cured the next morning.

Next time took about 2 weeks to figure out- had the same result.

Antibiotics do this too and if no good stuff is present, bad stuff will move in.

Over time, you develop things to digest particular food (re article on japanese ability to digest seaweed).

It's also important to eat dirt and other things as a child but thats a different matter- it can prevent you from getting an inflamed stomach because we are wired to need a certain parasitic infection (some of us anyway) at least once in our lives.

2 girls... (1)

binaryseraph (955557) | more than 4 years ago | (#32907076)

I *KNEW* 2 girls 1 cup was more than a smut film gone bad. Instead it is a story about two girls sharing good viruses with each other. That is so touching.

Vampires... err... Virals (1)

proc_tarry (704097) | more than 4 years ago | (#32907090)

Maybe one of these viruses will make us live forever. And grow huge teeth!

I am Babcock.
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